Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

G. C. DEAN, The Tailor Studies his customeis by giving good value. First-Class Fit. Overcoats In Rainproof, Naps  and Cheviots, from 30/- to order ? or ready for Immediate wear. "Lierapnon" (regd.) Blue Serge. guaranteed to stand any climate, the Suit, from 37/6 to order. + During the War, Country Customers on *9 giving an oHer, return fare will be paid ♦ within 20 miles of Swrnsea. Railway J Ticket can be produced after the order J is given. J Please note the address- 22, Castle Street, Swansea.. .4

Advertising

 0 A. ? "i\tver Again 0 i —  PAGE 4. I + 0 0

THE UNAVOIDABLE WAR

THE UNAVOIDABLE WAR." •ANTHRACITE MINERS' AGENT CON- VINCED BY GERMAN AUTHORS. In reply to a Oetter addressed to Mr -John James, Miners' Agent, A nth ra- ..ci.te Dict-rict., by a working miner who was anxious to ascertain the views of Mr James upon the atititude of tihe Lalwur and Socialist movements to- wards the War, Mr James sent the following characteristic observations, which we are allowed to publish. NO FAITH IN DIPLOMATIC I METHODS. "As to mi opinion of the war and what led up to it within the diplomatdc circles of the nations involved, I must confess that I have never had any faith in the secret methods of ambassa- dors. diplomats and other servants of departments of States, who carry on their work heliind the backs of Par- liaments anid other respresentatrive as- semblies of the nations of Europe. Neither have I any faith in the attti- tude of capitalistic governments to- wards democratic movements, in Ger- many, France, Russia or England but with all its defects and shortcomings, -tille British nation has extended facili- tries, and even encouraged opportuni- ties, unparalleled in the case of the other States, forlitbe development of democrat rule and government; and it is in consequence of this attitude to- wards democracy, that the government can now so confidently refly upon the whodeheartedness of the industrial and political organizations of the working- .€lass to show a united front towards the German foe. BRITISH DEMOCRACY AND GER- MAN BOMBAST. Of this I am convinced, the bombas- tic teachings that have fed the Ger- man mind for years past, would not find acceptance among the British democracy to the extent that would enable t.ho military caste to flourish and subject social and national wel- fare to a spirit of pan-Britiahism in the manner it has effected in Germany. If you want a good dose of real Im- perial bombast, read "Germajiv and the next War" by General F. von Bern- hardi i.t will certainly help you to understand the attitude of the mili- tarist caste of Germany, and help you to find new meanings to the word "culture," "morality," "Christianity," and will define very minutely what von Bernheirdi meabv statements of this nature "Might is at once the supreme right," and "the dispute as to what is right is decided by the aibdtrament of war." "jusfc as increase of population forms under cer- tain circumstances a convincing argu- ment for war, so industrial conditions may comped the same result." These .a,.r,e a few of the "doses u that will, ihowever, give J10U a real taste of the stuff that has fed the German military «chool for a considerable number of Tears. It is as clear as their hatred of de- mocracy to me. that the Kaiser and litis clique were determined to win "world-powder or downfaill" through rivers of blood, aiid tli-e Prussian's "blood and i-ron policy was to rule red- liande(I over the destines of Europe, but for the timely action taken by Britain in ortteaing in-t-o theco-nfliet to thwart and crush for ever this monstrous spirit of destruction. WHAT IS NOW INVOLVED. I I believe with Will Crooks "that if Tife did not hang together in this arises, we would soon be hanged separ- idely" by t.be Prussian War Lord. It now remains for us to see the horrible business through, find the industrial -organisations must prepare themseftjres for the tiTTle when the policy of "blood and iron* wiJl for ever be crushed, and see to it that it will not be trans- • planted nor allowed to spread among the nations involved for I believe the -down-tbi-t)iN- of militarism itself is now involved in this conflict, and t, t the domoenwv of Germany will ultimately thenefit uanl with those of the other ,naticrns of Europe. STILL FURTHER INFORMATION. I If you want further ii),form-atdon in iregard to tihe "culture" off Germany and the lioiyid teac-bings of her learned men. spare a few coppers to buy "Pan-Germanism" bv R. G. Usher, and "Germany's Swelled Head" by Etnil Ileicih, besides the firebrand Semihard i. and you will soon be con- vinced. as I am, not only by the per- usal, of the now famous White Paper of our own Government. but the Ger- mans themselves- I did the same thing -during the Boer War fifteen years ago, for I wanted to understand the view- point of the Boers as well as that of our then Governmenit, and formexl .opin,iom which you then shared with ine lIP heartily. I feel confident if you read the above books written by Ger- (maM for home and oolonial consump- tiÍon, you will soon be convinced of the inevitability of this War, and of the necessity to see it through in the interests of the democracy of Europe. «Ooia.r.u«d 'lot JtJl Will {le.I column

