Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
iCOPERATION IN THE DULAIS VALLEY

:iCü'OPERATION IN THE DULAIS VALLEY. STORES OPENED AT SEVEN SISTERS. AN INTERESTING CEREMONY. I I Saturday last was a notable day in the more recent history of the Dulais yalley. It marked the consummation of a movement commenced long ago, for the starting of a Co-operative Stores to serve Seven Sisters and dis- trict, and those who have taken part in that agitation can now congratu- late themselves on the result of theii; endeavours. The suggestion was first made about twelve years ago, and was talked of for about eleven years before any decisive action was taken. The rapid increase in the population of the ivalley, however, encouraged the en- thusiasts to take more definite meas- ures, and about eleven months ago a -committee was formed, with Mr. Geo. Jones (checkweigher) as president, to form a society and to take steps to- wards the erection of stores. The Society was formed under the title of Blaendulais Co-operative Society, and it will be remembered, the members were almost immediately faced with local opposition which made it neces- sary to take land for the erection of a shop in Ynisdawly instead of in the Seven Sisters village. After several vicissitudes, a group of from 40 to 50 members were gathered together, tem- porary stores were built, and about six weeks ago Mr. J. W. Davies, form- erly manager of the Crynant Branch of Skewen Society was appointed man- ager of the stores. The shop was actually opened for business on Mon- day of last week, but as indicated, the formal opening ceremony, had to be postponed until Saturday, when it took place in the presence of a fair number of members and friends. The ceremony was conducted in front of the shop, and was presided over by the president, Mr. George Jones. The principal speaker was Mr. John J. James, Cwmgorse, sub-agent for the Anthracite District. At the outset, the Chairman called upon Mr. William Davies, the oldest mem ber, to open the doors this being accomplished by a gold key handed to him by the manager. Throwing open the doors, Mr. Davies expressed thanks for the honour thus conferred upon him, and said the movement would be successful if they had the loyalty of all the members, and obtained the sup- port of their friends. Afterwards the premises were inspected, and Mr. John J. James made the first purchase (viz., a quarter of a pound of C.W.S. to- bacco) Later, the audience re-assembled in front of the premises, and in the course of a brief address, the Chairman spoke of the function of Co-operation as a force to counteract the evil effects of monopoly. He urged the members to remain loyal to the Society and to render the committee all possible sup- port oin their fight for success. Mr. John Davies (Ystalyfera) fol- lowed. He remarked that there was not a large attendance, but they, could take heart from the knowledge that every significant movement in the past had been promoted and nurtured by an intelligent minority of the people. He saw in their enterprise, a new outlook and a. new conception of things in the Dulais Valley. He was not there in any spirit of antagonism to the private trader, but speaking as an ex-counter man, he could say that the days of the private trader were doomec1 and the choice in the future would be between co-operation and monopoly. The ad- vantages of the former over the latter were obvious. Whilst conditions of mployment for the assistants in Co- -operative undertakings were not yet by any means ideal, they were far ahead of those in private and mono- poly. shops, and he appealed to the members of the new stores to be loyal and trustful to their manager and his assistants. Mr. James, who had a hearty recep- tion, said the history of Co-operation was the history of civilisation, and the history of civilisation was the history of Cooperation. The civilising in- fluences of the Co-operative spirit were more marked than the people of the European states vet realised. Now, the signs of the times pointed more and more in the direction of Co-oper- ation than in the previous history of civilisation. With the amalgamation and federation of undertakings being carried out so rapidly in the industrial world, Co-operation for the production and distribution of the people's needs was inevitable, and whilst the workers were combining to resist the combina- tion of capital in the industrial arena, it behoved them to realise the possi- bilities of Co-operation in the supply of all life's necessaries. To combine to resist capital on the one hand and to oo-operate with capital on the other instead of becoming their own pro- ducers and distributors and owners of capital was both a waste of energy and a misapplication of intelligence. He looked forward to the future develop- ment of the Dulais Valley on Co-oper- ative lines with hope, so far as the production and distribution of the necessaries of life were concerned. The rapid opening up of the Valley with the consequent increase in population welcomed the workers to render all assistance to the new movement among them by becoming members, and pur- chasing the necessaries of life from their own stores where they could gather interesting and useful informa- tion regarding the conditions prevail- ing in the production of their food, clothing, etc.. and could then compare those conditions with the conditions prevailing in private enterprise. The rfact that practically the same 3,000,000 'Trade Unionists of the country also belonged to the Co-operative move- ment testified to the increased activity and intelligence among the working classes of the country, and to the ex- tent that the Trade Unionist and eo. .,c"ttnyt#4 .at ,.m -of Itet colaria-7

