Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

THOROUGH Sight Testing and Spectacle Fitting 1 Mr. ERIC REES F.R.M.S.. F.S.M.C., Etc. 26 CASTLE ST- SWANSEA —-— The rendition of y-our sight will be demonstrated and all informa- tion willinglv given f i ,-?n willinu FREE OF CHARGE. Telephone: Central 520.

Advertising

¥ ? t ? MINERS MOVING. ► ► 0 I 4 1 1 SEE PAGE 2. I ► ► ?

EYEWITNESS AS A HUMORIST

"EYE-WITNESS" AS A HUMORIST. JAMUSIXG STORIES FROM THE FRONT. HOW THE ARMY IS FED AND MAIN, TAINED. BY "EYE-WITNESS." An interesting and instructive dispatch from the "Eyewitness" present with the British, headquarters was issued on Monday night, showing how the Army gets its supplies of food and war material. The Ordnance Department is termed the "Military Universal Provider," and some laughable stories are told. respect- ing it. The furnishing of food of every kind for mati; and beast is the duty of the Army Service Corps, the furnishing of every drug and appliance necessary for the treatment of the sick and wounded is carried out by the Royal Army Medical Corps, assisted by the various voluntary organisations which started their effective work when the war began, while the provision of stores for disabled animals falls to the Army, Veterinary Department The Rcyal Flying Corps puroha.ses its own machines, as does the Machanical Transport Branch of the Army Service 'Corps. Broadly speaking, however, with those .exceptions, the Ordnance Department supplies the Army with all the clothing ,equipment, arms, ammunition, tools, ap- pliances machinery, 'and expendible material that can be required, from guns weighing many tons to tin-tacks.. In a werd, it is the Military Universal Pro- vider. The vastness of the work of maintain- ing the Army—apart from feeding it— may be gauged from a few figures. In one month there were issued to the troops 450 miles of telephone wire. 570 telephones. 543,000 sandbags. 10,000 lbs. of dubbing for bcots. 38,000 bars of soap. 150,000 pairs of socks. I 100,000 pairs of boots. In ten days thre were also distributed 315,075 flannel belts. 118,160 fur waistcoats. The wav that insignificant items mount up where large numbers of men are con- 

EYEWITNESS AS A HUMORIST

(Continued from preceding oolumn). some of the difficulties of catering for ah army composed of different races :— 4982 24. 11. 14 O.G. 796. Mohammedan or Punjab lotah has a spout. With or without a handle. Hin- doo or Bombay lotah generally of brass but no spout or handle. Is carried by. Hindoos and Mohammedans here both agree that a. Katorah never has a spout but is a sort of metal bowl. Comfirm that you wanted the spouted articles, for which nearest substitute is enamell- ed teapot. In reference to complaints as to loss of property on ambulance trains, some official suggested the provision of a safe and a ladv purser. To this the reply W:1!1 .1,t, file PlIfA m.on]Id be furnished if iL was .thought i •'ceratry. but thst the lady was not an Ordr.ance supply.

