Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
No title

The steamship South Port sailed from Philsde'.phiia on Wednesday, having on board 70.000 barrels of flour which had been given by the millers of the United States for the relief of the de- stitute -in Belgium. This is the lazyc&b single cargo to be despatched from the United States to Belgium.

THE NATIONAL FUND FOR WELSH TROOPS l

THE NATIONAL FUND FOR WELSH TROOPS. l J To provide additional comforts for Welsh Regiments at home and abroad. President: Lady Plymouth. Chairwoman of Committee: Mrs. Lloyd George. To Mrs. Lloyd George, 11, Downing Street, London, S.W. I beg to enclose s d as a donation to The National Fund for Welsh Troops. Mamo Address EnnnaasnasBananaaaannas nan

LABOUR PARTYS FOOD POLICY

LABOUR PARTY'S FOOD POLICY. COMING DEBATES IN THE COMMONS. T.vo lines of immediately policy in regard to the food crisis were decided upon by the Parliamentary Labour Party at their first weekly meeting of the session at the House of Commons on Tuesday. As a fir measure the omcials of the Parliament Party were asked to press the Government for an earlv day for a full discussion of the question in all its bearings. Secondly, it was agreed to seek by way of the ballot for the opportunity to discuss the endeavours made in var- ious parts of the country to set aside the provisions of the Education Acts to permit of children being withdrawn from school to work in the fields. Committees were appointed to ob- tain the fullest information, on this subject and report to a future meet- ing of the party. In regard to the proposal to be made by the Government to make the entire time of the House, the Labour Party w.ill make representations to secure adequate time during the session to discuss import-ant. matters, and they will endeavour to extend the usual half-hour to permit of questions being raised daily on the motion for adjourn- ment.

No title

At the request of the Government, the new municipal map of London, which the London County Council has prepared at the cost of £ 20,000, after 15 years' labour, will not be placed on sale until the conclusion of the war. The map is the largest ever produced, und indicates every house in London.

Advertising

.+.+<.+++++.+++. EVVA R 13 SALE of ?  1 REMNANTS i ODDHNTS j nunMAM! ? ? Uuu!w?!?! P ?? i f1: i ? Commences SATURDAY, ? FEBRUARY 6th ♦ i ALL THE ACCUMULATION OF REMNANTS AND  ODDMENTS together with thousands of Articles which j ♦ are fresh and unsoiled-goods which are still worth every penny of their original valuewill be sold at £ ♦ much less than half the actual cost of production. + DON'T MISS THIS CLEAR-OUT. IT IS A GRAND t FINAL SWEEP that offers you the most remarkable $ I t bargains you have ever known. | i ALL GOODS PLAINLY MARKED AND T/Cj6T?r?? I THIS SALE /8 FOR ONE WEEK ONL Y.  f FDWARD Q' '?? t ?t ? OSl0rd Stre t ? T t L UW?SMSCS ? t  jjjjjt =& Park Street ?jj?VVU.i.t.?%?M. ♦ ? .-?- b ? ¡

