Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE FOOD PROBLEM i

THE FOOD PROBLEM. GOVERNMENT MUST INTER VENE. WELsa LABOUR LEADER'S VIEW. Mr. Vernon Hartshorn, the well-known Labour leader, writing in a contemporary, makes some interesting statements on the serious problem of the steady in- crease in the cost of life's necessaries. This problem, which is daily becoming graver, is one that wall affect the work- ers most seriously, although no section of the community can afford to remain in- different. There is a ring of "patriotic" profit- mongers in this country who take a mean and criminal advantage of the pre- sent crisis to increase thedr share of this world's goods, and it is only by the drastic and immediate intervention of the Government that the remedy is to be found. The risks of shipping have now become minimised by the employment of mine- sweepers. The British Navy has also been successful' in sweeping the Germans from off the, seven seas, but the steady increase in prices is still maintained. The British public is-prepared to pay the price of war, with bravery and forti- tude, of a natural and inevitable short- age. But there is, however (says Mr. Hartshirn), a fundamental difference be- tween a natural and inevitable shortage in the necessaries of life and the artifi- cial scarcity which is brought about by selfish exploitation on the part of private interests. It may be taken for grant- ed that the people will not bear quietly and patiently the private exploitation of their needs in time of war for the pur- pose of swelling private profits. This war is going to teach us many things, and not the least important will be the con- viction which it will bring to many who have hitherto held different views that the only way in which the interests c-f a community can be protected against ex- ploitation is by collectivist action and State control. This war will destroy once and for ever the old economic fal- lacy that the machinery of private owner- ship has in its very mechanism the means of adjusting itself to the varying needs of the community without the necessity of public interference. SOCIALISM'S PRACTICAL POLICE I The cry in favour of the Government control of the food supply of the coun- try is now going up not from Labourists and Socialists alone but from sections that have hitherto opposed collectivist proposals. This is extremely significant. But experience teaches all of us. What Labour has failed to do1 by an extensive propaganda of theories is now being done by the terrible difficulties arising out of the war. It is an expensive process of teaching, but it will bring fixed con- victions which will remain when the war is over, and which, will effect a peaceful revolution in important parts of our in- dustrial and economic system; CAUSES OF HIGH PRICES. I Th economic circumst-ances which the war is creating provide a unique oppor- tunity for a full investigation into all the causes of high prices, and the effect of monopolies and corners and trusts upon the welfare of the mass of the people. What we ought to do now is not only to press the Government to adopt eme-r- gency measures for the protection of the purchaser, but also to find out by a; thoroughly well organised inquiry how much of the present increase in prices is due to what may be termed the natural shortage caused by the war, and also how much is due to the ex- ploitation of the nation by monopolists and rings of capitalists. A Royal Commission should be ap- pointed for this, purpose, which should begin its work immediately, and continue its investigations throughout the war. But the adoption of this plan should not be allowed to interfere in any way with the prompt tackling of the present situa- tion by the Government Already, I think, the circumstances justify the adoption by the Government of drastic measures for the pjiblic control of food supplies (particularly as regards bread) and of the shipping industry. PRIVATE EXPLOITATION. I There is good jeason for believing that the greater part of the increase in prices is due to the tremendous advance in freights and also to exploitation by the wholesale dealers in wheat. Private ex- ploitation. whether by shippers or by (dealers in foodstuffs, is essentially an artificial evil which can be got rid of "by public control in the public interests. High prices arc frequently brought about not by any natural economic necessity, 1but by what I may term mental and moral conditions, which are subject to -control, and ought to be controlled by the public authorities. They may be ■

THE MINIMUM WAGE AND THE WAR

THE MINIMUM WAGE AND THE WAR. PATRIOTIC STEP IN SOUTH WALES. As considerable misapprehension ex- ists as to the date when the Coal Mimes (Minimum Wage) Act of 1912 expires, it iia expedient to give a brief survey of the position so that the master may be fully understood not only by the miners themselves, but by the general public. It will be remembered that the Mini- mum Wage Act was passed in the early part of 1912, in order to effect a settle- ment of the national coal strike, and as a tentative measure it was enacted that the new law should expire on March 28, 1915, when the whole ques- tion might be reconsidered. Owing to the outbreak of war. however, a shout Act was passed on August 7 last, en- titled "The Expired Laws Contitniitance Act," under the provisions of which it has been decided that the Minimum Wage Act shall continue in operation until December 31, 1915. The various agreements between the coalowners and the miners which define the terms of employment in the various districts subject, of course, to the pro- visriotns of the Minimum Wage Act, ca.n expire on the earliest date on June 30 by three months' notice being given on April 1. For some time there has been a general agitation amongst the men for a revision of the rates of paY; but it is believed that the whole question will be deferred unitil after the war, and this is the course which is being re- commended by the miners' leaders. As a matter of fact, the South Wales Miners' Federation have asked the Naticm.al Federation to take the ques- tion into consideration with the view of a uniform procedure being adopted in all districts, and the executive will meet at an early date to discuss the subject. There is said to be a strong feelitng amongst both employers and men that the matter should be posstponed for the present, in view of national emergen- cies, but. of course, without prejudice to the right of the mem to resume their agitaltion at the earliest possible date consistent with national interests. —————

