Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CHRISTMAS IN A HOSPITAL

CHRISTMAS IN A HOSPITAL. AND A NOTE ON ARMY COOKS. By W. S. COLLINS. Writing from Somewhere In France, Pte. W. S. Collins, R.A.M.C., formerly chief reporter of "The Labour Voice," -says It being Christmaa- week I ought to take the opportunity of wishing every- body the compliments of the season, and right heartily I do so. Out here we know very well that the people at home will be thinking of us and talking of us round the Yuletide fire. We know too, that the ever-generous British public will have sent out load s of gifts, and I am sure they will be received thankfully. I have a pretty shrewd idea, of how I shall fare on Christmas Day, and how my comrades in the trenches will fare. It will be a queer, queer Christmas, and I can think of quite a few places where the season can be better spent than in the North of France. But would we change? But^—"no my fair coz. What is -Christmas dinner like in the trenches? I will tell you when ita -over. But of the food supply up to date there is not a man at the front but will take his dyin' solemn that there never has been anything like it since the kind gods invented the first commisariat wagon. The supply columns work with mathematical precision, and the organisation of cater- ing is superb. COOKS COMPETENT AND INCOM- PETENT. I speak now of the raw material, but in the Army there be cooks and cooks. Some cooks would put Escoffiejr in the shade; others are equal to the best Swan- sea Valley housewives; others are fair- to-middling; but some there are who ought never to have come within hailing distance of a field kitchen. One, of course, admits the difficulty of preparing food in a large boiler over a wood fire, and the impossibility of suit- ing the tastes of an epicurean. Few sol- diers on active service-officers or other ranks--y.,ould refuse to eat when the pangs of hunger are insistent,- but I have frequently seen men turn away in disgust from the concoction which has been sent up as a stew. Where the task of super- vision is considered unnecessary it is. to be feared that many cooks take advan- tage, the result being that "fed-up" feel- ing to which Tommywmetimes gives ex- pression. Apart from these dietetic and other obstacles to happiness the majority of the 50 men in my company are as happy as sandboys. In ages we vary from about 18 to 40. The last joined recruit is of Kitchener's Army, and the oldest a Reservist. A more cosmopolitan crowd it would be difficult to gather together, as we have men from Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and various parts of England, an engineer reservist frae the banks of the Clyde, a medioal student from Dublin. a reporter from Wales, a knut from a. Lon- don suburb, etc., etc. ORDERLY ORDERLIES ? Apparently, we have taken up winter juarters under cover, and this, after the experiences of most of those attached to this Field Ambulance, is something which suggests home-like comfort as against the almost limit of human en- durance. There are times, however, when the feeling comes over me that barrack life is a peculiar thing, more es- pecially when one wishes to write or in any way desires quietness. From early morning to* late at night, there is one pereiste-nt babel of voices, interspersed with the eounds of a tin whistle, a violin. whistling, shouting, dancing and tramp of the feet of men coming and going. Under theso circumstances I feel that only one hour of peace would be worth more than the best cooked meal an ir- responsible cook might prepare in a creasy "dixie." From "reveille" to "lights out" life in barracks is something which would appeal to the average youth it is, per- haps, less appealing in its various aspects to one who shares Robert Blatchford's liking for growing roses aqd watching -earwigs in the garden. That laboured -.growl disposed of, I admit that we who aXe here have much to be thankful for. We have a roof over our heads, we get our meals at regular hours, and we know -to a little what is expected of us in the way of duty. THE DAY'S DUTY. We are knocked up at 6.30 a.m., breakfast 7.15, clean-up and general parade at 8.15. Our hospital is in a fine roomy factory, which has undergone mir- aculous transformation and is now cap- able of accommodating 1,000 patients. At present more than 500 sick or wounded -are being attended to. To see a batch of wounded arrive is a l'ight not readily forgotten. Most of them are able to walk, some hobble, others axe ssiqted by their comrades, and of course, s--rmetimes they arrive by ambulance train from the front and are then conveyed by a, fleet of Red Croes motor-cars—several of which are driven by ladies—to the hospita1. Others arrive direct by motor _cars—each car bpj ng capable of accom- modating fonr lying-down cases or eight to ten sitting-up cases. Most of them -are able to walk, others have to be car- Tied on stretchers to their places, the medical and snrgival "CMos" being sent medical an d surg i va to their respective wards. HARD WORK. T, ;cl r.rd cHb« and attend to the conifv.-is if Z •'i .ck -l Is -) f ? I ? light matter, especially if there is a big percentage of bed-cases. Whilst these sometimes do not receive the same treat- ment as would be the case under normal conditions, the demotion of those engaged in th, work of attending to the sick is such that very few can, under any cir- cumstances complain of their treatment. Many of the less sick cases are able not only to attend to their own needs but also to keep their sick comrades and the orderlies. The doctor makes his round of the ward and then prescribes treatment for each case so that for about 21 or more hours we are kept at it in dressing "cases," giving medicines and otherwise carrying out the directions of the doctor. Bed cases get their meals served to them, breakfast at 7.30, dinner at 12.45 and tea at 4.30. They can scoff and in no error. Most of them find that the generous hospital allowance is insufficient and we frequently to have to requisition more than we are entitled to from the Ste- ward's Store. Breakfast consists of tea, bread and butter, bacon, and in some cases special foods such as milk, eggs, etc. Most of them get through the regimental menu. Dinner stew, with plenty of vegetables and bread; tea, bread and butter; jam and cheese. I INVALID APPETITES. I From all sides of the ward-which is a partitioned off portion of the factory, the partition being a woven cloth (like flax) weighted with s&ndbags--come calls for more bread, more jam, and more tea. Oliver Twist surely never waa in it with these hungry Tommies who two or three days ago were in the trenches. Many cases of rheumatism, pleurisy, pneumonia, and frost-bite have been admitted, the former predominating—and no wonder. There are also ordinary ailments that would affect men under civilian condi- tions. When "cases" are fit for discharge they are not sent direct to duty, but to a convalescent camp, where they remain until they are fit to resume their places in the fighting line.

