Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
LABOUR LEADER AT THE FRONTI

LABOUR LEADER AT THE FRONT. Mr RamsayMacdonald Back Home Again. HIS THOUGHTS IN THE TRENCHES. Mr Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., on Sunday, delivered a remarkable speech on "The War and the Future" at Westbourne Park Chapel. He had a fine reception, and the speech made an -obviously deep impression. "Less than three weeks ago," said Mr Macdonald. "I was standing where shells, were flying to the right and left of me and over my head. A very dis- tinguished European statesman, who lias turned soldier for the time beaing, was with me. We were within the line of fire. We saw the wounded being carried away from the trenches. We watched the magnificent, the unstinted sacrifice of the soldier giving up his life for certain greait ideals, and my friend turned to me and asked if irfc had ever struck me that the wa,r might end before we were prepared to do our duty in seeing that those ideals were carried out." Those ideals, and that duty they in- volved, were the text of Mr Macdon- ald's speech. The three great issues involved in the war were, he said, that small nationalities should be independ- ent, self-governing, amd self-respecting; the mninltenance of public law and the sacrcdness of treaties: and the issue of militarism itself. Those were all moral issues, fundamental and essential. There was no division of opinion upon the fundamental facts that there was a moral foundation for small national- ities, that treaties and public law ought to be i-iglicliv respected, and that mili- tarism ought to disappear as a feature of civilisation. The trouble always was that moral phrases and intentions could be exploited l., the non-moralists, and because that was a fact no line could be drawn hehvoon religjon and life. MILITARISM AT HOME. I How was militarism to be disestab- I isb,-eoiile of that type in our own midst. (Applause). Amid cries of "Shame!" Mr Macdonald read the fol- lowing exti-aet from a report of the presidential address of Professor W. Ridgeway at the annual meeting of the Classical Association, held in London on Friday: "The history of Greece warned us against giving a hasty ore- dence to the dream of perpetual peace when military monarchies had fallen, and democracy was universal. A modern, world filled only with democratic States would be like a stagnant pond in some shady spot in which no higher animal force could live, but overflowing with all the lower and baser forma of life. In a world of perfecity peace humanity would perish from its own physical and moral corruption." "That," commented Mr Macdonald, "is the wicked nomsense that palms it self off a.s learn ling in some of our uni- versities to-day." If the jxilicies that made the war were to continue, then the war had given arguments in favour of conscrip- tion. that were absolutelyunanswerable. To-day we were resting upon the con- script army of France. We could not again go inito alliance and tell our Allies to wait for six months for our troops to come up and support them in the trenches. DEFENCE OF THE SMALL I NATIONS. Eloquently Mr Macdonald championted the cause of small nationalities. "We are going to set Belgium upon its legsi again." he said amid applause, "but what are we going to do with Finland, Poland, A lsace, and Persia ? The quee- ti011 of Belgium is so important and absolutely necessary that it is a moral obligation upon us, but the sacrifice has been so great and the enthusiasm so that. we cannot con- tent ourselves by simply sotting up Belgium while these other small nation- alities rema i Th in subjection, in chains, and crushed down under the heels of mightv military Powers in Europe." In the eyes of military nece-sity there wag no such thing as public law. The foundations of a H andhsting peace could only ho laid hv democracy, and democracy 1)(I educated not only in the knowledge of things but in ifne, accurate and true feeling and insight. Peoples had not made war, but w hen wars were made peoples had always joined in them. A crowd never danced until someone p'ayoxl a tune. and the thine; that was necessary was that mocniev s^ou VI have time to act be- fore the .final «+ace was reached. If the Dcaee organisations, the hrother- hood*. the Churches. the international Labour and Co-operative movements, and the specialised peace parties had bee' (riven rix weeks with an open fio-d in which +o work, argue, and me- gotiate 90 1)<<' r. Pi, üf the wars of the world would never have happened. (Ap- plause).