THE UNAVOIDABLE WAR

(Ow tin tied from preceding column) I ULTIMATE BENEFIT TO EIROP- EAN DEMOCRACIES. I share with you the opinion that it will afFecrt our social and political as- pirations for a considerable time to oome,. but I hold to the belief that the ultimate result will very materially benefit the democracy in their advance- ment towards the control of the governments, and the prevention of armaments' trusts and fomenting of racial hatred so commonly practiced by financially interested persons among t3ie nwtioM. WE MUST, PAY, PAY, PAY! I I ana aJso in entire agreement with vour view as to the diky of the Government towards those brave fellows who are risking their lives and limbs in the service of the nation, and will go further than you suggested, by demanding the imposition of a tax of 15s. ia the £ on all incomes over £1,000, and 10s. in the £ for incomes of over P,500, in ordefr to pay com- pensation for loss of life and 1.imb equal to the wage-incomes, and family Obligations of cach soldier wjho loses his life or is disabled durinig the War. If the Government had passed a short Bill to this effect. in the same manner as they passed their Moratorium Bills I doubt whether it wouM be necessar y I for tJhem to connJuct a Recruiting Cam- paign in the manner thev do, for tihe whole able-bodied manhood of our nation would come forward to defend I the country and to crush tihe common enem., of democracy1—militarism,—in t'llb conflict. I

GLAMORGANS QUOTA

GLAMORGAN'S QUOTA MAGNIFICENT RESPONSE I 24,500 MEN RAISED FOR I KITCHENER'S JLRMY Glamorgan's quota to Kitchener's New Army keeps on augmenting every day. On Tuesday it reached the mag- nificent total of 24,500. Apart from the splendid contribution it has made to the Army, the county has made up the shortage of about 1,100 men in the County Territorial Force at the outbreak of war, and furnished be- tween 2,000 and 3,000 men for the Re- serve or home service units which are now being raised for the Territorial Force Tlw mosrt brisk recruiting at present it going on in the Rhondda, where. Mr D. Watts Morgan, the well-known miners' agent, is redering yeoman ser- vice to Major Lucas, the chief staff re- cruiting officer, in raising the two Rhondda battalions of the Welsih Regiment. The special consideration which Lord Kitchener has shown this district in permitting men to enlist at a reduced standard height is meeting with great commendation and approv- al by the miners, who are rallying daily to the colours in large numbers. Cardiff has also no reason to feel dissatisfied with the response that is bedng made h:, the young manhood of the city. BOIth at the headquarter station at Park-place and at the Lab- our Exchange, Custom House-street, there has been a steady stream of re- cruits ever since Saturday, and in the words of one of the recruiting ofifcers, "Cardiff is beginning to reap some benefit from last week's two great recruiting meetings addressed by the Prime Minister and Mr Lloyd George." Major -Liicas toM a reporter that at the present time they were recruiting for Kitchener's Army about 300 men a day in the county. "We are not doing badly," he added, "but if the standard was lowered, a-z bar, been done in the Rihonddla. anid at Swansea, I feel confident tlnat we would receive several hundred more recruits daily."

GERMANS CAPTURE MINERSI

GERMANS CAPTURE MINERS I COALOWNER WHO PAID 212,000I RANSOM. Miners from Farciennes, near Charle- roi, proceeded to Antwerp to report to the Belgian Government on what has passed in their village. All the men left in Farciennes, 260 in number, were made prisoners by the invaders and carried off to the village of Fleurisse. The Germans then ap- proached the men's employer, M. Henin, a. wealthy coalowner, and demanded a heavy ransom. To save the miners from further ill- treatment M. Henin is said to have paid over a sum of jEl2,000, and the prisoners were released.

APPLE SOLD FOR SO GUINEAS

APPLE SOLD FOR SO GUINEAS ( A single applet fetched E55 under the hammer at Covent Garden on Wednesday —a record price surely for a record specimen. Grown by Colonel J. F. Honey ball, the apple weighed 31 ounces and had a girth of 17in. Doubtless the fact that the proceeds of the sale were to be devoted to the Prince of Wales's Fund influenced the price, but there were other apples bought for the same laud- able purpose which realised quite ordi- nary prices in comparison.