SIR T LIPTONS YACHtiOF MERCY I

SIR T LIPTON'S YACHtiOF MERCY I Sir Thomas Lipton's luxurious yacht Erin las left Southampton for Salonika with medical stores for the wounded •Serbians and Montenegrins, Sir Thomas ??? ?' .? -?. 'n'F v/m jfon the ;J-'e,f ,i1l jr¡jn ow!

SENSATIONAL DISCOVERY BY YSTALYFEBA IFRUITERER

SENSATIONAL DISCOVERY BY YSTALYFEBA I FRUITERER. I HE LOOKED, SURE ENOUGH! Considerable interest was taken at the Pontardawe Police Court on Friday in the case in which Dd. Thomas, tin- worker, and the ex-Pontardawe foot- baller, of Graag Shop, Clifton Hill. Ys- taJyfera, was charged with having stolen the sum of t26, the money of Samuel Llewelyn, fruiterer, Ystalvfera, on Saturday, Jan. 2nd. Prosecutor, who is known throughout the district by his cry "You can't be looking I'm  re,  re p  b My '1 sure," was reprsent by Mr Lewis Thomas (Aberavon), instructed by Mr Morgan Davies (Pontardawe), and Mr Hy. Thompson, of Swansea, was for the defence. Mr Thomas said the sum in. question was made up of t20 10s. Od. in paper money„ a 5s. postal -or-clei-, tl in gold, aind 1:4 5s. Od. in silver. The circum- stances were that at the time of the alleged offence prosecutor resided in rooms in defendant's house, he having the upper part, and defendant the lower part. With the statement that there was an aeroplane about, he had got prosecutor and his wife out of the house on the night in question, ne- j turned into the house before the prosecutor, and stolen the money, and then pretended to set off in chase of the thief before he was supposed to know that amy money had been stolen, He afterwards denied all knowledge of the -theft. When pressed to return the money, lie had communicated with Mr Thompson, and through him threatened a:n action for libel. Pr" neuter said that about 11 o'clock on t!:e night in question, he was sitting ¡with his wife and brother-in-law in their kitchen behind the shop. After supner they heard a noise and saw de- I going alcm!g n. passage by the I id of {he house, to his own quarters. Sho)"ly after twelve Mj?. Thonlfls I, called for them to go out into the gar- den to see an aeroplane. She said .her husband was there. Witness, toOgether wi: h hda wdfe, wemt cut and saw Mrs. Thomas ,but could not see either de- fendant or the aeroplane. A few minutes later he saw Thomas coming from an empty house close by. As Thomas advanced towards witness. ho fjpoke to defendant, but he did not, answer, and then his wife called out that. the money had been stolen. De- fendant got to the bottom of the gar- den, and then called to witness, "Come on Sammy," at) the same time begin- ning to run. Prosecutor said it was a very bright moonlight .might, and he could see Thomas running for over 100 viands, but there certainly was no one runtfuiinig in, front J him. He returned, about 1.15 in the morning, and wit- mess said to him, "Give me my money back don't rob a poor man. You have been caught red-handed. my wife and brother have seen you." Defendant then said he had been chasing the thief and got down to Godre'rgraig, but. failed to catch him. a-nd he had given, information to P.C Jon en. Witness said to him. "Don't tell any lies: give me 'mv money, if oJlly for the sake of vour little children." When, witness said that his wife and brother had seen him, defendant tunned to his brother and said, "Did you see me, j Jack?" and he replied: "Yes, you knlOlw very we1! I saw y/ni." Prosecutor added that the P,26 had been drawn- from the Post Office to buy fruit to start a nlew shop at Brvr-immn.n, and it was a serious 1?? to him. I Cross-examined by Mr Thompson, pro?e?utor said 1w under?tn?d that de- fendant owned the property he lived on. 1-fe Dr'???hlv w''c ?1??. off ?h3n he (Llewelyn) was.. He denied that h,) I had ever been jealous of hi" wife's re- ]),I'd ever b-ecn of Iiiq wife s I did not d