NOVEL RECRUITING APPEAL

NOVEL RECRUITING APPEAL. A novel recruiting appeal war, made at the Shaftesbury Theatre, Ioondon, on Monday night, wheni between the acts of Mr Benson's production of frewre V. Mr Benson. General Sir Tir' T V—1. 0-1 +i,„ t ^d Mayor of 7' cl'c; "l:r\ vniKm- men to enlist. ♦

HEALTH OFYSTRADGYNLAIS

HEALTH OFYSTRADGYNLAIS COUNTY MEDICAL OFFICER'S RE- PORT. SOME PERTINENT QUESTIONS. By the courtesy of Mr. G. J. Rees, M.R.S.I., Sanitary Inspector to the Ys- tradgynlais District Council, we have been permitted to peruse a copy of the report of the Medical Officer of Health for the county of Brecon (Dr. E. Colston Wil- liams, M.D.,B.S.,F.R.C.S.,D.Ph.). As Dr. Williams explains, the report is for the year 1913, and he did not take up his duties until January 1914, but he compiled the report at the request of Dr. John C. Bridge, who had resigned the appointment on having accepted a post at the Home Office. Many parts of the report are comments on the report of Dr. Richards, the Medi- cal Officer to the Ystradgynlais Council, but they are not leis interesting than the original matter. The report, in fact, is a very valuable document, and. reflects high credit on Dr. Williams. POPULATION, ETC. Dr. Williams says that the population of the administrative area up to the middle of the year was 60,970, the only part of the county to show marked in- crease, being Ystradgynlais, viz., 12,200, aa against 10,472 in 1911. In a passage on infantile mortality, it is shown that the rate was 129.6 per 1,000, an increase of 33.4 per cent. over the previous year. Dr. Williams says As the figures dealt with are for small districts, a small variation in the number of deaths makes a large variation in the mortality rate, and undue significance must not be attached to the figures. The doctor quotes the "pertinent remarks"¡' of Dr. Richajds regarding the effects of diarrhoea, and bad housing conditions upon infant mortality, upon which we commented when the doctor's report was issued, and he emphasises* the importance of this matter. INFECTIOUS DISEASES. In a reference to infectious diseases, Dr. Williams points out that no fewer than 129 cases were notified, a decrease however, of 18 on tho previous year. He says: There were six deaths, five in children under five, the other a woman in child bed. Brynamman and Ystradgyn- lais both had small epidemics. There is need for an isolation hospital for the use of these areas, and complaint jr, made from the Pontardawe Union, which bor- ders on Ystradgynlais, that its own suc- cess in isolating cases of infectious diseas- es is rendered much less by the absence of such facilities in Ystradgynlais and. the reintroduction of cases from that area. He urges attention to this matter at once. Among the 622 cases of diphtheria in 1913, Ystradgynlais had the largest num- ber of any district, viz., eight. Dr. Wil- liams thinks the Ystradgynlais and Bryn- mawr might be able to join with their respective neighbours, Pontardawe and Nantyglo, in the provision of joint j schemes for isolation. Unfortunately the negotiations between Ystradgynlais and Pontardawe have fallen through. WATER AND SEWERAGE. j The water supply of the district is derived from upland springs, and is good I and abundant, the distribution in the higher levels only being, at fault. This has temporarily been remedied by running the water from a higher spring direct into the mains. The increased needs of the area, especially when the system of sewerage will be canoo out, wi?I be ade- quately met by the laying of a supple- mentary and inch main (now completed). A storage tank has been erected at Tyny- pant to supply Brookland-terrace, Aber- crave, and about 30 yards of two-inch steel pipes have been laid for the con- venience of the houses. Dr. Williams makes a passing reference to the Ystradgynlais sewerage scheme, and points out that under the terms of the contract the work is to be completed within 18 months of the engineer's order to commence. There is no public arrange- ment in existence for the disposal of excrement, but daily scavenging is now made from house-to-house throughout the whole of Ystradgynlais Lower. Dustbins have been provided at Colbrem, and their contents are removed pericdoc-ally. Referring to house inspection under the Housing and Town Planning Act, 1909, Dr. Williams points out that in some dis- tricts, commendabla activity is shewn for example in Crickhowell, Brecon, and at Ystradgynlais. An. interesting review of the activities in 'house building during the year is also given, with the general contents of which our readers are already acquainted. Regarding tho milk supply the medical officer says that practically the whole is produced within the area, and is generally of good quality. The cowsheds are faulty in many respects. The common lodging houses in the area, (including Ystradgynlais) are fairly satis- factory. Dr. Williams concludes his re- port by appending several very inform- ling tables of statistics and a note of thanks to the various sanitary inspectors of the county.

No title

Two French officers, prisoners of war on parole in the time of the great Peninsular War, were lodged in the house now occupied by Mr Gwilvm, Medical Hall, Bi econi. Their names were Captain lie Mem and Captain Pago. The V ienna Labour paper, the A,r- heiter Zeitung," has published a pro- tect against the numerous sentences of d-v-f- 1 1<' .>2tr::1 militHY tri buna ls.

