Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

•^Q*^5»MM^?^g«5!«gg2g2g2g2g2a2S2 £ 22aSS8 3S^SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSr^^SSSSS5SSSS5SSSSSSSSSSSS a Is! WHO'S J y & Co. | ? 1 Easy. Payment I ? ijjf FurÐushers. || WHAT'S J at Cash Prices, is ? WHAT'S J ?N at Cash Prices. if § ? )ttt —————"———— I 1 In many cases it is not always Ü H ??? convenient to pay away a lot of g? S gg WHERE'S J H cash in of amount. In such n S ?? ?tt cases we sha,ll ? be pleased ]» to ex- §§ || 1 ??t ?tN tend our Easy Payment System £ • ? at Cash Prices. 3: I 22 o»    tttttta! OUR TERMS— o ?NNt ? worth of Goods !/? ? U R ?t? ?0 2/6 „ II R ?M? ?20 „ „ 4/- „ I ? 6/ g £ 50 „ 8/- „ g Can be paid Mouthly. E |All in| tending Purchasers of Furniture, who require really ? 1 Good, Sound and Reliable Furniture, should not fail to | i He our Immense Stock. All Goods delivered Free, in |j; II Pri vate Vans if desired. 81 ff Private V?ns if desired. § S «o JO 0  We employ no CoUectors. ft o8 g g 6I 9 0Q?? High ?Dt L? 8wansea I So .O.O.O.O.O.O.O.OÐO..C.o.oeoC.O.O.O.-o.f *# „ is88S8SSSSgSSSSS8SS88SSS2SSSSS222SgS2S £ 5 £ £ S2S £ S £ SgOSSS2S2SSS £ SSSSSSSSg2?SSSSSSgSSSSS2S25SSil £ S2S8SgSS2lf to