iCOPERATION IN THE DULAIS VALLEY

(Continued from preceding column). operative movements combined to- gether to overthrow competition in in- dustry, to that extent alone would the power of capitalism be curtailed. He oordiallv welcomed the proposed fusion of these forces because he be- lieved that both stood to gain im- mensely thereby. Not until they were working together in thorough under- standing and sympathy would they both progress as they should and could. (Hear, hear). In conclusion, he urged the members to maintain ,their loyalty to the new Society and to thus ensure its future success. (Ap- plause). At the close a cordial vote of thanks to the speakers was proposed by Mr. William Davies, seconded by the man- ager, Mr. J. W. Davies, and carried unanimously. Mr. James and Mr. J. Davies briefly replied, and the pro- ceedings then terminated.

PIT OWNERS HELP TO ABOLISH NONUNIONISM

PIT OWNERS HELP TO ABOLISH NON-UNIONISM. Out of the 700 to 800 men employed at the Charity Colliery, Bedworth, there were until lately nearly 100 non- Union- ists or men whose membership had lapsed owing to arrears. Strong steps have re- cently been taken by the Union men, who threaten to strike work against them un- less they either joined the Miners' Asso- ciation or were given notice to leave by the colliery management. The masters, realising the fact that the pit was in danger of stoppage, at once gave notice to a large batch of non-Union men. Many of the other non-Unionists have since joified or re-joined the Union. and Mr. W. Johnson, M.P., has just paid a visit to the colliery and spoken to the men going to and coming from their work. This has done a great deal of good. The situation is relieved, and all the men employed) at the colliery in fu- ture will be full Union miners. Eight hundred colliers are out at Thomas Williams and Sons collieries at Grovesend and Llangennech over a pro- posed new price list and also the price of house coal to the men. As regards the former the men contend that by accepting the employers' pro- posals they will be receiving less than, the rates prevailing in the district, and with respect to the house-coal question t-ha firm are asking 13s. a ton, whereas the men, who offered 7s. 6d., contend that the average rate is only 5s. 6d. a ton. ————— —————

PEER SINGS PEOPLE S ANTHEM

PEER SINGS PEOPLE S ANTHEM. LORD WILLOUGHBY DE BROKE IN NONCONFORMIST PULPIT. Lord Willoughby do Broke on Sunday afternoon gave away the prizes and de- livered an address at the thirty-ninth half-yearly book distribution of the Strat- ford-on-Avon Brotherhood. The proceedings took place in the Con- gregational Church. His lordship had a very hearty reception. What was described as the people's anthem, "God save the people, not crowns, and thrones, but men," waji sung. The society's secretary assured his lordship that he was in good company that afternoon. (Laughter). Lord Willoughby remarked that in singing" God save the. people" they should remember that God saved those who helped to save themselves. He had not come there to talk jingoism. The dominating note was that people should all march together and fully real- ise the theory and practice of unity. -0.

SENGHENYDD j

SENGHENYDD. j JUDGMENT RESERVED IN HOME OFFICE PROSECUTION. IliE) adjourjikid hearing of the sum- monses against the owners and manager of the Senghenycld COllieTy-arising out of the explosion in October—took place on Saturday at Caephilly. Mr. Ivor Bowen, for the Home Office, dealt with the Act of Parliament relating to the watering of the mine and the clearing of the roof and sides. The owners, he said, were bound to system- atically clear the place of dust as far as practicable. Expert evidence having been called, Mr. Charles Kens-hole, for the defence, submitted that so far as the colliery com- paJlY was concerned he had no case to answer. The fact that the company had appointed a competent manager and pub- lished the rules and regulations sufficed. Mr. Ivor Bowen said there was an absolute statutory obligation on the part of the company and management which he submitted had not teen carried out. Thle Trench reserved judgment until July 18th. ————— —————

