Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

EDWARDS' BIG CHRISTMAS DISPLAY IS NOW OPEN. IT IS FULL OF GIFTS WORTH GIVING, and if you are anxious to settle the PRESENT PROBLEM easily and rapidly this year, we cordially invite you to Visit it Soon and spend as long as you please in a leisurely inspection of our varied store of ATTRACTIVE CHRISTMAS GOODS. As this is, primarily, a Ladies' Shop, we have, of course, an abundance of Gifts for the fair sex, for, in addition to an over- flowing Stock of the Newest, Best and Smartest things in Ladies' Wear, we have a very large selection of Delightful Novelties in FANCY GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. THE CHILDREN must see our TOY BAZAAR. — Hundreds of things are here to delight. — TTaOprebrSy ORES, ?? Oxford Street ??? Oxford. Street wansea and Park Street s C + I •

THREE DYING FOES t

THREE DYING FOES. t LAST THOUGHTS OF THE WOMEN I THEY LOVED. A letter, which is ajnong the most moving documents written since the beginning of the war, has been received by a young American lady resident in Paris. It wa-s written by her fianee, a French cavalry officer, as h. lay dying in Flandws, and w-ith the letter she received the news of his death. The writer, after narrating how he was wounded in the chest during a cavalry 1 charge and temporarily lost sonsctousneee. goes on to say :—"Thar* are two other men lying near me, and I do not think there ia much hope for them either. One ia an officer of a Scottish regiment, and th* other a private in the Ublau. j "They jrere both straak down alter me, and when I cams tie myself I found tiuam bending over me, rendering first- aid. The Britiaber was pourisg water down my throat from his flask, while the German was endeavouring to staunch my aoond with an antiseptic preparation earved out to them by the rasdieal corps. "The Highlander had one of his legs shattered, and the German had several pieces of shrapnel buried in hia side. In apite of their own sufferings, they were trying to help me, and when I was fully conscious again the German gave us a morphia injection and took one himself. His medical corps had also provided him with the injection and the needle, to- gether with printed instructions for its oae. "After the injection, feeling wonder- fully at ease, we spoke of the lives we had lived before the war We all spoke English, and we talked of the women we had left at home. Both the man and the British had only been married a year. I wondered, and I suppose the others -did, why we had fought each other at ell. "I looked at the Highlander, who was falling to sleep exhausted, and, in spite of his drawn face and mud-stained uni- form, he looked the embodiment of free- dean. Then I thought of the Tricolour of France and all that France had done tor liberty. Then I watched the German, wh o had eeaaed to speak. He had taken ejki prayer book from his knaps&ck and was wrying to read a aervice for soldiers -rounded in battle; and while I watched him I realised what we were fighting for. He was dying in vain, while the Britisher Md myself by our deaths would probably contribute something towards the cause o £ civilisation and peace." The letter ends with a reference to the failing light and the roar of the gtffls. It was found at the dead officer's side by a Red Cross file and forwarded tn his ifancee a day or two ago.—Central News.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS. PhFenoiop- can he consulted daily at the Victoria AiraHf nput t \1 arlf VVJ:H»:

BLEW UP A BRIDGE

BLEW UP A BRIDGE. GORSEINON SERGEANT'S GALLANT END. News has been received of the gallant manner in which Sergeant Ernest Huxtable, of the 6th Dragoon Guards, second son of Mr and Mrs. Huxtable, Kingsbridge, Gorseinon, met his end. He had been engaged with a small detachment in keeping abridge against an overwhelming force. When reinforcements arrived the order was given for the party to reti re anq re- join the regiment, while the infantry; advanced and took over the position., This was successfully accomplished, the party first; blowing up the bridge. It was in the execution of this perilous task that Sergeant Huxtable, who had throughout, by his fearless conduct, earned the praise of both officers and men, met his death. Advancing under a murderous shrapnel fire, he lit the fuse, which reduced the structure to a ruin, and prevent-ed the enemy from crossi ng the canal. Whether he was hit bj; shrapnel or wounded by the ex- plosion is uncertain. His lieutenant said of him, "He is a great loss to the Carabiniers. No man over died a more gallant death than he died. -————< ————-

IAFTERWARDS ESCAPED

AFTERWARDS ESCAPED. Describing how a party of English- men who were taken prisoners were asked to sing for their German cap- tors, Private G. M. Taylor, of the A.S.C., in a letter to his sister at Kingswood, Reigate, says:— "We were t-aken to some farm build- ings, and our boots were taken off. The oiffcers had quarters in the farm house, and during the night they were singing and drinking. One of our chaps—Smiler is his iiic-k-naine sug- gest-e d we should have a sing song, and i opened the programme with a hunting- song of his own composition. "He's got a bit of a voice, and a big, burly German asked him to oblige j again, go he gave a parody on 'John Barleycorn.' I then sang 'Wink the other Eye,' and, to our surprise one of the officers came in. He gave us a cigar ette each, and took Smiler and me in- to the farm house to amuse the com- I pany. I vamped on an old piano, and Smiler sang three or four songs." The men afterwards escap~ ed to the British linos. ————— < I

No title

A fortain. general is said to have need plain language to some of the Smart Set ladies who have made them- s elves trou blesome in their persistent, efforts to get through, on one pretext or another, into the military areas in France and Belgium.