ILABOUR CONFERENCE

I LABOUR CONFERENCE. South Wales Resolutions. I PENSIONS FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS The adequacy of Government pensions to disabled soldiers and to widows and families of those killed whilst serving their country was discussed at a con- ference of Labour organisations, held at the Memorial Hall, London, on Fn- day,. The conference was presided over by Mr J. A. Seddon, and was at- tfsnded by representativès of labour movements from all parts of the coun- try. Our London correspondent learn- ed that on behalf of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain, a resolu- tion was submitted by Mr C. B. Stan- ton, Aberdare, expressing the opinion that the p resent scale of pensions was inadequate and asking the Government to provide for payment of a pension of not less than £ 1 weekly for widows .)f those killed in the service of their country, with an additional 3s. 6d. for each child, and also £ 1 per week for soldiers permanently disabled whilst serving with the colours. This resolu- tion was carried. CENTRAL LABOUR COLLEGE Consideration was also given by the conference to the questions relating to the Central Labour College. In this connected it was reported that as a re- sult of the National Union of Railway- men and the South Wales Miners' Federation co-operating for the pur- pose of removing certain financial diffi- culties, the continuance of the work of the college was now definitely as- sured. At present the controlling board consists of four representatives of the South Wales Miners' Federa- tion, a.nd two from the National Union of Raihvaymen. LOCAL DELEGATES. Amongst those present were Mr J. Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., Mr "William Brace, Mr J. H. Thomas, M.P., Messrs J. Winsitone, Pontypool; George Bark- er, A bertillery Vernon Hartshorn, Maesteg; Walter Lewis, Ben Davies, D. David, and Noah Ablett, Rhonddj; C. B. Stanton, Aberdare; E. Gill, Abertillery; James Manning, Blaina; J. E. Williams, National Union, of Railwaymen; H. Hiles, South Wales Baker- and Confectioners; W. J. Davis, E. Sanders, Brassworkers; T. J. Clatworthy and Channing, Cardiff Coal Trimmers; W. Hopkins, Mon- moUtth and South Wales Enginemen E Charles, N.U.R., Quaker's Yard; J. Hodge, M.P. A. Pugh and G. Davis, Steelsmelters' Association H. Gos.ing-, Watermen and Lightermen's Associa- tion. —————

ANTHRACITE MINERS CLAIMS

ANTHRACITE MINERS' CLAIMS. ACTIONS IN THE COUNTY COURT. Thomas Ray, of Llandebie, claimed compensation at Llandilo County Court on Thursday from the Llandebie Col- liery Company for injury received. Mr Meager (instructed by Mr Randall, Llanelly), was for the plaintiff, and Mr Prosser, Swansea., appeared for the com- pany. Plaintiff, who had been abroad as a soldier, said he had worked at the col lierv for three years, and became screen caretaker. On February 25, while clearing the revolving screen, which was clogged with wet coal. The brake-stick he was using caught a cross- bar, and the other end struck him in the groin. He did not give notice of the accident to the manager because lie had beeni seen immediately, after by a. colliery official. In April he saw the manager, who did not dispute the acci- dent, but said he would be advised by Dr. Dunbar, the compensation doctor. For the defence it was contended the man was suffering from ague, and not from the injury, and, further, that proper notice was not given of the acci- dent. His Honour found for the com- pany. COLLIER'S INJURY PICTURESQUE- ? LY DESCRIBED. Benjamin Jones, Brynymaell, Gar- mint, colliery, brought an action at Llandilo County Court on Thursday against the North Amman Colliery Company for injury sustained by a hundredweight of coal falling on his kmee. The result of the injury was the growth of a cist the size of which was variously described. Dr. Hawkins said it was sized between a damson and a walnut. Dr. Lancaster be-ingasked. by Marlay Samson to describe the size in frail}, if possible, said it was the size of a cherry, and Dr. Griffiths cem- pai-ed it with a hazel nut. It was stated that the applicant worked for etiighteten months after the accident against the advice of his medical man, and a.n operation had now become necessary. Assisted by anasrSessor. his Honour came to the conclusion that the con- dition of the leg was due to the acci- dent, but there was no justification for the man giving up his work in October, as he diid, after working so long after the accident. For incapacity during the- impending operation applicant would, undoubtedly, be •entitled to compcnea- tiora.

