Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

< < Great Summer Sale now Proceeding ♦ A Suit to Order for 30/ ? Usual Price 4BI-. J Finest value obtainable. < G. C. DEAN, The Tailor ♦ 22, Castle Street, Swansea. ? ♦ ♦ 4 ? Return fare paid within 20 v miles t-,f Swansea to any custo- mer placmg an order for a Suit or Raincoat, upon prodaction of Railway Ticket. v

Advertising

? O.H.M.S. ? SEE ? PAGE 4. ♦ ♦

Our London Letter

Our London Letter (By Our Own Correspondent). -IN THE STREETS. Up to the moment of writing we have seen very little in the streets of London to suggest that Great Britain is at war. Everything seems quite normal. The crowds are perhaps a little denser at some hours of the day, there is always a group gathered be- fore the windows of the newspaper unices which have a bulletin board, on which the latest war telegrams are displayed, and a smaller group is generally to be seen reading the notices shown "in the windows of the post •.offices. When the evening papers pub- lish their early editions there is a scramble to get copies, and people pass along the pavement with their heads buried in the pages. Every morning on my way to Fleet Street I pass by the offices of the "Times," and always, there is a big crowd there reading the last telegrams received: men on their way to their offices stop to read and 'hurry off with a sort of visible relief when they find there is nothing fresh to learn. Late at night Fleet Street, usually quite empty, shows more ani- mation than is usual: people are re- luctant to go home to the suburbs and "hang about until ten or eleven o'clock waiting for news. But generally speaking life is quite ordinary in Lon- don in these days, only that stress is beginning to teil upon the faces of people. Everybody looks grave. and worried. My train into the City is filled with men and women who have discarded novels and weekly journals for the daily papers no one looks out of the windows: everyone reads, reads, reads. THE MARCH OF ARMED MEN. I Actually the plainest evidence that we are living under abnormal con- ditions is the presence of uniformed men everywhere. When I came through the Temple this afternoon a big squad of Territorials passed me on their way to the gardens for drill. Most of them were in uniform, but a great many wore ordinary clothes, they were without hats, and carried rifles, •oartridge belts and bayonets. In the gardens about five hundred men were drilling. From my window this morn- ing I saw the march of another detach- ment of Territorials fully accoutred, with baggage cars—on their way whither P I do not know. But it goes oT,. In cars and motor- buses uniformed men in twos and threes travel (without being asked to pay their fares) at all hours. They have to report themselves at intervals, I suppose, and are then allowed to go where they like until orders are given for them to assemble and be moved on strange errands. They are all fine, straight; clean-looking men, drawn from offices, ware-houses and shops. For them work is over for a time: they are "embodied," and wait only the orders to march. Outside the recruiting offices a long patient queue waits to join the army. Men stop to read the -appeals posted everywhere to join His Majesty's forces, and one imagines in- dividuals hurrying off to take their place in that queue. This is London in war time, Fleet Street in war time. But one wishes it were over. LABOUR AND THE WAR. I In Labour circles here there is great .activity. Some of my friends have "been working day and night at the preliminary organisation of the move- ment in conjunction with the Citizen ^Committees which a.re being formed -all over the country by the mayors and lord mayors. On Sunday -morning a meeting of the newly-formed London Labour Party was held, and immed- iately thereafter a joint meeting of the London Labour Party with the London Trades Council and the local Labour parties to concert plans for this work. A strong representative committee was formed, composed of the Provisional Committee of the Lon- don Labour P-.rty, the executive oi the London Trades Council, and a few co- opted members: women like Dr. Ethel Bentkam, of the Women's Labour League, have joined for example, a& having special knowledge of the poor districts and maintaining close touch with the women antl children who are suffering by the war. Great schemes are under consideration. Do we realise that our British 'Society is being rapidly sociallood F-It is in the most genuine sense a prac- tical working socialism coming into beimr during these days of stress. The national committee, called the War Emergency National Committee are meeting contmualy to discuss plans -and to watch the direction these measures are taking. In the hurry many suggestions are made by ex- œlIentli intentioced w,ho do not understand wfcat they are doing: and that Labour men and women, with their superior knowledge of economics and working class conditions warn, re- strain and protest when they see the -darigers of carrving these suggestions out. Labour has its clear risioo of what? is needed, and loses no oppor- tunity of making the authorities understand the situation from ife point of of view. Mr Ramsay Mttedonald, who is a member of the committee ap- pointed bv the Government, keeps in close touch with his colleagues on this committ-so, the Labour movement, and 80 things are kept moving. So many j things happen or do not happen as they ought: the Labour movement is doing the right thing by watching the course of events, and being ready with advice at the right moment. BEFORE THE PALACE A couple of nights ago I went to see what the demeanour of the crowd was that gathers in front of Bucking- ham Palace every evening, and stays there a few hours hoping to got a glimpse of one or another of the Roylal family. What I saw confirmed the im- pressing which has deepened in me since the outbreak of the war. There is no Jingoism in England. On the eve of our declaration of war against Germany I was at the women's meet- ing in the Kingsway Hall. As we went in I saw a newspaper placard: "War at Midnight." After the meeting, which will remain in my memory chiefly for the extraordinarily eloquent and passionate speech of Dr. Marion Phillips (who was recently in Swansea Valley), I went off down the Strand to Whitehall. It was about 10 o'clock. Trafalgar Square was packed with a dense mass of people. Whitehall was nearly impassable, and the traffic was diverted down Northum- berland Avenue to the Embankment. There was a good deal of cheering, and a number of youths and young men were marching up and down wear- ing red caps (Liberty caps!) made of paper, and carrying paper flags. They were excited enough: but the real crowd was anxious, preoccupied, and silent: they did not want war, and showed it quite plainly. "Poor fools!" said a man near me, looking at the mob of young men cheering and march- ing as though it was Mafeking night I they were celebrating instead of the eve of the most tremendous conflict which has ever darkened history, "they don't know what they are in for." They did not some of them do not even now. But the crowd before Buckingham Palace realised what they in for. It was the quietest mob I have ever been in. There was singing, and cheering, but the mass of the gathering was silent and grave, curious, perhaps ex- cited, but not enthusiastic or jubilant or jingoistic. I write only of London crowds; but from what I hear of the state of feeling in the country gener- ally—no one wants war. We are in it, and will see it through, but when it is over there will be a reckoning, a call- ing to account of the press which tried to inflame public feeling, with the class rulers who concealed their bar- gains from us, the profit-mongers who got rich by feeding misunderstanding and fear. For the present we are at war. But we shall not forget.