DO THE ANTHRACITE liNERS WANT THE FIVE PER CENT

DO THE ANTHRACITE liNERS WANT THE FIVE PER CENT.? By T. J. Wat kins, Cilfriw. I As one of the rank and file, with a varied experience in both Steam and Anthracite coal, I feel that the time has arri ved when we in this District must be determined to settle this ques- tion once and for all. Of course, the miners will answer the question in the affirmative, because I they understand that it will mean an increase in their wages: but if we are to see this five per cent, finding a place in our next agreement, we must as a District be prepared to fight, with the whole of cur intelligence, at the Cardiff Conference on Saturday, Feb. 6th. At this conference we should en- deavour to prove that it is to the in- terest of the whole coalfield that this ) reform should be brought about. Let ine try and present a case that will bear investigation. We have now for 34 years been five per cent. beJow the 1879 standard. The average sell- ing prices in 1881 was only about Ss. or 9s. per ton. Prices have, of course, ebbed and flowed during this extended period, but for the last few years they have maintained1, a fairly thigh standatrd. Th average selling prices have risen enormously during the last few years, as a glance at the market prices clear- 1y shows:— Anthracite handpicked malting kirge 22s. to 24s. nett. Second Qualities, Malting, 20s. to i 21s.6d. nett. ¡ Swansea Valley big vein, large 18s. to 20s. less 21,. Red Vein, 17s. to 18s.9d. less 21. The average prices shown here axe I roughly about £ 1 per ton for large coal only, leaving ou* of consideration, all machine made coals. We can see 'I that the sellings prices have more than doubled during this period,—the great- er portion of which goes into the pockets of the coalowners. We have a guarantee of 35 per cent. minimum (less 5 per cent. in our District) above the standard day wage and cutting rates it is true, but no increase what- ever in the standard rates themselves. The introduction of new methods of screening and machinery for coal wash- ing has been another means of iiv- creasing profits for the coalowners, nothing of which is taken into con- si deration when fixing percentage rates. I think we can prove to the Conference that our selling prices are higher than that. of the Steam coal. In 1881 Anthracite coal had not the market stability or prominence it now enjoys. It is absolutely the finest coal for horticultural and malting purposes. This the coalowners cannot refute, as it is their own claim. These arguments in themselves are sufficient to justify our case. As a. District we must point out to the Conference that it is to their ad- vantage that the whole of these selling prices and volume of trade should be taken into account when fixing the percentage basis in our next agree- ment. I think I have said sufficient to show that our selling prices are higher than steam coal, and that it would be to the interest of the whole of the coalfield to have this difference insert- ed in our next agreement. But what are we as a District doing to bring this about I am afraid it is very little. Judging from my ex- perienoe a delegate at our last -District meeting, I fa.r that we are quibbling too much about the things that don't matter. In the face of the fact that it was known that a Conference was called, we should have been discussing our position and attitude toward the various items on that Conference agenda, and not wrangling as to where the sub-agent should reside. The Anthracite District is the second largest in members in the coalfield, and we are entitled to send twice as many delegates as the largest, therefore our power should be so great at these Con- ferences that the Executive would feel its farce, and act accordingly. But my experience at these Confc?rences shows much different results. We Lave no more power than if we sent 60 voting dummies, and the reason for this is that there is too much division, a.nd unworthy suspicion of one another. It appeare that we have not yet learned in this District what is due to our neighbour,—we are too much con- cerned about what is due to ourselves. Fellow-workers, let us sink all these petty differences, and present a united front at this Conference. That there is talent in the District there is no disputing; let the whole of this talent be used to bring back to the Antbra, cite miners that for which they have agitated for a number of years. I would suggest that the delegates to Conference meet and formulate a plan of campa.iprn, and appoint the men* to place our case before the Confer- ence. It is for us to act in this matter if we want to see this grievance re- moved. It is time that wo considered our relation to the whole CoaTfie'd. so as to und^rsta.nd what is due to our- f:elve* in that rcqitiainf-iiip. Not what is due Jo an individual, not what is due to a class, but what is due to the whole, should Iks the basis^of all consideration. ————— T. J. WATKINS. I ■ I

No title

Scores of letters are published in the New York papers denouncing Presi- dent Wilson's action in sending birth- day greetings to the Kaiser. The writer of one of the most strongly- worded, appearing in the "New York Times, says that the President's action "has grievously offended mil- lions of Americans whose feelings for the Butcher of Belgium are those of aversion and contempt. Surely, Americans do not wish for the accusa- tion to be made that they felicitate the Sovereign Hun amd wish him weU iml the year of killing and destruc- tion)."

Advertising

MASTERS CLOTHING First in 1867 Foremost To=day MISTERS & Co. ¡Y&Ai3) QL¡ \I 8, I (CLOTHIERS), Ltd., 18 & 19 Castle Street 282 Oxford Street Swansea 3 (ireen Street, Neath 17 Stepney Street, Llanelly, etc.