MAIL VAN DRIVER ACCUSED OF STEALING 80

MAIL VAN DRIVER ACCUSED OF STEALING £ 80. Charged on suspicion of stealing a mail bag containing about JE80 in gold and notes, Albert Sidney Harris, a. motor mail van driver, Mas remanded at Cardiff on Tuesday. The bag was one of several heing conveyed bv. de- fendant's car from sub-post offices to the head office, and Harris was said to have taken it during the postman's absence. -————- —————

POSTMAN JP IN CYCLE ACCIDENTI

POSTMAN J.P. IN CYCLE ACCIDENT. Mr. J. O. Smitli, of Bulkington, near Nuneaton, the only postman who is a justice of the peace, is suffering from injuries caused bv a collis ion when he was riding on the carrier of 1 his son's motor cycle. 0

No title

The non-Unionist question in the New Tredegar and Tirphil districts is brought to the front by the issue of notices by the Miners' Federation Committee tha.t throughout the whole of this week, com- mencing Monday, show cards must be I shown at the pits.

Advertising

EDWARDS' SALE 1 WWThe Sale that makes all other Sales look Insignificant NOW PROCEEDING. The price-slashing Campaign in every Department of this Store has resulted in the most drastic price reductions ever witnessed. Prices in every Section have been ruthlessly cu; down and all because our rigid rule at this time of the year is to make a complete clearance of all goods of passing fashion and all broken lots and odd assortments of other goods. LADIES Seize this chance to get the Best aid Biggest Bargains ever offered. Come at once, and come early in the day. You will thereby get choice at its best, and INCOMPARABLE BARGAINS. The List of Bargains on this page is but a fraction of what we are displaying, every article showing you a big, well-worth-while reduction on the lowest ordinary price. r-tr-ii—i r-i r-i n i—i n n m r-inrinnnnnnnnmrpnn rHrni^rHrnrTii^rTifTirnrTirTirTirirnr^i^rHrnrnrnrnrnr^rnr^I^rnrnf^nrnr^nRrnrniTlHIIIQGEIlOQIIiGGOOGGEEQCDQ UUJUlllUJUJULiUULiUUUUUUUULJLJUJLjL^i-jLJ Ul! RECORD REDUCTIONS IN COS-0 TUMES, COATS, DRESSES AND ° BLOUSES. ° El Every lady who takes bargains must a comes post haste to this section. WeOEl have here beautiful and fashionable g garments marked down to less than half iD original prices—for no other reason El than this-they are of passing fashion. g a OODOOOOooooooooooooooooooo a Ladies' Smart Parisian Silk Coats, Helioci and Black figured, and Saxe Blue and g Black figured. Instead of Five Guineas, 0 they are offered at 49s.6d. £ 3 0 Smart French Gowns made to sell at 0 Seven Guineas. Our Sale Price, 63s. A Quantity of Ladies' Tailor-made Cos- m tumes. Five Guinea lines offered at 0 59s. 6d. g Smart Linen Costumes. Regular price, 21s.lld.. Sale Price, lOs.lld. g Some Dozens of Ladies' Black and White g Check Coatees. Season's price 7s.lid. 0 each. To clear during Sale at 3s.Hid. 0 600 Ladies' Woolaine Blouses, all good a colours. Usual price 3s.llld. To clear 0 at ls.llid. EJ oOOOOOOODOOOOOODOODDOODDEJog MATCHLESS BARGAINS IN UNDER- 0 WEAR. ° Hundreds of bctrgaiii-ba,rgaiiis whose EJ excellence is too obvious to be over- 0 looked await you here in Underwear 0 and Hose. Never were price reductions 0 in perfect underwear so drastic. o 000000000000000000000000000 600 Ladies' Smart White Underskirts, g trimmed lace and embriodery. Usual 0 price, 3s.ll|d. Sale Price, ls.Illd. ° Set of Underwear :-1 Nightdress, IS Chemise, 1 Knickers, 1 Camisole, each ° made of white nainsook effectively 0 trimmed embroidery. Worth 15s.lid. □ Sale Price, 7s. lid. g B 0 50 dozen Ladies' Black All Wool Hose. 0 Usual prices, ls.3fd. to Is.634d. per pair. TQ clear at 18.0d. 0 120 dozen Ladies' Cotton Hose, in all ° shades. Season's price, 10d. Sa-le 13 Price, 6id. 0 Price, A 0 76 dozen Children's All Wool Hose. 0 Worth llid. to ls.6id. All clearing a at 5i. to 9fd. 0 Great Bargains in Ladies' Fancy Hose at g odd lines, clearing at less than half E0l usual prioes. 