Advertising

? I11 t. ??. :?-. ?- -1 -1 I  ?? z-e- .?:,?.?:i:i:"?:?:?, :?- ?-i. r?, ?' '?* .I.?. ?- ?. i::????::?*i?i???i???.??i?i?i??:ii?i?????:?:?:7-j:?-?:?:?: i:i??:i::??:??::?:??:?????::?* ?. -7.' -?. :?i;:i??:?:???i:?-?::???ii:?:1,.1, @A.  -?, Ai .i: .7:i. ? ,?.? 4? :ii??:???..?? ?: i: :i: .? ??j :?:? ??l i? ??: -? ?:? .:? ..? i: .-? ?. .? .i ??i ?i :??:??:??ii?ii??i?????i???i.]?.i.??.i.?'i.i: i?' ::?:?:?:?:j:?:?.?:i:??i:i::?::i:i:i"i:?:?:? ?,???:?:?. -?. ?l- j: ?:: :? -? :? .?.?i.?- ?: ?: ?:? ?: :7,: :?: ?.?., i? ?;. i. ?':?: j: :? :?: :?, :? .? ?..?: ''?: .?..i:.?. .?:?:?:?:?:? -?:i: -.?: .i:?:] :?. ..?. Y 1$, i  ,) ?i? .?? ?.L" -?- ?.- -7=====r-43 fIlI? ??.,?. ?.. i: :? ::?.: :? :? :? :? ;?** -:? :i :?:?: ?:?: ?: j: ::? j:? .?.: .?*' -i?????????i?:??:?:?::??,i::?????i???:?- ,:?:7,  ?, .) x.?. *i' ,? .?: ,"i 'k4. .?: :?- ?:?: :?:j-*?:i.?.???:i.?':?:?:?.?:?,?:j-j:?:?:?.:?, .i: :H:?:H::j:??:?:?:j:?:?:j:?:?:?.?:j:j.?.i:?.j.?. ".? ?. ?.?-? :?. .?:i:?:i.?.?:?.i:?:?:?-?.. ?.II?.. ?, I I,  .:??i' .?? ?. '?: :?: ]: :?::? :?: i.:? .?i:?:???.. :i:?:?i:?:i?:??:?.?.:???:?i?.?: .:? :? :? :?- -?:? :? :? :? :?  ?: .?. ?. .?. ?! .I.I. 1. ?. 11 '?. y -??. ? ?.? ,'?.r. ??.  I I 11 I ,:?. :?: :? :? :?: i: ,? ?: ?: ?: i?? ?: ?:: :?: :? i: :i:?:?::j:-?:?:?:?. :i:?:?:j:?:i. .?.?-?.?.. .i.?..??.?:? .I- ,.I '?,,?,.?,. .?. ?:"?.-?: 1, I ,?:??; .?.?.?.' .?.?'?-?.?: ,i:?:?:?:?:k. ,?, ,?*?,????::?:?: :?- i?? i, ?i .?:?-?: .? I ?. I.?". :?? ,? ?. :?: ?:?:?: ?:: i: .?. .?. :?:? .?  ?: ?: ?: ?: ?: ?., .:?: .?-. :i i. ?:?. I. :? .? ,"?:?:' .?'?:?:?:?.?:  .?. .I:?:?i,,?:?i:??i:??:??:?:?:?:?:?, ?.I .I. ?. ?, ?. ,?- :? ?: ?I: i:?*?. :? .?:?.?,. j:?: .? .:?:??:?]?::?????.' ??:?::iii::?i?????::i??i:i????::?]?.?? .'i?:?:?????:?::?- '?, ,cz, ? :?:?. i:? :?:i ?: ?: i; ?: :? ?: '?,  :?.   I  .l?:i:?i:?.?:?:?:?:?:?'' .?-?.- .?: ?: ..?-?:??:?-?:?:?:?:?' ,?:?-?:??- ?- :? j: II  ?I A )I I I ,? .?:?.??i??:???,?????::i:???:? ?: ,?: :?. I?. '?.? i:?i:?i:?: I ?. ,?.? ?:??:: i* :? 4 47? i. ?,:?:??  ?:? ?. ??.?: ?" :? i? ?:? :? .? .??.i??:?., .i:??:?: :? ,?*:? ??: ?:- .1 ?- ?.???? ?:- _?_- ??, ?1. i::     ?; ?: -? :? .'? ?: ?- ':? :? :? i:: ?: :i?:?:?:???i.. i:???, ,i??:??, ,???:?' .L-.2. = = ,?'?. -1. -??-?- ?? :?: ,.? .?. ..1.? I .1 1 l?? :1.  "I ?: i: j:? ?: .?:?:?:?.?: :? ?: :? ?: ?: .? ?: .?.?- ? :I. ?., I ?, ?.? ??: :? ,?:: i? .?. ?. ???.?  :?:7 :?'?? :? .i.i.? i: ?: m i, ?.- -.???ii????i?:?i?i???????'?? -?. ::i,?:?': "'7 i: ?: i: ?: :??:i:?, :?:?,?:?????i???i?:??: ,?:?? ????i?*??i' '??, .?.??. ,;? I. I. -I .? :?.' .'sh.? "?????:?'??:?::?:????: l :i: ?:: ;:? i:? ?: ?: :? .?:I. .I.?.I ,?.? .?. (.. .,? ?.  ?? :? ?: ?:  i: ?: :j :j: i ?*  ?? ,?, i?:?, :i :?: ?: ?:? ?: -.?: ?: ?: ?- K ,? ??.? .I. ?r.- I- 1.I '??:? :?: ?-: :?:???' ?.  i?   ii?? i?  i? ?. I- .?.?. ?, .I. ??:?   ?.. I.I ?.? ,-?. -7:I. ?,? .?. .?.I- :?  i? ?. .?   :i  i: :?: I ? ?.. .?,  1-1- V ::7, .:? -? ?: :? I  :?. .? ?- 1' .? 1. I.. ??, .? :? '? .?.?I-" -? ?, ?i ?.?. ?. ?: -?: i- :??:?:j?:?:?.?: ?, ?i  :?:?. .?.?.?:?.?. ::i,?,??:?:?,?:?.. -?  ?:: .?: -? /1  I., ??, .?:?* ,??,.?,???. ,-? -?: -] .I.* .I T-Z ?- -??-? i .?. I .I '?  :?? $ ?: ?: ?: ?:  1. ?- I- -? I-" *?- .i?i:?.???i:???'?:?:?,i:?:?.?,i:?:?-j:?:?:? ? (  .il -1??\\v I11/ ) ?. .? :?, :?.. .-?. ?: :?? i? i? ii ?: ?. i? ?. ?. I. II ?, .?:?:?*??:?.,7: .?.? .??. ??.  -1 ?- :7: ?: .?:.??.i?*??' .?: .?:??i?,??????..?ii??i?i, -.i:?i?ii:?:i??:??"* ?.. ?.I- 11-? .? ?.?.?: -I. ?. ?: ..? .? ]: :?, i ?. ?. -I ?, -? ?' ?..1. -'?.W--?--l-i?.?7-??-pC '?,- (,.I,?. I ..?. ?? ?: ?.:?- :? .?. ? ??-? :? i?,  .?? ?.? ,? ?.I *I "01*1- 1.?' 1. .1? .? ?. I. j, :?: .?.i:?:?.?.? .I' .? e.i- :.1 ..?* I.. ..?:?:?:i:i:?:?-?:?:?:?:?:j??:i:?-?:?j-' A, i** I. ?- i. ?. I ?: ,?. "I :I i,. I. ?:. '?, ::? .?: ??:: :?  i I: I.(I ?. ?. ..I ?. I. :?  ?-. tI.  ?: :? I.? I ? I t \t ]:? ?: ?:: :? Iii '0  -1. ,.?- o,- o ]::?:??. .i??]?i:??.i??: -?i?:??].F.?i?,.?.. ..i???i]?i?i??i.?.?.?.?? li.?. 4I- -I X ?.- ?:?7?:??????????????: .:?i?i.i:??:????i?i??::ii?i??:,i-:?: .?:? :??? :?- ?:i :?, ]:?%?, :?: ?- ?: ?::? *:? :?: ?: :? l.&k-???,?:??:iii:?::??:??:?-?. :?:i! llili,rillilli'llililll I. I.- .? ?: *? ::? ?: ?,?:j:?:?:?:?:?.:?:?.?:?:?.?:?:? i:4.????'?i.?' .i??:??*7.?: .?/ ??\ .4 -? ,?. .Y'  1 ?', //I1- ,?-? /Ii .:? ::?  :?: -?:??, .????:i??i?:???:?:??:?:????i??? ??, ?: ?: I ",I .? 11 ,?? .?:??:?.:j-?:?:i: ,?: i: .?.I,?-- I/4"1. I ? I ?: -?: ?:? :??. :?:. I *??:?::?, i?  ?: i? ?.. ?. N .?:??:?.?.? ) ?. .I. .?..?V.?. .II I- 1 'I. :?, () ?? )I ?:? ?: ?: ??::??::i ?:??"???::??: ::?:N7\\?-?::?"?:: :?: ??:,? i:?: ?:: 1,44 k,R 9: :?. ?:: ::? :-IMUW  ::I i:: :7:: ::?: I :?:?: ?: I??:: ::?? (?t ?i  ) -mr.-w e :?)c "??s ;? A- :??I ? I'   I ;) I I -I I? ?, Ir l, 1-?- -4 ???. I  0  -?- 7 ?,ni f ?- 11 ) ? ,( I I (At.? 4 Dr  I :?. f ?- I 1 ) ?, .? ?- ?, ':? ?- i?.:  ?:?, 1-6. ? +. k a ..?.? .?:?:?: :?.?? .Il -? ?: ?- :? :? :?:7-?-?::?:i ?1; 1 .? .?.  .i:?- .,??.?? i ,?: *?:?:j:?:?:?:j:?:?:  .?,?,??, -.? .?- :.?:?*?.?.?:?:l.?:i:?:i:i.?:?:i:i:?,"i:?:?:?:?:?: .? -i:?.?:?.?.?:??:?:?: ?:i???-?:i:i?i:?:?:?:i: .i:?:i:i.:i:i:i?i::?: .?.?.?-?. ?: '7?'*7*'77*a? i, ????i-?:?: :?:?:?. .i? .?.?.? I.i-?.??l.: :?.:?. -?. .? .? ?.  Ii ? .1! r. .7. ..F.?.?.?.??.?. *i: ?- ?, ?.. :? :?5.:? :? :?: *i: ?: :? ?' .1 0 :?  .?: .?: .?. -?- X- I ?, I .? :? ??.?:- :77:]:?:: :i:: ::?? ??.??  -'?.* :?? :? .T: ?:. E??? ?: ?:? :? ?. i.: ?. ,? ?:' ?: :? ?:, ?:? ?. :i:?? i,. :?,t, w.. ..? .?: .? ??*. .?..  .I. :??: .?:  -.?. :? .?:? :?: :? ?.? ?::  ?.?* .?. :??. -? i:i: :?:i -?:?:?:j:??:?:j- .? .? ?: ii.i .:? :?:. g.?? ..i ..?Y .??:: -??:t:  ??.i ,?:?  :?:??,X% .?:?:j:?: -j:j:?:?:?:?:??:ii. :? ?: ?i???? .I .I. .I.. .?. ?. ?*: ??.* :? :??i ::? :? ?: i:i :?. .?.i:?.i:?-?:?:?:?:?:?:!??-?.?. .'?., '.?, .:j: j:?: ?:? .:?:?:i: i:? :? :?:?:?:i :???: :? ? i ?.' :?: :?7 '?:' .?: .:i :?. .7.:?:?: .?..??. ?. O 'l i  .,i.:i-?-?,?:??i?.:??i?:i?,?. ..?..? ?  ,?:i"Y*?:?:?:?:i:i:?: +: ?.I, -???. ????:??? i ?:iIl- ? i: )  1 ?, :? .?:?. ?:? :? ?: :?: ?: 10 .? .?. .?..?. ?- ?. .A ? I ?: :? ,?. ':?: ]:?: :? ::i ?*?.?, :.i.?. ?, :j:. :?. ::i??i:: =. -4 4 "O ,?: -,f/,7,,1!  ;4?'?' ,?4. i??ii??i? .? it, :]. i: :] :? :?, *.?' i' ,?- i.  i?  ?,??:,?: ?.:i:?:??:??.i:??.???:i'?:???:?.:?::?:.??:?:. ? ii** ,I.? ?. :?:i.??: ???: .*i?iiH: :? 4 t a. ?-, ?. ??. ?: ?: .? ?; i??????:??: ?,- j?? ?. .?: ::?. l?? ?:. ?:?::?:j::?:?:??:?::?:-?:i:?: ??:: ??:,??.. j: .I. ?: ? -? 4I')i ??:???::?:?::?, ;7i"?????:?,?ii:?::??7. i: j:] :? ? j: ::? ? ?: "?:?:?:?:?:?:. .?.?. .? ?, Z-*?v,,) I'll ..?- I" ?.. ,? t 1 i: ?: .?. I' :?:?:?.??:?:j:?.j-?:?.i.?:?: :? ?:* ?:?.?:?:?:?:?.?. .?? :?", :?:?: ?: i:?i?: ?.?: ?:? :?:?:?: ?: :?:j: j:?:? :i: ?:? ?, .9- ,?. ,?: :? :?: .?-?:?:?:?:?:j?:4i?ij:?,???,?:?*??.?::?:?:?:??..i?:: .???i'i.?.'ii.*H:??.i????:?:i:?::?:i7,?::?:?:i:?:i:?:i::?j:]:?:?:i:? :?:?:j??????:?: i:?".  ? ) V :???::?:?:??:??.?? ?. ?: .?.?: .?.??:, :? ?: :i ?:? l? ?: ?:?:?: :? :?:??:?:ii i :?:????::?:ii: :?::?! ?: ?: :?: i: :? :?: ?:?: ?:: ?:y .?:?"?:?:??:?.?:-?*i.i.:?i-:?:4:i:.?.i,:?"l.i?']i?i:?i?i?i?..?????i?i.ii?.?., ..?:?:?"?:?.? .?. .:?.?:?. .:? :?: ?-?- E??: Iz ?'"??:??::?:i:i:i:i:?:?:i:?:?:?:?:?::?:?::?:?:?:?i?,i:?:i:.i; ?., i?*i. :?: i-,?.. .??? ?5. i?? ?:? .? :? :?: :? j-?:?:?:?:i:?:?:?:?:?:7.?:?:j:?:i:?l?:?-?: ::?:4. ?t ??: :?..  :.?:.?: .?:.?- .i.?.- .i.?'- .?:- .?: :??.?:?: .?:?:?: "?:?.?.?. I., ?: "?:?: .??? .?-?i???i? ii- .????Hi?. .?: .?. ? N?" ,'?,;I\ :? .-?. ?-. -"? -?:, *?: :?. .,i :i-. .-?-  :? .???  :? .?:?t:?:?. ?*?:?- :,Z?: i: :i ?-. .:?  :?:?:?:?:?' .?.?.?. ?:?:?: .? ?. 1 t: *?. :.?: .'?   :? :?: -? :? i:i :? :?:? ?. ?":? :?-?: ?., :i ? :I* ;? .?  :? i, :? :?:?:j:? :i :H:?: i??, ?.??// *I. ?: i' ?: :i, .?! l' :?: :? :?: :j :i:?:j:j: .?:i:ii:?*i:?- ..?.  .-? .? ?i.?:?:??- -?,?-?:i?: I ?..? 1 f ,I,, ?I, I .i. ?.. .? ,?:?-?:?.?.: ?? /1 C, I/V i ?-. ?" .? .:? 