Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

♦ Lierapnon (regd.) Serges hold J ? the Field at the present moment I + Guaranteed to stand any climate. G. C. DEAN, The Tailor Will sell a suit to order off this Noted Serge from 35/ 37/6, + ? 42/ 45/ 50/ 55/ Return fare paid within 20 + X miles of Swansea to any ciisto- mer placing an order for a Suit or Raincoat, upon production J of Railway Ticket. + Please Note the Address X 22, Castle Street, Swansea.

Advertising

♦ "We Mve had good results from advertising in Labour X Voice"—Swansea Trades- X X man, Name on applIcatlOL ♦ ? Do you want good results 7 X h Do you want good results 7 ♦ ♦ —— ? ? If so, Advertise in + ♦ LLAIS LLAFUR." ? { X

HARTSHORN v HUGH EDWARDS

HARTSHORN v. HUGH EDWARDS. Smashing Reply to Mid- Glamorgan M.P. AND A LITTLE MORAL ABOUT CARSON. All the Young Liberals, and all the Old Men, Couldn't put John Hugh together again. Rev. John Hugh Edwards, M.P., has had a great fall. In a recent speech, instead of retailing personal anecdotes about Mr Lloyd George, which he does quite prettily, Mr Edwards made a ve- hement attack on Mr Hartshorn, the Labour candidate for Mid-Glamorgan. Mr Hartshorn has replied—and the rev. gentleman is in the condition of the traditional Humpty-Dumpty. There has been organised interference in the affairs of the Miners' Federation by Mid-Glamorgan Liberals and Mr. Vernon Hartshorn very properly re- sented this. In a speech delivered at Maesteg, and reported in last week's "Llais Llafur," Harts- horn warned the busybodies to "keep off the grass," and told the Liberal M.P., for Mid-Glamorgan plainly that if he sanctioned such practices, or participated in them, he would meet with as warm a reoeption as some time ago at Nanty- ffyllon, where a meeting of indignant miners showed in no half-hearted fashion, their resentment at the rev. gentleman's attacks on the Labour Party. Mr Edwards construoo thi" as a threat of physical violence, which, he said, was in ill consonance with Mr Hartshorn's recent elevation to the bench of magis- trates for Mid-Glamorgan. In the course of his remarks he compared Mr Harts. horn to Sir Edward Carson. Replying in the "South Wales Daily News" to Mr Edwards' ill-natured at- tack, Mr Hartshorn wrote "ALONE HE DID IT." I "Mr John Hugh Ed wards professes now to believe that it is not in the in- terests of law and order that I should have been made a magistrate, and he seems to attach all the blame to the Ad- visory Committee. What in the world has the Advisory Committee to do with it? "Has Mr John Hugh Edwards for- gotten that "alone he did it?" "Has he forgetten that several months ago, shortly after the list had been drawn up for submission to the authori- ties, he came to me and warmly con- gratulated me because my name was on the list? "Has he forgotten that he then claimed that it was his powerful influence and friendship which had secured me nomina- tion ? NOT A REV. "WHITE HOPE." I If 1 unworthily discharge my duties as a magistrate the blame falls entirely on Mr John Hugh Edwards. It was his influence, I understand, which put me into a position for which he considers me unfitted. It is not for him to blame the Advisory Committee. "Mr John Hugh Edwards need not, however, fear that I shall prove un- worthy of his patronage. If he will deal truthfully with my Maesteg speech he will be forced to confess that in it there ia not the sligheat incitement to violence —nothing unworthy of a Justice of the Peace. "The idea of calling in thousands of miners to do physical violence to Mr John Hugh reallv never entered mv head. The idea that I should need the assistance ef anyone for that purpos? is II rather funnv. because I have never 'looked upon 'Mr John Huah Edwards as ;a White Hope SOWING-AND REAPING. "Mr Edward s may quibble about BOW- ing seeds of dissension, but I challenge him to deny my assertion at Maeste.g that "he and one or two others closely associated with him are keenly interest- ing themselves in the matter of exemp- tion for one or two of their supporters in the district." "I promise him peace and quiet so long as he goes on with his dreary round (of sloppy sophistry, but if be comes into my district to sow the seeds of dissension among the men w hom I serve, en- deavouring to create disunity among us and to weaken our Trade Union, he will have as livelv a time as he had, at Nant- yffvllon, but nothing will be done which will we unworthy of the position which 'he claims to have secured for me. rPREACHING TO THE PREACHER. I MMr Edwards likens me to Sir mwara rCMson. As a matter of fact there is mot the slightest analogy between mvself and the Ulster leader. But suppose there was. "What has Mr John Hugh Edwards, the Liberal member for Mid-Glamorgan, the thick and thin supporter of the "Liberal Government, to say against Sir Edward Carson T If Sir Edward is not law-abiding, why he is at large? Why ido the Liberal statesmen kow-tow to him and compliment him! "i have never stirred up rebellion; I have never advocated the formation of Trade Unionists into a drilled body armed with lethal wessons; I have neyer been at, the head of an organisation which indulges in eun-running while the Liberal Government turns the blind eye. ONE LAW FOR CARBON: AN- OTHER FOR MANN. A Liberal member has no right to Insinuate that Sir Edward Carson is not law-abiding. ?'?S. Mr John H?h Edw? ? and his Liberal Government have been too busy putting Tom Mann and other forking men into prison to spare the Jn to be ffqr to political opponents. ne,«. column.,