AN INTERVIEW WITH LORD KITCHENER x

AN INTERVIEW WITH LORD KITCHENER. x "There is a story being told in the clubs of the birth of a Bantam Battalion, or rather, of several Bantam Battalions" says "T.P.'s Journal of Great Deeds of the Great War." The hero of this story is a man from a mining district. He began to work his,district and to gather in men. There was a magnificent response, several thou- sand men. Progress to the recruiting station was a procession of triumph; the visit to the recruiting officer, however, was a tragedy. "Under standard," he said. "All too short." All those men with great and strong arms were dismissed for their too few inches. The man who had brought the miners up to the recruiting office was angry, but he was also a man of action and a man of sense. He came up to London by the first train. He left the train and went straight to the War Office, and failed to see Lord Kitchener. He went back to his hotel and wrote a letter to the man he could not see. He stated his case boldly, and asked for an interview. An interview was fixed bv I return of post. KITCHENER CORNERED. I The Secretary for War saw the man, heard him out, asked to see some speci- mens of his recruits; "They are here," cried the busiriis&ji like fellow. He went to the door. and a moment&atoer three solid, huge-shoul- dered, tough, but undeniably bantam miners were trying for all they were worth to be military men on the War Office carpet. "They're short, of course," explained the enthusiast; "but they can't help be- ing short. They're miners. For genera- tions the families of these men have worked in the low galleries of mines. Nature has built them short for the work they have to do. But—but look at their shoulders. "I'll take the lot, and as much of their kind as you can send me," said Lord Kitchener. He had been looking at their shoulders from the first.

G BRETON BARD IN THE WAR

G BRETON BARD IN THE WAR. Mr J. Ceredig Davies, of Llanilar, near Aberystwyth, has received an inter- esting letter from M. Jaffrenou. better known in cisteddfodic quarters as "Taldir." The Breton bard says that he has been in the thick of the war. He was in the battles of the Marne and Aisne, and latterly took part in the fighting near Arras, which place, he says, hardly suffered from the bombard- ment. He pave a high tribute to the bravery and gallantry of the British 1 troops. The Bretons are proud to fight sdde by side with their Welsh brethren on behalf of civilisation. "Let us hope" says "Taldir," in conclusion, "that we shall meet again after this calamitous war is over on the peaceful field of the Gorsedd." "Taldir," who viis wounded a few months ago, has rrtrrr^d to the