CHARITY THAT MAY HARM WAGEEARNERS I

CHARITY THAT MAY HARM WAGE-EARNERS. I WORKERS' PLANS TO MAINTAIN I EMPLOYMENT. I The War Emergency Workers' Com- mittee met at the House of Commons and passed the following resolutions: "That in view of the supreme im- portance of doing everything possible i i to maintain undiminished t he volume of wagarning employment, and es- pecially; in view of the hnndreds of thousands of women now being thrown out of employment, this Committee strongly protests against various well- meaning suggestion that women of in- dependent means, or girls of school age, should undertake gratuitously the making of garments for the poor, necessaries for the troops, or other work that would otherwise be paid for 'on commercial lines; and this Com- mittee urges upon benevolent persons willing to give their help that they can only avoid doing positive harm by confining themselves to many duties and services that are performed only By volunteers, and of which more will be required. BUILDING NEW SCHOOLS. I "That representations be made to Mr Herbert Samuel, as chairman of the Cabimet Committee, and to the Board of Education, suggesting that local education authorities and univer- sity colleges should be at once asked what works of building and improve- ment, as regards elementary and secondary schools, training colleges and hostels, technical and university colleges are in contemplation, and could be put in hand immediately, if fands were. provided; and that they should be informed that the conditions for building grants may be relaxed, for approved schemes, so as to enable the whole cost to be met without rais- ing. the rates. MAINTENANCE SCHOLARSHIP. I "Tha.t in view of the importance of maintaining the total volume of era- ployment of women as well as of men, and of the necessity of promptly taking action for the aid of the rapidly grow- ing unemployment ol women and girls, the Cabinet Committee be requested to consider whether it could not, in con- junction with the Board of Education, assist local education authorities to withdraw from the Labour market as many girla under 16 as possible by affording temporary maintenance scholarships for girls as well as boys."