HARTSHORN v HUGH EDWARDS

(Continued from preceding eoiuma). "Or perhaps he has been wasting his time congratulating the men whom he has (or has not) put on the Commission, of the Peace for Glamorgan." "All that remains for Mr Hartshorn to do is to vary the invitation to the Anti-Socialists of Mr G. B. Shaw after his encounter with Mr Mallock, and ask the Liberals of Mid-Glamorgan to sweeo np the fragments of the Rev. John Frigh Edwards, M.P., and produce i their pezfc champion.

TRIPLE ALLIANCE TO STRIKE SUDDENLYi

TRIPLE ALLIANCE TO STRIKE SUDDENLY. GREAT SPEEGH BY MINERS' PRESIDENT. MR. SMILLIE ON THE COMING FIGHT. j At a great miners' demonstration at Morpeth, Northumberland. on Satur- day, a. fine address was given bv the president of the M.F.G.B., Mr. Robert Smillie, who was accorded a great re- ception. He said he had never worked in the Labour movement simply as a politician or simply as a Trade Union- ist, but as a Socialist. (Applause). He had taken every opportunity to preach the doctrine that the people of the land should own and enjoy the land and its fruits. So long as they had a capitalist class they would have to feed and clothe that class a great deal better than the workers were ever fed and clothed. Trade Unionism in itself wpuld not solve the problem, nor would politics solve the problem of itself. "But," said Mr. Smillie, the Trade Union movement properly used, side bv side with Parliamentary action, can, I believe, solve the problem of poverty with which we are faced." (Applause). IDEAL LIVING WAGE. I The idea of a living wage. he de- clared, was no longer the idea of a mere wage that enabled them just to exist. He was out for a. wage which would enable the miner and the workers in every other industry—to be well housed, well educated, and able to put by enough not only to secure a week's holiday in the year, but at least six or seven weeks a year. (Hear, hear, and a Voice: "Whv dont' you do it?") "Why don't I do it?" re- torted Mr. Smillie; I think I've done as much during the last 20 years as any one man can do to realise that." (Cheers). He had spent 20 years of his life in organisation. He had joined the Trade Union movement when it was broken up and in small, scattered sections. They had at last got an or- ganisation second to none in the world's history. They had talked about a Minimum wage, but so long as they left the mines of Great Britain in the hands of private exploiters they could have all the legislation in the world. but working for private profit would mean they'would stiil have their alarm- ing accident rates -1 THE EFFECTIVE BLOW. I He was proud to have taken one step in the uniting of the miners, the rail- waymen, and the transport workers— that great triple alliance. (Cheers). A few years ago it would not have been possible, but it was now possible be- cause the magnificent organisation- of the railwaymen and the transport workers had been gradually drawing their forces together for some time. He had no reason.to think that they would stop at the organisation of those three great bodies. (Applause). Those on the executive of that great body, though some were men of advanced thought and some men backward in industrial action, were absolutely unanimous on co-operation between the three bodies. He was not going to tell them what lines they would take. He was one of those who believed that if any, army was going to strike successfully it would have to strike suddenly. It would be wrong if they let the employing class know that three months or six months hence they were going to do this, that, or the other. Their aim should be quietly to make up their minds what they wanted, demand it, and also de- mand at the earliest possible moment, with the full knowledge that. if the claims were not satisfactorily met, work would be stopped from one end of the country to the other. (Cheers). In the miners' strike they gave too much .notice to the employers and the public, and he hoped they would never be so foolish again. (" No. we won't.") Had he had his wav, the strike would have commenced long before it did. Reasons for general action might come much more quickly than any of them anticipated.