0 0 000000000000000000000000000 GRAND GLOVE BARGAINS g A Glove Sale here always means real q bargains, and this Veal", as a result of n our busiest season we are able toO give better Glove Bargains than ever. æ 65 Dozen Brussels Kid Gloves, all ;n ° the new shades and usually perod at Q 2s.lld. for ls-Old. pair. 0 89 Dozen Real Doe Gloyes, in Grey -uido Beaver. Usual prices, ls.lld. and 0 2s.lld. To clear at 10d. per pair. ° 120 Dozen Real Nappa Gloves, a good a quality for hard wear. Usual prices g up to 2s.6d. pair. Sale price, ls.6^1. 0 E 00000000000000000000000800 ( 0 A large quantity of odd numbers in 'e-  liable goods to clear at a third usual m  prices. oooooooooooooooooooooooooog a STRIKING REDUCTIONS IN 0 EJ MILLINERY. a We are rushing out our entire stock of 0 Millinery at prices which you will in ° vain search to equal. 0 A Dozen 2 and 3 Guinea Models offered □ at 15s.11d. each. g Two Dozen 30s. Models offered at lOs.lld. 0 each. ° 48 Trimmed Hats, all this season's goods. 0 Usual prices lOs.lld. to 25s. Offered g at 2s.ll3d. each. 0 Children's Hats to be cleared at less than g half usual prices. 0 Several dozen Ladies' Semi-Trimmed Hats. Usual prices 4s.11d. to 16s.lid. 0 All to be cleared at Is.lld. and 2s.ll^d. a Tartan Silk Hats, suitable for holiday 0 wear. A quantity of 4s.lid. lines to0 clear at ls.Ilid. g All Untrimmed Shapes less than halfo price. EJ n JOOOOOOoo0000000000000000008 RUSH-OUT BARGAINS IN HOUSE- o HOLD GOODS. CD Our Household section has not escaped g from the price-cutting process. There a are hundreds of money-saving opportu- g nities here for you. Q 116 White Honeycomb Quilts, all full g sizes. Usual 5s.lid. quality for Sale 0 at 3s.llid. a 65 Pairs Plain Hemmed White Sheets, 0 21) x 3 yards. Usual price, lOs.lld. 0 Sale Price, per pair, 7s.llid. g 42 Down Quilts, full size, new designs, n Worth 17slld. Must be cleared at 5 12s.lld. 0 25 Pieces Double-width Pique, in WThitep and Colours, offered at ls.Oid. yard. a 135 Pairs White Twilled Sheets, all full a sizes. Special Price, 4s.llid. pair. g 210 Pairs White Twilled Sheets, size 2x0 2i yards. Usually sold 5s.ll^d. Sale g prices, 3s. llid. tJ 32 Dozen Grass-bleached Table Cloths, ° If x 2! yards. Usual price 3s.Hid. g Sale price. alo-ld. EJ 38 Dozen Bleached Table Cloths, 13 x 0 38 Dozen Blæched Ta.ble Cloths, 1 x o 1?. Worth 2s.lld. to-day. Offered at? Is. llid. g 0 0000B000D00000B0B000Q00000 0 n a a Any Goods sent on Approval. Patterns Post Free. □ BDWARD0' DRAPERY ) D W A R STORES ??tjj? ????L 0 jjjtN Oxford Street  jt Bt -Waterloo Street KVwansea ?!  Street -=. _B TEMPTING BARGAINS IN DRESSES AND SILKS. Wonderful Dress Material Bargains now possible. A visit will convince you that the reductions are absolutely genuine. Participate in this chance. 380 yards Lustre, light ground with black stripes. Usunl price, 2s.ll £ d. the whole to go at Is.3d. 260 yards Paisley Satin. Usual, Is.llid. Line to clear at ls.Od. 680 yards Shot Taffetta, Stripe Silks, all the latest colours, 38 inches wide, never before sold at less than 3s.6icL Sale price ls.llid. 356 yards Fawn aind Grey Costume Whip- cord, 52 inches wide, 4s.illd. value. Now offered at 2s.61d. 275 yards Black and White Striped Suit- ings, all 56 inches wide. 4.llid. gooda for 2s. 61 d. 00000B000000B0BBB0BBBBBQB3 WONDERFUL CHANCES IN RIBBONS AND NECKWEAR. Opportunities that will awaken wonder and delight await you here. We must clear out our entire Summer Stock, and to do this with speed we have madfr red uctions that are sure to tell. 50 pieces Glace Silk Ribbons in all col- ours, 5 inches wide. 6fd. line to clear at 3fd. 20 pieces Chene Ribbons, best shades, all 6 inches wide. Reduced from ls.Old. to 6fd. I 15 dozen Ladies' Crystaline Scarves, largo size. Usual price ls.llid. To clear at 6Jd. 30 dozen Guipure Lace Point Collars, ali in Ivory and Paris. 6fd. line for 32d. 12 dozen Ladies' Silk Bows in all colours. Lowest price in this lot, 6fd. Sale price, 3!d. 12 pieces Embroidery Insertion, 2i to 3 inches wide. Worth 4id. Sale price lfdt