No title

The Bishop of Birmingham hao; decidod that in the. existing circumstances it is impossible to hold the Church Congress in that city, arranged to take place on October 6th to 9th. A meeting of the (exeoutive will be held to consider the question at an early date.

SOCIALISTS SENT TO DEATH

SOCIALISTS SENT TO DEATH. TRAGEDY OF THE LIEGE TRENCHES. Writing in the "Daily Herald," Mr C .Langdon Everard gives publicity to startling information which has reached him regarding the German forces employed in the attacks on the Liege forts. Mr Everard says: The outstanding feature of the Ger- man attack on the forts around Liege last week was the adoption of what is known as "close formation" on the part of the attackers. Masses of in- fantry were hurled forward to certain death by the gCTieral commanding. Even admitting that the figures given out from Brussels were exaggerated (the Japanese with 400 guns lost 16,000 men at Port Arthur), the carnage was terrible. We lead of bodies being piled four and five feet high in the trenches, of battalions, turned in- stantly into a shrieking mass of humanity by the explosion of mined terrain, of soldiers swept like chaff from the glactfe of a fort by the awful hail of lead from machine guns. Though the defenders must have suffered considerably, it was Hell let loose so far as the unfortunate German infantry were concerned. Thousands of men were sacrificed deliberately by the adoption of obsolete "rush" tactics. SINISTER TACTICS. I The newspaper reports agree that I the brunt of the attack was borne, not by Prussian, but by South German troops. From private advices which I received to-day it appears that the Saxon regiments were given the "hon- our" of being wiped out by the forts. The significance of that statement, from our standpoint, lies in the fact that Socialism is extremely strong in the kingdom of Saxony, and that the Saxon infantry is composed to a very considerable extent of Social Demo- crats If the reports I have received are true—and I have every reason to trust my informants—those "rush" tactics, which astonished the military experts, are open to a very sinister ex- planation. The Prussian militarists (and it is well to remember that when we talk of "German" policy, we mean the policy of the Prussian autocracy which, since 1870, has bossed the Empire) regard the Social Democrats as their most dangerous foes, and rightly so. Every accession to the ranks of the Social Demokraten is a blow at the militar- ist policyi of the Prussian ruling caste. Hence it is that members of that caste have declared, on more than one oc- casion, their intention of sending the Socialists into the firing line in the event of war. THE STORY OF CANUTE I The slaughter at Leige shows that they; are prepared to carry out their threats. It is the story of King Canute over again, but on a ghastly scale. When General von Emmich sent those Saxon lads to destruction be dealt a blow at the Prussian autocracy from which it will never recover. In vain they flung these soldiers in- to the jaws of death. In vain they have prohibited all Socialist meetings. In vain they have suppressed Ger- many's ninety Socialist newspapers. In vain they arrest the leaders; I am in- formed that the Social Deputies to the Reichstag have been placed under ar- rest, but can get no confirmation of this at the moment. So far as one can prophesy, the days of the Prussian autocracy are numbered, and a German republic will arise out of the likely results of this international slaughter. Already, despite the stringent police precautions, there has been trouble in Germany-and not in Germany alone. News comes to me of bloodshed in Hamburg on Sunday last as a result of a collision between the police and a huge crowd of protesting citizens. Similar rumours leach me from Stutt- gart and other German towns. War is hell, and the German people do not want hell. If, in the end, they send their brutal rulers there few of us need be surprised. ——.——

WARNING TO COMBINES I

WARNING TO "COMBINES." I BOARD OF TRADE WILL NOT HBSITATE TO USE ITS POWERS. Mr Runciman (President of taie Board of Trade), replying to a question from Mr Barlow in the House ef Commons said if any instances were brought to the notice of the Board of bgef com- bines or any, other persons unreason- ably withholding meat or any other foodstuffs the Board would be bound to put into force the powers which Miev took on Saturday. (Cheers). Mr Bruianer asked whether the pro- hibition OIl the export of salt had been withdrawn. Mr Runciman answered that a new porola.mation was issued that morning stealing with the exportation of food- stuffs, and under that the exportation of salt was not now prohibited, as this country had more than it could con- sume. The Unreasonable Withholding of Foodstuffs Bill, which gives the Board of Trade the powers to which Mr Runciman referred as reported above. was passed through all its stages ic the House of Lords on Wednesday.

