Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
SCRANTON THE CHANGED CITY

SCRANTON THE CHANGED CITY. "WHY FOREIGNERS HAVE DISPLACED THE WELSH. By John Blunt. I Mr f-ltenlien Graham has in the last few years become known to the British reading public a.s the foremost inter- preter of Russian life. He really knows Russia, and by Russia is meant not the official and commercial classes of Petrograd, but the peasants who are now at death-grips with the Germans on the plains of Poland. Mr Graham has lived with the peasants, shared their simple joys and elemental sorrows toiled with them in the fields, accom- panied them on a religious pilgrimage 1.<1 Jerusalem, and voyaged with their emigrants to America, the El Dorado of the Russian peasant's dream. He wanted to see how they settled 

OUR EMPIRE SOUL

OUR "EMPIRE SOUL." The fact cannot be gainsaid that England, who does not begin to be as logical as Germany or as systema.tic as France in matters of government, has, nevertheless, the knack of making men step out of their own free will to die in her defence (says the "Republic." of St. Louis, Missouri). She has ,own herself indinerent to the {XMse??ion of the taxing power over her Co 1oniœ-1 but what matters it ? Those Colonies willingly tax themselves to send her warships, and their sons seize their rifles in time of strife to go to her aid. She has the wisdom so to train and guide the sjyarthy children of alien races, and even the foes of yesteryear, that they put their living bodies be- tween England and England's enemies. She has a fearfully muddled theory of government, but her practice of government lavs hold on the deepest things in the soul of man.

I LAWABIDING LLANELLY

LAW-ABIDING LLANELLY The business of the Llanelly Police i Court on Monday was disposed of in less than ton minutes. Superintendent Jorl)ec-) commented on the fact that during the whole of Christmas week there were no cases of drunkenness in the town. Mr Thomas Jones, the pre- siding magistrate, expressed the hope that the present excellent otet,-Q of affairs wuuid continue. affair. ii-ouid owinue.

I YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL I

I YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL. The monthlyi meeting of the Ystrad- gynlais Council took place on Thurs- day, Mr W. D. Walters presiding. Others present were Messrs. S. J. Thomas, David Lewis, Rhys Chapman, J. Howells, T. Williams, D. R. Mor- gan, and Lewis Thomas, together with the clerk (Mr A. Jestyn Jeffreys) the surveyor (Mr T. Watkins), and the sanitary inspector (Mr G. J. Rees, M.R.S.I.) MORE ABOUT WATER SUPPLY. I YSTRADGYNLAIS HIGHER MEM- I BER'S COMPLAINT. I Mr D. Lewis raised the question of a clause in Minute 16, referring to the question of supplying water to Ystrad- gynlais Higher, "for such time as the Lower Parish Council can spare it." He did nor +hink that those therms in- cluded in the resolution. Mr D. R. Morgan felt that unless the terms were to be adopted for 6d. per 1,000 gallons forthwith, he thought they should withdraw it. Their idea was to bring Penrhiw spring into the lower reservoir to supply Ystrad- gv/niais Higher. They must have the matter decided by a Parish Meeting in Ystradgynlais Higher forthwith. Mr S. J. Thomas said they as a Council could not spend the money on the scheme they had in mind of the offer to Ystradgynlais Higher were not going to adopt the offer. Mr David Lewis said he was quite sure that the provision he had referred to was not in the resolution. Mr Rhys Chapman said he was sure it was passed in the committee that they could only offer the water for such time as they could spare it. Mr S. J. Thomas said if the clause was not put in, and they found that they could not supply Yst radgvjilais Higher, the latter would be able to sue the Council for com- pensation. The Chairman said that if the clause was maintained, it would end the negotiations so far as the two parts were concerned. M] D. R. Morgan said that on the reading of the water from Penrhiw Spring they had come to the unani- mous conclusion of granting water for no limited time. There was no doubt about that. Mr David Lewis said that was the very matter that they had opposed all the time. Mr D. R. Morgan said he agreed to the minute with the exception of the j phrase referred to, and if; thev would have accepted it for 6d. per thousand now, but he would not be prepared to Iteep it open for any length of time. They would have to arrange their scheme, put it before the L.G.B., and i apply for a loan. Mr S. J. Thomas said they wanted to finish the matter now. Some of them might not be there if the ac- ceptance of the offer was now delayed to appear later. "In fact" (he said amidst laughter). "You and I too might be out of office." Mr J. Howells said they must insist on the clause in question. It was a necessary safeguard to the Ystradgyn- lais Lower Council. Mr Tom Williams thought it was out of the question altogether. The last time th^v discussed the matter. they agreed that they had plenty of water without putting the clause in at all. No parish would accept an offer containing such a clause. Mr S. J. Thomas: I am surprised at you, Mr Williams, talking in that way. Mr Howells: No, no. We are going to safeguard Ystradgynlais Lower. The Clerk said the question was as to whether the minutes were correct or not. A SCENE. Mr J. Howells moved that the minutes stand, and Mr S. Thomas seconded. Mr D. R. Morgan moved that the words referred to be deleted, and Mr David Lewis seconded, but the Amend- ment was defeated, and the resolution carried, Mr Howells insisting on urg- ing the claims of the minutes in spite of the chairman's ruling. Thumping the table, Mr Walters cried, "Sit down, Mr Howells, sit down, sit down." "No, I won't sit down. I am here to look to the interests of Ystrad- gynlais lower." When the motion had been carried, and quiet. was restored. Mr David Lewis said he thought Mr Howells ought to apologise to the chair. Mr Howells said if he had done anv- thing wrong, he did apologise, and the matter then ended. RATEPAYERS AND TH.E ELEC- TRICITY UNDERTAKING. A further matter arising out of the minutes was mentioned bv Mr D. R. Morgan. Mr Morgan said that ameng the items in the minutes. regarding the purchase of the electricity undertaking there was no stipulation as to whether the purchase should be confirmed by the ratepayers. He had himself told several that it was to be considered at ratepayers' meetings. It wa& a big undertaking, involving an outlay of £ 17,000. What was to be their posi- tion if people in certain wards ob- jected to the purchase? The Clerk: The remedy is to "chuck" you out at the next elec- tion! (Laughter). Mr D. R. Morgan said it all right for the Clerk to savt that, but they were responsible to the ratepayers for the control of Uie Council's business. The Clerk: Yes, but you cannot sub- mit everything you do to the rate- payers. Mr Howells: We are ient here by the ratepayers to do the work of the Coun- cil, Mr Morgan. Mr Morgan said this was an excep- tional matter. He understood that certain parts of the districts were not prepared to abide by what the Coun- cil had done. Mr Howells: It is settled now. The Chairman said lie had put it to the Clerk whether Ystradgynlais Highes was part and parcel of the district in the taking over of the Electric Plant and he replied in the affirmative. That being so he (the chairman), &aid they would want equal treatment for the upper part of the district, with the lower part. He understood that two of the Ystradgyn- lais district members were not favour- able to equal privileges for the upper part with the lower, but if they in the Upper Parish were going to take their share in the payment they would expect the same treatment asi Ystrad- gynlais. The Clerk said that would be given. The minutes were then adopted. LOCAL FIRE APPLIANCES. I The Clerk said a letter was to hand I from the Clerk to the County Council stating that at a meeting of the Stand- ing Joint Committee for the County I the question of tire appliance storage in Ystradgynlais district