MINERS FOUR BAT WEEK I

MINERS' FOUR BAT WEEK. I SCOTTISH OWNERS CLAIM TO I REDUCE BONUS PAY. The executive of the Scottish Miners' Federation agreed an Friday to recom- mend that the first idle days under the four-day week policy should be Monday, the 27th inst., and the 1st of August, the idle days thereafter to be Wednesdays and Saturdays. The recommendation will come before the conference of the Federation on Wednesday afternoon. On the same day the Scottish Coal Trade Conciliation Board meets to con- sider the ooalmasters' claim for a reduc- tion of bonus percentage of 25 per cent., equal to Is. per day. The executive granted R50 to the builders on strike. in London and j320 to the Agricultural Labourers' Union in connection with the. strike of its mem- bers in England.

ICARMARTHENSHIRE POLICE RESIGN

I CARMARTHENSHIRE POLICE RESIGN. BECAUSE OF INSUFFICIENT PAY. I I CHIEF CONSTABLE EXPLAINS. I At a quarterly meeting of Carmar- thenshire Standing Joint Committee at Carmarthen yesterday, Mr. James Philipps (St. Clears) presiding. Mr. John Simlett (Llanelly) referred to the resignation of five or six constables during the past quarter, and .asked for an explanation. The Chief Constable (Mr. W. Picton Phillips) said some of the men had re- signed because—so they stated—they did not receive sufficient pay to enable them to live comfortably,; others had left for other forces, whilst some left because they had relatives living away who they had to maintain, and they could not do it by remaining. During the last twelve months he had ap- pointed 36 men. Some did not care for the work, and other found they could make more money in other em- ployment Replying to Major Spence Jones (Cwmgwili), the Chief Constable stated that, with one exception, all those who had resigned were'recruits. Mr. J. Simlett said the wages of the police were very small, especially in a town like Llanelly. where the expense of living was so high. It was impos- sible for a man to live respectably— as they, wished a constable to live—on a paltry sum <)f Ll 5s. Id. per week. After fifteen years' service a constable only received £1 13s. Id. per week. The matter, not being on the agenda, was ruled out of order. In his report for the past quarter the Chief Constable said the criminal and other offences s howed an increase of 140 as compared with the corres- ponding quarter of last year, the fig- ures being 1,333 as against 1,103. The increase was principally noticeable un- der the following heads:—Drunkenness 70, other offences airaiust the intoxi- cating liquor lavs 42. assaults 15,. Motor Car Act 7. There was a de- crease in simple larceny of 9. Educa- tion Acts 63, fishery laws ôd. Indict- able offences numbered 122. of which 23 were committed for trial, represent- ing a decrease of 13 in the number of offences and 12 in the number of com- mittals. -aCw

iCRIME IN GLAMORGAN

CRIME IN GLAMORGAN. LOCAL MAGISTRATE ON A SERIOUS II PROBLEM. I At the Glamorgan Assizes at Swan- sea on Tuesday, the foreman of the Grand Jury (Mr. G. H. Strick, J.P.. Cwmtwrch)", said the grand jury wished to emphasise Mr. Justice At- kin's remarks on the previous dav with regard to the number of revolting eases of indecency and crimes against women a,nd children, which showed no signs of decrease in the countv of Glamor- gan. The judge said it was undoubtedly a very serious matter, and the difficulty was how to cope with such cases. Their experience coincided with that of the judges throughout the country. Whilst some thought it should be put down by increased severity, there was also- a large body of public opinion that the only chance of reformation was through methods of educating public opinioji and the public mind. It was certainly a very serious problef. Their presentment should be forwarded to the right quarter.