GREAT WELSH SCHOLARS DEATH

GREAT WELSH SCHOLAR'S DEATH. Passing of Sir Ed. Anwyl. CAREER OF DISTINGUISHED SERVIE. NVe reget to announce the death of Sir Edward Anwyl, the eminent Welsh edu- cationist, which took place on Friday midnight, at the residence of his father, Bryn Elen, Tyfica Road, Pontypridd. The deceased gentleman, who was on a visit to his father, Mr. John Anwyl, had not been well for some time, and death was due to an affection of the heart. EARLY CAREER. Sir Edward Anwyn was born in 1866 at Chester, and was educated at St. John's College and King Henry VIII. School, Chester, and Oriel College, Ox- ford, where he waa open classical scho- lar. He was appointed to the Professor- ship of Welsh at the University College of Wales, Aberstwyth, in 1892, and on the) departure of Professor Angus to Cardiff as registrar, the professorship of comparative philology, which was pre- viously combined with Latin, was trans- ferred to ProfeaSsor Anwyl. who had taught Latin and Greek and comparative philology to the students of the college for some year, He wac for some years. He was also appointed Dean of the Faculty of Arts. He had been a member of the Court of the Senate and the Theologies 1 Board since the foundation of the University of Wales, and also of the Executive Com- mittee of the Central Welsh Board since the creation of that body. On the death of the late Principal Viriamu Jones, first Vice Chancellor, Professor Anwyl was adopted; vice, j ,chairman of the Board and Executive Committee. On the death of Sir Hum- phreys Owen, M.P., Professor Anwyl was appointed chairman. CAERLEON COLLEGE PRINCIPAL. In November last was offered and accepted the principalship of the Mon- mouthshire Training College at Caer- leon, which will be opened next month. A distinguished Celtic scholar and archaelogist, the deceased professor had contributed largely to Welsh literature, had written numerous songs, and was the author of a Welsh grammar. He had also taken a prominent part in the development of thieological studies in the University of Wales, and for some years had acted as examiner in Holy Scripture for the first examination for the B.A. He had also published a commentary on the prophet Hosea and various essays in pamphlet form. Professor Anwyl was knighted at Bangor in July, 1911, on the occasion of the Royal visit, as an acknowledgment of his services to the cause of Welsh higher education. A REPRESENTATIVE FUNERAL. TRIBUTES TO A GREAT LIFE. The interment of Sir Edward Anwyl, M.A., took place at Pontypridd on Tuesday, when eloquent tributes were paid by representative public men to the great services rendered by him as Welsh patriot and scholar. The funeral was attended by a number of prominent edu- cationalists and members) of various pub- lic bodies of the Principality. The cof- fin, which was of plain unpolished oak, bore the inscription Sir Edward Anwyl, M.A., died August 7th, 1914, aged 48 years. The cortege left Bryn Elen, Tyfica Road, the residence of Mr. John Anwyl, father of the deceased, and proceeded to Gelliwastad English Congregational Church, where a. short service was con- ducted by the Rev. 0. Lloyd Owen (Sardis). CHIEF MOURNERS. j The chief mourners were :—Mr. John Anwyl (father), Mr. Hugh W. Anwyl, Corwen; Mr. William Anwyl, Gainsbor- ough; Rev. J. Bodvan Anwyl, Ponty- pridd (brothers); and Mr. Evan Rich- ards, Chester (fcousin). Lord Pontypridd and Dr. Lynn Thomaa attended, representing the Uni- versity College of South Wales; Princi. i (pal Roberts, Aberystwyth (Vice-Chan- cellor Welsh University); Mr. Owen Owen (Central Welsh Board) Mr. D. Llenfer Thomas and Professor Powell (Welsh National Library); Professor Young Evans (Aberystwyth Theological Colleger, Professor Edward Edwards (Unirersity College, Aberystwyth) and Air. J. H. Davies (Registrar); Mr. John Evans (representing the Mayor and Cor- poration of Aberystwyth) Professor Marshall, Cardiff; Professor Joseph Jones, Brecon; Dr. Abel Evans, H.M. Inspector of Schools; Mr. John- Row- land, J.P. (Welsh Insurance eornmis- sioners) Rev. H. glv4 Lewis, M.A., London; Dr. Aaron Davies, Barry Mr. Tom John, J.P., Llwysypia > Mr. M. D. Propert (Local Government Board auditor) Rev. H. Morgan (Newport Welsh Society) Alderman Hopkin Mor- gab and Rev. J. LI. Thomaa (Neath Welsh Society" ) Ald«rn»n D. R. Wil. liams, M.A., Barry; Alderman T. H. Parry and Alderman S. N. Jones (Mbn. mopit la shire Education Authority)- Mr. R. W. Jones, J.P., pengam; Mr. Chaa. Lloyd, J.P., Waunifor; Professor Tonj Jcnes (Brecon Education Authority), Alderman Richard Lewis. J.P., Mr. Ellis Owen, Mr. Hopkin Smith Davies, Mr. R. A. Lewis, Mr Lewis Lloyd, Mr. I Ed. Rees, Mr. Maytury Williams, Mr. ttbnttnued «t bottom of lied oolunm.j I