DULAIS VALLEY CHAT

DULAIS VALLEY CHAT. Gan Ymdeithydd. A great many of those who are serving in the colours have returned for a few days holiday, and they are all looking the picture of health, and in good spirits. The Valley feels proud of its gallant sons. A very enthusiastic Parish Meeting was held at the Council Schools, Seven Sisters, on Wednesday night. Councill- or D. T. Davies presided. Several bills were produced to prove the exorbitant charges made bv the District Council for water pipes. The following spoke strongly against the Council's action: Messrs. W. Davies, loan James, D. J. Jones (Dyffryn); John Samuel, Geo. Jones (Seven Sisters) and W. E. Thomas, together with the two Disr- trict Councillors. After a long dis- cussion the meeting decided to make a protest against the charges, and ad- vised the people not to pay them, and a den ti tat ion was selected to approach Mr D. M. Davies, the surveyor, on the matter at once. The following were selected: Messrs. W. Davies, D. J. Jones, W. E. Thomas and George Jones. The meeting afterwards was adjourned until another date, to be fixed by the deputation. The dispute at Maesmarchog Col- liery over the price list of the new four feet seam has been satisfactorily settled. The Workmen's Committee together with Mr J. D. Morgan, J.P., the miners' agent, met Mr E. Bevan at the end of last week, and after a long discussion (both sides compromis- ing), a settlement was arrived at, sub- ject to the approval of the workmen. A meeting of the workmen was held Monday morning, and the new list was explained by Mr J. D. Morgan, and after a lengthy discussion it was de- cided by a majority, to adopt it. The 4ft. seam is a new seam at Maes- marchog, and it is anticipated that it will be immediately opened out, and a good number of men will find employ- ment in the near future. All the collieries in the Valley are supporting the Local Distress Fund ex- cept Llwynon Colliery. They rather than support a good cause, find faults and cast aspersions on others in the miners' District Meeting. If they would only join and see what is being done it would be more sensible. The people of Seven Sisters are glad to see that Mr Samuel Evans, check- weigher, has brought his family to live in the place at last. They all welcomed them, and hope they will become use- ful citizens in the future. Congratulations to Mr David Hughes,, B.A., of Woodland terrace, Crvant, who has been notified by the War Office that he has been appointed to a commi&sion in the 9th Welsh. When the war broke out Mr Hughes was at Havre, and, after a thrilling experience, arrived home about the end of August. On September 1st he enlisted as a private in the 9th Welsh at Cardiff, and was transferred with the 8th battalion to Salisbury Plain. Two of his tent mates here were Reggie Stroud and Tom Owen, the well-known Neath and Resolven footballers. Lieut. Hughes is an old Neath Sun- day School boy, and the news of his rapid promotion has been received in in the town with great satisfaction. At the local Polica Court on Friday, James Nicholas, collier, Bryndulais- avenue. Seven Sisters, were summoned for failing to produce his ticket on the Neath and Brecon Railway. Mr James Revel 1 prosecuted. Evidence was given that defendant was found asleep, in a tin in which, arrived at Seven Sisters attd refused to his ticket or to pay his face, and also declined to give his name and address. He was fined 10s. aitd costs.

ellI THE TINPLATE TRADEl

ell I THE TINPLATE TRADE. l BRIGHTER PROSPECTS. Further tinplate licenses have been granted for the export of tinplates to Holland. The total number of licenses to this country is now 18, Sweden has a total of 3, and Denmark 1. The news will be received with much satisfaction in tinplates circles generally for this is regarded as a most hopeful sign for future developments. The restriction of the trade in Holland has been a most serious matter, for this is by far away THE BEST CUSTOMER OF THE j THREE, 43,249 tons last yeer going to Holland alone. The total exports of tin plates to Sweden last yea.r were 4,493 tons. and to Denmark 6,761 tons. So it will be seen that Swansea's trade with Holland is a most important one. The plates are chiefly required for tinning food stuffs. While the tinplates makers are co- operating with the Government in every e dible way, it ia a great source of satisfaction that the latter has seen its way clear to extend the licenses. So j great is the care that has to be super- vised that not only the maker and the receiver have to declare, but the people whom the reciever ultima.tely sends them to. Further licenses to Denmark are not likely for the present.