SOUTH WALES MINERS ANDI NAVAL COAL SUPPLIES

SOUTH WALES MINERS AND NAVAL COAL SUPPLIES Joint Board Agreement. LONG STANDING DISPUTE TO BE SETTLED. On Saturday the South Wales Coal Conciliation Board met to consider how to arrange for the payment of the men who will be asked to work the daily extra hour under the Eight Hours Act in order to supply the Admiralty with the extraordinary requirements of the Navy. There was a larger attendance than usual and great harmony prevailed each side of the Board expressing their desire to do all that was possible to assist the Gov- ernment in its difficulties, and! there was unanimity in the resolutien passed that the workmen should be paid afa the rate of a turn and a sixth for day work and a turn and a. fifth for afternoon end night work. Advantage was also taken of the occa- sion to try and settle all outstanding dis- putes in the coalfield in order that in- dustrial peace might prevail in South Wales, and a special committee will meet to-day for this purpose, so that work may fce resumed at all idle pits without delay. This committee is composed of Messrs. Evan Williams, E. M. Hann, W. Stewart, T. Griffiths. and Gascoyne Delziel on the owners' side, and Messrs. J. Winstone, Alfred Onions, Vernon Hartshorn, D. Watts Morgan and Thomas Richards, M.P., on the work- men's side. HOME COAL PRICE. It is ca Bering to know also that the owners agr, ed in principle to the request of the wo kitten that the price of coal for kome con sumption should not be in- creased, if possible. The ownera were unable 'o siv how far they would be able to control the prices, but they pro- mised to do their best in the matter. THE OFFICIAL REPORT. A joint official report of the proceed- inga was supplied by Mr. W. Gascoyne Dalziel and Mr. Thomas Richard's, M.P., the secretaries, a follows:— A special meeting of the Board of Con. ciliation for the coal trade of Monmouth- shire and South Wales was held at Car- diff to-day (Saturday), Mr. F. L. Da.vis presided over the owners' representatives and Mr. James Winstone presided over the workmen's representatives. The meeting was held at the request of the workmen's representatives in order to consider a request which they had re- ceived from the representatives of the Admiralty that the workmen at all col- lieries supplying coal to the, Admiralty should, while the present emergency existed, work every day an extra hour per day under the Coal 36iiiiee Eight Hours Act. There being a complete accord in the desire of both sides to assist the Ad- miralty in the matter, the Joint Board unanimously agreed to comply with the l-equest Of the Admiralty. The, following a ang-ement was arrived at in regard o th3 payment of overtime to fcho»° work men who are requested to work the xt,t hour at the collieries referred to The Joint Board agreed that owing to the conditions now existing the working of overtime of day wage work- men who are required to work the ex- tra hour per day shall be paid on the day shift at the rate of a turn and a sixth for each shift worked, and on the afternoon and night shifts- at the Tate of a turn and a fifth for each shift worked, and this is also to apply to the colliers' minimum wage rate. EXISTING STOPPAGES. The workmen's representatives also refered to stoppages now existing at several collieries in the coalfield, and made an appeal to the owners to co- operate with them in endeavouring to arrive at a settlement of the disputes that have led to the stoppages, and so obtain a resumption of work in the in- terests of the coalfield generally. The owners' representatives acquiesced in this suggestion, and it was arranged that a joint sub-committee be appointed to consider the stoppages now existing with a view of endeavouring to arrive at a settlement, and the sub-committee will meet on Monday morning next at 10.30 for that purpose. HARMONIOUS FEELING. Both sides of the Board were fully in agreement in the desire expressed for a re-establishment of harmonious rela- tionship at all the collieries in the coal- field, espt-cially at the present juncture, it being pointed out that in adopting such a course the Board would be fol- lowing the example shown in other in- dustries by the removal of all labour troubles while the nation is in such need of harmonious feeling amongst all classes of people in the United King- dom. The collieries which were especially mentioned as having existing stoppages were Messrs. Thos. Williams and Sons' collieries, Swansea district; Messrs. John lancaster and Co.'s No. 3 and No. 4 Griffin Pit; Messrs. The Pwllbach Co. 's Tirbach Colliery, Swan- sea district; Messrs. The Cwm Vale Co.'s Collieries, Swansea district; Messrs. Cory Bros. and Co. 's Gelli Col- liery; Messrs. Partridge Jones and Co. 8 Crurnlin Navigation Colliery. AN EFFICIENT SUPPLY. MR. D. WATTS MORGAN'S APPEAL. Mr. D. Watts Morgan, J.P. (

PATRIOTIC BRECOXIANS

PATRIOTIC BRECOXIANS Brecon has been a busy centre during the latter part of the week with the assemblage of troops, equip- ment. and departure. In addition to the County Regiment of Territorials, some hundreds of Army Reservists (South Wales Borderers) have come into the town and left by special trains, each let receiving a very hearty send-off by large numhers of the civil- ian Twpulation of the ancient borough. On Sn-urdnv the 3rd Battalion South W aV?.s Borderers (Special Reserve) as- sembled at the dep.ot, and departed, under the command of Colonel S. W. | Morgan, in the evening. About 2.000 townspeople assembled in the precincts of the railway station, and lustily cheered as the special trains steamed out. In each instance the men were in excellent spirits, and their fine soldier- like appearance was a general topic of discussion. I

No title

The Commissioner of the Swansea Boy Scouts' Association has received from headquarters a communication authorising the offer of various forms of assistance. Early next week, matters will be properly organised to this end, with headquarters in Swansea having telephone facilities, and all civil and military authorities will be written of- fering the services of the Swansea Scouts and officers.