GREAT WELSH SCHOLARS DEATH

(Continued from preceding column). Phillip Williams. (Great Western Col- liery), Mr. Ben Davies, J.P. (miners' agent), Mr. John Evans, J.P., Mr. George Evan, Councillors Hopkin Mor- gan, J.P., H. T. Richards, T. B. Evans, J.P., W. Phillips, and D. Arnott (Ponty. pridti), Dr. J. Morgan Rees, Dr. B. M. Lewis, Revs. J. Tawelfryu Thomaa, John Williams, W. A. Williams, Deri Morgan, D. E. Evans, and Emrys James. I PERSONAL TRIBUTES. The eerviee at the chapel was an im- pressive one. The Rev. 0. Lloyd Owen spoke of the loss Wales had sustained by the death of such an eminent sc holar, and one who had at all times taken an active interest in Welsh national move- ments. Prineipal Roberts, Aberystwyth, said he had always found Sir Edward to be a loyal and true friend. He was fam- ous not only for the breadth of his in- terpretation of the early literature of Wales, but also for his ceaseless indus- try and his love of country. Mr. Lleufer Thomas (Pontypridd stipendia.ry), speaking of Sir Edward aa a life-long friend, said there were many tjraits in his e haracter which Vverq most beautiful. He was a great worker and. beloved by all who knew him. Rrofeabor Powell, Cardiff, also spoke. The Rev. O. Lloyd Owen officiated at Glynfeaff Ccraastery. Wreaths were sent bv the Abervstwvth University Senate. Pontypridd Cymmrodorion Society, and ) Mr. 0. B. Lloyd, Corwen.