THE WAR AND THE TINPLATE TRADE

THE WAR AND THE TIN- PLATE TRADE. SOME FACTORS IN A SERIOUS PROBLEM. CAN PERMANENT INJURY BE AVERTED The perplexing problem confronting those engaged, in the tinplate trade at the outbreak of war, and to some extent yet prevailing was refered to in our columns last week. Upon information of local gentlemen, the problem was described as serious, and a leading article appearing in a South Wales contemporary on Monday somewhat comfirma this view. The writer states The Welsh tinplate industry when war broke out was mainly dependent upon its exports, something like two out of every three boxes manufactured being sent to British Dependencies and foreign countries. Consequently, when the war affected shipping, the industry immedi- ately suffered, and the large business with enemy countries wes stopped. The reult is seen in the fact that out of 581 sheet and tinplate- mills only some 390 are now at work. As a sight compens- ation the home. demand has increased, and possibly at no time has so much tin- plate been consumed in Britain, a great increase having taken place in food pack- ing of all description for use by our sailors and soldiers. The enemy are in great need of tinplate, and have made spec/ial efforts to secure supplies. It may be recalled that when factories and bakeries were opened in Denmark to make up a food called "gulloch," a sup- ply of tinplate for the making of eighty million tin cans was sought from Wales. The Britijh Government vetoed this promising bus-tness by placing an em- bargo on tinplates entering Holland, Sweden, and Denmark. Before the war these oountrie were good customers for Welsh tinplate, taking in 1913, 1,118,384 boxes. Representations were made to the Board of Trade, and ultimately it was understood that licences for the export of tinplates to Holland and Sweden would be granted on satisfactory guarantees. WELSH MANUFACTURER'S HAM- PERED. 1 1 ine position in so far as the Welsh manufacturer is concerned is set forth in the following passage There is no doubt that licences have been granted with exceptional promptness to some merchants, but with irritating slowness to Welsh manufacturers, who make the plates needed, and have had to hold them in stock for a long period. Last week a deputation again waited upon the authorities in London, and it is hoped that as a result there may be a further relaxation of the embargo. What adds to the seriousness of the local situation is that, whilst the Welsh manufacturer is unable to export plates to his customers in the neutral countries named on guaran- tees, his most dangerous competitor is supplying his old customers with tin- plate without being required to give a guarantee that the goods will not be used to meet the needs of the enemy. The United States returns up to the end of November show that the exports of tin- plate and trne plate for N v>vember, 1914, were 4,837 tons, or nearly double the trade in the previous November. The ex- port trade of the Welsh industry is fur- ther handicapped by the cost of material being higher than for many years. Block tin is JB174 per ton. This metal has been higher at times, but not for a long period and seldom have tin bars been quoted as they now are at E6 per ton. Added to these difficulties is the high price of coal and other materials and the difficulty of obtaining shipments, a combination of circumstances that brings up the quota- tion for tinplate to 15s. per box, as com- pared with lis. 9d., the lowest price of last year. It is obvious that, uitless some measure can be devised to relax the con- ditions to which the tinplate trade is now subject, the industry may, uffer perma- nent injury and irrevoverable loss during the war. ——————.

No title

They were discussing in the workshop the question of corporal punishment. "I believe in the old maxim," said the fore- man, "Spare the rod and spoil the child." When I was a boy I know I received many chastisements and whack- ings, and it did me good. On one occasion, I remember, I was punished for telling the truth." "It cured you," whispered a voice from the far corner.