A CRITICISM OF THE NONRESISTlJR

A CRITICISM OF THE NON- RESISTlJR. LABOUR PARTY CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS. If Germany had adopted the ideal of force t-hati was no reason why Britain should depart from tie force of ideaL This was the keynote of an address by Mr Arthur Henderson. M.P., at AVhit- field's Tabernacle on Sunday afternoon. Some people, he said, were ready to declaim against militarism in Germany but were not unwilling to support uni- versal mrilitarism in England. Those people were constantly saying: "W e told you so." They took up the atti- tude that they were .not as the rest and asked why, their advice was not taken. That was their position in one breath, and then they were declaiming in the next that the only country that was prepared for this war was Germany, armed up to the teeth, and they were puzzling their brains as to how they could get England to go and do like- wise. Of another class who refuse to recog- niise the right to ta.ke up arms even on the defensive side, Mr Henderson said that in those circumstances it was im- portant that we should understand not only the moral significance of this great crisis but also its moral implication. He could respect the holders of non- resistance views but he could not agree with their contusions. It was not an easy position And required great cour- age and confidence. It might involve the non-resister in much sacrifice, it might mean the risk of being shot rather than incur the responsibility for shooting. He would like to reason with the non-resister and would askt him if he was satisfied that his position was as sound as he imagined, either ethically or logically. DEFENCE OF BELGIUM'S RIGHTS. I Did iiti mean that a niation, a com- munity, an individual was to be de- stroyed rather than be protected or saved by force ? There must be a limit, and like every other principle, it must have some regard,^to circumstances. Whale it was sacredly and eternally true that in certain circumstances "Thou shalt not kill," he believed it was sacredly true that in other circum- I st lances "Thou shalt not permit the weak to be killed." It was the highest duty devolving upon the nation and upon the individual to repress every form of injustice and wrong and to in- dicate the right. Although in the closing days of July he longed with all his heart for the possibili,ty of Britain keeping itself out of this war, when he found that a foul doodhadj blean perpotaiated, that a moral obligation had been thrown to the wind, that a solemn compact had been reduced to a scrap of paper, that the Belgian people had been treated al- most worse than one wild animal would use another, it seemed to him that, we being under a solemn compact with those people, all our resources--moral, military, and financial—ought to be behind that little people to defend tlteir rights. (Cheers).

I I I I FARMER AND WIFE SENT FOR TRIAL i I

FARMER AND WIFE SENT FOR TRIAL The New Radnor magistrates on Saturday further investigated the charges against a farmer, manned John J.Williams, of The Burl, Llanfihangel Nantmellan, New Radnor, and Lucy Williams, his wife, of stealing a nufn- J ber of sheep the property of neigh- bouring farmers. The total number of shoec-p alleged to have been, stolen was sixteen, the property of Thomas Price, Siluria John Thomas Price, Wolfpitxs Ii John and Thomas Rogers, The Rhewev John Owens, Llaraevan, Ijanfihangel Na,ntmellan; William Phillips, High- gate, New Radnor; Edward Davies, Maesmellan, New Radnor; and J. J. Pro ber t, Yardro. It was stated that they were found on the prisoner's land marked with his pitch marks. In re- gard to rche sheep claimed by J. T. [ Price, the police evidence was that • prisoner's son stated that he had pitch- marked the sheep, and that his mother had told him to do so. Prisoners were committed to the j Radnorshire Assizes, to be held on the 23rd inist.

l14W I COURAGEOUS BRECONSHIRE WIFE j

l 14W COURAGEOUS BRECONSHIRE WIFE, j An inquest was held at Trevinion, near Talgarth, on Saturday afternoon, by- -the acting-coroner (Mr W. Jor.es- Yv illiams), of Ystradgynlais, on E. W. J. Powell, of Trevinion Fach, son of Alderman W. Powell, Pendre, Llan- gorse, who was found dead the prev- ious day. Deceased's wife, on return- ing home from Talgarth Fair, failed to find her husband in the house, aild went in search of him. In an outbuilding she discovered him as though standing upright, but he made no response to her calls. Then she noticed a oord tied round his neck and fastened to a beam. She instantly cut t.he cord with a knriie which she found in deceased's pocket, but he was dead. Deceased had been a little depressed, being tmuhled greatly with asthma.. The jury returned a verdict that de- eomnmit.t#»d suicide by hanging while temporarily insane.