FATE OF A TRAITOR

FATE OF A TRAITOR I Sentence to death by court-martial late on Saturday night, Josef Fourie, lately a captain in the South African Union Defence Foroe, and one of the leaders in the rebellion, was shot at 5 a.m. at Pretoria. Fourie's younger brother, who also joined the rebels, was sentenced to death at the same time, but the penal1 y was commuted to one of five years aixl labour, on Fourie plead- ing that his brother acted under his influence. A minister of the Dutch Reformed Church remained with the condemned man all night. The court consisted of one British officer and two officers of Dutch de- isoent.

CLYDACH FOOTBALLERS DEATH

——— ———— | CLYDACH FOOTBALLER'S DEATH. Official notification has been received of the death of W. R. McLaughlin, of Vera road, Clydach on Tawe, who has been in action whilst serving with the Carlisle Border Regiment at the front. McLaughlin or "Mac," as he was better known amongst his host ) of friends and admirers, was called to the colours in the course of the mobil- iaation of the Army Reserves at the outbr-eak of the war. He was well known and much admired throughout Clydach and the Swansea Valley as a ■clever "Soccer" player, having for severa l seasons past rendered excel- lent service to the Mond Nickel Works A.F.C., both as half-back and back. At the annual general meeting, held early this year, he was elected captain l of the Mond Nickel Works A.F.C. for the ensuing season, but the subsequent declaration of the war resulted in his recall to the colours, and, incidentally, resulted in the Mond Club cancelling all fixtures for the season. On and off the field he was a, typical British sportsman.

GERMAN TRIBUTE TO INDIAN TROOPS

GERMAN TRIBUTE TO INDIAN TROOPS. The war correspondent of the "Cologne' Volks Zeitung" in West Flanders speaks of our Indian troops in the following terms, which has ap- pea.red in the above German news- paper: The Gurka is the the wisp" I of the battlefield. ttndor cover of i darkness the stealthy Gurkha creeps to the trenches on all fours. He often; hurls the knife at the enemy in aseeg- ai fashion, "and I am sorry to say these murderous fellows have a habit of disappearing as noiselessly as they approach." Of all the native troops the Sikhs are considered the deadliest foe. They are tall, strong, slim demons at storming the trenches, and it is admitted that they "nave commanded the respect of the Germans.