CORRESPONDENCE I

CORRESPONDENCE. I ALLTWEN AND PONTARDAWE CO- OPERATIVE SOCIETY. I To the Editor, "Llais Llafur." Sir.—Mr R. Bodycombe's outburst in your last issue suggests that he did not read my last letter; and, if he did, his imagination must have played irreverent pranks with his judgment. Mr Body com be does not (and, of course cannot) deny that he called Mr Warren a foreigner, and in such a.n offensive manner as to call down upon his angry head the opprobrium of a large number of those present. One wonders if Mr Bodycombe recovered his usual good temper up to the time he sent his letter to your columns. It were perhaps well that Mr Bodycombe be left to the em- barras silence in which good natured people sit w hen some prominent person volunteers a fatuous remark but on this occasion it would be unfair to others, be- sides myself) to allow his heated tirade to pass without comment. Mr Bodycombe ought to know that vul- gar abuse, and, the reckless shouting of "liar" are not argument. He falls into the trap of admitting that he has a very weak case, indeed. I am usually willing "to build a bridge of silver for a flying foe," but I must ask Mr Bodycombe if the meeting he refers to was not called for the purpose of condemning the action of the committee, why did he and a few of his friends meet together on the Society's premises on the Friday previous to the meeting and resolves) that a committee of investigation—apart from the members of the general committee, which Mr Body- combe and his friends assisted to elect- should be appointed? Will Mr Bodycombe deny that the general committee authorised Mr Warren to re-organize the Society, and that his (Mr Warren's) recommendations were ac- cepted by the committee? Under similar circumstances, in the Trade Union to which Mr Bcdycombe belongs, would not Mr Hodge, say, be justified in "interfering with the manage- ment of our Society?" I shall ignore the cheap sneer that I "would have saved the Society from the deplorable position he wants the public to believe it is in" because, where Mr Bodycombe and myself are only in- dividual members of any Society, our voices are not loud enough, nor -are, our arguments strong enough immediately to break down a system which is the growth of years,—but we may help, and that, Mr Editor, is what I claim I have tried to do. Whilst I dismiss the statements that I have acted as a coward with the con- tempt it dieserves, will Mr Bodycombe give a single instance in the course of any of my letters in which I have "taken up the preposterous position of mud- slinger at those who arc trying to do their best for the Society"? And will he please say who are the ppople who are animELted by such high ideals? Further, in which of any of my letters did I predict the downfall of the Society ? In conclusion, I must decline Mr Body- combe's ingenuous invitation to disclose my identity. My personality, I admit, is unimportant; my facts a.re distinctly otherwise. Your faithfully, I Pontardawe, STEELSMELTER. July 3rd, 1914.