'i::???????????.:?:???i????:?. I.?? ?:? -???i..??:?:????i?i?:?????:?:?:i.?,?.?:?:?. :j:?.?'?.?,- K :i :? :? :?: :? -?.:?; ?j ?: ?:?:?:?'?:?.: :? ?: :?:j ?, ?: :?:  :j ?.: ?.?: *i:.?, .j: j: :?. .?:?-. .?.?.?..?.?.?,:?:?. .?.??.l, .I' ??'?.l.?' k?. *? .?. .I. ?, ?"* .,? ?-' ?. ?. ?: ?: i. ?:?, ?* ::? :? ?' ?: :?:j:?,i:?:?':?:?:?:i:?:j:?:j:?: j: ?: ::?:: ?- ?: ??.?: :? ?: ?: i:?: :? ?: -.i:?: .?:. :i:?:? ?*. ??. i: i. :?:* ?: :? ?: :? ?: -.?..?.: -?:?,i:?: ,?:?: :i: :?: ?, ?: :?: ?: i" .?i* .I-  I i??.7 -i*,i:?*???"?'??:?l:?.?'i??.  :.?.?:?::1,?:?::?:i:,??:?:?:i:i:?:?:?:?:?-?. .?.'? '?:?,?.???.?.?:?:?:?-?:?:?:?:j:?:i:?:7- i:.? ?,?j:?:?:i:i. -?:?:??? .-?:j:? ,? ?:'?),?' .?:- -?: :j., ,i:i:?:j?:i:?:]-j:?- .?:?:?:?:i:i:i.?-.?.? -?..??-?-j.?.?-?-?.?.j. .J.,0.1?1. .? ,7 I  ?"??.i.i:?..?.? i-?: l"?: i.??: :?.: :?. ?. ?- '?: ?', ..?: .??i:?-?:?-i:?: .?: ?.??,. ?, ??, i! :i: ?:? i:  ?! .?:? ?: "?: :?? ?.i :???,* *i :? ,??  :?.. :i :? j K :? :?:i:H:: ?: j-?.:i :?:3 :?:?: ,? ,?? ,:?.,?:i"?::?::i. ?. :?,?:??.  ?: i?:?: ?. ?: :? .?:i. .i::i:?:?:?:?:?: "?  I ?:, .? i: ?: :? ?: ?: :j:? ?:? ??,,t* ?: ?:Y.  i:. .?:? k ?: ?: ?: .? ?: ?,  .?? ?:? ,?: ?, :??: :?:j ?:?:i :.?.?:?:?:??:?-?:?:?:???-" -7: .i ?' -?.. ?. ? .?. ??????H i???i??." ,.???i!?:?*?:?i ??* :??  .?. :?: ? 4 1, Ie- :i. I.. I .I  ? ?.-?:?:i:?.?:?:?*?*?:?:?:?:?-?: .:?:?:?::?:?.?:???'?:?.,?::?,?-?:?.?:?.i.?.? .?:i ,?:?,i:?:i:i:?:i:?:??,?:?.?.:j.-?:i:?: .?????:?:?.?:?.i:?:?'?,i:?:?'i.- 'i:?:???:?i????i???:i??-??i???.???:??:?iii???i????*?ii?i:?i?i?.- .??????.?' :?:i:??:"?i:??: i:?: ?: j:?: :i., .??,?:? ?: ?: i: :? ?:?:"i: .?:?:?:?:?-?:? ?.'?.?: ? :? ?'  :? ?: .?? .?. .?:j:?:?.?:?:j:?.j;j:j:?::?j:?:?:i:? -?:i:?:?:?:?:?'i?-????:?.:iii?ii?i?i*?i??i?j??:???:?:?:?.?:j:?:?:?:i.?: :?: ?: j:j ?.: ?: ?:? ?  ?* .?:i:i.?:?:j:?:?%?: ?-? ?: ?: *?, ?7 ?- ? ?:?: ??* ?*   ??????i:???:?????i???ii????:?:?.i??:?-. .?.i:i:i:?:i: :?:?:?:?:?:?:??:i:i:?: ?:: ?.' *i:?:i:i??,i: -+:+: ?:? i:? :I ?' :?" ?* ;il il .? :t ,?. :?*i??: ?:i: i:?" rv .,I. ::?.:?:?:.1:?.?-6.?.?.I I ?:?    ?, -?,?:?:?:i?i:i:i?"i:?:?. .YY.?-?-.?. -Y. i:? :?  .i??. 'i*?,:i:i: ?:?  ?? I.. L I. I.. -???- ?. .? = I 4 .? ?- I .?.iiii:?:?:iiii:?. :i: ?: j: ?: :?'? i: ?:? :? "?,?-?,?::?:?:?:?:?:i:??.i?:?:?:??\.? ?.?::?::?:?:?:i:i::?.i:i:i:??: :?' .?. :.?.??. Y??i?i.,?ii?i???]??.?.?.i?.?.?.??'' .?? i???*i. '?' ",I I:?.- *?* .Y.I  ?i :?:- H????????.??:i,- .]?. .??:?-  .?, .? :?. -?,.?- .?. .??.????ii?i?i??:??i?:?i:??'   Z O I L,2 i .?.?. I THE GOD IN TjTuxm v (WAR) MACHINE First 'Hi6(yh Pri-st at Potsdam (readin 9 of reverses ) Gott im Himmel! What if this makes our people disbelieve in our God on Earth.