THE NEW SOCIALISM

THE NEW SOCIALISM SIGNIFICANCE OF GOVERN- MENT'S STEPS I WHY NOT PERMANENT CONTROL? On Saturday (says the "Daily News and Leader"), the Government passed through all its stages in the House of Commons a, Bill authorising the Board of Trade to requisition foodstuffs in the same way as the military and naval authorities. They also introduced a Bill authorising the immediate expen- diture of £ 4,000,000 in promoting housing schemes throughout the coun- try so as to mitigate unemployment. Both measures were received with ac- clamation by the Opposition, Mr Chamberlain, Lord Robert Cecil, and Mr Bonar Law joining in the chorus of praise. They were scarcely discussed at all. Yet they represent two further important advances in the process of revolutionary change which has been going on with lightning-like rapidity before our eyes in the last week. The powers of the Government in the con- ditions in which we now a.re have been shrfwn to be practically unlimited. The old social fabric has crushed down, and a quite new and totally different struc- ture has arisen as if by magic. A week ago cash payments were suspended for certain bills bYI proclamation. Last Tuesday the Government announced its intention of taking over the insur- ance of war risks at sea. On Wednes- day the moratorium was made general for all debts but rents, wages, rates, and taxes. I RAILWAY NATIONALISATION. On Thursday the Chancellor an- nounced his intention of issuing new currency notes on a basis totally un- kown in this coutrv hitherto. Rail- way nationalisation has been effected at a. single stroke without a word from Parliament. An aliens' law of un- dreamt of severity has been passed al- most without a murmur. The Govern- ment have simply taken over the questions of food supply and of unem- ployment, and no one doubts or grudges for a moment the vigour with which they will be handled. Society, as we have known it has simply dis- solved and a new social organisation been set up in its place amid general acclamation. No one dreams of blaming the Government for the steps it has taken: on the contrary, even its most bitter enemies applaud their vigour, and with reason. They are the sole alternative to anarchy now, and everybody knows it. They have been marvelously suc- cessful simply because they have the hearty support of the entire country. As an illustration of the spirit behind them we may. mention an offer we have received from a lady to trive her services free of charge "in o-der that some man's salary may lie paid and his place kept open" during his "absence" on duty as a Territorial or Reservist. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CHANGES Anv social organisation can be made to work. at any rate temporarilv. bv a spirit like that. But the importance of the now changes should not for that reason he ignored. They are revolu- tionary: and they cannot be wholly, temporary. The system which they superseded can never return in its en- tirety after the war, partly because the conditions in which that system was set will have vanished, partly be- cause men's minds will have been so profoundly affected by the new experi- ment that they will not consent to re- turn to the old conditions without modifications. The appeal from the Society of Friends which we published on Saturdayi called upon men of good will to prepare already for the great task of reconstructing society which will he imposed upon them after the war. There will not be wanting very new and very startling data on which to work for this end.

ISWANSEAS TRADE REVIVING

I SWANSEA'S TRADE RE- VIVING I SHIPPING RESTARTS. I COAL-TIPS AT WORK AGAIN. Three coal tips in the Prince of Wales Dock, Swansea, were working on Thursday on coasting steamers. Arangements are being made to des- patch vessels this week-end to French and Italian ports. Two cargoes of sugar are on their way from America. When these arri ve sugar will drop to its normal price. Grain cargoes destined for Germany are being brought into English ports.

BRITAIN AND AUSTRIA I AT WARi

BRITAIN AND AUSTRIA AT WAR i As From Midnight On Wednesday. The Austrian Ambassador has been informed that a state of war exists be- tween Great Britain and Austria as from midnight on Wednesday. The King held a Privy Council at; Buckingham Palace afc 10 p.m. last night for the signature of various documents contingent upon a state of war between this country and Austria. Earl Beau- champ, the Lord President, attended, together with the Earl of Granard, Lord Allendale, Sir William Carington, and Sir Almeric FitzRoy, Clerk to the Council.

BSPS MANIFESTO TO THE WORKERS

'B.S.P.S MANIFESTO TO THE WORKERS. WARNING AGAINST THE AFTER- MATH OF WAR. The British Socialist Party iss.ied on Wednesday a manifesto to the work- ers on the war. It says: The great war, long threatened nd feared, has suddenly come upon us. This country is drawn into he general struggle by the declaration of war up on Belgium by Germany. We are anxious you should thorough- ly realise that this awful catast" >plie 's not war of the people. The workers of Germany declared vehemently agamsi war. No one knows to-day how r any German Social-Democrats and Trade Unionists have been shot down or im- prisoned for their opinions since mar- tial law was proclaimed. At this moment of natural hatred of German aggression we appeal to you to distinguish soberly between the mass of the German people and the Pruss- ian military caste which dominates the German Empire. The manifesto then urges the workers to insist upon the Government acting with the same promptitude in regard to food supplies and unemployment, as it has done in mobilisation. Amongst the proposals submitted are State and Municipal control and distribution of food, feeding of necessitous children, care of distressed mothers, works of public utility to be put in hand, with- drawal of the Insurance Act contribu- tions by workers, and the extension of the moratorium to rent, hire purchase, and tallymen's charges. I After dealing with the terrible effect of war in the homes of the people, it urges the workers to press for a demo- cratic agreement between Great Brit;'in France, and GerTniny, which shall pro- tect Europe against the despoitc Russia, and ms W war impossible.

