Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Telephone Docks 35.. | W. WILLIAMS & CO. JBWELLESRS, &c. 29, CASTLE STEEET, SWANSEA. .+. Specialities; Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lever Watches. Good Foreign Watches. English k-,f)o d Foreign IVat4ches. English and Foreign Clocks. English and Continental Novelties in Gold, Silver and Electro Plate, suitable for Ch rLstening. Birthday a,nd Wedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for all Sights. IT WILL PAY YOU TO COMP, TO US To BUY FOR 3 REASONS- 1 (Hi*1 Largest Variety, Best Quality, and Lowest Price. I FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. jj AND J ??=   = ??= ?: S = S S  ?.=.  r=L  ?==  -=  -=? F = Weld Lacy j The Up-to-date LONDON TAILOR Who serves you personally and Cuts All Garments Himself Specialists in MOURNING ORDERS. 222, High Street SWANSEA

COLLIERS IN CONFERENCE

COLLIERS IN CONFERENCE. Important matters fall to be decided on Saturday at the conference of the South Wales Miners' Federation. Un- like conferences dealing with the ex- piring agreements of past years, this t-onference must have regard not merely to the interests of South Wales, but to the wljele of the miners of Great Britain. In some senses it forms a landmark in Federation history. From scattered lodges the orgarisation of the miners has extended from lodges to districts, from districts to coalfields, from coalfields to national unity, and from one mighty union of miners to alliances with other trade unions in this oountry, and with other miners' unions in countries beyond the sea. Under ordinary circumstances there | would be no doubt that the Conference would decided, and would obtain the support of the M.F.G.B. for the de- cision, to tender notices terminating the agreement. There are certain l'e- forms which must be effected, and among them are the abolition of -,he maximum percentage, the raising of the minimum from 35 to 50 per cent., a minimum of 5a. a day, and other ad- vances, for surface men, six turns for five for afternoon and night shifts, and the placing of the Anthracite area on the same basis as the rest of the coal- field as (regards percentages. These demands must be pressed, as part of the national programme, to the extent of a national strike if needs be. But the present is an, abnormal time, ar.d a strike of miners would entail as much damage to the country as the exactions of the shipowners, or a victory of the German fleet. The enforcement of the just demands of the miners must await less troubled times. But if little can be done just now in the way of removing long-standing grievances, the Federation can do a great dml in preventing new imposi- tioiis, amd mitigating the effect of some recently imposed. The Hiiners must support'their leaders and the M.F.G.B. in the stern stand they are taking: against "the selfish proposals of seffie coalowners in England and orth Wales, an,d other interested persons, to have the Eight Honrs' Act tempor- arily suspended. The coalowners hate that Act as vigorously as ever, and they will take advantage of any nation- al or weakness to do- stroy it. { Most important of all considerations j is this—a very real reduction of the wages of every collier in the Kingdom has taken place in the last few mo fbs. j A sovereign buva now lees than fifteen shillings' worth of food. This is as direct a loss as though the ooalowners had depressed cutting prices, the rates for dead-work, the minimum wage, or the percentage above the standard. The shipowners, the wheat speculators, the farmers, and other profiteers have burgled the oollier's pantry. Carmot the Federation use the period in which I they are debarred from taking the offensive by strengthening the defen- sive? Cannot they devise a means of ) championing as effectively the miner as consumer as they have furthered his interests as producer? If the-; Federa- tion would institute an inquiry into how the market in foodstuffs is manipu- lated by the wholesalers and others in South Wales, they would learn of something greatly to their benefit.