No title

The fortnightly meeting of the Pontar- dawe Council was held on Monday, Mr. Morgan Davies, J.P., presiding. I GWAUNCAEGURWEN GAIETY I THEATRE. The Clerk said there were some gentle- men in the vestibule waiting to hear the decision of the Council regarding the licence of the Gaiety Theatre, Gwa.unca.e- gurwen. "I did ;iot know you had a Gaiety Theatre," tvid the clerk, address- ing the Rev, Eva t i,Wvvs. Mr. Davies Oh, yes we have, it's a fine one, too; you should come and see I it! I SMALL DWELLINGS ACT ARREARS. I Mr. Wyndham Lewis said a list had been drawn up showing arrears of j3150 under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act. This was a very serious state of affairs. Under the Act they were bound to insist on regular payments. But the list was a most formidable one. In Ys- talyfera some had never paid anything at all. Mr. H. J. Powell said they might give official warning to those in arrears. The Chairman thought they should take more definite action. Mr. H. J. Powell said they did not know all the circumstances. It waa agreed that lists should be sent to the members in whose districts the arrears were due and ask them to ¡ endeavour to get the defaulters to pay. CWMTWRCH DRAINAGE. I The Llandilofawr Rural District Coun- I cil wrote saying that they had appoint- ed five delegates to attend the proposed conference regarding the Cwmtwrch Drainage Scheme. The Clerk said he sug- gested that their offices at Pontardawe would be the most suitable centre for the meeting, and as Pontardawe had only appointed four members to attend it was agreed to appoint a fifth to be equal to Llandilo. Tha Llandilo members are Messrs. D. W. Lewis and Gomer Harris (Brynamman), R. D. Powell (Upper Cwmtwrch), J. L. Williams (Bettws), and Wm. Williams (Lifndilo). SURVEYOR'S REPORT. I The Surveyor (Mr. J. Morgan) report- ed, that Messrs. Hvbrough Bros., the con- tractors for Gilwen Bridge, Cwmtwrch, had agreed to reduce their charge of 230 for the old and waste timber from Is. 3d. to Is. per foot, and this meant a reduction of 95 14s. He suggested that he should issue a final certificate for j319 10s., the balance due to the com- pany. Agreed to. The improvements (widening, etc.) at Church-road and Glanyrafon-road, Ystal- yfera, was being proceeded with, but up to the present the Council's property had not been interfered with. Now, how- ever, the contractor wrote saying that the level of the present highway was to be raised, and the surface boxes over, the water valves, etc., should also be raised accordingly. He was not aware that the road was to be taken over bv the County Council and required instruc- tions on the matter. After some dis- cussion it was agreed that the question be left in the hand* of the surveyor and the clerk. PLANS COMMITTEE. I Mr. J. G. Harris submitted the re- port of the Plans Committee, and said the only matter was a stable in Tre- banos which they recommended should now ba passed. It was deferecl at the previous meeting. Carried. INCOME TAX FOR SEWERS. ) The Clerk read a letter from the Sur- veyor of Taxes, Swansea, respecting a communication from the Council regard- ing the payment of income tax on sewers. The official said that as the Council were puobafcly aware the matter was governed by a House of Lords case, when the d-e-. cision was that income tax was payable on the full annual value as stated in No. 1 Schedule A. He revised the terms in Mawr, Llanguicke, etc., but if the matter was not yet clear he would give a further explanation. The Clerk said there was a little re- duction in the amount payable on the sewer in Llanguicke Parish, but it was hopeless so far as other cases under Schedule A was concerned. They would have to pay. G.W.R. 'BUS REVISED SERVICE. I The Clerk read a letter from Mr. Frank Potter, the general manager of the Great Western Railway stating that they had put on a closed motor 'bus from Bryn- amman to Neath, and had altered the time of starting of the 'bus from Waun- leyshon from 7.45 to 7.30, so that it now arrived at Neath in time to catch the London train. (Hear. hear.) The Rev. Evan Davies expressed ap- preciation of this revision. | SHOPS ACT AND CLOSING HOURS 1 Mr. J. M. Francis, assistant secretary I to the Pontardawe Chamber of Trade, wrote stating that at a meeting of the chamber on December 2, the question of closing the premises in pemiance with the provisions of the Shops Act were dis- cussed. They would recollect that at the joint conference between the Council and the traders in the area, the Pontardawe tradesmen agreed to all the hours includ- ed in the Order of the Council issued on the 26th November, with the exception of the time of closing An Saturday even- ings. He was accordingly directed to protest on behalf of the members against the closing of shops on Saturdays at 10 o'clock, and to urge the Council to is.sue a separate order for the Pontardawe dis- trict, incorporating the bonus as stated in the order already issued with the ex- ception of Saturday evenings, and on this evening to fix tho time at 10.30. Mr H. J. Powell thought this letter was rather late in the day. There had been an agreement between the parties of the conference, the Council had issued their order, terms had been come to. and now the Pontardawe Chamber of Trade came along and protested. A Voice Let them protest. Continuing, Mr. Powell said it almost seemed that the Pontardawe men did not know their own minds. The Clerk said that in accordance