WESTERN MINERS AFFAIRSI

WESTERN MINERS' AFFAIRS WHAT TO EXPECT FROM PRINCE I OF WALES FUND. The monthly meeting of the Wes- tern Miners' Association was held at Siddall Buildings, Swansea, on Satur- day, December 19th, Mr Caadog Jones (Pontardulais), presiding. Others pre- sent were Messrs. John Williams, M.P. (chief agent); W. E. Morgan (agent); D. J. Williams, Clydach, treasurer; and Gwilym Bedw (W. J. Jones). Mr Glyn Thomas. (Gowerton), was elected doorkeeper, and Messrs. Win. Lloyd and Elias Williams tellers. I CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS Mr Caradog Jones, in his address to the delegates said he was glad to see that the air had cleared a little during the past month, so far as the Western District was concerned. He understood that the men at Grovesend, Brynlliw, Morlais, and the Brickworks had re- started work. He was not there as chairman to say that he was satisfied with the conditions under which they had restarted, —=far from it. But it could be said, and they may as well understand the position that they would only receive from the employers just as much as they could compel them to give—(hear, hear). They gave nothing as philanthropists. Everything the workers had got has been fought for and won, and he was sorry to say; that many things that had been fought for had been lost. They found that attempts had been made to take away what they had had for a number of i years. He believed they should con- sider) the position in which they were placed, and perfect their organisation to such a degree as to compare favour- ably with the forces of the employers. It was no use blaming individuals or a certain collection of individuals. They had to blame their organisation. It was an industrial fight. The nation to-day was fighting against Kaiserism, and appeals were being made on plat- forms for recruits. Workers had given of their best in this fight. In Lon- don recently, he heard one of the miners' leaders from the North say that 25,000 members of their organisa- tion were serving in the Army, to crush Kaiserism. Yet when they came nearer home, and considered the con- ditions under which the workers had to live, the lives sacrificed month after month (there were three in the Wes- tern District during the past month, but unfortunately all were non-Union- ista),-wben they remembered these things, they must see that the war j they were fighting at home against local Kaiserism was of the greatest im- portance. These little Kaisers had done more injury to the working class movement, and to the members of the class they belonged to, by far, than the Kaiser across the seas. He thought they must keep that in mind. In some collieries to-day the conditions of work were such that even if the Kaiser did come to this country he could not serve the workers worse than some of the capitalists in their District to-day did. (Hear, hear). A Voice: Too true. Continuing, the Chairman said he thought it was only right that he should tell them these things, and that they should set about the perfection of their organisation. Although the capitalists were now paying money to the people of those who were out at the front. when the latter returned they would have the old fight over again, against the same men nA before. His opinion was that the only way the workers could get their full share of the products of their labours would be by getting sufficient of their own claw in Pnrllament to legislate on be- half of the taking over of the Indus- trial machine, and working it not for profit but for me. He believed that it was only by those means that the workers would get their due. The pre- vious day they had a long discussion in the Western Di«tricf- Executive about the "Daily Citizen," the paper that was launched by the Labour or- ganisations to voice the case of the workers. On the war, unfortunately, the paper did not please everybody,— probably a large number of the Trade Unionists of South Wales, but after the war is over there should be a real cohesion of forces, a.nd they ,}£"I11]-; make the "Citizen" (J t)i- reg. l v o p ,r the working classes. He trusted that thoed who took a really Veen interest in industrial and economic matters (and many workers were quite M well versed as their leaders in these ques- tions), would continue their support. Theee men expectedi the "Citizen'' to be advanced, hoping by that means that tread it would be moved out of the rut they had been in for so r^ary, rears. His career as chairman of the District was nearly at an end, and before he concluded ho wanted them to remember that even if a settlement at Brvnlliw. etc.. had taken place for the time being tl,- Western Di-vtr.iH: and its officials wonld have t-o be on the alert in regard io the 5ft. seam. Thev had better take that j matter in hand now its infancy than allow it to become a giant, and have to deal with it then. He thought everything was now right re^ppctina: the Cwm Vale question, and tl,it were due to restart the following Mon- day. Mr Williams: That is so. In closing, the -cha,]rman ii< hoped Messrs. Wales and Morrell would be able to deal with the amended price list ,and bring about a far settlement between master and man. REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATE- MENT. The report and financial statement were adopted as printed. EXECUTIVE REPORT The Chairman read the report of the j Executive Committee meeting held the previous day in Swansea, when there were present: Messrs. Caradog Jones (T,)re,i,Iing) AV. H. Da.vies, D. R. Grenfell, E. H. Thomas, 1,V. J. Mor- gan, J Williams, W. E. Morgan, andI Gwilym Bedw. CWM VALE REPORT AND CLAIM I A report was given as to the present position of the Cwm Vale strike, and it was stated that the question had been dealt with at Cardiff. Mr John Williams, M.P., oR behalf of the men affected, and the Western District, made an appeal for financial support for those idle, and it was there de- cided that a sum of JE2 each be granted to the men. We are also glad to 're- port that after many efforts the men are to resume work on the following Monday on the terms of paypient for the use of small trams only; the pay- ment for all dead work as when the colliery stopped, and that the men re- turn to work in order of senority in each seam. The question of strike pay was also before the committee, and it was decided that it was not eligible as thev would receive money from the Central for the last four weeks. OUT-OF-WORK PAYMENTS. A very lentghy report was given by the agents, Messrs. John Williams and W. E. Morgan on the position, and the working of the Prince of Wales Fund. The agents had been several times to Cardiff on the matter, but up to the present, the third claim had not ar- rived. Every effort would, however, be made to get the money, before Christmas. It was also explained that the lodge secretaries were very slack in sending in the claims in their proper time, and the supplementary claims they submitted made it very difficult to make the claims out. It was also ex- plained that the forms to be filled in j at once by the lodge secretaries had been sent out, and the sooner they are returned properly filled in, the better. The Chairman also explained the steps taken for the proper administration of the fund by the lodges, and sa.id that they had agreed to have 6,000 receipt forms printed. These were to filled in by the lodge secretary, presented to the treasurer for payment, and ? signed b? the recipient. j I PRINCE OF WALES FUND. j MORE HOPEFUL OUTLOOK The Chairman said he would ask Mr John Williams to say what had tran- spired during the month in connection with this matter. Mr Williams said the matter was dealt with exhaustively at the previous District Meeting, and he thought then by allowing a month to elapse that he would be in a position to put something .before them in a tangible form. He was sorry that they of the Centrl. Executive were not yet in that posi- tion, but the Central was not to be blamed for the position of aifairs. The Executive had done all in their power to get the matter through in order to print a circular to i&sue to the secre- taries of lodges. Mr W. E. Morgan at- tended an executive meeting at Car- diff with a view to getting informa- tion as to the procedure to be adopted by lodge secretaries. and was told by Mr Richards that the only inform ac- tion he could give was that as a. re- sult of the deputation of mastem and men, the London authorities agreed to the appointment of a committee, but he could not just then give the names. It was a body totally apart from either the Federation or the coal- ownere. They had no representation on it at all, and it had to deal with the money that the Federation required from time to time. At the head of the body was a commissioner of con- siderable ability. On Wedneaduy pre- vious, a Federation Commi ttee, oonsist- ing of Messrs. T. Richards. Wm. Jen- kinc, Frank Hodges, J. D. Morgan. Tom Lucas and him°e!f sat, the object of this body being to deal with the funds necessary to discharge all the Federation liabilities created by the the t- ,iie t l -,e nien war for the whole of the tlmt" the men had been idle from August 8th to Dec. 12t,h. The committee discueeed the matter for many hours. Hp placed the position of the Western District be- fore the committee, and pointed out that they wanted £ 872 for the pay- ment due for the week ending Aug. 29th. He had aaked Mr Merga.n to also work out the total remaining of the full weeks idle at all the collieries, and Mr Morgan had had much difficulty in getting the necessary date, for the information of the Central. This was to be regretted, and somethin g must be done in this direction to get the secretaries of th* lodges to send more promptly. They would have to act upon the instructions, of those who were Tcpr"