was con- sidered, and the committee regretted that there was no room for such stor- age in the Police Station, on the policemen's dwellings, but that they were sure the police would render all possible assistance in case of fire. Mr D. R. Morgan said this was rather a difficult matter. They had considered the matter of getting ap- pliances, and now found there was no place for storage. He'was quite sure I that at the earliest possible moment they would have to go into the ques- tion thoroughly, and find places in various parts of the district for stor- age. If fire now broke out, they had no means of coping with it. Mr Howells thought they ought to proceed with finding places as soon as possible, and Mr Morgan suggested the holding of a conference of representatives from each part of the district to see whether they could get places for storage. It was agreed to secure places for the accommodation of hand carts and hoses, and to proceed with the provis- ion of standpipes forthwith. ROADS BOARD AND BRYN- I MORGAN BRIDGES. A letter was read from the Roads Board regarding the, Council's applica- tion for a grant in respecting the erec- tion of Brynmorgan Bridges. The Board stated that whilst it was open to the Council to make an application in respect of a loan for the bridge which was not yet completed, they were now in communication with the Treasury as to whether they could make grants for work already carried out. Otherwise they could not make grants towards schemes excepting where they had beenl rendered necess- ary by unemployment created by the war. The Clerk said this would not help them Very much. Mr D. R. Morgan said he had formed the opinion that the Board could not I meet them in the matter. He thought they might get into communication I with the L.G.B. asking them to con- sider the position in Ystradgynlais so far as out of work labour in Septem- ber and October was concerned, saying J they had carried out many improve- j ments in which the Roads Board would be well advised in supporting them. I Mr T. Williams said they should put it to the L.G.B. that they did this because of the necessity of relief for unemployment, and after further dis- cussion it was agreed to. INFECTIOUS HOSPITAL' QUESTION The Local Government Board wrote regarding the, provision of. an Isolation Hospital for the district, and forward- ed particulars for the guidance of the Council in this matter. j It was agreed to abide by the Coun- cil's resolution to consider the matter with the Medical Officer at a special meeting of members. j PRINTING THE MINUTES Tenders for printing the minutes and agendas of the Council were con- i sidered, and on the motion of Mr D. j R. Morgan, secon led by Mr Howells. I it was agreed to give the work to "Llais Llafur" Co. I APPOINTMENT OF HAULIER Out of several applicants, Thomas Pearce, now temporarily employed by the Council, was appointed perma- nently at a wage of 30s. weekly. CWMTWRCH SEWERAGE. Mr Gerald Swayne, consulting en- gineer to the Council. wrote regarding the joint meeting of the Ystradgyn- lais, Pontardawe and LLmdilofawr Councils ro the ab-ove matter. He said that the local Coun- cil met at the Police Station on Tuesday, when he generally diseussed with the members the Cwmtwrch Sewerage Scheme. It was decided, on the proposition of Mr D. R. Morgan, that the whole of the Council should attend the conference in the afternoon at Pontardawe. This was held, but the Llandilofawr delegates did not attend. The members of the Pontardawe Coun- cil, however, with the Clerk and Engineer, were present, and after generally considering the matter, it was agreed that Mr J. Morgan, the engineer of the Pontardawe Council should ask the surveyor to the Llan- dilo Council to prepare a plan show- ing their proposals and give all the neoessarv information to him to en- able him to report on the subject to tlie Council, after which another joint meeting could be held. This report was confirmed. WATER MAIN TESTED. Mr Swayne further reported having tested the Council's S-inch watermain in the manner adopted in July last, and had pleasure in informing the Council that the result was ihighly satisfactory, there being no leakage in the main. Mr Wm. Walters and Mr S. J. Thomas were present also Mr Watkins, the surveyor. The contrac- tor's period of maintenance of the works expires in the first week in January, and he therefore would send in a certificate in favour of the con- tractor for the amount of the retention money, about E158. The Council consi dered the letter, and arranged for meeting the claim of the contractor for the retention money. SANITARY INSPECTOR'S REPORT I The Sanitary Inspector. Mr J. G. Roes. M.R.S.I.. submitted his report for the month, in which he said that nothing vet had been done to the dis- used shafts situated at Cwmphil and Abergiedd to prevent possible acci- dents. and he recommended that the Council should write again to the ground landlord, directing his atten- tion to the matter. He further recommended the Council to serve statutory notices on the fol- lowing parties to further refrain from disposing of house refuse on the road- side near their respective premises:— Messrs. H. Jones, Gomer Dennis, Jas. Stone. Thos. John Prosser, Twyn-y- rodyn. Aix-rera-vol, and Mr T. R. Davies. Pantycwrt, to remove all waste building material from the highway near Twyn-yrrodyn. As there was no fixed site at Colbren for the disposal of house refuse, and he desired the Council to decide upon what site such refuse could be dis- posed. He further recommended the Coun- cil to serve closing orders on the owner of the Pencwarcoch cottages. Penycae. The owner had been written to on two occasions directing his at- tention to the condition of the pro- perty, but nothing had been done. Mr Rees also reported on the in- sanitary condition of a dwelling house at Cefnbyrle, near Colbren, rendering it totally unfit for human habitation, and recommended that a closing order be served on the owner. —————