WHAT ENGLAND S POSITION WILL BE

WHAT ENGLAND S POSI- TION WILL BE. VIEWS OF FAMOUS EXPERT. Mr L. G. Chiozza Money, M.P., ia t one of the best known and most re-¡' liable of present day statistical econo- mists, and it will therefore bo of in- terests to read his views on the out- look for British economy; during the progress of the war. In the current issue of the "New Weekly," Mr Money says:—■ "England has been so long at peace, save for her engagement in such a "sort of war" as the South African campaign, that we must not be sur- prised if our committal to a great European struggle deprives some of our publicists of reason. I have had the misfortune to read in the last week or two a number of "leading" and other articles dealing with British trade and British credit calculated to bring loss and misery to their readers by filling them with unnecessary coun- sels of despair. Some of these writings, assure the British public that British credit has collapsed, that British trade and in- dustry will never recover from the effects of the war, that food prices "are quite certain to attain unheard- of heights," that there is a "gold famine," that hundreds of thousands will soon be starving in our cities, and so forth. Millions have been fed with I stuff of this character, and many un- thinking people have been accordingly driven into foolish action prejudicial to themselves and to their country." IN TIMES OF PEACE. I The present crisis, is, ot course quite exceptional, and Mr Money says that if we are to have a properly calm and sober view of British economy, in this present war, we should remind our- selves of what that economy is in times of peace. Therefore, he con- tinues:— "Our British forty-six millions live in two small islands which produce about one-half of the food they eat. The common belief that the greater part of our food is imported from abroad is grotesquely untrue; it is only the greater part of our corn that we obtain from abroad. Most of our people are engaged in manufacturing and commercial pursuits, and the basis of our in'-lu-strial economy is our native coal, which gives us cheap power, and which draws to itself, as by a magnet, the raw materials of all the world. Far less for food than materials are we do- pendent on sea-borne supplies, and without supplies our people would soon lose the greater part of their employ- ment. Importing vast quantities of raw material, and working it up into manu- factured stuff, we produce goods for ourselves and a big surplus for export. The big export surplus largely pays for our imports of food and of raw materials, but we also earn from abroad the imports which are so prec- ious to us by the services of our mag- nificent mercantile marine (which in- cludes. about one-half of all the ships of the world), and by interest receiv- able on oversea investments. Such being the normal position in time ocf peace, how is it changed in time of war? Without imports, and without maintaining the experts which largely pa; for those imports, we per- ish. How can om- oversea trade be maintained, or how much of it can be maintained, if the great war lasts six months, or a year, or longer? EUROPE AND OUR SUPPLIES. In the first place, tat us take note of the fact that both in regard to food and raw materials, we are very little dependent upon Europe. The" great bulk of the corn and other foods which we buy comes to us from the New World and from Asia. and the same is true of the raw materials which are so essential for our work. As far as the greater part of the stuff we need to do our work is concerned, the posi- tion in war is that, given the command of the sea. we can obtain supplies as easily as though war did not exist. Observe the all-important words, i "given the command of the sea." Have we that command? Unless there has been a gigantic miscalculation, we are able to write that our Navy is im- pregnable. COMMAND OF THE SEA. We have the command of the great trade routes, along which there pours the constant. stream of materials which feeds our factories. There is no reason to believe that our Fleet is inadequate to protect our commerce, and we are happily able to add that owing to the spendid work of the Committee of Im- perial Defence, and the prompt action of the Government, what little risk there is is underwritten by the State. A Government War Risks Office has been opened at Lloyd's, and 80 per cent, of the risks of ships and their cargoes will be undertaken hy the British Government. Under these cir- cumstances. our, trade can go on, if trade there be. HOW WILL TRADE SUFFER ? Mr Money naturally now sets out to show how trade will suffer what trade can exist in the present circumstances. Hit, arguments in this connection are the profound, interest and importance: "In the first place, most obviously, our home trade can be pursued, but in proportions. diininshed hí the dearness of money and depreciated credit. As for credit, it is wickedly false to as- sert that it has been destroyed, and those who circulate such statements a.re much to blame. It is perfectly true that if by such writings you can persuade men to make fools of them- selves no one can save people from their own folly. That is as true of peace-time as of war-time. If in normal times you could set bank de- positors and others clamouring to turn paper credit instruments into gold, you would suspend every bank in the country in twenty-four hours. We have very little gold in the country, whether in peace or in war, and just as much gold in the country in war as in peace. We carry through our transactions normally by means of paper promises to pay gold, which are set off against each other by bankers, and it is just as possible to do that in war-time as in peace-time. And what of that foreign trade which, as we have seen, is so important? It is true that our European trade must be crippled during the continu- ance of the war. That is so obvious that even the average leader writer can see it. What is forgotten, how- ever, is the very important fact that Europe takes the smallest part of our exports. WHAT GERMANY STANDS TO LOSE. Mr Money makes it quite clear that we stand to gain tremendousl" y over Germany in the crisis:— Last year out exports amounted to over £ 525,000,000. Of this gigantic total as nearly as possible £ 180,000,000 was accounted for bv our exports to European countries" including those with which we are at Var, those with which we are allied, and those which are neutral. The enemy countries, Germany and Austria, took between them only E45,200,000 of our exports. Even at the height of the war we shall not lose the whole of our European trade, and as a set-off, it is possible for us to do in Asia, in the New World, and in our own Colonies in particu- lar, the export trade which the enemy countries will lose through the war. With the command of the seas, we can almost cancel German and Austrian commerce, and it is. indeed, arguable that if, as one pro-German writer sug- gests, Germany make a very long struggle of it, we could capture the greater part of her trade-trade which so far as it is done with Germany's present enemies, or with the neutrals outraged by Germany, or with the British Colonies, mar be never ro- gained by the traders of the Father- land. IDLE FEARS DISSIPATED. Therefore, the picture ot Jaritisn economic conditions in the war is not nearly as black as it is painted by those who, because they,, hate our par- ticipation in the war, are allowing themselves the dubious privilege of disseminating alarms and of en- deavouring to create a condition of fear and panic which may deprive many people of their senses. Let the public, then, oppose these gentlemen, not only in respect of their most un- fortunate policy, but in respect of the idle fears which they are endeavour- ing to spread. It is not true that the country need come to a standstill; on the contrary, in a month's time the English Channel and the North Sea and the trade routes may be as safe as the Thames. It is not true that mill- ions are in danger of starvation; on the contrary, the Government can easily take steps to make it less diffi- cult for a man to starve in war than in peace.