I SUPPLY AND DEMAND

I SUPPLY AND DEMAND. A meeting of shipowners was held in Cardiff, and they were very indignant at the outcry against the present ab- normal freights. No doubt it is very indecent of the public, to object to being fleeced by the shipowners. Why does Great Britain support a navy to chase German ships from the seas if British capitalists are not allowed to profit by it? This newspaper-manu- factured agitation is absurd. And really the profits made by the ship- owners are quite negligible. This is what the financial expert of "The South Wales Daily News" says:— If an owner was asked to-day what profit a 5,000 ton steamer oould make a round trip of, say, four j months under present conditions, he would probably estimate on a con- servative basis that somewhere be- tween P,8,000 and 210,000 would be I left as net profit after paying all expenses. That is, one steamer of j 5,000 tons would be earning profits at the rate of k24,000 to 230,000 J per annum. These modest profits, the Cardiff Ship- owners ieemed to think, are only due to them to make up for lean years. One shipowner had an inspiration: he said that the increase in freights was due to the law of supply amd demaaid, and that sturdy Liberal capitalist, Mr Henry Radoliffe, cordially agreed. This law of supply and demand. is a most excellent thing. It coveres a multitude of profiteering transgress- ions. Ascribe extortion to this myster- ious law, which is assumed to be as much beyond human control as the movements of the stars in their courses and then the capitalist stands excul- pated. The simple truth is that it is impossible to point to the wage of any worker or the profit of any company and say that it has been determined by the law of supply and demand. Supply and demand are variable, and can be increased or decreased by human will. Demand cam be created. Thousands of en spend their whole PJmetΠdevising ways of creating and stimulating de- mand. It is perfectly obvious that supply cam be artifioaiJly restricted. How does the law of supply and de- mand—that precious raiv in the thick- et for the Cardiff shipowners—stand in relation to present freights? The de- mand for the supply. This is due not to a sudden inflation of demand, but to a Sll dden shrinkage of supply. The ?.horta?e of ships is due to the fa?t that the German md d,ite to the f?i,"t the Cer-uiau a.nd the hgh SOO! Tlle:-ø are. many, Ger- man ships, prize? of \'mT, lying in British ports.. These can be uved by the Government to increase the supplv of vessels. If this does not remove the strangle-hold of the ship owners on the food of the people the Government can fix the rates of freights, or make all merchant ve^^els national propertv for the time being as they have done with the railways. The shipowners may plead the law of satpply and de- mand in extenuation of their rapacity, but the excuse "won't wash clothes" <1.<; far as the intelligent workers off I this oountry are concerned. They know that the greed of the shipowners is doing more harm to the oountry than Von Tirpitz's submarines. -0.

No title

The "Harodelsblad" learns that the German Socialist deputy, Dr. Lieb- knecht who has thrown up the gaunt- let to the German Socialist Party, has beeas called to the colours.