NOTES and COMMENTS

NOTES and COMMENTS. TO-DAY. I met a. smiling Welshman Just by Trafalgar-square, Said I, "Hello there, Taffy, Are you off to do and dare?" Said he, "I am ne Taffy Whateffer, n8 indeed! To-day I am a pull dog Off the good old British breed. I've just seen Sandy Tawsh As I same along the street In a brand new suit of kilties And a sporran trim, and neat. Said I, "My word, young Sandy, You're a son of Scotland true;" Said he, "Hoots, AW'Jn no Scottie! I'm a, Britisher the noo. I saw young Pat McGinty And I said to him, said I, You're Irish to the backbone And you will be till you die." Said he, "In peace Qi'm Irish, —Shure Oi cannot get away, But now the storm-clouds gather Oi'm a British man to-day. W.B. in the "Daily Citizen." I found an interesting reminiscence, by a correspondent, in "The West- niinster Gazette," of the great Inter- national Congress at Basle in 1867. There had been a keen discussion on the state control of education, and Liebkneoht (father of the present Dr. Liebnectht), representing the German ,gee-ialists, had vehemently op- posed state control. The cornespon- denit, was much surprised at this, and when the opjxvrtunity caw he asked Liebnecht privately for an explana- tion. "Sooner or later," said Liebkneoht, "Prussia, which now dominates the North German Confederation, will be paramount throughout Germany, un- less Bavaria under Catholic influence atands apart. Prussia will staff tih« primary schools, the Gymnasia, and in I a great degree the Universities, with teachers of her own moulding. These have already been cast in the same mould, and within fifty years all Ger- mans who have been educated during that. period will think alike—and will become unconsciously deprived of all individual views or personal opinions. They will think as their teachers speak ajnd their teachers will receive their orders from Berlizi-the seat of all pro- motion and reward for them. What their orders will be, what influences wi(I dominate the Ministry of Public Instruction, I do not know, nor would I care to foretell. Of this, however, you may be certain, wifcat Berlin de- cides the German schools will have to accept. That was far t*o sweeping a state- ment, but the Labour leaders of the United States have a much, harder row to hoe than we Have. A large number of the manual workers of the United States are unable to speak English. Mr Stephen Graham, has just published a book on America in which he repro- duces the following election circular: Balsok ant John J. Casey. Hlasujte na John J. Casey. Gdosujgie na John J. Casey. Votate par John J. Casey. Vote for John J. eagey. Labour Candidate for Congress. John J. had tackled a pretty staff pro- position in a polyglot electorate of the kind indicated by the cipoular. Recently a man who has travelled I a great deal told me of a project to send a number of persons prominent in the poliHioal, literarv, social, and religious life of this country to the United States to acquaint the Ameri- can public with the case for Great Britain in the present war. I sug- gested that a number of trade union leades should be included in the Mis- sion, but he curtly dismissed the sug- gestion. "The trade unions have no i-nflueme OR the public life of the | United States/' he said. The Press Bureau is being belaboured for not giving the public more news. The reason given, and accepted, for the meagreness of its communications, is that facts useful to the ene.m. must not be made public. There is another And a. more cogent reason. If the whole truth about this war were told civilised nations would scrap their armaments to-morrow, The war has produced some fair-to- middliilg poetry, bat little in the way of masterpieces. We must, however, make one exception. Australia has pro- duced a National Anthem fo. itself, and we reprod uce below one of the most im- pressive verses of a singularly inspiring production Fellers of Australia! Cobbers, chaps and mates Hear the- enemy, Knocking at the gates! Blow the —— bugle, Beat the —— drum, Upper-cut and out the swine To Kingdom Come. It will be seen that the "Llais" censor has severely handled this flower of Aus- tralian verse.

I WHAT THE KAISER FORGOT

I WHAT THE KAISER FORGOT A Philadelphia, U.S.A. contemporary, dealing with the warof nations and the remarkable manifestations of loyalty that have asserted themselves all over the British Empire by land and sea iw not to be reckoned solely -in terms of battle- ships and armoured cruisers, aeroplanes and submarines, batteries of artillery and regiments of guardsmen, and impregnable coast defences. Her imperial riches and Yeaouroes are chiefly in the abundant pro- vision her Colonial dependencies afford and the loyal willingness of the people of the provinces to give without stint in the crucial hour." The Kaiser envied the the aforesaid "Colonial dependencies," and he forgot to include in his calcu- lations their devotion to the mother country.