Advertising

MASTERS' CLOTHING I First in 1867 I Foremost To=day MASTERS & Co. (CLOTHIERS), Ltd., 18 & 19 Castle Street 282 Oxford Street Swansea 3 Green Street, Neath 17 Sepney Street, Llanelly, etc. I

I Will it be a Long War I

Will it be a Long War I | People are asking how long the war will continue. Any time from three weeks to three years has been men- tioned. The time will depend, no doubt, on the rapidity of the military events, but it may depend still more on our naval grasp of the vitals of German commerce. Within recent years Gerv many has become more and more de- pendent on foreign sea borne sources of supply. She has changed from being chiefly an. agricultural country to one largely occupied in industries. Her i harvests will this year go unreaped, un- less women and children can do the work, and she will be deprived of her supplier of wool, cotton, hides, rubber, and a hundred other requirements of her industries. She can receive nothing ) from Russia, and Austria will require f everything she can grow or procure. Germany, in fact, is being shut in, chiefly by naval action. What social and economic convulsions will be caused we do not know, but they will cer- tainly play a large part in determining the close of the war.

No title

No news has been received from Pro- fessor Gwilym Davies, Aberdeen Uni- versity, who left for Servia some Weeks ago to collect material for his new book on the early races of Eastern Europe. Professor Davies is a native of Newport, and before his appoint- ment to Aberdeen was lecturer in history at the South Wales UniversityJ College.