with their order all objections up to January 4 were to be considered by them, and he thought they would be saving time if they deferred the letter until then. If the Pontardawe Chamber of Trade were not then satisfied with the decision they could appeal to the Home Secretary. Mr. L. W. Francis did not see why they should not have had an independent order for each district. If Pontardawe had had this it would not have adverse- ly affected any other district. Mr. Owen Davies replied in. spirited terms to Mr. Francis, and said it was not right for the chamber to attempt to riae over the agreement arrived at by the Pontardawe members at the con- ference. It was ridiculous to ask for separata orders under the circumstances, it was nothing more than jealousy. In the midst of many interruptions, Mr. It A. Jones said if the Council did not abide by their agreement they would be nothing better than the German people and their scraps of paper. (Loud laughter. ) It was agreed to defer consideration of the letter. WORKERS WANT MORE WAGES. Mr. Wyndham Lewis read a letter from Mr. Rees Llewelyn, of Cardiff, secretary of the Municipal Employees' Association, asking for an advance of 3s. per week for the men employed by. the Council. He stated that a great number of local bodies had of late given similar advances and he asked for generous consideration of the application. The Clerk said they were to have the entire matter of salaries under consideja- tion in January, and thought therefore that the letter should be referred to the Financa Committee. Mr. F. It Phillips asked if they we^ going to be pressed and coerced into considering the wages question* as a re- sult of the receipt of that letter. The Chairman replied decisively in the negative, pointing out that the clerk had stated that it was decided to con- sider the matter before the receipt of the letter. The suggestion was agreed to. COL. GOUGH AND YiSTALYFERA I ROADS. A letter was received from Mr. Lee, agent to Col. Gough, referring to several roads in Ystalyfera. Regarding Swan-field road, Mr. Lee said he had met Mr. Mor- gan, the surveyor, with a view to the Council taking it over, and it appeared that it was necessary for Mr. Gough to go to the expense of curbing both sides and laying a storm drain to the river. He was quite prepared to consult Col. Gough re the drain, but could not see his way to recommend him to do the I curbing Two years ago the Council of- I fered to take the road over if the drain wa.s made, without the curbing. He did not think tho curbing was necessary, j Mr. Morgan said Mr. Lee had ex- plained the. negotiations passing between then,, and the clerk said that the Coun- cil had changed its policy since the offer made two years ago. Mr. H. J. Powell asked if it would be fair to go back on their old policy. The position was somewhat difficult. On one side there were no buildings, and the road was narrow. He thought they might accept the offer. Mr. Francis said if the previous offer was not accepted they were under no obligation to keep to thosè. terms, and Mr. R. A. Jones emphatically protested against any proposals to take over the obligations of lessees as in the case of Smithfield-road. There was a further long discussion, and it was decided to ask Mr. Gough to construct a curb on one side and the drain. Messrs R. A. Jones and Richard Thomas voted against. I CLYNGWYN ROAD AND NEW I WERN SCHOOL ROAD. I Mr. Lee said it was understood that ) these were now constructed to the sur- veyor's satisfaction, and the clerk said J the Council had already agreed to take them over. They ought, however, to have a little plan showing paxticula-rs of Clyngwyn-road. The Surveyor said I the agent had agreed that there ought to be a. little fencing near the bandroom, and that he was prepared to erect a post and tube fence, asking the Council to carry the work out and charge to Col. Gough's account. The Surveyor said Mr H. J. Powell had suggested the erection of this fenc- ing. It certainly would be useful as th" place, was dangerous. The Chairman commented on the re- quest for the Council to carry out this work, and said it appeared that they would have to take the estate over for him soon. Mr. F. R. Phillips said they were almost running the estate for Col. Gough. These would have to be an alteration. POSTAL DIFFICULTIES AT GWAUN-I CAEGURWEN. The Clerk reported receipt of a letter from the G.P.O. stating that as the first motor 'bus to Cwmgorse did not reach there ontil 8.53 a.m., and if the mail was sent by this, delivery could not be proceeded with until 9.30. The Clerk said they were evading the point. The suggestion was that an earlier post could be put on, but the letter did not refer to this, simply adding that nearly all deliveries were now made by 8.45. Regarding the telephone facilities, a. further letter said that if the names of those prepared to act as guarantors wore sent in, the work of erecting the call office could proceed. The Clerk said he did not think it was necessary to seek for names of guaran- I tors. Six or seven gentlemen were ready to act accordingly. It was decided to write pointing out that the Council did not ask for the mail to be sent by the 'bus named by the G.P.O., but wanted an earlier deliverv for Gwauncaegurwen. I LOCAL GAS QUESTION. As a result of a report made by Mr. Seyler, of Swansea, arising from his tests at the local gasworks, the clerk was in- structed to tilke proceedings against the company. —————- —————