I YSTRADGYNLAIS ILP AND j TRADE UNIONISM

I YSTRADGYNLAIS I.L.P. AND j TRADE UNIONISM. To the Editor of Llais Llafur." Sii-Your most considerate corres- pondent, ''Young Liberal, in order to give me the opportunity of closely observing froth, springs upon me this week a shallow stream of frothy rhetoric in reply to my former letter. Personally, I should refrain from ar- guing with anyone whose powers of reasoning I considered weak—it would be simply waste of time. Evidently, Young Liberal in passing this limit of allowable personalities of the mind, as Holyoake puts it, did not mean what he said, otherwise of course debate would be useless. In this letter Young Liberal" says decidedly that he is a better Trade Unionist than any member of the Ystradgynlais I.L.P. What proof have we that lie is even a paying member of a Trade Union! It is easy to make such statements as this when he hides his identity bdbind bis nom de-plume. Like a bandit sniping at a traveller from behind a. rocky shel- ter, Young Liberal shoots darts of personal abuse at me, fearing, I suppose more tu quoque if he were to show himself in the open. I maintain that Young Liberal" has not disposed of my contention that he cannot be a true Trade Unionist if he votes Liberal. He argues that he is justified in voting for the Liberal Party because the pre- sent Government has given us Old Age Pensions, National Insurance. The Eight Hours' Act, and the Miners' Minimum Wage Act. He might as well argue that he can be a good Trade Unionist if he votes Conservative, because the Conserva- tive Party happened to be in power when the Workmen's Compensation I Act was first passed, and because Lord Shaftesbury, the Conservative, was chiefly instrumental in getting the Ten Hours' Bill passed in 1847. Young Liberal" does not state that the Minimum Wage Act was wrung I from the Government by the miners' strike and the Labour M.P.'s, and that since then the Government has steadfastly refused to extend the ap- plication of the Act to workers in, other industries. Every worker knows that the Acts he mentions are full of imperfections. Why? Because the Liberal Party is full of employers of labour, and the Acts have been so drawn up that the workers have to pay, and dearly too, for most of the blessings that they contain. There is no doubt tha.t in future the House of Commons will have to deal more and more with bread-and- butter questions. It will have to regulate wages, and improve the con- ditions of the toiler. Would the workers dream of electing their em- ployers to serve upon their workmen's oommittee-a body which has to fight him, tooth and nail, for a living wage? No. Well then, in the name of consistency, how cAn a wor ker be true to Trade Union principles if he returjis his employer to Parliament to fix him minimum wage or to improve his conditions of labour? I suppose Young Liberal" would have voted for the Liberal mineowners' candidate at the recent North-East Derbyshire by-election in preference to Mr. Mar- tin, the Miners' Federation candidate! "Young Liberal" says that he strik es for better conditions (by the wa,Ni, I wonder if he has ever been on strike), and he votes for better condi- tions. Are the conditions of the toiler better now than they were eight years ago when the Conservative party went out of power ? Since then the cost of living has gone up 18 per cent., while wages, in spite of the Minimum Wage Act, have only been increased by 5 per cent. During the last eight years the attitude of the Govomm.>nt to- wards organised labour is written in the blood of the toilers.. Have we for- gotten Tonypandy, LI and I y, Dublin, and South Africa? His next point is that the Labour members combined are not as strong a force for progress as Mr. Lloyd George. He also states, in paren- thesis, that most of the Labour mem- bers were returned by Liberal votes. Mr. Lloyd George could enlighten him on this latter point. Does he not know that if the Labour voters in Liberal constituencies refrained from voting, or voted for the Tory, over 100 Liberal seats would be lost? Ipswich br- election was to the Liberals a most painful illustration of this. The Nation." the most influential of Lib- eral weeklies, said, There can be no substantial doubt as to why and how Ipswich was lost and Avon. the deciding stroke was dealt by the In- deoendent Labour Party." I cannot deal with all the side issues which "Young Liberal" has raised, but the reference to Mr. Lloyd George as a force for progress must be touched upon. I believe it was in 1910 that he raised the election cry of, The Land for the people," and I believe also that this song was sung by his song was sung by his followers: "The land, the land, 'Twas God who made the land; The land, the land, The ground on which we stand; Then why should we be beggars with the ballot in our hand. For God gave the land to the people." Mr. Lloyd George has shown us since then how the people are to be- come once more the owners of the land. He has levied land taxes which lwhf,n they mature will bring in £ 1,000,000 a year (they now realise £ 200,000 a year). Authorities on the question state that the value of the land has increased on an average £ 5,000,000 a ypar since 1910. So that in four years the Exchequer has re- ceived R800,000, while the landlords have taken an additional £ 20,000.000. "Young Liberal" can now see that the land is actually lees the property of people than it was before he sang hopefully four years ago: "God made the land for the people. Numerous oases can be cited to show that Mr. Lloyd George's progressive policy is to give to the people with one hand, and at the same time take more away from them with the other. Now I come to the question of the excavations. I reiterate once more j' that no principle of Trade Unionism was ignored when the members of the I.L.P. decided upon clearing the I ground for one of their tennis courts. To me it is news that Trade Unionism insists that a body of Trade Unionists should give out work which they them- selves are able to do, whether they are financially strong enough to pay for the doing of this work or not. Any;- how, since we had no money to spend on the tennis court we were not de- priving any man of his bread, so Young Liberal's" statement is ab- solutely incorrect. I do not know who or what Young Liberal" is, but let us take it that he is a poor man (if he was alluding to me in this way he would probably in- sert a gibe here with respect to pov- erty of thought" or nakedness of argument or some such gentlemanly epithet). Well, let us assume that he is a poor man, whose earnings are such that he and his wife are unable to keep a domestic servant to do the household work. He may know quite well that scores of girls are in need of such a post, but he has no money to hire one of them. Would it be cor- rect to say that he is keeping the bread out of the mouths of these girls who live by doing household work if he or his wife attends to those duties ? Young Liberal's" reference to Shaw, Hyndman, Blatchford and the others is, of course, irrelevant. That So- cialism has its "fat men" I do not deny, but they are the exception and not the rule. It is otherwise with Liber- alism. Of course, I said we (in Ystradgynlais) were "comparatively poor men ajid had no wealthy repre- sentative in Parliament to help us. I have yet to learn that the persons above mentioned are members of Par- liament. "Young Liberal's" gibes the coming co-operative commonwealt h are humorous, to say the least. H<' ond his party have no visions of tie fu- I turthev have no ideal, -io ol for which to strive. The Liberal Party's program (you can only find that in "to-morrow's" "Daily News and Leader") is one of "social reform," and consists in dealing with results .and not with causes, e.g., Old Age Pensions, National Insurance, and Workmen's Compensation. The Lib- eral Party desires to keep up the pre- sent svstem, while the I.L.P. maintains that this system has been tried long enough. ) As soo:r^v has passed through vil'age communism. Chattel Slavery. Feudal- ism to Capitalism, so now Capitalism ha to nive way to Socialism as a step in the evolution of society. We So- cialists refuse to believe that the world has laboured for centuries to produce our present state of society, and as I mentioned last week, we are looking forward to the realisation of our ideal -the co-operative commonwealth. In conclusi on, let me add that I am now quite certain that the impelling force which drove "Young Lilieral to tttack our me.mbers was the well- founded fear that we are going to oust the Liberals from their position at the head of local affairs. During the last month we have enrolled over 50 new members, fourteen joining at the last branch meeting, and this in spite of Young Liberal's" attack on us. We shall also continue with the work of building our hall, and institute and preparing tennis courts and bowling green. We worship our cause even as the monks of old worshipped theirs, when they built their magnificient cathedrals and filled them with everything that their hearts and minds could desire. When our home" is completed I trust that Young Liberal or one of his party will honour us with his presence there. We shall then in that spirit of brotherly love which is so rife among Socialists" gladly devote an evening to a debate on "Socialism versus Liberalism." Yours, etc., LLEW. E. MORGAN. Ystradgynlais.