Late Ystradgyniais Pastor in Bankruptcy Court

Late Ystradgyniais Pastor in Bankruptcy Court. On Tuesday, Mr. William Moelfryn Morgan appeared at Carmarthenshire Banyruptcy Court for his public examin- ation Debtor's liabilities amount to £6,067 4s. 7d., and he attributes his failure to "Taking over a business of which I had no experience; opening Tirfryn Colliery and Quarry; bad trade, bad debts, and pressure by creditors." Messrs. J. R. Williams and Co., Llan- dilo, appeared for debtor; Mr. Lilling- tan (of Messrs. Morgan Griffiths, Son, and Prosser, Carmarthen) for petitioning creditors; and Mr. David Roberts, Swansea, was present as trustee. Debtor stated that up to 1910 he waa for 25 years a Congregational minister at Ystradgynlais. In September, 1909, he purchased the business of a grocer, draper, etc., at London House, Bryn- amman, from the trustee in the bank- ruptcy for £ 1,770. He subsequently purchased the leasehold premises of Lon- don House, Brynamman, and the bakery at Llandilo Road, Brynamman, borrow- ing the purchase money from hia bankers, his wife providing the securi- ties. For six months he traded with J. R. Jones as manager. He had engaged other managers since. He had no know. ledge or experience of the buainess. He gave up the bakery business at Llandilo Road, Brynamman, in September, 1912. A year later he gave up the grocery business at Llandilo Road. In 1910 he opened up Tirbryn Quarry on his wife's property at Bryn Farm. Last March the quarry was valued at £ 2,875. Since September, 1912, he had been engaged in opening up and developing a ooal drift on the same property. The colliery was valued at £ 8,767. Debtor's bankers were a contingent creditor for an over- draft of £ 6,131 13s. 5d. This aooouat was secured by a guarantee of debtor's wife to the extent of £7,200 covered by a deposit of deeds of her property. Debtor said he sold book debta of the face value of £1,400 for L300 to a debt collecting firm. In April, 1914, he exe- cu ted a bill of sale an the furniture and effects at London House for an advance of L300. A portion of the furniture was the property of his wife. The Official Receiver Why did you gi,ve a bill of sale on property that did not belong to you ?-I was pressed for money to keep things going, and that was the only course open at the time. Apart from your w ife, you have been insol vent from the beginning? Oh! since I was born. (Laughter). I had no money of my own.

PLIGHT OF THE GERMAN SOCIALISTS

PLIGHT OF THE GERMAN SOCIALISTS. A correspondent from Paris writes: An English tourist from Cologne in- forms a Brussels colleague of mine that unexampled terror reigns throughout Germany, all the Socialists clubs being closed, Socialist meetings being for- bidden, and Socialist journals sup- pressed. All news from abroad is being subject to rigorous censorship. The German Socialist reading circle here. a very, old institution of the Ger- man Social Democrats, which is regu- larly affiliated to the German Socialist party, and may be regarded as ex- pressing the sentiments of their oom- rades across the frontier, has issued  a declaration to the effect that though its numbers are animated by an ardent love for their fatherland, they hate the criminal military Government of Berlin, which is attacking peaceful i nations, and they therefore refuse to fight their French comrades.

I COLONIALS TO THE FORE I

I COLONIALS TO THE FORE. 48,000 MEN TO BE SENT, AND THEIR NAVIES. • I Canada has offered 20,000 men, Aiis- tralia the same number, and New Zealand 8,000, and these offers have been gratefully accepted by the Government. In addition, Canada has offered the cruisers Niobe and Rain- bow for the purpose of commerce pro- jection and Australia and New Zealand, have placed their naval forces under the control of the Admiralty. The cost of the equipment, main- tenance, and pay will be defrayed by the Governments concerned. Reading detectives on Sunday arrested a German under the new Aliens Act, and it is stated that important papers dealing with military matters were found in his possession. His name is not yet dis- closed. He is known to be a person of good social standing. "We think," said the "Daily Citizen," on Monday, "that the present system of diplomacy is doomed. We think the mili- tary caste is doomed in Germany and elsewhere. It is yet too soon to raise and discuss these questions in detail. But we must begin to prepare for the new Europe and to shape the new ideas. We must see to it that democracy emerges stronger from the ordeal of blood and fire forced upon democracy without its knowledge or consent." With a view to maintaining as far as possible the aggregate volume of employ- ment the Development CommÎsSiioners de- sire to do everything within their statu- tory powers to make immediate avail- able the whole of the funds still unal- located1, amounting to nearly a million pounds. At the City Temple on Sunday, the Rev. R. J. Campbell, M.A., said Now is the time for us all to show what Christia,n fortitude can do. If we have real greatness of soul, it will become evident when want and misery, desola- tion and woe become the familiar oom- i anions of our everyday life, and level all the barriers of privilege. In the stern ti! that is upon us, let us stand by one Oliotiter t., the utmost of our resources, moral and material.