THE BETTER WAY I

THE BETTER WAY. INTERVIEW WITH A GREAT PACIFIST. FUTURE OF INTERNATIONAL PEACE MOVEMENT. Mr Felix Moscheles, president of the International Arbitration Association, and now the senior members of the In- ternational Peace Bureau, which is the standing committee of the peace soeities of the world, celebrated his 82nd birthday, on Monday, and received congratulations from far and wide. I found him (says a correspondent) engaged upon a water-colour painting and surrounded by pictures* and sou- venirs of many illustrious Mu'sici. tI and writers, in his delightful studio ill Elm Park-road, Chelsea. "I tun surprised to find myself so well," he replied to my inquiry, "1 should be ;i.tmed to feel better amid i so much misery. Oh, yes! I Sltill laugh. Who was it said he laughed lest he should cry? Besides, there is still so much in life that really cannot be taken seriously. I still meet what I call para-bellum people—those who think the piling up of huge armaments the only way of keeping peace— though you would imagine that six months of war would have killed that supersti tion. "I see the best of bishops telling mothers that their sons died the death of Christian martyrs, while good Ger- man Christians invoke the protection of their own particular Lord of flofAs- a revival of polytheism amid which God, the Father of all is apparently forgotten. For half a century we have been warning all who would hear of what the cultivation of war frenzy would lead to; and there are still thousands of people who can't get over their surprise. "WHAT ABOUT PACIFISM NOW?" "They come to me and say, '\Vell, what a';ou,t pacifism now r" And, as you can see their sneer, I reply, 'Well, what a bout the big battalion theory now ? Wouldn't itliave been better if you had made the Hague Conference do tho work it was founded to do? Didn't you know that "war is not made with rose-water" ? Wouldift it have been much better to make peace before the war broke out ?' Then they turn aside, with a sigh, and ask me how long it is going to last. And I amswer, 'Go to! .Do you take me for an expert attached to lunatic asylum?' The veteran artist and pacifist chortled. Presently he added: "Even our favourite papers do not escape this taint of tragic absurdity. A hundred innocent civilians are slain in a mur- derous raid upon the North-East Coast, and they proudly cry: 'There was no pantie P No panic, forsooth! For my part, I should find no shame in trembling for those nearest and dear- est to me, or for those perhaps least near and dear, doomed to indiscriminr- I ate slaughter, because certain rulers amd statesmen have failed to settle a far-distant quarrel. -ave are the solace, the conscious- ness of common danger and suffering, while I ask my eternal question—not when the war will end, but when the folly and wickedness, of peoples as well as Sovereigns, which lead to war, will end. "GO TO LAW NOT WAR." "This catastrophe was no surprise to us. It is the believer in the armed peace who should be shocked and peni- tent. We who helped to pioneer the Entente Cordiale and hoped for other ententes, to follow, listened many a time with a sad question in our minds w.hile speech-making burgomasters said: 'Love me and I'll love you.' What if we should quarrel? If you, have gone no further than a vague good feeling, what better are you when that good feeling evaporates ? Nations must learn to do as individuals, busi- ness firms, and even large communities have learmed to do—to go not to war, but to law. "That is the chief demand of the international peace movemenrt, amd the present calamity offers the gnatest justification for it that has been seen in my lifetime. Foreigners sometimes j scoff at us as A nation of shopkeepers. I wish it were true, for then we should j at least have learned to look after our own business, and to look after it pro- perly. "A month before the war broke out, ( in a. little paper which I called 'Scares for Scaremongers,' I was speculati'ng I about the possibility of a bomb, per- haps a shower of bmnbe, being thrown upon one of the South Kensin?on Museums, or upon some of the Picca- I dilly dubs, or the Bond-street arsenals of fashion, trying 'to open the eyes of those who are lacking in imagination and cannot see beyond the narrow j limits of our Fools' Paradise.' When • it was too late the eyes of millions of European sufferers began, to be opened to the folly and wickedness of a sys- tem which divided them into blood- tight compartments, and ilnculcated hatred and oppositioln where there should be love and co-operation. Send some of that good British or French or German blood to an analyst, and what differences will be find ? (Continued at bottom of next column)

THE BETTER WAY I

(Continued from preceding column). ROMANCE OF WAR GONE. "It wouJd be cruel to say 'it serves you right' but the only satisfactory thing in the outlook is tiliart multitudes. have learned in sorrow to prize peace as they never did before. They have learned that we were right when we said that warfare does not pay, and that i.t is no longer t'he glorious sport we read of in romantic books. We may be more confident now than be- I fore in saying tha.t democracy will never stand a repetition, of these ills. The very soldiers and sailors them- selves will be the first to rejoice at their liberation, and to insist that, for the general safety, a new type of states i craft must be established, in mahich the supreme law will be the happiness and progress ("\f the labourin.g masses in all lands."