WALES HELPS BELGIUM

WALES HELPS BELGIUM. PROMPT RESPONSE TO BRUSSELS APPEAL. ( —— Wales has shown this week a most prompt and generous response to an urgent appeal for aid for Belgian wounded. On Momcfey afternoon the Secretary of the Welsh Insurance Com- mission at Cardiff received from his friend Professor Wexweiler, president of the Sociological Institute of Brus- sels University, an urgent appeal to send clothinjg and comforts for the use of several thousand wounded soldiers who were being sent from Antwerp to coast towns and villages in the neigh- bourhood of Osteoid. Prof. Wexweiler begged earnestly fot a large consignment, and suggested about 30,000 articles. The secretarv of the Welsh Commission at once com- municated the appeal to his chairman, and together they, took immediate steps tb enlist local support- Mrs. Marcus Paterson, wife of the director of the King Edward Welsh National Memorial, and Mr Polderman, a Bel- gian refugee now resident at Cardiff, had collected several hundred pounds by miid-day on Tuesday. Through this money, supplemented by gifts from the Red Cross Society and from Queen Mary's Guild, the Hon Violet Douglaa Peninanit, the Lady Cammissdaner for Wales, obtained all the necessary articles, and got them ,I night,. Mi,% Ten together by Tuesday; night,. Miss Ten- nMllt accompanied them to Dover, and saw tflie whole consignment safely on board the steamer late on Tuesday night., the Admiralty providing special transport facilities. This welcome Welsh gift, consisting of over 30,000 articles, including blankets, socks, jackets, flannel, slippers, underdoth- inig, was on tihe quay at Ostend on i Wcdssjsdaj mcriiing.

PENSIONS FOR WAR DEPENDENTS

PENSIONS FOR WAR DEPENDENTS. EXPOSURE OF A SCANDAL CALL FOR MORE GENEROUS TREATMENT. The other day, Mr G. H. Barnes, the well known Labour M.P. wrote a letter to the "Daily Citizen" calling attention to the* grossly inadequa-te pensions that had been and were still being, paid to the widows and defend- ants of those men killed in their coun- try's service. "What," Mr Barnes asks, "is the amount upon which we should ask a woman to live whose husband has been taken from her in fighting for the n'ation ? And what is the amount which we should pay to a man who may come back from the war nodnus a leg or an arm? The indications of the Govern- ment's mind on these questions are not reassurin g. MR JOHN HODGE. M.P. MAKES A STRONG STAND. Interviewed in London on this highly important matter, Mr John Hodge. M.P., said: "Those of us, whether physically fit or not who for any. cause have not gone to the front ought to realise tlwiA the men who a.re there, many of whom will come back broken, should never be permitted to wamt. If they do not come back those who have been dependent' upon them should be adequately provided for. Thote of us who are safe at home should grudge no tax that is necessary to supply them with a suitable living. "The widows and the children must be looked after as they have never been before in the history of this coun- try. If it doubles the income tax, I am willing to pay. I have declared at every recruirting meeting that I have been at that I will support any proposal of such a character, and that 1 shall condemn anything that is in- adequate. "I recognise to the full that the Government have their hands full at present with emergency legislation. I am not sure that it is not a good tbint "hat they have not made any definite pronouncement, therefore because it gtives public opinion an opportunity to express itself, and so strengthen the hands of the Government. MR A. HENDERSON, M.P. STATES A REASONABLE MINIMUM. Mr Arthur Henderson associates him- self with Mr Barnes with regard to the importance of the Government at once producing their scheme of pensions for widows of soldiers killed during the I war. also the oompemsatxvn to be paid to those soldiers permanently or tem- porarily di gabled. "The Government," he says, "can only alki, y a vast amount of uneasy feeling by promptly dealing with this subject, on lines commensurate to the services rendered, and having regard to tihe wealth of the nation in whose service lives have been lwt or serious- ly injured. "During the South African war a scheme of pensions on a flat scale of 5s. from Government funds was estah- lished. This amounrt: was augmented by the Royal Patriotic Association. It is to be hoped that the prpnt of the Sontih African war will not be followed so far as the amount of the flat rate is concerned. It is altogether inadequate, and has led to mnny of the cases that no ci tizen cares to hear about of dependents of our soldiers finding themselves unable to continue the home and who have l>eetn com- I pelled to have recourse to the poor law, or, as is so often seen in our streets, disabled so ldiers for lack of propei- support are to b found begging aJms while decorated with the medals secured in the services of the State. "A more reasonable allowance should be given to every soldier's or sailer's widow based unon a minimum of 10s. for the wife and 2, for each c-Iiild. If this were done the Royal Patriotic Fund Association would only 1 e ro- qnired to augment the pension in very exceptional cases. The question of disablement should be considered with I some regard to the piple of work- men's compensation.

I THE MUSE AND WAR

I THE MUSE AND WAR This war, like every othtr in mode; n times, has been responsible for a con- siderable amount of activity among the poets. Some of the results have been e4reelleiit, irtqmy have beeb indifferent, ..jid more had better be left undescribed. The men in the camp have even provided themselves with marching choruses by the way of variation on "Tipperary," which their French comrades have found it difficult to translate. The Canadians at Valcavfcier Camp wiareh aloirg to the rhythm of the following For we're going to the Hamburg Zo?, Hamburg Zoo. I To see the elephant and wild kiligar,-o, leaner roo. And we'll all ftick together In. all kind M weather. j For