AT THE WORLDS MERCY I

AT THE WORLD'S MERCY, I PLIGHT OF 7,000,000 PEOPLE IN BELGIUM. Mr Emile Francqui, one of the most prominent of Belgian bankers, re- turned to Brussels the early part of the week, afer a. brief visit to London. Mr Francqui, who is chairman of the executive of the Belgian National Re- lief Committee, a component part of the Commission for Relief in Belgium (3, London Wall-buildings, E.C.) said: "The world has not vet awakened to what is going on in Belgium. People do not realise that seven-eights of *.he Belgian nation are still on the soil that was once their own. Surrounded by contending armies, prohibited from communication with the outside world, seven million Belgians are to-day being governed by, the Germans, who ootro- tend they have no responsibility for feeding our civil population because, according to the Hague Convenftiomt, an army of occupation is not respon- sible for feeding a conquered nation, the vanquished being required to find sustenance for their victors. "We Belgians who have stayed in the country that we love are truly be- tween the upper and nether millstone and we have been ground exceeding small. "We in Belgium would have been powerless to meet the emergency had it not been for outside support. The formation of the Commission for Re- lief, at the instigation of the American and Spanish Ministers, solved a tragic problem and saved a nation. Under the American flag we drove a coach and horses through the callous brutality of the Hague Convention, penetrated the lines of three armies, and secured the removal of embargoes made by half a dozen nations. Our 'coach and horses' took the shape of carnal barges laden at Rotterdam with food that could not have roached, us except under the neutral auspices of the commissioner. "The German authorities undertook that the food should not be touched by their troops—an undertaking which they have scrupulously .observed—and reoenth] they have stopped all requisi- -tiond which might hinder the task of victualling distressed districts. "Thanks to the Commission for Re- lief, we have in Belgium just enough food to keep body and soul together in seven million people for a few weeks. We can scrape through on about £ 1,250,000 worth of food a. month. Everybody in Belgium is now en a ration, the rich as well as the desti- tute. If anything happened to disturb the steady working of the commission's tremendous operations we should starve before you could put it right again. "The generosity of the Americam, Canadian, Australian, and New Zea- land public has been, magnificent. I only wish the people in those far-off lands could see how their self-sacrifice alleviates misery and allays disease and suffering. "We are a proud and thrifty race, but we are now at the mercy, of the world. If that mercy is strained we shall no longer exist."

GERMAN SPY IN KENT HOSPITAL

GERMAN SPY IN KENT HOSPITAL. DISCOVERED AND TAKEN TO FRANCE I AND SHOT. A special correspondent of the "Daily -Itail" writes "An Oblate Father of St. Francois de Sales, who is a professor at Walmer, near Dover, tells in a letter to his family at Chambery, an extraordinary story of a German spy who posed as a Belgian refugee in England, but was was finally unmasked and shot. "y ou must have heard about the Ger- main api)rfs," writes the, good Father, "about their skill and audacity. Their unceasing watchfulness, which was never at fault, extended over the whole world. Even now they are constantly being caught in England, where a boat cannot leave ths shore without the Gernuui Navy knowing it. "Among the Belgian wounded treated at the Naval Hospital of Deal ^Keat) i had noticed one very intelligent—a ser- geant—who &s sooit as his wound was dressed would begin drawing. His work showed a certain originality. Re was always rea dy to do his comrades a service When lie left the hospital ne was sent. to Folkestone, where there are a good many convalescent Belgians. What was my astonishment to meet him some time afterwards, clean shaven, in a private house in the neighbourhood of Deal which had been turned into an infirmary. ile, told me he had fallen on the skating riak at Folkestone, and had been spit- ting blood over since, lie aeenied very downhearted and not without reason. "His old father, his wife, and three children had been shot by the Germans. Such waa the l;e he had just received from one of his friends, a doctor at Liege. He was in a state of nervous ex- citement, and spoke of nothing but kill- ing all the Germans he met when he was able to return to Belgium. Filled with compassion, I exhorted him to take I courage and trust in God, and left him after making him a present of some cigarettes. Less than a week later one of the at- tendants at the same infirmary met the priest and told him that the poor Bel- gian invalid had been fetched three days before by Belgian soldiers, taken to Calais, confronted with another Belgian soldier, whose name and history he had appropri.it:d, a? d shot as a. German spy.