MONSTER EISTEDDFOD

MONSTER EISTEDDFOD. "GREATEST ON EARTH." Copies of the preliminary programme of the International Expositicn Eistedd- fod, to be held at San Francisco from July 27 to Ju)y 30 next, have just reach- ed this country, It is a most interesting compilation, and tends to support the claim that has -since been made by the Wekh-Amerii u promoters that the San Francisco Eisteddfod of 1915 will be "the greatest thing of its kind on earth." The competitions will be open to the world, thus giving them international scope and character. The meetings will be held in "the two million auditorium" at the new civic centre in San Francisco, which will seat 10,000 people. No posi- tive announcement can yet be made as to the number of choirs that will enter the different choral contests, but a con- servative estimate indicates that at least eight choirs of 150 voices each will com- pete for the chief choral prize of 10,000 dollars, and that twelve choirs of 60 voices each will enter for the 3,000 dollar competition for male voices. The subjects chosen for competition in each department are wide in variety, and show a wise discrimination on the pa.rt of the committee. In the chief choral competition the* test pieces will be Handel's "Haste ye, My. Brethren," and H ear us 0 Lor:i," from Judas Mac cabeus" choruses 4 and 5, from G. W. Chadwick's "Phoenix Expirants," and Dr. D. C. Williams's "Indian Serenade" (unaceomanied). Dr. Willial# is a Mer- thyr man, and other Welsh composers represented in the vest pieces in other competitions are Emlyii, Evans, Cyril Jenkins, T. J. Davies, and Dr. Vaughan Thomas. All information respecting the eistedd- fod and the Panama-Pacific Exposition, which will be held at San Francisco dur- ing the same period, may be secured from the general secretary, Mr. W. Solomon Jones, at the Exposition Buildings, San Francisco, California.

NEW RECRUITING POSTERS

NEW RECRUITING POSTERS FIVE EXAMl'LE/¿ ::TED IX THE WELSH LANGUAGE. A splendid new series of recruiting posters has been issued by the Parlia- mentary recruiting Committee, many of them being pictorial works of great artis- tic merit. They include numerous ex- amples of the way in which recent events have been seized upon by the producers in order to emphasise the need for more and more men, the reasons why the fit should enlist, and the incen- tives which should appealto the patriotic. The general size of the posters is 30in. by 20., but there are many others of varying dimensions, and not only are there numerous slips for use on trams and taxi-cabs, but there is even a long gate-post poster for use in rural districts. There is thus abundant room for choice, and the possessor of a vacant hoarding, w indow, gateway, or 'gatepost will find it possible to make a fitting selection from the list which has been prepared. Five of the pesters have also been rpo- duced in the Welsh language.

AMMANFORD CHILDRENS HEROES

AMMANFORD CHILDRENS' HEROES Ammanford school children were invited by the headmaster to vote for one of the names written on the blackboard to show whom they considered their favour- ite hero of the war. The result was that almost with unanimity the King of the Belgians was first favourite; next came Commander Holbrook, who braved the passage of the Dardanelles; and then Admiral Sir David Beatty. Another who secured a number of votes was Private. Fuller, V.C., of Swansea.

EARTHQUAKES IN WALES

EARTHQUAKES IN WALES It is a mistake to suppose, as some do, that Wales is immune from earth- quakes. During the last five centuries some thirty Welsh shocks are on record, some of which are described in the chron- icles as severe. One in 1426 was preceded bv a tempest. A shock in 1574 demolish- ed part of Ruthin Castle. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 was marked by some strange phenomena at Swansea.