ITRAGIC AMMANFORD DISCOVERYI

I TRAGIC AMMANFORD DISCOVERY. I A tragic discovery was made at Pen- vbank-road, Am.manford during the week- end, by Mr. Richard Milne, dental mechanic, who found that the woman at whose house he resided, Kathleen Gil- mour, was dead in bed. The police and a doctor were sent for, and an inquest was held. Deceased was 51 years of age "?r! 

I WALES DOING WELL I

WALES DOING WELL. I I RECORD RECRUITING FIGURES. Waies has responded magnificently to the call for recruits in the new Army. The fighting instinct is strong in the Welshman's heart, though, owing to the influence of Puritanism, it has been for generations directed away from military channels. I A righteous war like the present, in which Great Britain i fighting for the principle of nationality, for the sanctity of the law of nations, and for her own free Empire, was, however, boumd to make a strong appeal to the men of Wales ;and so it has proved. In past ages Welshmen have fought valiantly for Britain on Continental battlefields. One-third of the British Army at Crecy was Welsh, and in later centuries Welsh soldiers have distin- guished themselves in every campaign waged by this country. The Welsh Fusiliers and the Welsh Regiment have added to their laurels in the present war. SEVENTY THOUSAND RECRUITS. In recruiting for this greait war I Wales has done better than any part, of the Kingdom. The, number of men re- cruited in IVales from August 4 to January 9 exceeds 70,000. The figures are not quite complete, as they do not include recent statistics of recruiting from Llanelly and Brecon, and the Territorial Associations for Denbigh, Flint, Merioneth, and Mont- gomery. Excluding these, the number of recl-,uits from tip to January 9 Was:- For the new Army 56,327 For the Territorials 13,078 69,405 Districts from which returns are. in- .complete wiU bring the total up to cover 85,000, and recruiting is still going on briskly. Wales has done better in proportion to population than Englanidhas done, I and even better than Scotland. 8

iWHY BRITAIN INTERCEDED

WHY BRITAIN INTERCEDED. THE COMPACT WITH BELGIUM Speaking at an assembly of the Lon- don Federation of Brotherhoods at the Bishopsgate Institute recently, Mr I Art,hur Henderson, M.P-, said that the Brotherhood ,movement was under a. severe test. While not wishing to justify war, he said that under certaiir conditions only were we bound by the commandment "Thou sihalt not kill." We had to see that the weaker were not killed. Before the declaration of hostilities, Mr Henderson said that he desired that we should remain neutral, but when., Belgium was ruthlessly invadied he con- sidered that we, Britain the powerful, were under an 'obligation to nss.i?t Belgium. Referring to a peace settlement, Mi- Henderson said that he wanted the movement to think that wh-nn the time came they would put the whole in- fluence of the movement behind a peace settlemenft that would make for ever impossible a recurrence of this war. He hoped that the peace would be a itik--t one; one that would make the de- mocratic control of the issues of war, for only in that, way could democratic progress be made. —————

THE SWANSEA TRAGEDY I

THE SWANSEA TRAGEDY. I The hearing was concluded on Mon- day at Swansea, of charges against Sergt. William Hopper, of the 6th Welsh Reserves, of causing the death of Private Enoch Dudley and wound- ing Private Lewis Gates, both of the same regiment, by ^hooting them on Christmas might. Gates, giving evi- dence, bore out previous statements as to Hopper and Dudley having a fight at South Dock where they were on sentry duty. An escort was sent for, and Hopper marched the guard into the town. In WTind-street Hopper ordered a halt, and witness sa.w him putting his-- rifle to his shoulder and heard the shot. He saw Dudley fall, and im- mediately he fell himself. Hopper was committed for trial at, the Assizes. ————- 0-

RUSSIAN TRADE UNIONISTSI

RUSSIAN TRADE UNIONISTS. I Resolutions have been sent by the London District Committee of the Society of Operative Stonemasons to the Prime Minister and Foreign Secre- tary condemning the action of the Russian Government in deporting 38 Trade Unionists to Siberia. l The opinion is added that it ill be- comes an ally, who is presumably fight- ing in the interests of democracy, to adopt measures of this character, and the hope is expressed that steps will be taken to get the prisoners released. ————— —————