PONTARDAWE POLICE COURT

PONTARDAWE POLICE COURT Friday, before Messrs. H. N. Miers (presiding), E. Benthall, G. H. Strick, F. R. Phillips, S. Jenkins, and D. T. Williams. AN ABSCONDING TENANT. Mr. Barker, solicitor, Swansea, made an application under Section 4 of the Distress for Rent Act for a summons on behalf of Messrs. Shepherd, Ystaiyfera, for payment of a penalty of double the value of the amount concerned against a tenant named G. Lee Gardner, who on January 7th, left one of the applicant's houses in Godre'rgraig owing £2 15s. in rent, and unlawfully and clandestinely re- moved his goods to avoid distraint. One of Mr. Shepherd's sons called three days before the people left and threatened to distrain if the rent was not paid. The man left four days later, and had gone, they understood, to England,The ap- plication was granted. GUNS WITHOUT LICENSES. ALLTWEN AND YNISMEUDW MEN FINED. Daniel Thomas and Frederick Howells two young Gellynudd boys were sum- moned for carrying a gun without a licence. Mr. Morgan Davies, solicitor, ap- peared for Thomas, who was not present, Howells pleaded not guilty. P. C. Sheen said that at 1.10 p. m. on Monday, December 21st, he saw the two defendants at the incline at Gellynudd firing at the birds in Wauncoed wood. Hb eaw that they carried the gun in turns, and when he approached them they made for home. Following them he found that they were in possession of a Rooke gun. They admitted not having a licence; Thomas who owned the gun said he did not know that he required a license. Howells I did not shoot a single shot. Mr. Morgan Davies said it was a very simple matter. He admitted that it was his client's gun, and he did not know that a licence was necessary until the con- stable told him of the fact. The Chairman said he would like to know where the gun was obtained from. It was the duty of those who sold it to young people to see that they knew that they must have a lioence. Mr. Davies Young people have a ten- dency to do these things nowadays. The Chairman Yes, I know, they are preparing to go and shoot the Germans, but it is a dangerous matter in a public place. Thomas Daine and David John Davies were summoned for a like offence at Ynismeudw on December 23. P.C. Hall said at 11.15 a. m. on the day named, he saw them at Ynismeudw in possession of the gun and went up to them and asked if they had a licence. They an- swered in the negative and he told them that they would be reported. Both pleaded guilty. The Clerk Any excuse to offer ? Defendants Oh, we were just out with the gun. Clerk Looking for Germans? (;Laugh- ter.) Fined 15s. and costs. CHILDREN'S ABSENCE AND MEDI- CAL CERTIFICATES. There were a considerable number of summonses for absence of children from school,' in which medical certificates were presented which had been obtained from doctors after the issuing of the summons- es. The Chairman said the certificates were not at all satisfactory, and, in future, un- less the certificates were produced to the attendance officer when he called round they would be obliged to ignore them. It may seem very hard in some places, but otherwise they may be very much im- posed upon. They thought sometimes that the doctors did not exercise sufficient care in giving them. Mr. D. T. Williams (who did not ad- judicate in these cases) said the education committee had "discussed the matter and they thought that one of these days they would engage a solicitor and supoena the doctors to give evidence in order that they might see whether the cases were really so serious as to be kept from school. The absence of so many children was a great loss to the authority in grants.

No title

It is notified by the War Office that considerable delay in delivery is oc- cajsioned by the omission to put the number of the battalion on letters ad- dressed to officers and men serving in regiments in the Expeditionary Force. The public are, therefore, particularly requested to insert the number of the batt.alion in all cases when it is known to them.

Advertising

EraSTIMN brings about tHc most dirurtwastng effect* and hBtLdat.h.ö.. It e3lUÄi:t onft ho C,W up th, v !>I'O. duei"" t" ''Y1' ist»t WIOA. I Truv ,(.rI;oo. 8. arid premiirur-My ao,d û!-lI'rU.l1ce. Gup ruetnocis are strictly saien* titis and up.t.o.d"t. Wo never recommend jilftssea untass ataa* ititeiy ne

I BOYHOOD OF CHRIST

I BOYHOOD OF CHRIST." SUCCESSFUL CANTATA BY LADIES' CHOIR. Two excellent penorniiince.j of the- cantata "Boylioud of Ciiii-i,t were, given a:, Amon Chapel, \&uadgynliauir on Thursday and Saturday hist, like chapel was weli fined on both occaA- ,ions, and the concerts were a complete success. The Rev. D. J. Davies occupied the chair on each occasion, and in his opening remarks said that this was the first L»adies' Chqir that lscradgya- lais had produced", and their efrorts fully justiued further attempts of the other chapels in this direction. The choir was ably assisted by the following principal artist&i:—Sopraix>K Madame liessie Morris, Amman lord; contralto, Miss Rachel Jones, Ammaaii- ford; baritone, Mr Gwilym Jones, and violinists, Miss Florence Grabham and. Mr Llewelyn Williams, A.C. V. (1'strad- gynlais). The accompanists were Messrs. A. O. Rankin and Edgar Hughsou, Ystrad gynlais. The choir rendered the choruses with marked ability; the chief successes being, "Hear all ye people," "0 daughter of Zion," and Jesus, Lord, in perfect measure. The musical aocompanimen-ts through- out the cantata were of a very high, standard the introduction to "0 Blessed be the Lord," bedng consider- ed as one of the finest existing in can- tata music. A miscellaneous programme was pre- sented after the cantata, Miss Florence Grabham opening with a violin solor "Swiss Air," and responding to an en- core by a rendering of "The Druids." Mr Gwilym Jones who only appeared, in the miscellaneous programme sang; "It is thou who has blighted," "Yr Hen Gerddor," and a composition of Mr Edgar Hughson. Madame Bessie Morris and Miss R. Jones rendered "Babylon," and "The* Toilers" respectively. Mr Llewelyn. Williams also gave a fine rendering of "Il Trovatore" on the violin. All the artistes were encored both- evenings. Great credit is due to Mr Howelt Phillips, A.T.S.C., the able conductor, whose persistent and painstaking lab- ours have not been in vain. The committee wit h Mr Lewis- Wathen as secretary, has also contri- buted greatly to the success of the per- formances. It has been suggested that the choir- enter the field of eisteddfodic activity.