I PONTARDAWE GUARDIANS j

I PONTARDAWE GUARDIANS. At the Pontardawe Guardians meetiyil, on Monday, Mr. H. J. Powell, JP. (Ystalyfera) presiding, the report of the House Committee was read and adopted. The report stated that the committee met on the 17th inst., Mr. F. R. Phillips presiding. For the supply of milk only one tender was received, that of Mrs. Williams, of the Farm, Pontardawe, at Is. per gallon, and the committee recom- mended its acceptance, together with that of Mr. D. J. Harries, grocer, Pontar- dawe, for groceries, bread and cake. The committee interviewed Messrs. Dd. Jones, butcher, Alltwen, and Gwilym Lewis, grocer, Pontardawe, as to their respective claims for consideration in re- pect of the advance in commodities caused by the war. The committee went carefully into the matter, but were not satisfied that a good case had been made out in either case. In that of Mr. Lewis, the period was August And September, and in their opinion the advance in prices after accounting for possible stocks pur- chased before the war, were not suffi- cient to warrant any special treatment. Regarding Mr. Dd. Jones, the contract had been extended to the end of March, a.nd without committing themselves in any way, they would be prepared to consider the matter again at the end of the period of the contract, but they were bound to say that at present they were not satisfied that the rise in prices of meat was due directly to the war, but rather to the fluctuation in the market that commenced the upward tendency -some months prior to August. No evi- dences of actual buying prices were pro- duced. Regarding the electric bell system at the Workhouse, this had never been satisfactory, and they recommende d that a new system be installed, the ten- der of Mr. D. 0. Williams for L14 (the lowest of three offers) to be accepted. As stated, the report was adopted.

y PULPIT DENUNCIATION OF GERMAN CRIME I

■ ■ y — P'ULPIT DENUNCIATION OF GERMAN CRIME. I "We do not hate the Germans as they hate us," said the Rev. R. J. Campbell at the City Temple on Sun- day, "but I should think within the last few days we have been nearer to it that we ever were before. "Out of sheer vindictiveness they have brought the war to our shores,* and killed and maimed unarmed civil- ians by the hundred, including help- less women and children. Then they go home and boast of it, and there are great rejoicings in Berlin. "They have killed little babies with their shells, torn the life out of little children at their play or on the way to school, and this within the anniver- sary which of all others in the calendar is sacred to childhood." "But," the preacher continued, "if hell has been busy so has Heaven." Never were braver or nobler things done, never has the spirit of Incar- nation been more sublimely apparent. This is a sombre time, but a great time of soul stirring and renewal. God grant that we may oome out of it with spiritual vision enlarged and moral perceptions purified." I

I I LOST SYMPATHY OF THE WHOLE I WORLDI

'——— ——— I I LOST SYMPATHY OF THE WHOLE WORLD. I "Germany has spent enormous sums of money in endeavouring to obtain sympathy for her in the United States. They might as well have thrown the iroiley into the sea. The rajd on de- fenceless women and children on the East. Coast has alienated the sym- pathy of the whole world."—Mr Bonar Law at Bootle on Monday night.