THE CHARMS OF MUSIC

THE CHARMS OF MUSIC. REMARKABLE IMPRESSION IN THE TRENCHES. Tka depressing feature of this war is its anonymity. We know of its errors, but we rarely hear of the deeds which, like the tardy sunshine that has tinged the grey plains of Flanders with gold these few days have brought frequent bright rays of glory into the drab work of trench fighting, and even less of the little exhibitions of human- ity sometimes displayed by the grim combatants. > v I have already recorded how a Welsh revivalist preacher, in the person of Private John,, who by the accident of circumstances found himself a soldier in the Welsh Regiment became, in the words of an officer, "a regular mon- goose on Germans" until an unlueky shot sent him to solve, the great prob- lem about which he had preached so ardently. I have now received the story of another Welshman which is no less remarkable. This soldier, came from Tonypandy or Llwynypia, or some place with an equally unpronounceable name, and except that he possessed a remarkably good tenor voice, was an otherwise undistinguished wearer of the King's khaki. He has acquired a local fame, not only amongst his comrades, but also amongst his foes in the oppo- site trenches. "HOB Y DERI DANDO." It seems to have happened in this way. It was one of the many miser- able mights which troops have spent in the muddy trenches. Our outlook from out trench across the flat fields of Flanders was one of the most for- bidding kind. It rained heavily, and always the mud was semi-liquid, knee deep, and frigidly cold. There was ho sound beyond the occasional "plip plop" of a German rifle, and the sharp bark of a reply. In these circum- stances, the gallant Welshman sudden- ly lifted up his heart in song. He sang a merry \VeIsh ballad, "Hob y Deri Dando," and when he had finished from the opposite trench there "came, in excellent English, a demand for more. So once again the clear voice was lifted up into the grey night. This time the song was "Mentra Gweai," and again the Germans applauded. "Have you got Caruso there?'' one of them shouted acrdbs. At this time it seemed to dawn up- on both sides that singer had created a truce, for whilst he had sung not a, shot had been fired. Everyone within earshot had momentarily forgotten the deadly work of war to hang tupon the melodies arising from tilie mud of Flanders. A bargain was struck on German proposition that if the soldier with the beautiful voice would sing again they would agree to fire no more until daylight. For the third time the singer enter- tained his strange audience, this time choosing "Hen Wlad fy Nhadau," and the stirring strains of the Welsh national anthem arose for perhaps the first time over the dismal Flemish morass.

WELSH PRISONERS OF WARI

WELSH PRISONERS OF WAR OUTWITTING GERMAN CENSOR. Welsh prisoners of wa.r in Germany are able to notify their friends in this country more fully of the conditions of prison and internment camp life than are their English colleagues, and that without having recourse to t-ho i doubtful safeguard of invisible ink. 1 A letter which easily passed the German censor, and which is, and will long be, kept as a family treasure, contains the following. The word; given, here in brackets are the English equivalents of the Welsh word im- mediately preceding. The letter was written in English throughout, ex- cepting the Welsh words, which the German censor took to he the names of other English prisoners. The letter reads:—• You will be glad to hear news cf odd friends. Mr Bwyd (food) is very bad here. Mr Barn. (bread) is very much darker than when you s-tv him, and is quite ha-rd.' I never see Mr Ciig (meat) and Mr Ynvmyn (butter) but seldom lie was very bad indeed the last few times I mot. him. I used at first to meet Mr. Llaeth (milk) every day, but he has not been here now for some time. I

No title

Noticing the gardener putting bands of tar round the fruit trees, the little girl had asked endless questions as to the reason, etc. A few hours later, after tea, she came down into the drawing-room, where her mother was entertaining, and among the guests was a visitor with a mourning band on his left arm. "Mother,' exclaimed the child presently, in one of the pauses which so often occur, "what's to stop 'em crawling up his other arm?" Have you. noticed that Kitchener was born at Kerry, has a country seat in Kent, as Sirdar was employed by the Khedive, fought the Klialif at Kartoum, also Kruger. now fighting the Kaiser, Kluck, Kriinp, Kultur?