NOTES AND NOTIONS

NOTES AND NOTIONS. The correspondence on the affairs of Palleg farmers which appeared in "The Labour Voice," lent additional interest to a very remarkable speech delivered by Mr. D. D. Williams, the Board of Agri- cure's live stock officer to a meeting of farmers at Cowbridge. After drawing up a formidable indictment of the far- mers, in which he charged them par- ticularly with ignorance of the scientific uses of manures, he insisted that they needed three reforms (1) More educa- tion and a better system; (2) Business- methods; and (3) Co-operation in its greatest form. These are just what Mr. James Evans is pleading with the Palleg farmers for. It is a remarkable example of how experts think alike. An officer who was allotting duties to a sentry in the North of France endea- voured to take a rise out of him. "What would you do if you saw these Dread- noughts coming at full steam across that field?" he asked. "I should si^n the pledge, sir," answered the private. A soldier who has returned for a few days to his home in the valley after hav- ing been at the front is very emphatic on one point. "If you hear any chap who has been at the front," he said to a friend, "saying that he is really anxious to go back again, give him my compliments, and tell him he's a liar. INothing but the sternest sense of duty imakes any of us go back." The Welsh Fusiliers, who have lost their regimental pet at the front, were presented by Queen Victoria with a goat which, after several years of exemplary conduct, fell into bad ways. Its culminat- ing act of insubordination occurred when the regiment was quartered at Wrexham, and one fine summer evening after mess the officers were strolling about smoking and enjoying the fresh air. The colonel stooped down to push in the end of his  trouser strap, and the goat, who hap- pened to be close by, fouhd the tempta- tion irresistible. He charged fiercely and butted his commanding officer against an adjacent wall with such force that both his eyes were blackened and his face was otherwise damaged. By this esca- pade the goat earned the title of "Tha Rebel," and only the good record of his early years of service saved him froTi being drummed out. THE NON-COMBATANT. I, a free-born Briton, boasting Of a heritage of pride, For the which my fighting fathers, Dreading but dishonour, died— I who cannot wield a weapon, Though a grandson fiercely fights, Still may claim a Briton's birthright, Still assert my ancient rights. Should a hostile airship hover Over my devoted cot, Mine the right to watch and wcnJer, Waiting for a sentry's shot; Mine the privilege of paying With a life for living there; Mine to try no rash reprisal— That's some other folks' affair. Should the foe obtain a footing On the sacred soil we tread, I shall have some rights remaining, Freedom will not yet have fled; For'in silence I m.lY sxiffer Death, dishonour, pillage, pain, Taking all the good he gives me, Never hitting back again. A. W.'B. in "The Daily Chronicle." Are we getting used to the small bank nok'6! Here is a worker's complaint "To my wife I handed two £1 notes. New notes, of running numbers. During tho week-end shopping she paid away one, as she thought. Not till she ex- amined her money, on returning home, did she discover that both notes, stuck together, had been paid away as one. A visit to the shop failed of any redress, the shopman denying the receipt of any second note." This is, one fears, not a solitary instance. Possibly a safeguard might be found in that bank-clerkly habit of licking your finger when dealing with "flimsies." Or do as a Scotch friend of mine does fold each note separately when first received. The Kaiser, in ordering his birthday potatoes to be served up in their jackets, and eating them jackets and all, has set a fashion which might with advantage be adopted by ourselves. In peeling you not only waste about 10 per cent. of the potatp, but throw into the dustbin by far the most valuable part. The skin it- "self is rich in useful mineral matter, and what is technically called the "fibro-vas- cular layer"—the part just beneath the skin—contains far more proteid than the 1 "flesh" itself. The Irish people have I done remarkable well on unpeeled pota- [ toes. And although there are more than 100 different ways of preparing them, < experts say that if you want to catch the full flavour of the potato proper you j mt-st go to the baked potato can. A good story conle3 from one of the I Wel sh training camp3. The brigade medi- cal officer and a lieutenant visited a sick I soldier at his billet. The doctor said the man would have to be returned to duty. A maid showd the two upstairs. Some- j how they lost her, but as the doctor had visited the man before he went into the room, snook up the sleeping man in the Middle bed, and a ked. "Who told you to stay in bed?" The man was sleepy and did not reply, so the doctor spoke I to him in a sharper tone, telling him he should be outside taking exercise, and finishing up by demanding to know what was the matter. Before the ma.n could reply the maid re-appenred and said, "Pardon me, doctor, you are in the wrong foam; and this man is the night j porter." I Even soldiers cannot stand everything. One soldier of the Gloucester Regiment, j after being in the trenches for twenty- six day* up to his waist in water, was slightly wounded in the head. In a letter to his wife he said, "It was a treat to be wounded, to get into hospital to be cleaned. From "Who's Who" for. 1915 it is possible to gather some interesting m- form ertion as to the recnpn.tions of a- ermm- ber