Advertising

lf £ "I  ?L?-?.'? <. ??? f6e ?e?ri of ??? ?? ? N?t?Y  ^0W mUS* ?tt/' ?? \???" ??? ??? MU?f o. 10 Qvoansea /y Wo prove it South Wales Transport Co., Ltd. Motor Coach Service BETWEEN Ynysforgan, Clydach, Pontardawe, YnysmndW, Godre'rgraig, and Ystalyfera. ALL CONNECT AT YNYSFORGAN WITH THE ELECTRIC CARS FROM AND TO SWANSEA TIME TABLE—22nd JUNE, 1914, UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. MONDAY TO SATURDAY. Leave YNISFORGAN: 8.30; 8.45; 9.15; 10.0; 10.50; 11.35 a.m:¡ 12,29; 12.55; 1.30; 2.5; 2.40; 3.15; 3.50; 4.25; 5.0; 5.35; 6.10; 6.45; 7.20; 7.66; 8.40; 9.15; 10.0; 10.40 p.m. :W' Arrive YSTALYFERA (Coliseum): 9.35; 10.20; 11.5.; 11.55 am. 12.49; 1.25; 2.0; 2.35; 3.10; 3.45; 4.20; 4.55; 5.30; 6.5; 6.40; 7.15; 7.50; 1.25; 9.0; 9.45; 10.35; 11.5 p.m. t Leave YSTALYFHRA (Coliseum) 9.40; 10.35; 11.18 &m; 12.5; 12.58;- 1.30i; 2.5; 2.40; 3.15; 3.50; 4.25; 5.0; 5.35; 6.10; 6.45; 7.20-; 7.S6; 8.30; 9.5; 9.55; 10.35; 11.10 p.m. An-if. YNISFORGAN 10.45; 9.50; 11.30 a.m.; 12.15; 1.10; 1.55; 2.35; 3.10; 3.45; 4.20; 4.55; 5.30; 6.5; 6.40; 7.15; 7.50; 8^5; 9.0; 9.35; M.10; 11.0; 11.40; 12.15; 11.45. SUNDAYS. Leave YNISFORGAN 12.15; 1.0; 1.50; 2.35; 3.20 4.10 4.56; 5.40; 6.30; 7-15; 8.15; 9.0; 9.45 p.m. < Arrive YSTALYFERA (Coliseum): 1.20: 2.5; 2.55; 3.40; 4.2&; 5.15; 6.0; 6.45; 7.35; 8.20; 9.20; 10.5; 10.50 p.m. Leave YSTALYFERA tcdisouni) 1.85; 2.10; 3.0; 3.45; 4.30; 5.20; 4.5-; 6.50; 7.40; 8.25; 9.25; 10.10; 10.56 p. In. Arrive YNIBFORGAN 2.30; 3.15; 4.5; 4.50; 5.35; 6.25; 7.10; 7.55; 8.46; 9.30; 10.30; 11.15; 12.0 p.m. In order to ifx time at int-modiate Halting plaam, add 8Ø iaU6im r— In crdefto Ax t.m? ? iatarm