LABOUR CANDIDATE FOR SWANSEA

LABOUR CANDIDATE FOR SWANSEA. COUNCILLOR DAVID WILLIAMS INTERVIEWED. Steps are being taken at Swansea with a view of deciding whether Swan- Town division shall be contested by; the Labour Party, and, if so, by whom. For some time the matter has been before the various Unions and the voting as in progress, but a decision is not expected to be made known till next month. It is. however, believed that the decision will be in favour of a contest. As to the selection of a pos- sible candidate, the various societies .are entitled to vote on any name they choose. A feeling prevails that Mr. David Williams, J.P., the ex-Mayor of Swansea, and the candidate orginallv selected on a former occasion, would be the one most likely to carry the Labour banner t-o victory. Questioned on the subject, Mr. Wil- liams says he is entirely in the hands of the Swansea Labour Association, and that if selected he will stand. He has been on ,the Parliamentary list for the last 12 months. When previously selected, he says, the Boilermakers' So- ciety (of which he is a member) was advised it was not desirable to contest Swansea, and his name was withdrawn. As to the expenses, he sayp the I.L.P. will find 25 per cent. of the election expenses, and the balance would have in his rase, to come from some other aotirce.for he could not find it person- ally. He bu OOen'invited to stand for South Gla¡;¡;-ë:1) bt he lad doclined. bou.h Glan;c??, bu. he had J?lin?l.

PROPOSED NEATH DOCK I

PROPOSED NEATH DOCK. « I Effect of Swansea Valley Developments. BRYNAMMAN-NEATH RAILWAY LINE I The scheme for making a great harb- our at Neath has a. very considerable bearing on the future life of the Swansea and Dulais Valleys. It is proposed first of all to construct a lock 1,000 feet by 100 feet long at that part of the estuarv where it begins to widen, that is by the Briton Ferry Ironworks and the Victoria Tinplate Works. The river will be deepened and widened from here to the swing bridge which carries the Rhondda and. Swansea Bay Railway across—a distance of one and a half miles—up to the Main Col- liery Company's coal tips. The navigable cut made by the pro- moters of the former scheme will also be utilised, and the marsh lands on both sides of the "cut" a.nd the river will be reclaimed by using the sand and rubbish from the bed of the river, whilst several lines of railways from various points have already been authorised by Acts of Parliament, so that when the improvements are completed the Neath Harbour Commissioners will fce in a position to deal promptly and effectively with the coal output. NEW SINKINGS I This portion of the South Wales coal- field in the near future is expected to materially increase ita output as the re- sult of new sinkings in the area near Neath. At present much of the coal produced in, the. anthracite district (says the "South Wales Daily News") finds its way by tho Midland and Great Western Railways into Swansea, but there is in contemplation also a new line from Brynamma 11 through Pont-a; dawe to Neath, and this will tap a large por- tion oLthe anthracite field and divert the traffic to Neath. Thus the coal produced in this region, in the Dulais Valley, and in the Vale of Neath up as far as Aberdare will find a speedy out- let at Neath. It is considered that quicker access can be provided to the Aberdare ui:d 'i i colliery dis- tricts, and that the coal can be con- veyed to Neath at cheaper rates than to I Citrd Iff owing to the shorter distance. Already South Wales produces 93 per cent, of the Anthracite in the United I Kingdom, and there is an increasing de- mand for it. Last ye-r record figures were reached in its exportation. The rise has be?n steady and continuous since 1910, the exports from Swansea I last year of anthracite alone being 2.397,404 tons, and from Llanelly 165,566. THE ANTHRACITE COALFIELD. In order to form an idea oi the vast wealth of coal in the anthracite district it is only necessary to refer to the re- cent sale of the Miers mineral estate of about 8,000 acres. It is estimated that about 200,000,000 tons of coal still re- main to be worked in the Onllwyn and Gwauncaegurwen district-- in the known seams, irrespective of others which may yet ba revealed. The thickness of the seams in the Dulais Valley is 58 feet. and in the Cwmgorse district 33 feet; ajid in these districts six cr seven seams |j are already being worked. There am now between 40 and 50 collieries producing steam and anthra- cite coal in the district which will be served by the projected Neath Bocks. In the Vale of Neath the most important a.re Aberpergwm, Pwllfaron Rock, British Rhondda, and Cwmgwrach, near Glynneath, Resolven, Glyncastle, Rheola, and Ynysarvved. near Resolven, and the Wenajlt Cwm Corrwg, Talbot Merthyr and Merthyr Llantwit, near Aterdulais, without mentioning the pits in the locality of Aberdare. j DULAIS OUTPUT THREE MILLION TONS. Then in the Dulais Valley there are already the LI wynon Collieries, Crynant, Nant Merthyr, Seven Sisters, Brynteg, Dillwyn, Onllwyn, Maesmarchog and Banwen, and in the Skewen. district the j several pit? of the Main Collieries, Cwrt Herbert, Cwrt y Bettws, and Bryncoch, and the estimated output of these mines is about three million tons. In addition to these, however, there must be taken into consideration the col- lie-ries on the western side of the An- thracite district, which will find an out- let to Neath through the proposed new Brynamman-N eath Railway, and the new pits being sunk at Crynant, Pwllfaron, Glynneath, and Rhigos. It goes without saving that the im- provements Proposed a.t the Neath Docks will tend to give a great fillip to the de- yelopment of the coalfield, and that the increased output of the collieries will further the prosperity of the ancient borough.