BETTER RAILWAY WAGES

BETTER RAILWAY WAGES. AMICABLE SETTLEMET THIS WEEK Mr. J. H. Thomas, M.P., general rec- retary of the National Union of Railway- men, delivered a highly important speech at a meeting of railway workers at Lei- cester. Justifying the action of the executive in not going forward with the national program, Mr. Thomas said "We suggested that a deputation as representing the railway managers and a deputation representing us should meet for discussion. We have held two meet- ings, free, frank, and unfettered. The general managers not only, received us in a courteous, fair, and honourable spirit, but they discussed with us fully, recog- nising that there is a claim for the rail- way men which has got to be met. (Cheers.) Our negotiations are still pro- ceeding. We shall be meeting again in a few .Jays—not, mark you, to consider the claims of one grade, but of the railway men of the United Kingdom as a whole. "There are those who say it is your duty to immediately threaten to strike. Let me make myself perfectly clear, speak- ing as one of you—as one who owes every- thing to ycu-I say with all the solem- nity of my nature that any man who ad- vises the railway workers to strike at this time is not guilty of a crime, but he is rendering you the greatest disservice it is passible to render. (Cheers.) A strike of the5 railway men at this stage would not be a strike against the companies. It would be a strike against the nation. (iCheers. ) "I repeat here and now, as my last words, that 4Wen before this day week we shall have arrived at a settlement— (cheers)—not of your National Program— because we are not dealing with pro- grams we are dealing with special cir- cumstances at the moment. We are deal- ing with the work you are performing, with the increased cost of living, and we are asking that this should be met by a substantial advance in wa.ges to every- bodv. I am certain we are going to suc- ceed. The negotiation may. not yield just all we want—negotiations never do- but I am orofoundlv satisfied that we shall get a l'rger advance, a more impor- tant advp've. than has ever been ob- tained be.>r?." (Cheers.) The routing passed a resolution sup- porting tlH action of the Executive.

BOY AND COUNTY COUNCIL

-—— ——— BOY AND COUNTY COUNCIL. JUDGE'S VIEW OF PLAYGROUND. At Haverfordwest County Court on Monday Judge Lloyd Morgan gave judg- ment in the action for damages brought by Joseph Thomas, Dew-street, Haver- fordwest, by the next best friend of Joseph Omv.n, a schoolboy, against the local education authority in respect of personal in juries sustained by the boy falling in Barn-street Council School play- ground. The bcdl Orman fell while playing football. Blood poisoning en- sued, and he has ever since been a patient nt the Haverfordwest Infirmary. The case was heard at the last court. Plaintiff claimed 2100 damages. The Judge now said he was satisfied the boy Orman fell, and that the injury sustained was the result of the fall, and had it been caused in the way described by plaintiff he should not have hesitated to hold the defendents liable. The play- ground in his opinion was not a fit place for boys to play. in, as there were pro- jecting stones in it. The question be had to ask was whether plaiptiff had establish ed the onus of the proof, and he pointed out that the version given by the boy Orman at the trial was very dif- ferent from the one he gave to the de- fendents' solicitor and to Dr. Griffiths, of F-.vanfea. The boy wis then express- ly asked whether he tripped over a etone, and s'tid he did not. That was said in the presence of his own medical man, Dr. Lloyfl. and, having regard to this and to the discrepancy in the accounts given by the other witnesses, he could not hold that the accident was due to the defen- dents' negligence. He, therefore, gave judgment for the defendents. On the application of Mr. R. T. P. Williams, who appeared for the pbintiff, the Judge made an order that costs be not enforced without leave.

0 GERMAN NAVAL LOSSES j

-0 .———— GERMAN NAVAL LOSSES The German naval lists of casualties numbered It. and 17 contain the names respectively of 1,178 and 1,089 officers and men killed, wounded, or missing, bringing the grand total in the seven- teen lists to about 15,000. These do not include the losses in the sinking of the Blucher. The last four lists of the Ger- man Army equalities mainly consist cf names from the fighting on the east front. The losses there appear to have been much heaveier than had been sup- posed. I The "Chicago Sunday Tribune" reports under the heading "The Oldest Man in the World," the following :—"Wsterville, Neb. December lgth.-Tlhomas Morris, of Waterville, is probably the oldest man in the world. He will be 121 years of age on. January 15th. He has lived in three centuries and in the administration of every President of the United Stites. He has seen the reign of six monarchs "f England. Morris is still vigorous. He was born Januarv 15th. 1794, rt Bell w, Montgomery Wales."