I COAL EXPORTS RESUMEDI

———— ———— COAL EXPORTS RESUMED I SHIPMENTS MAY BE SENT TO I NEUTRAL COUNTRIES. Great relief was felt amorp, coal- owners in Northumberland and Dur- ham on Wednesday evening, when it became known that an order had been received in Newcastle from the Secre- tary of Customs, London, revoking the restrictions whioh had been placed on the shipment of large coal on the de- claration of war- All classes of coal, with the excep- tion of the variety of Welsh steina c u by the Admiralty, may now exported to neutral countries. Thi> will mean that more employmert wi 1 be available for the large nu nl. of c,Iliers who have had to ceaso work during the laa-t week or eo, IV- 1n1, ports lllFP a hujre export cos* trade with Norway and Sweden, as as with other countries.

Y0FXG THVES TO BE REMEYEI

Y0FXG THVES TO BE REMEYEI) The War Office lias relieved the anxiety mne-orliing the wives of tokl- iors married off the strength. In or- dirtary, times these are not recognised bv the authorities, but during the ws#r they will receive separation* money i« the aurne pnrpurtitm as those AvVi-e marriage lias been officially sanctions?. It is particularly re«[Uo«ted tka: I women organising work partic-.s should employ »ei»]>etresse^, blouse-makers, etc., who are temporarily out of work owinrr +0 the T>-rr>?t crisis. Hv glwrjnN ) in this patiaofcic measure they whl b^ ( rendering a real service to the State.