have nob troubled to mention their j favourite pastimes, and these ioeluSe The Bishop of St. David's, Mr Lleufer Thomas, Mr Ben Davies, Sir Henry Jones, and Professor Tom Jones. Of men of letters journalists, Pro- fessor J. Morris Jones likes cycling; Mr W. H. Davies prefers walking, "most- ly alone"; and Mr "Harry Jones, of the "Daily Chronicle," inclines to golf, cycling, and walking. Mr William Davies, editor of "The Western Mail" appears to share the proverbial 'bus- man's idea of a holiday, for he gives his recreation as journalism. There is a pathetic suggestion of the disabilities that attend advancing age in the par- ticulars given by Major Evan Rowland Jones, of "The Shipping World," who gives his recreation as "formerly tennis, riding, swimming, now walks and books. Most of the Welsh ministers men- tioned in "Who's Who" are located in England. Elvet does not mention his recreation, and neither does the Rev. I T. Charles Williams, of Menai Bridge, f who informs us however that "the family have been ministers from father to son for over a hundred years." I Principal Griffith-Jones has catholic t tastes in recreation—photography, I golf, motoring, and a little chess. Rev. T. Rhondda Williams likes walking, and Professor T. Witton Davies con- fesses to cycling, foreign travel, music and book-hunting. From the frequent mention of golf and other pastimes it would appear that the old Puritan aversion to support is fact dying. A staunch Methodist like Mr David Davies has a range of interests com- parable to those of an English Tory squire. He is "much interested in sport ,in eluding hunting, and has fox- hounds, otterhounds, and beagles at Llandinam. The Bishop of St. Asaph is fond of fishing and riding. Mr D. A. Thomas, of the Cambrian Combine, has simple tastes—his re- creation in farming. Mr Llewelyn Williams, M. P., inclines to fishing ajad golf, and Professor Levi to "boating, on sea or river." Rev. J. Hugh Edwards, M.P., who is studying to be a barrister, -finds pleasure in cycling. ,r- Mr T. J. Williams, having beaten his opponents, will hi due course suc- ceed. Sir D. Brynmor Jones as the Liberal M.P. for the Swansea District. Fnom the Labour point of view the selection of the Liberal Association could not be more agreeable. Either of the two defeated aspirants would have made the task of winning the constituency for Labour a somewhat formidable one. If the local Labour men will now set their affairs in order, create an organisation, and select a candidate, Swansea District, at the next contested election, will pass to the Labour Party. We could wish for I nothing better than a straight fight between a representative of the tin- platers, and Mr T, Jeremiah Williams. On a recent Syoday the captaiin of a company in kitchener's Army was uiepecting the men mustered for 'c hurch parade. Observing that the company was far from being up to strength, he asked the colour-sergeant for an explanation. "Well, sir promptly replioo the latter, "we've sixteen Roman Catholics, twelve Wes- leyance, six Primitive Methodists, two Jews, and four peeling pertaters in the company." Welsh county councils were singled out for rebuke for their i/iat ten tion to the housing problem by Mr Herbert Samuel, the President of the Local Government Board, in an address he delivered to the Executive Council of the County Councils Association in | London. We shall never get any forrarder in housing reform while Liberal and Tory councillors conceive it their duty to keep down rates iac"ier than to remedy social ilta It is to be hoped that the Labour re- presentatives will succeed in quashing the movement among farmers to employ schoolboys to do agricultural labourers' work. The policy is most unfair to the boys, and can only result in squeezing down the already small wage of the labourers. Since the outbreak of war the farmers of this country have made well ever three millions extra profit, and they can afford to pay proper w. to adults. The Hamburg Echo," a Socialist paper, is affronted because Herr Arthur Henderson has been bribed by a Privy Councillort>hip, which carries with it the title Rig-ht Honourable ("about the same as Excellency") and a "correspondingly princaly income. We hope that this re", buke won't cause Herr Henderson many bl*»pless nights. A correspondent in' the "Frankfuiter Zeitung" offers the following advice to the patriotic poets of the Fatherland Oh, yon poets, patriotic poets, re- ) mem ber Girolamo Castelli. You will ask Who was this man? Listen, then. Girolamo Castelli lived at F&rrara at the time of Count Lionello Borso and Eroole von Este, and wrote numerous patriotic poems. And when he died he ordered in his will that no ver&es of his should ever be printed after his death, just as none had been printed in his lifetime. Oh, poets, you patriot- ic poets, remember Girolamo Ctitdli This correspondent won't be very popu- lar in Bavaria, where the hate comes f rom. i It is alleged that Count Zeppelin is a great evangelist—and this does not, refer to the GxpeJ of Blood and Iron. "ITis chief delight consists in running evan- geEstic meetings and C??pel-tent servl ces." It may be presumed that w h.?n j? Count Zeppelin closes his eyes, folds his ha-nds, and murmurs, "'Let us prey," the silence is so deep that one could almost hear a bomb fall. While so much is heard of German spies it is as well to remember that there are also British spies. A supplementary estimate for the Civil Services of 007,399 includes £60,000 for secret work, bring- ing the total estimate for this claee to £110,000. 1 (Continued at bottom of next column)