No title

One of the immediate results of thee war (says the American Consul at Johannesburg iirv a report to Washing- ton) has been the shutting down of the diamond industry in the Cape,, Transvaal, and Orange Free State pro- vinces, this including the famous Kim— berley and Premier mines, as well as. practically putting a stop to the opera- tions on the alluvial diamond diggings; in the Vaal River district. It is, however, common knowledge ire Johannesburg that the diamond rzidna- companies in South Africa have large- stocks in reserve.

No title

Oherwydd amgylchiadau aavorfod penderfynwyd gohirio darlith y Parch. W. Moelfrvn Morgan yn yr Temper- ance Hall, Cwmtwrch, hyd v 24ain o'r mis hwn. On Thursday evening a debate was held under the auspices of the local debating society, the subject being Is the cinema an advantage?" The affirmative was taken by Mr. L. D. Williams (Gwys), arId the negative by Mr. E. Kinsey. Miss R. Davies (schoolmistress) delivered an address to the members of the "Cym- deithaa Gymraeg Gwys" on "Tro byr i'r Amerig." The lecture was a very enter- taining one and was very much enjoyed. Conn. Lewis Thomas occupied the pulpit at Ebenezer on Sunday, and gave inspir- ing sermons. We are given to understand that Mr. Thomas is a likely candidate for the ministry. Miss Llewelyn, a teacher at the Cwm- twrch School, has declined: the offer of a good post as school mistress in the Rhon- dda Valley. Mise Lewelyn prefers to re- main at Cwmtwrch. The Bethel Dramatic Society are giv- ing a performance of "Die Shon Dafydd" at the Drill Hall, Gurnos, on Saturday, when a pleasant evening is anticipated. The Ebenezer choir, under the conduc- torship of Mr. D. Davies, G. and L., is rehearsing "Josiah, King of Judah." It is expected that the concert will take place about Easter. The funeral of the four months old child of Mr. Wm. Rees.. of Gynol Terrace took place on Monday. It is sad to note I that Mr Rees buried his wife a month ago, a victim of the white scourge. The infant child of Mr. and Mrs Dd. Price was al ao buried on Monday. An accident which might have termin- ated fatally occured at Cwmllyrafell on Saturday. Mr Henry Rees, who was accompanied by the son of Mr. David Davies, Gwaun-cae-^urwen, was riding down Cefnybrain-hill, in a trap when the back chain broke, causing the horse to bolt. Both the man and the boy were thrown out, and were nearly run over by the trap. Mr Rees escaped with a few minor injuries, but the boy has been wither seriously injured. j The local Belgians are doing well, j there are now eighteen in the place. .clothing to the vaJue of R30 was divided -among the three families last week. Great regret was felt locally on Tues- day, when it had beoome known that Mr J. Hammond, who was well-known and respected in the place, had passed away at Aberdare. Deceased was an insurance agent between Ammanford and Lower Owmtwrch, from 1900 to 1910, when he moved to Aberdare. The funeral took I' place on Thursday at Aberdare. The Blaencaegurwen colliery has been working irregularly of late, the pita have been idle for two days this week. The infants' school was re opened on Monday, after having been <-lostd on ac- count of measles since the latter pa.rt of November. There was a fairly good at- tendance. The teachers have been in the meantime engaged at other schools. The Mutual Improvement Society's pro- gramme, drawn out at the beginning of the session, is being carried out in spite of the poor attendances (iprohably due to the war). St. David's D.,iv is to be cele- brated by a miscellaneous concert entire- ly in Welsh (addresses on Welsh heroes, singing of Welsh airs, folk-songs, and recitations). The session ends later with a supper. A sewing class, formed at beginning of the winter to provide comforts for our soldiers is being held weekly. The work is chiefly done at home in evenings—knit ting scarfs, helmets, body belts, mittens, etc. The finished work is received, and work cut out in class. The children help I eagerly. One little girl who had put her name on mitters done by her and then sent out, was very proud to receive a nice letter from a grateful soldier actually from the front! -————