Advertising

Pan Fyddwch yn Abertawe ac am GWPANAID 0 DE neu GINIAW BLASUS Y He goreu i chwi fyned yw i'r HOTEL MONICO, ♦> 33 HIGH STREET. Ystalfell eang, gysurus at wasanaeth Un. debau, Gwib-gyrch Ysgolion Sul, etc. PERCHENOGES: MRS. A. E. RICHARDS Pruoedd rbad, ir gwasaaaeth goreu.

Welsh Mine Troubles

Welsh Mine Troubles. BIG COLLIERY LOCK-OUT ENDED. It is officially stated thd the lock-oufc at the Hafod Colliery, near Wrexham, has been terminated. As the result of conferences bet wee r* the employers and the men's representa- tives, work has been resumed at the col- liery this week. The settlement is hailed with delight in -t-fie districts of Rhos, Ponkey, and Johnstown, as the majority of the 1,500 men employed at Hafod re- side there.

No title

I /t a meeting of the Ammanford Council on Friday, Mr Evan Evans moved that negotiation^ be '-nt* rvd into for the- purpise of the AmmaJiford electric s-jp- rlv 71w n-ction w" mrri,ed, ai;d Mr D. G. Davies save notice that ha would move at th* next th.t, similar negotiations be onte/ed UltQ with. the local gas company.