NOTES AND NOTIONS

(Continued from preceding column). An American Roman Catholic Bishop was leaving his hotel, and a nigger boy of about fifteen oarried his bag to the station. The Bishop wished to be affable, so he said, "wan, irv boy, are you a Rorm-n Catholic?" "Hell!" came the answer, "ain't it bad enough to be a nigger 71,

SEVEN SISTERS LEVY QUESTION

SEVEN SISTERS LEVY QUESTION. I To the Editor. As I am asked a few questions by Lover of Truth and Consistency'' in your last issue, kindly allow me to further explain the attitude I have taken up in this controversy. Seeing that your cor- respondent asks these questions in the name of the public, I think it is only fair that the public should know who he is. They should also have a chance of deciding whether I am a humanitarian or a hypocrite. Let me remind your correspondent that Mr. John James' attack was directed against the Seven Sisters officials, accus- ing them of being responsible for with- holding the levy. Although not an offic- ial of the Lodge I refuted the statement made by Mr. James for the reason that the assertion was completely without foundation. With reference to my continued sym- pathy towards humanity, I have never claimed that distinction for myself. I have only voiced the opinion of a huge major- ity of the workmen of the Dulais Valley. With reference to the other questions I have always supported every movement that aims at uplifting the working classes, whether in the Dulais Valley or else- where. As a member of the joint com- mittee I supported the matter of contri- buting towards the distress relief, and I an arangement was made that the check- weigher should pay a sum periodically in proportion to the amount paid by other workmen, but our contribution has not yet been called in, as the fund has a sufficient sum in hand to deal with immediate cases of distress. If your corespondent wishes a further explanation I refer him to Mr. George Jones, (check) at Seven Sifters Colliery. | .With rogiird to Llwynon and the com- bine levies, may I put a question to "Lover of truth consistency." Why 'I did the finance c nmiitt Q refuse to pay strike pay to th* Llwynon workmen I after thov had inspected the books of the Lodge And why did the. Llwynon leave tha di&trict for a cor.do-able time ) aftevwards ? If vour correspondent takes upon him- nelf tho duty of acting in the public i,- tfrf,,Pt. the public would bo grateful to him if he addressed his oonrespondeuce in future above his own f.-O that they may have a.n opportunity of judging his real oapacity to fulfil such an im- .taut undertaking, and not hurl hap- hazard insul ts at others v.ho have suffi- cient courage to art their opinions publicly, while he remains concealed under the cloak of "tnlth and con- sistency." yours etc., I SAMUEL EVANS. ————

SUCCESSFUL VALLEY EISTEDDFOD

SUCCESSFUL VALLEY EISTEDDFOD. A sucoossful eisteddfod was held at Elin Baptist Church, Craigcefnparc, on Saturday evening, Mr John T. Jones, (Gwalia Stores) presided over a large I gathering, and Messrs. Dd. Williams, L.R.A.M. (music) and Evan Thomas (literature) officiated as adjudicators. The awards Solo for children (under 10) Miss Maggie Alexander solo for children (un- der 14) Master W. Havard; recitation for children (under 10) Miss Maggie E. Davies; recitation for children (under 14): Miss Muriel Alexander; soprano solo Miss Maggie Davies; tenor solo I Mr. Jacob Jones; essay on "Y ffordd I oreu i fod yn llwyddianus" Mr. Lewis John; verses of poetry on "Cwrdd ¡ Gweddi" Mr. W. Bowen baritone solo: Mr. Morgan Havard mixed choral com- petition, "Gosteg For" Salem Choir, Llangyfelach (conducted by Mr. T. A. Jones). .a*.

POSTAL ORDERS NOT LEGAL TENj DER

POSTAL ORDERS NOT LEGAL TEN- DER j The effect of a proclamation which the King signed at a meeting of the Privy Council at Buckingham Palace is that postal orders cease to be current and legal tender. Holders of any postal orders which have been issued as legal tender will be able to obtain payment at any time before June 1.

ICARLTON CINEMA SWANSEA j

CARLTON CINEMA, SWANSEA. j The programme now runninjg at Swan- sea's leading Cinema is one that can be highly reoommended to our readers. There are two special features, viz., "The Coward" and "The Poor Folks' Boy. Both are indeed so good that it is hard to say which meets with the most favour. "The Coward" is a "Domino" production in two parts, containing many thrilling and exciting dra.matic situations. "The Poor Folks' Boy" is by The Vitagraph Co., and the characters are played by such well-known artistes as Karl Formes and Anne Schaefer. This picture is also in two reels. An excellent twenty-minute drama is "The Rescue," by the Than- hauser Film Co. The star comic is "Tril- by," played by th9 inimi t., ble comedian Pimple. It is a brilliant burlesque of the popular play. "A Double Error," and "Doc Jak's Cats' are most amusing. An interesting travel picture of a. topical nature is "Life in the Samoa Islands," the latest news from all parts is rhown on the current Animated Gazette.