Iapel AT GYMRU WEN

Iapel AT GYMRU WEN I GAN Y GWIR ANRHYD. D. LLQYI? GEORGE, CANGHELLYDD Y TRYSORLYS. Mewn trefn i anion ein hieuenctyd cr ganol eu goruchwylion cyffredin i am- ddiffyn diogelwch ein tir, nid gormod gan y genedl heddyw un aberth nac ymdrech. Dyledswydd pob mab a merch a adewir ar 01 Vjdyw ymarffr, gyda? chymorth Rhagluniaeth Duw, bob, gwroldeb ac arafweh dyna yn unig ail ein cysgodi rhag canlyniadau gwaethaf rhyfel. Mewn sobrwydd a hu anbarch meddianwn ein heneidiau, fel v bvdd- om ffyjldlon i Dew a'n gwlad, ao o wneud hyny f", leddfir min dioddefaint i weiniaid y tir. Heddy,w. mewn parchedig ofn a di- frifweh, gadewch i ni osod at ein calon- au dair dyledswydd bwysig:— Y Ddyledswydd Gyntaf ydyw peidio bod mor ffol a llesterio ymdrechion y Llywodraeth i gadw yn ddisigl gyflwr arianol wlad. Nid yw cyfoeth ddoe wedi ei gyffwrdd. Nid oes neb eto yn dlotach er hyny; os y myn pawb droi ei eiddo-yn aur batliol ni ddiehom dim ond dinystr disyFyd ein goddiweddyd. Dygir busnes rhai o brif genhedloedd y byd yn mlaen yn amser heddwell gydag arian-nodau, heb aur bathol yn wel- adwy o gwbl. Heddyw y cwbl ofynir genym yw peidio hawlio aur, eithr vn. hytrach talu a derbyn tal mewn nodau ac arian. Yn lie aur bathol fe roddir i hawb arian-nodau: fe wna'r arian- nodau hyn y gwaith a wneir yn gVfff- redin gan aur bathol, a bydd yr aur yn rhydd i ymladd wrth gefn ein milwyr frwydr arswydus ein rhvddid. Dynion ac aur ydyw anghenion anhebgor y foment. Os yw nodyn mor werthfawr a sofren, ac os y cyflawna holl wasan- aeth arferol sofren, os y ca ei dder- bvn a'i newid pa le bynag v cynhygir ef o fewn y Deyrnas Gyfunol, yn- fydrwydd a llwfrda anheilwng o bobl yn ofni Duw ydyw coledd rhagfarn gut i rwystro'r genedl yn nydd ei hing. Defnyddied pob dyn, gan h vrny, vr arian-nodau, ac felly cynorthwyed i'w dodi mewn cvlchrediad. Yr Ail Ddyledswydd ydyw peidio prynu un amser fwy o ymborfh nag sydd raid wrtho ar y pryd. Y mae prynu llawer yn chwyddo'r gRw a thrwy hyny yn codi'r prisiau yn mhell 1) risiau vii inlie l l uwchlaw'r safon gyffredin; felly Ihvyr lethir y gwan rhwng dau bwn: cyflo<^ Ilai a phrisiau uwch. Penderfyned poh Cristion y Sabbath hwn i ymatal rhag un gwastraff pechadurus. ac i beidio estyn ei law o ddydd i ddydd at fwy ii,,i, i raid o gvfoeth v genedl. Y Drydedd Ddyledswydd: Yirdiech- od ]loll gyflogwvr JIRfm h-l eithaf eu gallu i gadw eu dynion mewn gwaith. Newyn ddilyno ddiffyg gwaith, a gwae a gofid ar y plant diniwed. Ni ddylai un gwaith, cyboeddus na phreifat, sefyll 06 y gellir mewn unrhyw ffordd ei gario yn mlaen. Dechreuer gweith- io ar welliantau cylioeddus, terfyner gweithio "overtime' er mwyn cymery i ychwaneg o ddynion i mewn. Gwell i bawb weithio amser byr na bod llawer yn ddi-waith. Gyda chyflog bach gellir sicrhau angenrheidiau prin bvwvd, heb- gyfloflg o gwbl nid oes yn aros ond di- raddiad cymdeithasol a dinystr. A wna pob cyflogydd, gan hyny, gymaint a hyn o anrheg ax wlad: peidio troi yr un gweithiwr o'i wasan- aeth tra y gall trwy ddyfais ei gadw, a llunio cyne i gyflogi vchwaneg o ddynion ? Ar lafur y bydd byw'r genedl yn amser heddweh ac ar lafur ac aberth yn unig y gellir ei clivnal yn nydd rhyfel. Ni wyddys eto yn Rhagluniaeth ddoeth y Goruchaf beth fydd diwedd y rhyfel erchyll hwn er hyny bvdded i ni a orfodir i aros gartref ar YI tir, yn V. lofa, yn y chwarel, gvflawni'n ffvdd- Ion y dyledswyddau uchod yn yir un ysbryd dewr a hunanaberthol ag a feddiana. ein brodyr ar faes y frwydr. D. LLOYD GEORGE.

THE IRON HAND

THE IRON HAND. German Socialists Shot. ANTI-WAR DEMONSTRATIONS IN BERLIN. A correspondent of the Manchester Guardian'' writing from Paris on Mon- day evening states :— Several days ago a French Socialist deputy received information, winou he. believed trustworthy, that tiiere naa lkj. ik. at iietrlm demonstrations against utie ar leading to serious disturoancrs, and nia-t j^ieLKiicciiL aid oaier fekx-iajist itti-ders had been shot. fcmee then aim. jc.1- iiave reacxitU ra,b ir,)m uler sowoes, and now foreigners ar- riving in iiriu&els from Berlin -y that tiiey saw a crowd in Unter den Linden ei-yw-ig "Down with tne Emperor," ".vo"Il with the Crown Prince." It is impossible bo obtain confirmaVjjgdi oi LAtie reports, whjcfi i mention vnui ail rt»erve, but the anxiety ot ttio tjcr- niay Government to prevent knowledge ot 4DYehts in Berlin from reaching other countries ie evident. The "New York Herald'' states that the Ameritaa Ato- bassadar in Berlin has been forbidden to communicate with his own Government. Dr. Liebk-secht is the famous iff the Reicbetag who exposed fciui scandal. (Ttjegrams from Berlin at tke end ci last month showed that just before the uermaii ucciaration 01 vw against, Russia the German Socialists hdu in Berlin, Hamburg, and other cities laany very big demonstrations against the war. In Berlin processions in LutiT ot-ii Linden and other streets were, dli-p-?rsou by j;-i.ee chives, and blood was shed.)