BACK FROM THE BALKANS

BACK FROM THE BALKANS. Brothers Whose Lives Were Threatened. I MESSRS. BUXTON INTER- I VIEWED. I ——.——. I Mr Noel Buxt-on, M.P., accompanied by his brother, Mr Roden Buxton, ar- I rived in London during the week-end after paying a lengthened visit to the Balkan States, Greece, and Italy. It will be remembered that Mr Bux- ton and his brother, who are numbered among the leading authorities on the Balkan States, were the victims of a murderous attack by members of the Young Turk party in Bucharest, when I they were in the capital on the occa- sion of _the funeral of the late King of Rumania. They have, happily,, both recovered from thd effects of that at- tack, During their visit they went to all the capitals of the Balkan States, and on their way home stopped at Athens, Rome and Paris. To a press representative, Mr Noel Buxton said he could not make any statement about the political situation in the Balkans. "But I may say," he went on, "that I was immensely struck by the extra- ordinary courage and skill which the Serbians have shown in their fight against Austria. "After we came out of hospital," Mr Roden Buxton mentioned, "we went to see our assailant in prison, and dis- cussed with him Herbert Spencer and John Stuart Mill and ethics of political assassination. "Contrition at all for what he had done?" Mr Buxton added in answer to a question, "Not. the least." While reluctant to enter into any detailed discussion of the political situation in the Balkans, Mr Noel Bux- ton said they felt clear that the var- ious aims of the Balkan States were in no way irreconcila ble. Greece was at present giving material evidences of friendship with Serbia, and he pointed out further that should a renewed Aus- trian invasion of Serbia be allowed to reach a successful issue Bulgaria might well be driven, in the interests of self- preservation, into the arms of Turkey and Austria. Of the gallantry of the Serbs both the brothers spoke with emphasis and i enthusiasm. f "We reach Nish," Mr Noel Buxton said, "when the Serbians were at their lowest point of depression. They frankly admitted that their army was in great measure demoralised. Some of the legations, indeed, were on the point of taking their departure from the city. The extraordinary rally of the Serbs is not even now wholly easy to explain. It was partly due to the arrival of much-needed munitions just • in the nick of time, which enabled them to support their infantry adequately, with artillery, as they had not been able to do before, and pair-tiv to the wonderful elan which the Serbians al- j I ways exhibit. Their old King, who is over f-eventy and in feeble health, came out of his semi-retirement and actually shouldered- a rifle and went with his iren into the trenches." I "And this makes me the more anx- ious to press the claims of the Serb- ian Relief Fund upon the people of this country. It has already saved a great number of lives and it has done much to encourage the spirit of the mem bers of that brave nations. "As a people they keenly appreciate any sympathy which may be extend- ed to them, and they have been im- mensely delighted and encouraged by the Vending of a contingent of therRcd Cross workers under the auspices of Lady Paget, the wife of our late Minister of Belgrade, and which is now established at Uskub. "Their wcrk is a model to all the other hospital workers in the country and it has acted as a wonderful stimu- lus to the Serbians. 'When I was in the country, an im- mense problem was presenting itself in the shape of the numbers of refugees who had fled from the dis.tricts which had been in the occupation of the Aus- trian troops. These amounted to nearly a cluarter of the population of the coun- Irv, and they have now gone to the Southern parts of Serbia. "They were arriving every, day in Nisli with their family wagons and the few belongings they could rescue from the invaders. Some of them were un- able to nnd shelter in the town, and numbers were dying every day from the effects of the cold. "The whole resources of the country are taken up by the desperate strugole which is now being waged against the enemy, and it is impossible to expect it unaided can deal adequately with the necessities of these poor people. "It seems to me that the least that the British friends of Serbia can do— and we must all have been struck with I the heroic fight they have waged-is to send help, not only to the Serbian j wounded, but also to these re fugees. j "Therefore, I hope that the Serbian Relief Fund, of which Sir Edward Bovle, 69, Queen's-gate, S.W., is the treasurer, will be adequately sup- -1 -I.. ported. ————— —————

No title

j the result of Monday's groat firo L1' 1 )J. 1. (" ,,IU pl\:1 Merxem, near Antwerp, the oi!works have the hak •••-r.i of tho -V rquet:cr'.2 Ar.vcr- soise.