WITH THE SIXTH WELSHI

WITH THE SIXTH WELSH. G.C.G. MAN ON MASSACRE OF INNOCENTS. Havoc wrought by the Germans is well described by Private Albert Shoe- maker. a G.C.G. man in the 6th Welsh in a letter to his brother at 23, Cur- wen street, Gii-apneae-tirwen. Writing from St. Penant on December 9, Private Shoemaker declares:- "As our party went in the wake of the German stampede from Paris one could almost weep unceasingly at the scenes of devastation we met at every turn -wrecked villages, a deserted house left standing here and there, or the steeule of a beautiful church still towering as though on guard over the dead, pierced through and through with shell. Here and there we came across an altar in a church with the figure of Christ untouched, as though defying man a second time to destroy Him. "One meets with the F-iucy( Cockney, who, despite his unkempt appearance, always manages to make his presence felt by tantalising everyone who pre- I sents an equally woe-begone appersr- ttiiep as himself, often singing out. 'Hi mate, if this is soldering, then I hope the blooming war will never finish." "Wliqt struck me most was the ex- treme quietness everywhere. It was like an eternal Sunday, or a city cf mourning. "One noticed for miles' fields in which are hastily thrown mounds, with little wooden crosses, some without, all of which everlastingly testify to the pitiless mas.s.acro of innocents by a race of drunken .ravaging cowards, who will not face men,. except in over- whemling numbers, driven o-n by their cut-throat Kaiser. The German army, has committeed unprovoked attacks on innocent people, wounded soldiers, and put to death evcrv officer w ho has taken part in the war. "The Indian troops I have seen at different places seem to suffer from the cold and damp. but they bear it all with stoical indifference, and are fine fellows."

I DUMDUM BULLET TRICKERY

I DUM-DUM BULLET TRICKERY. It is understood from an authorita- tive American source that the Ameri- can manufactures who have sold dum- dum bullets to the Allies will state that the samples submitted by Count Bernstorff, the German Ambassador, are sporting bullets, and will not fit the bores of British. French, Belgian, or Russian army rifles.