No title

A Swansea lady resident, Mrs. H. S. Slater, of 5, Town Hill-villas, Mount Pleasant, had no less than 33 members of her family in his Majesty's services, two of whom have lost their lives, including her on!? brother, Stoker R. Beddows, who he,- ci)!v I)rcther, ?,tolcerr R. Beddows, w h o

No title

Under tragic circumstances the death has taken place at Brecon of Mr Thomas Pritchard, probably one of the best known journalists. in Mid-Wales. For some days past Mr Pritchard has been I depressed owing to a death, and when ha was last .seen on Thursday even,irg this depression was very marked. He waa not seen about as usual on Friday, and on Saturday the house was entered. and he was found to have committed suicide. The deceased, who was about 60 years of age, had spent his life in the town and district. From the print- ing trade he became a reporter, serving on the local Press up to some years ago. As a batchelor he lived a more or less secluded life, but he was very popular with those who knew him and was much respected as a journalist -c, the inquest held on Saturday ever ing the evidence showed that death was 1 due to strangulation the deceased having hanged himself in the kitchen. The jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during temporary insanity," and the foreman of the jury, Mr T. Jones, expressing sympathy with the brother of the deceased said that Mr Pritchard was held in high esteem in the town and country, and his death was greatly regretted. ————— e ——————

LOCAL DRAGONS FOREGATHER

LOCAL DRAGONS FORE- GATHER. INTERESTING TOPICS DISCUSSED. — A very pleasant evening was spent at the weekly meeting of the Guild of the Red Diagon, Ystalvfera, on Friday evening last, Mr G. Griffiths (Capital and Counties Bank), presiding over a good audience. There were two speakers .Mrs Taliesin Lloyd gave a very illumin- ating andj stimulating paper on "Thought abouts the Drama," and Mr. George Greenwood spoke on "Zionism and the War." Both papers were much appreciated. In very interesting manner, Mrs. Lloyd spoke on the History of the Drama and the change in the reception now accord- ed to it compared with earlier times. After tracing its evolution from the first crude conceptions, the speaker went on to refer to the method of presenting the drama, and said that in this connection she regarded it as the greatest of the arts. With much ability she sketched the influence of the drama over the lives of the people, and incidentally said that if Ystalyfera could have the best forms of the art consistently played before the people it would prove a great moral force. Mrs. Lloyd then went on to refer to the relationship that should exist be- tween the Church and the stage. She said that the Church had always regard- ed the stage as more or less a rival teacher of morals. This was quite wrong. Properly conducted, the stage might be the greatest ally of the Church in the teaching and spreading abroad of reli- gion and ethics. In concluding Mrs. Lloyd referred to the question of a national drama for Wales. She did not think that this movement would be sue- cpssful so long as English language dra- I nias were given. Thus far they had had an undesirable effect. (Hear, hear, and applause. ) On "Zionism ::nd the War," Mr. Green- wood said that speaking as a, sympathetic I observer of the hope3 and endeavours of the adherents of Zionism, he felt that the present was the supreme moment in the history of the Jewish nation since their great expulsion by tho Romans nearly 2,000 years ago, from Palestine, their home. The Zionists had been striv- ing for many years to ie-establish the national home of the Jews in Palestine, partly because of the fact of the fright- ful persecution of the Jews in the Eas- tern countries of Russia, Roumania, etc., and partly because of their rapid assimi- lation in the west. It seemed to him that the time had now come when the British Government could be of more service to the Jews in their national as- pirations than any other Power. Mr. Asquith had d'eclared that, Turkey hav- ing declared war on the Allies, her mis- rule not only in Europe, but also in was to be ended. Britain would have an insistent voice in the settlement of the terms of pace when the war draws to I a close, and as Jews had fought lovallv and heroically not only in the British I force* but in the armies of the Allies, the Jews were surely entitled to a voice in framing the terms of peace. It would be fitting if Britain used her efforts to the secr.iing of the restoration of Pales- tine to its ancient owners, their integrity guaranteed under British suzerainty and protection. He felt quite certain that such an effort would meet with approval and support from every thinking British- er. An excellent due us.-ion followed., and the speakers were cordially thanked for their services. —————— —————-

SHOULD M P s SALARIES BEI ABOLISHED

SHOULD M P 's SALARIES BE I ABOLISHED. Among other questions that may be expected to be ventilated at an early period of the new Parliamentary Ses- sion, should opportunity present itself. are the advisa-bility of using the pre- sent interval in political controversy for the thorough overhauling of the Spendimg Departmentsof the State 8.00 the necessity, having regard to present claims upon the finances of the country for abolish-no; nayrrert of Tremlws and reducing :he salaries cf Ministers.