PURSUED AS A SPY

PURSUED AS A SPY. ENGLISHMAN'S ESCAPE FROM GERMANS. Among the many Englishmen who were in Belgium when the war broke out was Mr A. A. Shaw, a trainer and jockey, living at Hoeyleart, a village about eight miles from Brussels. Mr Shaw has since managed to make his escape, but before doing so he had some interesting experiences. When the Germans first arrived he was left to carry on has business un- molested, and the makes no complaint about their conduct in his own village. Asked as to the outrages committed by the Germain troops in other places, Mr Shaw advanced a curious theory. "The excuse always made," he said, "by the Germans, when they looted, pillaged, and destroyed a village, m-ae, that their soldiers had been fired at by civilians. I believe, in a good many cases, these shots were tired by the German soldiers in order to give an excuse for looting, and also to wound themselves so that they should get seat to the base. "I know of two oases in which this was proved. In one instance a man saw a German soldier deliberately shoot himself through, the hand with a re- volver, and then inform his command- ing officer that he had been shot at,. from a wood near. "Preparations were being made to fire the village when the maire laid this information before the commander of the troops, who at once countermanded the order to fire the houses. OFFICER WHO SHOT HIMSELF. "The second was the case of, a village near Monti. Here an olhotr nred .\0- shows \1.11 his revolver, ana oi.ta re- ported that they had been lirta mL him from behind a hedge. A girl saw tae incident. The usual preparations- were made to burn the village, toe giri related her story to the parish priest. "The priest went to the commanding officer, who a.:>k2d it the g-rl vouia identify the man she had seen sihoau She said she could, and the regiment- was at oiuoe paraded. Without Hesita- tion she pie k.>d out the olheer, and it was shown that his revolver had lately been fired and two cartridges were missing. "He was taken out and shot there and then, and no harm was done to the village." Mr Shav. eon,tinned to live at Hoeyl- eart until the beginning of Ouiober. Ha did a good business driving people auout the country, as the railways wei-e all slopped. Then the order went out that ad Englishmen under the age of 55 were to be sent as prisoners to Ger- many. He managed to elude tzie vigil- ance of the Germans, and turned iiia aiUemcion to selling fruit in tLe towns round about. He got as far as Namur on the one. side and Liege on the other. BotJh pLaees. he says, are strongly fortiiied, and surrounded by entrenciimenu» and wire entanglements. Numbers of Bel- gians have been employed o these forti- fications, being paid at the rate of five francs a day. After some week, the hue and cry became very strong after Mr Shaw, and he was obliged to hide with some fri?nd?. The Germans were very anxious to catch him, as they suspocted him of beirug a spy, moving about the country -is he had been. Finally, he managed to get across the frontier between the sentinels on a dark night. He has been obliged to leave his horses, his carriages, and ad his fur- niture. -4p

SWANSEA VALLEY TRADE

SWANSEA VALLEY TRADE. There was little change to report in. the state of various trades oi t<,» Valley during the pa.¡A, we-eli. Employ- ment was generally good, and in the coal trade few collieries were reported idle. The Birchgrove and Samlet Colliev- ies were busy and outputs heavy. The demand for pig iron was heavy, while the couper trade was in. a flour- ishing state, all mills and refineries being kept constantly going. There was continued activity in tihe steel industry, the yield being hijgh, and furnaces wer.9 working fuly. The tinplate industry was still de- pressed, and a number of rails we it' only partly engaged. There was little business doing at the sulphuric acid factories owing to the quietness of the tinplate trade. The spelter factories were regularly employed, and the furna

No title

A good story is being told of a con- versation between a Biitish Tommy ard a German prironer. The latter retrarked disparagingly to Tommy, "You fir-ht i'r Y oii fi,- mr*T>ey I'd b,-) ashamed to do th.it. We fight for h^u' r.r." To which Tommy r; c inij)-, "Tea, I ?ropofe we're each* Inck."