THE BRECKHOCKS ON THE BRINY

THE BRECKHOCKS ON THE BRINY. I LAY OF AN ANCIENT MARINER. It is abundantly evident by this time that the Brecknock Territorials in their journey to Aden, were the helpless vic- tims of some soulless money-grabbers, who, in their greed for profits did not i h,itate to subject our gallant lads to needless discomforts, and even danger, arising from the condition of the ship "Dilwara," in which they made the jour- ney while the quality of the food sup- plied was the most inferior possible. It is to be hoped that the responsible par- ties will be called to book. The "punishment to fit the crime," in the opinion of one who suffered, would be a firing squad, and the, culprits up against a wall. And one cannot help sympathis- ing with this attitude of resentment. It is now known that when the Dilwara arrived at Aden, by some miscalculation there was no accommodation ready for the Brecknocks, and so they were sent forward to Bombay, with the Middlesex Territorials, who were also on board. Here they remained for 10 days, while the "old tub," as she was generally ) dubbed, was being cleared and refitted, preparatory to bringing the lancashires ) to France, and taking the Brecknocks back again to Aden. In spite of the discomforts of the voy- age, and the monotony of the conditions, the men retained their high spirits, and  the evening before they landed in Bom- ) bay a farewell" concert or rather a "thanksgiving" concert, was held on board. Several of our local lads took part, but what occasioned the great- est interest and amusement perhaps, was a competition instituted by the officers for a versified description of the pre- ceding month's experiences. We have received a copy of the prize composition—by Private A. Hands, of H Company, Brecon—and in spite of the hit and miss metre in some parts, we are sure our readers will enjoy the humorous touches, and sly digs at those responsible I' for the wanderings end disappointments of the Brecknocks. THE LAY OF THE ANCIENT I MARINER. (By Pte. A. Hands, of. Brecon.) I 'Twas. one August the war broke out, sir, And I was scarce eighteen, But the colonel said, perhaps I was tw enty So thtv stuck in the years. between. Well, they drafted us off to the fort, sir, Where v/e stayed till some orders came, Once we got shoved on an island- Coast defence, so they said, was the game. We were sleeping one night on the mud, sir, When a telegram came at Li&t. We had kippers and tea at dawn, sir, And all fears to the wind we cast; We could see fame and glory ahead, sir, While wo slid through the mud the next day To the station, I ne'er, shall forget it For' Hairy Wade said "Left, Right," all the way. When we boarded a boat at Southampton The kids, they all cheered as we came, But thought we were off to the front, sir, But it wasn't ourselves were to blame, 'Cause the War Office promised the Colonel We should sail for a summer clime, As they oouldn't stand us at the front, air, At least, not for a deuce of a time. So we sailed in the dead of night, sir, As soon as they got us on board, And we slept up in bags with all strings on, And tae novices all found themselves floored; And we all were mixed up in a mess, dr, In a mess we all were, we could see, By the time we wok e up in the morning Old England was far on our lea. We got down to the Bay on a Sunday, And the last thing we did was to pny. We studied the waves all the night, sir, I And we fed the fish most of tne day What upset us most was the language That was used by the Chief En^.neer. When the old tub would only go sideways 'Cause they burst up the steam fct«v».,ig gear. Well, they patched her up somehow again, sir, When at last we arrived at the Bock, But the rest had gone on ahead, sir And left the Black Sheep of the tkx-k. We stayed there for several days, sir, A week-thombout&-I should say, We were marched all up round the forts, sir, And Hary Wade said "Left, Right," all the way. We've since called around at Port Said, oir, But what the Port said we don't know, The officers may perhaps tell you They landed—we frizzled below. We sailed down the Cut to old Suez, And then dowit the Red feea we rome, i My impression is, bar rats and biscuits, It's been most atrociously tame. But making my story short, sir, As this was some yeans ago, I must hurry along with my yarn, sir, Or the rest you'll never know. Well, it seems we were ordered to Aden, But they could not provide us the grub, And they said they knew nothing about us And disowned the decrepit old tub. Now we sailed the Persian Gulf, sir, Sometimes, Bombay, they siy. But we are floating about with the biscuits, ,n-{,rï,

THE BRECKHOCKS ON THE BRINY

(C-ntinned from-Pr tpx oolumn) And we're getting old and grey. Perhaps the little tin gods of India May send us off once more To fetch some more tins of pineapple From dear old Singapore. When I dream of our noble Bresknocks, When I fight our battles once more, When I think of our glorious Empire, And it- ripceWs. trt-ure ftTe: When I think cf the mi;t<.us and kids, sir, It skives one a kind Cf T),-ii- C1 h 1p the Kinx and Ùc. Empire i I d'«i't th rk coire hick ag ¥