FARMERS RESISTEDI

FARMERS RESISTED. I Norfolk County Education Com- mittee have refused by 13 votes to seven to sanction th/5 employment of boys of 12 on agricultural work. An ingenious attempt was; made by Mr Sap well, who introduced the pro- posal, to colour it as a. scheme in time of emergency to a;1;ow lads to pursue their education on the land instead of in the school room. Besides, they can earn 3s.6d. a week. But Mr Fowler pointed out that no 0I1I6 would think of allowing boys of school age to curry a builders' hod. or a girl to stav at home because her mother was unwell. Hr Herbert na.v "'lid if farmers wanted more 1111r they must pay more monev ■ fi,r(i M,. Burden .

I WELSH FLEI DEARER1

WELSH FL\EI. DEARER. The aimrnl flannel fair was 0001- tinued at Maesleg on Tuesday. There was not the u.unl quantity of fla.nnel SUB in pr^Vros rears, and the number of stall hold-? was considerably below the half. Prices of flannel and wool were higher—shirting Is. 3d. to Is 5d. per yard, and other articles higher in proportion.

No title

——— ———— Teach t Name a great inventor. Boy" Augustine. Teacher What is the popu- lation of T,)fi's 'Vell? Boy: Twelve million. Tliat lad will go far. Many a earc-kfti c rema rk has bettn rn'■ de on the Jew as a soldier, but if this war does nothing ■■«*» it wii] have made th,m all look V'; v ilv (savs the "Jewish World.") For tHe -T-TV ha., s hown remark- able capacity for fighting on the field of battle, both as to valour and resource. He is being sought after as a. particularly valuable recruit for just these qualities.

TRAGEDY AT YSTALYFERA TRAGEDY AT YSTALYFERA I

TRAGEDY AT YSTALYFERA.! TRAGEDY AT YSTALYFERA. ALLTYGRUG RESIDENT COMMITS SUICIDE A sad discovery was made at Allty- grug, Ystaiyfera, on Friday evening when a well-known local resident, Mr. Phillip Williams was found hanging at his home, I a cottage near Ailtygrug Farm. De- ceased was seen at home by his sister, Mrs. Meredith, at about seven o'clock, when she went to give him tea, and when she returned- about two hours later she she found him hanging from the reof. The authorities were immediately iu- formed, and P.C. Cook quickly arrived on the scene, followed by Dr. Lewis. Williams was cut down but it was found tha-t he had been dead for some time. Deoeaed, who was 53 years of age, and a bachelor, resided by himself at the farm cottage, Mrs. Meredith's home being next door. He was a labourer on Col. Gough's estate for many years, but ceased work nine months ago. Dr. Lewis had been attending him some time for depression and insomnia, and it was thought that the continued sufferings had deranged his mind. The inquest was conducted by Mr. Wil- son, deputy coroner, at the Police-station on Saturday evening. Mrs. Meredith, sister of deceased, said her brother had not been in good health of late, and had been engaged on Ynis- cedwyn Farm. Deceased frequently com- plained of sleeplessness and restlessness. He also said his nerves were shattered. Deceased never gave any indication that he would do away with himself, but he often wished he was dead, as he was so miserable. Deceased lived alone in a house next door to witness, and he ap- peared fairly well on Fridap night, about 7 o'clock, when she took his tea in. Some two hours later, when she was taking his supper in, she noticed that there was no light in the house. As it was a bright moonlight night, however, she could see deceased hanging in the kitchen. John Williams, Alltygrug-road, brother of deceased, said that as he waa going to- wards deceased's house on Friday night about nine o'clock he met his sister com- ing down the road, and she told him what she had seen. He made for the house as soon as possible, and cut the rope to which deceased was hanging. at once. It was tied to a nail in the beam. De- ceased was quite dead. Witness sent for Dr. Lewis and the police. Dr. W. J. Lewis, Ystalyfera, said he had been attending deceased for some months past. Deceased suffered from neurasthenia and mental depression. Apart from this deceasedw as physically healthy. Death was due to strangula- tMML. A verdict of suicide whilst temporarily I insane returned. I