I THE WESTPHALIAN COALI SYNDICATE

I THE WESTPHALIAN COAL I SYNDICATE. EFFORTS TO EFFECT ITS RENEWAL. Questions as to the renewal of t,he Rhenish-Westphaiian Coal Syndicaue have entered upon a new phase. The mineowners were requeued to make a statement to the syndicate committee by Decem ber 20 last as to whether they were willing to refrain from making anv sales w h atever until September 30, 1915, for delivery from January, 1916. in order to allow time for the continua- tion of negotiations for the renewal. The "Viktoria" Compa.ny apparently made their acceptance subject to being granlted a higher allotment in the new contract, whereas the Langerbrahm in- terests. who conclude notable contracts over long* periods through their own trading company outside the syndicate, will only agree to the proposal of with- holding sales for 1915 if that special privilege of outside contract ing is al- lowed to them. The other mine-owners have declaired themselves willing to grant the demands of the Viktoria Company and the Langenbrahm group, but only, on the condition, as regards the latter, that the quantities contrac- ted for ouJ;(le the syndicate he aUowpd f-vr out of tn'T" syndicate al'o'-me^ts;. which condition, however, has bean re- fused. Fresh attempts will be made to in- duce the merp Vw-s to ^-ithhold for 1916 provisional1 y only until January 31, 1915. instead of Sepember 30 nexi. If aU the rr-,ri)-m fall i1"\t.f) V.,¡a. n meeting will be held this week at which the question of the syndicate's renewal will be exclusively dealt with. It is hinted in some quarters that there is but little prospect of a satisfactory agreement being reached, a.nd even t hat the collapse of the syndicate is pretty certain to ensue.

SHILLING INCREASE ON LONDON COAL

SHILLING INCREASE ON LONDON COAL. CAUSES OF THE INCREASE. "There is no need for the public: to become a [armed because coal has gone up a shilling per ton." said a repre- sentative of Messrs. E. A. Cornwall. "Prices are by no means abnormal yet, and there will have to be very con- siderable developments before they got as bad as when the strike was on, whea coal was over €2 per ton." Compared with last year's prices at the corresponding period, coal is only 2s. to 2s.6d. more per ton, which is remarkable considering the war. The increase is due not so much to the shortage of coal, for there is no actual shortage, but the fact that the coal can/not be brought to London in suffi- cient quantities. Owing to the govern- mental demands upon the railways, it is impossible to get enough trucks to carry the coal, while the water tran-'t it also interfered with. Ships have to follow the Admiralty instructions owing to the presence of mines in our coastal waters, and this makes the passage much slower. COUNTRY FIRST. "There is no blame to anybody," said the gentleman referred to. "The country and our soldiers have to be thought of first, and if the famine of coal got so bad that we had to pay £ 5 a ton we must not grumble. But surely things are not m> bad when you Carl., stiill get coal art 26s. per ton The merehant.s are not making more than the ordinary. fair trade profit, for there are inereas?# freights to pay, and the price of fodder for horses ha." gone up. Another import-ant fac'or in the !O<1 \1:1.- ton is the shortage of labour caused through so many men joining the col- ours." As showing the ex-ent of the delay, unavoidable no doubt through the mili- tary demands made up'-n thcv "J ,,y lines, it may be point -1 out that one colliery coal was pla,e-d in the trucks ready for transit +o T Noveinber, and has not reached its destination yet HOW PRICES VARY. Prices vary a little in the va districts, but a compa n-cir rf "-o charge IjVs round about shows the ifgures to ave^^a n, fnl- low- Per ton. Best Silkstone. from Best House coal, from 31«.. to "3. Seconds, from 2%d..to (L, Kitchen, from 28" 2&- Pri: to Stove, varying .25^ 2&0., to 27s. Best Nut«. ? Ad to QO. And one place in Brixton wt's lyolcll.- advo.itisirg "Good Home Cool at 25s. per ton.

EMPLOYER S CLAIM ON RECRUIT I

EMPLOYER S CLAIM ON RECRUIT. ———. ——— The Northampton magistrates granted an application made on he-haM ofMr A. Clarke, a builder for s\n order upon the military authorities directing them to rcglnr- gli apn'-criticc who had enlisted. Mr H. W. Williams said that his client was not unpatriotic, for 20 per cent, of his employees weue serving the colours, and he wax trffltjug them liberally. The however. had h!m, n.r»d Mr f. du! t of a ("ld\. W;J:) obivlierko'to tho&o in authority.