No title

The Kaiser's appeal to his troops to j "make your girls proud" strikes one, vith the record of atrocities still fresh in mind, as being what Mr Lloyd George calls "the limit." j Amongst the "bravest villages" pub- lished by the "Weekly Dispatch" are St. I.^hmael's, Milford Haven, with 36 at the front out of 315; Troedyrhiwfuwch, I Glamorgan, 110 out of 500; and TTelewis Glamorgan, 121 out of 1,544.

Advertising

j Great War Sale!! j | NOW ON. I —— I t ¡ Every Article Reduced. I  g PANK?S ? § •o W1 •o 11" High St., Swansea.  I 17, High St., Swansea. ♦ 3

rOHTARDAlYE ALLTWEN GLEANINGS

rOHTARDAlYE ALLTWEN GLEANINGS. In connection with St. John's Church, Alltwen, a jumble sale and tea took place yesterday (Thursday), at the Gwyn Hall. It was very well attended, and was in every way success- ful. The annual social gathering for the members of the DyfIryn Mixed Choir is to take place on Saturday evening week at St. Petor's, Pontardawe. It is the custom to have a meeting of this sort at the end of each year, and the members are looking forward to a good time. Among other local events shortly to take place are a social at the Higher Elementary School in connection with the Continuation Class members (in three weeks' time), and the annual Parochial tea and sale of work, etc. at St. Peters on Thursday next. Great preparations have been made for both these events, w hichare expected to be particularly interesting and enjoyable. Three applications have been re- ceived for the post of curate at All Saints, rendered vacant by the forth- coming departure of the Rev. Rowland Thomas. They are each coming for a service on trial, and one from Llan- elly preached at the Church last Sun- day. Quite a large number of acknow- ledgements have been received this week by local gentlemen who forward- ed tobacco, etc., to Welsh soldiers at the front through Miss Jenkins' Xmas Fund. They are nearly all from men in the 1st Welsh, one man says he hails from Pontypridd, and another from Cwmavon. There was a mild sensation at the Canal Bridge, Pontardawe, on Wed- nesday afternoon. Two young child- ren had wandered away from home, and it was feared that they had got into the water. Quite a large crowd gathered, but happily the children were found later at Trebanos. The incident serves to show how dangerous this spot ie. It ought to be guarded more efficiently. Mr Marlay Samson, barrister, of Swansea, is announced te speak at a meeting under the auspices of the Church of England Men's Society at Pontardawe next Thursday, on "The Present Position of the Church in Wales. Intimation is to hand from an ex- collent source that Mr E. Hall-Hedley, J.P., of Alltycham, Pontardawe, is shortly leaving this district to take up residence in England. Mr Hedley, is managi-ill, director of the South Wales Primrose Coal Co., Limited (Tarreni Collieries) where he is greatly esteemed and respected, and a move- ment is on foot there among the work- men and officials to make him a pre- sentation ere he leaves South Wales. An interesting local wedding took place on Saturday at Tabernacle, the Rev. H. Scdriol Williams officiating. The contracting parties were Mr David Griffiths, Ynismeudwy, son of Mr Mor- gan Griffiths, and Miss Eleanor Wil- liams, daughter of the late Mr Wm. WTilliams, of Thomas Street, Pontar- dawe. The weekly meeting of the Taber- nrele Young People's Guild, held on Wednesday evening, was addressed by the Rev. D. Eiddig Jones, of Clydach. on "Cvmro ar Grwydr" (A Welsman on Tramp). Mr Jones spoke of his ex- periences in Switzerland, and the ad- dress was much enjoyed by a good at- tendance. Very many friends in all parts of the Valley have learnt with feelings of deep regret of the death of Mr Thos. George, late colliery manager, of °ijeel-road, Clydach. The deceased, ho was a well-known and much-es- teemed native of the neighbourhood, passed away at his residence early on 9>siturd?.y nvrrir'ns: after a prolonged il'neps. Much sympathy is fÑ. with ■Sh" 

No title

At a Rhyl induction service last week it waa stated that the raajoritiy of Non- conformist ministers in that place hail from South Wales. The latest recruit is the Rev. J. W. Jones, B.A., -late of. Morriston. I