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can 1, be consulted daily at the Victoria Arcade (near the Market), Swansea. .) THE NAME OF ❖ ♦> FREEDMAN ❖ *1* Is well-known in Swansea *1* and District as a guarantee of | V GOOD JEWELLERY fV No matter what is paid for it-Jewellery you are not ashamed of and don't have to apologise *1* *1* for as "only a Cheap < Thing, you know." Our clients are always proud of w hat they get from e.. uti, because wo Special- ♦J* ♦J* ise in ? GOOD JEWELLERY ? V V Pretty to look at, and ♦> lasting in wear. It proves our statement when Customers Come Again ♦w» and bring their friends « £ ♦ also become regular < customers, assured of the Fullest Value Always V ♦> not for a few days only, « £ ♦ and in everything then buy. In our Stock Every Piece is 'Right' ♦J» both in Quality and Price. FREEDMAN ♦> WATCHMAKER & JEWELLER ♦> ? COLLEGE STREET | SWAMSEA. ?? ♦> (.!i.:i.¡.ø..ü.=.=.

No title

Tuesday, before Messrs. E. Benthall (presiding), D. Wrlliams, J. E. Moore Gwyn and Morgan Price. POACHING AT GLYNLLECH. Jas. Williams, miner, Corslwyndu, Coelbren, was summoned for trespass- ing in search of game on the Glynllech estate: He did not attend, his wife appearing and stating that he was ill. Wm. Howells, gamekeeper to Baron CederBtrom, said that on the 3rd inst. he saw defendant on Mr Morgan Prices' farm, Glynllech. He had a dog, driving it among the fern, which he was beating with a stick. He was working to get the rabbits into some burrows, and witness went up to him and asked if he had permission to do so. Williams replied in the negative. Asked what he had on him, defendant replied nothing, but on witnesa com- mencing to search, he knocked him over. Howells said he found a ferret and three nets on defendant, who gave a wrong name and address, and caused considerable trouble thereby. The wife said her hushad denied the offence. He was not out of the house when the offence was alleged to have taken place. Howells said defendant had admitted guilt in the presence of P.C. Williams, and the latter corroborated. A fine of £1 and costs was imposed. CWMTWRCH WOMAN'S CHILD. Lydia Harris, widow, near Lamb, Cwmtwreh, summoned Frederick J. Davie*, Cwmtwreh, in respect of her iema'.e child, born May 23rd. It Was stated that defendant (who did not ap- pear), admitted paternity, and an order of 4s. per week for 16 years was made.

WAt TAX ON BELGIUM

WAt TAX ON BELGIUM. It is reported from a German source in Brussels that Belgian Provincial Councils representing nine provinces met on Saturday and decided to intro- duce a war tax of £ 19,200,000 im- posed by the Governor-General, to be paid monthly bX the issue of Treasury Bonds which will bo guaranteed col- lectively by the nine provinces. They will be taken up by a syndi- (-ate of banks headed by the Societe Generate Beige. The Governor-Gener- al declared that in the event-of prompt payment requisitions will be padd.

Advertising

DO YOU NEED GLASSES? s It is possible you can see well and ) yet be seriously straining yoar eyes. You cannot tell yourself. « Only a scientific test, such, as we use, will decide this. Under no circumstances do we advise glasses unless absolute- ly necessary. In case of disease we refer you to the oculist. MAKE SURE. WE WILL TEST roull SIGHT. r- L. Clatworthy Watchmaker J?well?r ? Optician, Ystalyfera g Ystradgynlais.