YSTRADGYNLAIS POULTRY j SHOW

YSTRADGYNLAIS POULTRY j SHOW. I LIST OF AWARDS. I A highly successful show took place on J Monday at the New I.L.P. Hall, Brecon- road, under the auspices of the YstracL gyniais Fur aud Feather Society. The sn6w exhibits were oonfined to exhibitor* living within three miles of Ystradgynlais post office, but nevertheless the function was excellently supported, and there were about 200 exhibitors. The olticials of the show were Messrs. Dan iivans, tire- con-road (chairman), D. Griffiths, Cwm- giedd (treasurer), Matthew R. Downey (secretary), Daniel Morgan, Pelican- street (show manager). The judges were Messrs. Charles Ford, Sketty (poultry), D. J. Morley, Port Talbot, and J. H. Whitford, Swansea (pigeons). The awards were as follow Orpington (any colour).—1, W. J. Wil- liams, Caerbont; 2 T. J. Da vies, Maesy- deri, Abercrave?; 3 Thomas Bros., Pen- rhos; reserve, Dan Evans, Brecon-road. Wyandotte (any colour).—1 W. J. llcp- kin, College-row; 2 Jas. Williams, Yorath Village; 3 W. J. Hopkin, Col- lege-row. Rhode Island Reds.-1 and 2, M, R, Downey, Cwmgiedd; 3 Sam Morgan, Cwmgiedd. Sussex.3—1 and 2 D. M. Griffiths, Cwm- giedd 3 Jno. Griffiths, Penparc Farm. JUmorca, Leghorn, or Aiidalusiaii.-I and 2 Geo. Morgan, Pvlicau-street; 3 W. H. Davies, Yorath Village. Rocks (any colour).—1 Jno. Griffiths, Cwmgiedd 2 Tom Morgan, Ynisuchaf; 3 Juo. Griffiths, Pehparc. Any Variety (not before mentioned).— 1 Jno. Griffiths, Cwmgiedd; 2 David Llewelyn, Ynis. Any Variety Bred 1914.—1 Sam Mor- gan, Cwmgiedd; 2 W. J. Hopkin, Col- lege-row 3 Thomas Bros., Penrhos. Selling Class (15s.).—1 D. Prioe and Son, Bryngrinen; 2 Dan Evans, Brecon- road 3 Jno. Griffiths, Cwmgiedd. Bantams (any variety, Cockerel).—1 Jno. Morgan, Metz; 2 W. L. Phillips, Pen-y-Bryn; 3 Jno. Morgan, Metz. Bantams (any variety, Hen).—1 Mrs. Lyons. Smith-terrace; 2 and 3 Jno. Mor- gan, Metz. PIGEON SECTION. Homers (flown 200 miles).—1 Mathiaa and Newson, Periybont-row; 2 Jones Bros., Gkuirhyd 3 Evan Anthony, Cftnsu twrch. Homers (flown 100 miles).—1 Horace Marke, Gladstone-terrace; 2 Jones Bros., Glanrhyd; 3 Stephen Wright, Glanrnyd. Likeliest Flyer (bred 1914) C-ock.-I Evan Anthony, Cwmtwrch; 2 W. Lewie, Church-street; 3 W. T. Williams, Col- lege-row. Likeliest Flyer (bred 1914) Hen.-l H. Grey, Abercrave; 2 H Marke, Gladstone- terrace; 3 Jones Bos., Glanrhyd. Class No. 17.—J. Phillips, Gladstone- terrace 2 Ernest Evans, Penybont»row 3 H. Marke, Gladstone-terrace. Class No. 18, Pigeon (any other variety) -1 Hector Grey, Abercrave; 2 and 3 W. R. Thomas, Oddfellows-street. SPECIALS. Bc-st Exhibit in Show.—J. Morgan, Metz, O.E.G. Bantam. Best Exhibit in Poultry Section.—J. Morgan Metz, O.E.G. Bantam. Best Exhibit in Poultry Section (op- posite sex).—J. Griffiths, Cwmgiedd, Barred Rock Hen. Best Bar.tam in Show (excluding J. Morgan's bird).-Willie Phillips, Peny- brvn. Best Bantam in Show (opposite Dox).- Mrs. Lyons, Smith-terrace. Best HomeT in Show.—Evan Anthony, Lower Cwmtwrch.

ITHE SEAPLANE IN WAR fc

THE SEAPLANE IN WAR. fc What are named soapla ses by the Ad- miralty, and hydro-aeroplaoies by some experts in the nbcxALirgs of words, are in reality aeroplanes with floats. The sea- plane is the natural deve lopment of the aeroplane, and has jastified in its thrtie years existence all th it was predicted fer it. The Fabre hydio-aeroplane was  h* first heavier-than-air machine to make successful flights starting from and alight- ing upon wc-ter, and its seagull move- ments revitilsd the ext-riordinary possi- bilities of the new arm of war. It was not unt 1 July of this year (says the London "Daily News") that the true "land and water" type of then popular phrase, "boat that fles," arrived, and it was the work of Naval Shipwright Sh^w, a young airm-an at the Ea tchurch Naval Flying School. The posdb^itfe of the hydm-aer^phne nierft dramt'cslly brought to public notice by Mr. F. K. McClean, who, in August, 1912, was the first to fly uo the | Thames to Westminster, and to alight on the river, after skimming the water and >v -111 under the arches of several bridges. Two vpbes ago Commander Samson ac- complished a. world's record in navaf flying. He piloted the Short hydro- aeroplane F41 from Sheemeas to Ports- mouth, a rrwRore d flying diatonoe of 194 mile*, m two and a quarter hours, and ivac'ied an altitude of 2,000ft.