Every Form of Crime

"Every Form of Crime." JUDGE'S STATEMENT AT THE GLAMORGAN ASSIZES. Mr Justice Aitken, in opening the Gla- morgan Assizes at Swansea on Monday, said there was every form of crime in the calendar possible for the wicked mind of man to conceive. Though large, the calendar, however, was not so large in proportion to the populationi; still the number was serious and deplorable. The calendar comprises about sixty charges. ————— ———

No title

Popular instruments in ol d en Wales: were "pibau coed." These pipes were played m the Swansea Valley, according to one historian, till about the years 1830-40. In fact, the writer has a record of a Swansea Valley piper officiating at the marriage of his grandmother in 1826.

LONDON LETTER

LONDON LETTER. (From Our Correspondent.) I Fleet Street. Thursd ay. I ULSTER AND THE NEWSPAPERS. All Fleet" Street has been looking to Ulster for something exciting, but nothing has happened. Nearly all the "special" writers of Fleet Street are somewhere in Ulster, waiting im- patiently for the "erisas." Lord North- cliffe's newspapers endeavoured to work up a srare, and then abused the Liberal newspapers for suppressi ng the news from Ulster. Then the Morning PoJt" butted in, if one may be ex- cused for using such a phrase in con- nection with so august a journal. The Morning Post" rebuked the Yellow Press for its sensationalism with re- gard to Ulster, and remarked that al- though the Legations at Pekin were surrounded they were not annihilated. This was an unkind dig at the "Daily Mail," and its famous Pekin canard. Of course it is rather hard on the Mail," after sending to Ulster a special corps of correspondents, camera men, telegraphists, etc., ar- ranging special methods of communica- tion, and chartering a yacht, not to be able to secure the anticipated "scoops." But Sir Edward Carson will not stage his little revolution just yet, even to oblige the Daily Mail." Ho is in an awkward corner, and it would be a. Heaven-sent deliverance for him if the Government were to arrest him, and take the offensive in Ulster. But the Government is as reluctant to oblige him as he is to supply Lord Northcliffe with sensational copy. The "Daily Citizen" has its correspond- ents in Ulster with instructions to des- cribe what they see, and not to write or colour facts from the Liberal or Tory point of view. That is what the public wants, and they will only get it from the "Daily Citizen. HOME RULE FOR WALES. I A memorandum setting out the pro- posals of a Home Rule Bill for Wales has been considered by the V.V.slr Lib- eral M.P.'s. The Bill presses to establish a single Parliament for the transaction of the affairs of Wales, in- cluding Monmouthshire. Women are to vote. The power of the Welsh Par- liament are to be those conferred on the Irish Parliament, except the con- trot of the Post Office, with the oddi- I tion of control over old age pensions, national insurance, and labour ex- chances. The executive power is to be carried on by a Lord President, advised by a committee of a Welsh Privy I Council, and power is taken to eet up a. Welsh Judicature appointed by the Lord President. The proposed Bill is, of cour", no more than a bit of kite-nying. but it would be well for Labour men in Wales to keep a dose and critical eye on the manoeuvring of the Welsh Liberal M.P.'s. The Lord President pro- posal particularly needs looking into, as does the suggestion for Proportional Representation made by Mr. E. T. John and others, but now discarded from the draft Bill. One fatal draw- back of Proportional Representation is that it would double the political power of millionaire monopolists like Sir Al- fred Mond a.t a stroke. Anything that tends to put more power in the hands of plutocrats, and worst still, in the 'I hands of their political hangers-on, should be narrowly scrutinised by, the Labour Party. And certainly the La- bour men and Socialists of Wales should demand a much more democratic constitution than Ireland is likely to get. PRESENTS FROM POLITICAL ADMIRERS. Quite a number of M.P.'K receive from time to time presents from their political admirers, and I believe that Mr. Keir Hardie, in this way, has be- coime possessed of an embarrassing number of pipes and other articles. Everyone has heard, of course, of the famous blackthorn walking-stick pre- sented to Sir Edward Carson by his Ulster admirers. Now the balance has been adjusted by a present which Mr. Asquith has received from a Home Ruler. Mr. John Redmond received on Tuesday a quartz and gold nugget from a" Iricli gold-miner named Whe- Ian at Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, j