RAILWAYS AND THE WAR

RAILWAYS AND THE WAR. Why They Should Be Nationalized. The important part flayed in the war by the railways is generally realised, but j ih3 magnitude of the task imposed uoon them can only be dimly appreciated. "Records of Railway interests in the War," which has just been published from the office of the "Railway News," a; I Nk-a y New.,?, gives a very good idea of the way in which the managers of the various British railway companies rallied to the assist- j ance of the State when the ?ar was declared in August, and the Govern- I merit, in virtue of an Order in Council took steps to secure control over the rail- way service of the country. The war scheme drawn up by repre- sentatives of the various companies in I case of national emergency provided for a committee of general managers to be known as the War Railway Council—a title subsequently altered to that of the Railway Executive Committee. In peace time most elaborate programmes were drawn up by the authorities and the railway companies through the commit- too in connection with the running of special troop trains, under which each train was provided with an index num- ber. which was placed in a prominent position, and each train was known by thIS number throughout its journey, hav- ing definite times of arrival and depar- ture. It is sufficient testimony to the ac- curacy of these tables that the whole of them, which provided for the movement of hundreds of thousands of men, were carried out without a single hitch in the case of the Expeditionary Force by far the greater proportion of the trains arrived at the port of embarkation 20 or 30 minutes before time. STARTLING FIGURES. About 1,500 trains were needed for I the mobilisatiojL of the troops. The work included the conveyance of about 11 60,000 horses (seven per truck), requiring some 9,000 vehicles. On one busy day there were 213 troop trains running in different parts of the country. The Expeditionary ¡ Force took 6,000 odd vehicles with them, and 5,000 tons of baggage, and on the busiest day 104 trains ran, with over 25,000 troops and over 6,000 horses, covering nearly 1,000 four-wheel and two- wheel vehicles, and nearly 1,000 tens of ba ggage. Some, idea of the magnitude of the work involved can be formed from the fact that the Great Western Railway Company had up to the end of Septem- ber run over 2,200 special trains in con- nection with special naval and military requirements. On the Great Eastern system, from August 5th to September 14th. there were 870 military trains run, and approximately 20,000 vehicles were I in use for military purposes. j Not only in transporting the army by j land have the railways deserved well of I the nation. They have also done a great national service in providing docks and j harbours at various points on the road ) at a cost of some „ £ 46,000,000, and several of these have been of the high- est value in the war. The railway com- panics have also provided, at a cost of L6,405,000, a hundred steamers of over 50 tons net and 117 of under 250 tons. More than half of these have been taken by the Admiralty, and the work of the others in maintaining communications with the countries of our Allies is well- known, A ftriking feature of the situation dur." ing the early weeks of the war was the extent to which the railways carried on their usual business, despite the excep- tional transport work they had to under- take on behalf of the Government. Pro- bably goods traffic suffered more, but on the passenger side there were very few a lterations of a. serious character, and it was remarkable how many cheap facili- ties were retained. In addition to this work of tnrsport-l- t.io,i. the railway companies have fur- nished one and a half army corps for the scrvice of the State, no fewrr than 66,356 men—over 11 per cent. of the total num- ber of 594,000 men and 49,000 "boys"— having joined %he colours. I HOSPITALS ON WHEELS. I The hospital trains generally were a l- most perfect in their arrangements. Under the general arrangement with the War I Office the construction of the number re- quired was apportioned among the large companies of the country. In each train beds are provided for aick officers and men, sa well aa day and sleeping accom- modation for doctors, nurses, and per- sonnel. Each is furnished with a com- plete pharmacy, treatment room, linen room, office stores, hot and cold water, cooking appliances, lavatories, etc., to- gether with wards, each accommodating 20 men. The trains are equipped with electric lights and steam heaters, and j also with the necessary fire appliances. ( In the ordinary way there is no need for special goods vehicles, and even where demands are heavier most of the railways have trolley, well, bogie flat, girder and other waggons adapted up to loads of 50 tons capacity. But in view of the heavy traffic associated with the ordinary work of the great armament firms in the Uni-ei Kingdom most railways had to intro-bice vehicles designed either expressly t)r, or in view of, this traffic. Guns of 80 iuid 100 tons in weight, are unwieldy obje-ts to move about, and the special c?#riages for their conveyance are of ingenious con- struction. REMARKABLE BIG GUN WAGGONS Ore for nsa on the system of railway; I ,tht.:1n..r-'t& Lo"tUc 'If .e -I -i I.- I