No title

———— Many German subjects who fled from Belgium on the outbreak of war are now I returning and lodging claims for damage's with the municipal authorities. The German commander supports these claims and forces the authorities to pay them.

CWMTWRCH TRAGEDY

CWMTWRCH TRAGEDY. FOUND DEAD AT GWYS. A startling discovery was made near GWyti Station, Upper Cwmtwrch, on Wednesday afternoon, when the body of a young man was found lying beside the Twrch. Upon inquiries being instituted it was found that it was that of a young man named George James,(24), from Clifton- on-Teme, Worcestershire, a foreman em- ployed by Messrs. Hobrough Bros., of Gloucester, the firm who are erecting the new Brynmorgan bridges. It is surmised that deceased must have fallen over the low wall between the railway line and the river, and that he had been there since Tuesday evening.

MRS RAMSAY MACDONALD

MRS. RAMSAY MACDONALD MEMORIAL TO "A GREAT WOMAN." On the north side of Lincoln's-inn- fields, within sight of the house where Mrs. Ramsay Macdonald spent fifteen years of happy married lite, was un- veiled on Saturday a memorial to a woman who was much loved and whose .loss is still deeply felt. The memorial is not merely orna- ni.eii,a.. Subscribed for by the mem- bers of women's political and philan- thropic societies all over the world, it takes the shape of a seat for six per- sons, sheltered by an enclosing granite setting. On the cornice of this is en- graved, "This seat is placed here in memory of Margaret Macdonald. who spent her life in helping o-'er-i." Over it is a bronze group some twelve feet in length. It represents a troon of happy children. full of the joy of life, and in their mid,t is a i>ortrai figura of Mrs. Maedonald stretching y>rotest- ing arms over them. It is a work ad- mirably conceived and executed, and the portrait is an excellent one. Many people saw and admired it in this year's Academy. Now that it is in the posi- tion for which it was de^vrned ;t is even more striking. Mr Richard R. G-oiilki-en, R.B.S.. is tre seal )tor. and he has most successfully typified -N4r,. Macdonald's life-long efforts to bring joy into the lives; of others. It is a sign of the times that Mr Goulden has temporarily forsaken his profession he appeared at Saturday's ceremony as an officer of thp Royal Engineers. A bronze tablet on the back of the memorial bears the inSlription She was the daughter of John and Margaret Gladstone. She was bora in Kensington in 1870, was married to J. Ramsay Maedonald in 1896, and lived with him at 3. Lincoln's Inn- fields. Here her children Nwere bom, and here she died in 1911. She brought joy to those with whom ord for whom she lived and worked. Her heart went out in fellowship to her fellow women and in love to the child- ren of the people whom she served as a citizen and helped as a sister. She quickened faith and zeal in others by her life and to-tk no rest from doing good. Sir Laurence Gamme performed the simple ceremony of unveiling the memorial in the presence of many of Mrs. Macdonald's oo-workers in the cause of women and children. In the course of a brief address Sir Laurence described the memorial as one offered by London to a great Lon- don woman. She had lived a beautiful life devoted to others, and her in- fluence and example would assuredly be impressed not only on this but on future generations. When the oppor- tunity far service came to Margaret MncdonaM she seized it with all her soul. and never relinquished her place in the world.

ATTERCLIFFE VACANCY

ATTERCLIFFE VACANCY. The writ for the Atfcercliffe Division Parliamentary bye-election to fill the v-cancv caufsp-d bv th" death of Mr. J. Pointer, M.P., Sheffield's first and o-lv I ab

CARDIFF RECORDERSIP

CARDIFF RECORDERSIP. A Welsh legal appointment which is much discussed in the Recorderehip of Cnrdiff, at present held by Sir David Brvnmonrt Jcmcs, K.G. Up bo the present Sir David has not resigned that appoint- ment, ard he has declared h;" ^ntinn of presiding over the next sessions. As a matter of fret ther* ir" :,1 t" be some precedents for Sir David holding the recordership together with the Mas- tership of Lunacy to which he was re- cently appointed and which has necessi- tated his retirement from political life. It is understood, however, that he has no intention of giving up the recorder- ship imyncdiatel.v-CeTtainlv -ot befcr- he has tak,-n up the duties of his n

No title

A Munster (Germany) despatch spates that the military authorities hare issued a proclamation, in which civil- ians a.re requested to be snaring in their consumption of petroleum and 90rn.