with the request that he would be good J enough to hand it to the Prime Min- ister as a token of the sender's appre- ciation of his efforts on behalf of Home Rule. The request has duly been ob- served, and another treasure has been added to the household gods of the Asquith family. TEA ON THE TERRACE. With the return of the hot weather tro. on the Terrace is back again in favour. One afternoon this week a party of law-abiding suffragists, a party of South African farmers touring this country and a party of distin- guished negroes from West Africa, were being entertained to tea by hos- pitable M.P.'s. The House of Com- mons, by the way, is to enhance its reputation aa the beet club in Europe. Six large rooms overlooking the river have been secured for conversion into retiring rooms for Members. The apartments will be furnished with otto- mans, and decorated with palms. I Another "R.est Room" for tired mem- bers in the shape of a well-appointed lounge leading to the Terrace is also to be constructed. These improve- menta will be appreciated by tboee who ta.ke life in the House leisurely, but there is greater need for securing rooms where members can do their reading and writing in comfort. The House of Commons is one of the most difficult places in the world in which to do hard mental work. THE UBIQUITOUS TOURIST. This is an age of travel. One need only to be ordinarily observant in the London streets to see how t he modern facilities of travel are contributing to the education of the wealthy classes of different nationalities. The London hotels are having an extraordinarily busy time, and I am told that, it is impossible to book a room at the Strand Palace Hotel on less than three weeks' notice. American visitors would seem to be exceptionally numerous this year. One American, with yellow parch- ment skin, and the aquiline face of a Red Indian, accoisted me yesterday on the Emlumkment with, "Say, young feller, can you tell me if I'm right for Westminster Abbey." I put him right for the Abbey, and told him of the points of interest to look for on his way thither. Incidentally I showed him Somerset House, and informed him that it was the building where the files of particulars of all the British joint stock corporations were kept. He gazed at it in ecstatic reverence, and also called his wife to do homage to the sacred edifice. Among our most interesting visitors are a party of South African farmers who have been touring the country in a fleet of motor cars. They find the heat trying! Ap- parently the moist heat of an English summer is 'more debilitating than the dry heat of South Africa. CANADIANS AND SCHOOLBOYS. j A party of Canadian educationists, numbering 170, has arrived in the West of England, and they are due in Lon- don shortly. Their object is to gain an insight into educational methods in this country, and to apply the informa- tion they acquire to the administration of the Canadian schools. After do- ing" London they will go to several provincial cities, including Glasgow, where the Lord Provost will entertain them on the eve of their departure from home. More interesting even than the visit of Canadian educationists is the holi- day which a party of forty North Lon- don schoolboys is now taking in France. For a year past they have been saving for the purpose, and each bny s,tart:? out with a sum of 4?s. If the Labour movement in this country could org::e(i.«e of Socialists. A Mr. John Henry, Fos- ter, of Philadelphia, dyer, left legacies to a number of eld friends and quaintances at IL-difax. One of the beneficiaries under his will is Mr. John Muirhead, caretaker of the Socialist Hall at Halifax, He receives £ 1,070. This legacy, says the capitalist news- papers, puts him in a very awkward predicament. If he accepts the money he will 1>~ receiving unearntcl incre- tnent" if tie, invests it he will be rp- cpiivjiv- interest, or profit, which SocialiiJ.s out to destroy. This is the kind of smartness that over-reaches itself. Socialists do not contend that rent, interest, and profit should be abolisliied by individuals, but collectively. If Mr. Muirhead gave the money away he would he conform- ing to the individualist ideal of charity, not to the Socialist ideal of social jns- tice. He puts his views on the matter in A nutshell: "There are many rich Socialists. It's the system that is wrong, and if I were to foresjo t!w windfall that has come to me the good my sacriloe wou ld do would be out of i all proportion to the harm it would do ■ to me and my family. But any ri- fice of the le<*ncy by me could do no good unull uiie ÍiI)iD\m id altered"