I THE COAL PROBLEM I

I THE COAL PROBLEM. I ECONOMY IN USE OF COAL. COLLIERY EXPERT'S WARNING. At a meeting of the Monmouthshire Coliiery Oiacials' Association at New- port on Saturday, Mr L. H. Hornby said the progress made in the county was amazing, and the indications pointed to prosperity in the future. It was noticed that the various public bodies were now pulling together far better than in the past. Trade would not prosper if public bodies pulled against one another. This principle not only applied to public bodies, it to all engaged in trade from the top to the bottom. Each one should do hioS best in his own snhere. THE THIN SEAMS. Mr J. fox Tallis, said that the c< il trade was the backbone of So ifh Wales. They were working the coal out of the district very rapidly, and it was "up to them" to save as much of the coal as they could. They might not be troubled with the shortage in thex own lifetime, but the time would come when their coal would be exhausted. Germany was in a far better position in th:s matter than this country Wa51 and they could imagine what some- fnture Kaiser would do when ririta.r. had no ('08,1 and Germany npd plentv. This shmred t hem the necessity* of economising their own coal. Much of their SJll!11J coal was -till left in the pits, and pprts of thick yearns were for various reasons not completely worked out. one reason lieing that of £ s. d. It was for them to put their head s together and see what could be done. Further, the day was coming when 1 they would have to wor1: +i>eii- thin seams, as was done in Somersetshiiip to-day. It would he an ob ject lesson to some of them in South Wal es to see how these Somerset seams of 15 and 9 inches were being worked to adva.nta/ro. He would also like to urg", them not to give all their at-tolition to coal. Thpv trv and prorrtotp her dustrie* and capture some of the Ger- man t Ti/h' It wns not a very easv matter because they would have to con- ti- id w+h the lower wages and longer hours, worked in Germany. Still they should try and solve this problem.

OYSTERS VERSUS COCKLES

OYSTERS VERSUS COCKLES Dr. G. Arbour Stephens, M.D., Swansea, writes in a contemporary, drawing attention to the proposal of the District Council to empty, the sewerage in 10 the River Loughor. Should the District Council be f;UC- eÎut in carrying out such a scheme, people of Penelawdd will realise when it is TOO late that the low-lying marshes in the estuary have been con- taminated and their cockle-beds ruined. At .Mumbles the oyster-beds have al- read y been rendered suspicious by the action of the Mumbles people th >~i- selves, who have placed their sewer in close proximity to the beds. under the impression that a little poison may not be dan gerous. The cockle-industry is an important one. not only for the Penelawdd people themselvesbut also for a large num* ber of the industrial class who ap- preciaite greatly the tastyi cockle, whereas Mumbles oysters are mainly for the "nuts," wh o are prepared to throw away their money and to take risks. Either oysters or erwk'es must go, and it is for the Gower to de- cide which industry is to survive, the one at Mumbles, which already is justifiably getting less and Tess or the one at Pen;l:rwdd, upon which so many of the inhabitants depend for a liveli- hood. If. however, rive Swansea scheme does not go through, and the ])is.tr''t Council is allowed to contaminate rhe Loughor. then both cockles and oysters will be done for. -—————- —————

A BASELESS RITXOUR

A BASELESS RITXOUR. BRECONSSIRE BATTALION NOT YET IN ACTION. There have been persistent rumours during the iavst few days that the BreeonshirerTerritoria! Battalion of the South Wales Borderers, who, unil\r t he command of Lord Glanusk, are now en- gaged on foreign service, have been in action against the Turks. We are in- formed that the rumour is baseless, that no actual fighting has taken via e within about 70 miles of the battalion's I)a,se. ————— —————

Advertising

.fuotM! from rreoodtng eluom). near Woolwich Arsenal, and designed to carry guna up to 130 tone in weight, is in three sections, and) has a total length over buffera of 66ft. 3in. One of the most, remarkable in use for armament traffic has been built in the St. Rollox Works of the Caledonian Railway, and consists of a combination of waggons for carrying 100-ton guns. Two 35-ton ingot waggons are fitted with a cradle, which rests on both waggons and a 35-ton trolley waggon is fitted N,, ith a cradle to carry the muzzle of the gun. The cradle can be taken off and the wasjeons turned into ordinary trf- Hc vh 11 not required for carrying suns, and rui he fitted with the cradles aait, in a- few h-uirs. h' a t