BRITAINS COLOURED SLAVES I

BRITAIN'S COLOURED SLAVES. I A Plea from South Africa. Presenting the case of the natives of the South Africa. Union under the pro- visions of the Natives Land Act, Mrs. Georgina M. Solomon, widow of the late Saul Solomon, of Cape Town, says encouragement seems to be deserved by the deputation sent by the National Native Congress, now representing in this country the serious practical grievances of four and a half millions of His Majesty's subjects overseas. DRASTIC COLOUR BAR. She say,; tiiere is nc ju»t:ce in the Colour Bar" which oppresses a vast population for whom n• 

0 POWEfi OF THE PURSE

——— 0- -——— POWEfi OF THE PURSE. HOW WE ARE GOVERNED BY RICHES Pursuing his campaign in favour of clean Government, Mr Cecil Chesterton, at Knightsbridge on Saturday, declared that at present ours was a system of government by rich men who could afford to pay cea-taun sums to have their will carried out. It had become very rampant under the present Government, but had been con- cealed from the public under the "Pseudo-democratic tosh of people like Lloyd George." There never was a time in the world's history-not even in the corrupt periods of the eighteenth century-when a man could make, as he could now make, an alteration Ly the simple process of signing a cheque. (Laughter). It was a system of govern- ment by pat masters who paid politiciana to carry out their will. At present the party caucuses selected and financed the candidates, and no constituency had a chance of selecting the fittest and most suitable candidates. If a man was paid for his work in Parliament it followed a fortiori that he ought to be paid the expense involved in returning him to Parliament. But if election f expenses were paid out of the public funds the electors would have a wide choice, and candidates would be freed from the party caucus. The only reason why there was not the open bribery of the eighteenth century waa because they had not a free Parliament. In those days if a Member of Parlia- ment was a bad man he sometimes sold his vote, but now Members had been bribed before they entered Parliament, for they had to satisfy the controllers of the secret party funds that they could t e trusted entirely to support the policy which the directors of the fnnd d,eir,& to be supported. A nerUin Ijçrü W. rnon the, roojiner in which the n~rty filtli a revived by the Hon- i ovr s List, and a certain light was thrown were ppent bv the di'-Von lk-t. "The sale of honour* ;> perfectly notorious fnri. Mr Ch<*st#rton pro. c^'ded. "Tbors ie a nrvrVt for ho-iorr*. and until this year, at any rate, any. bodv con M go into Downing street, olant d«d or peerage, to the rof t cheque," But that, perbao*. the most harm l ess wav in which thn party fanda were recruited. ————— '6 ————-

l WELSH SUCCESS AT QUEENS HALL

l WELSH SUCCESS AT QUEEN'S HALL. Miss Merfydd Owen, Mus. Bae., was the composer of "Morfa Rhuddlan." a tone poem for orchestral work, which was a notab le future of a 0f Ttoya.i IT of Music, 11d pt the un- (lnr ormnnc►or^hip of Sir A. f". \Ll<'1"1I;lif'. Vfw Owen's effort wni OT- CIX^i'-IO-lv, h- A IIVT* audioTu-f», ▼hose pbindite vras iMvat«~v^lv !n1V1 ..1') ncVy.tvVde* MiV Owmi. who Wli from Tr^fnr^f. is n ç, of tht- Lol.e-e, 'Jarditf.