Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

j "THOROUGH" SIGHT-TESTING. J Mr. ERIC REES, F.R.M.S., F.S.M.C., Etc. (Lond.) > ) 26 CASTLE ST. SWANSEA i (Opposite College St.). 'Phone Central,|520. V J Consultation & Expert Advice Free.

Advertising

PREMIER CINEMA. The 4th Instalment of the World } Renowned Gold Seal Serial HTREY,O?HEARTS f Wiil be shown TO NIGHT (FRIDAY) & SATURDAY- I One Instalment of thi MaJfnificent Seriil will he s hown EVERY FRIDAY and 2 SATURDAY in each week for:1I WNU. No Seats Guaranteed after 7.30. 1

FROM THE HANDS OF THE HUNS

FROM THE HANDS OF THE HUNS. mRITISH WOMEX ESCAPE BELGIUM. SOME HORRIBLE EXPERIENCES The spec ial correspondent, of the ""Daily News and Leader," writing on "Wednesday last from Rotterdam for- warded a vivd account to his journal >«f interviews with a. number of Britishers who have just been released from Belgium. Their story, told by Mr G. F. Steward, is most thrilling. He says:- To-day I met forty-eight English .1women and children as they came into Dutch territory after their enforced sojourn in various parts of Belgium ,-and France. They were overjoyed at -escaping from the clutches of the Ger- mans, for some have had nerve-wrack- ing experiences. Among them were three Canadian "girls whose friends cannot be traced. "These tftrre girls are destitute, and are coming to England in the hope of findings a home. When the party arrived at Esschen, -on the frontier, they jumped on to the jpla/tform cheering and shouting "No j ;more Gentians; free at last." Probably the most i interestinsr and -•exciting experience was recounted to me by Mise C. Needham, of Fence Houses, Durham, who went through 'the burning of Louvain and saw civil- ians shot. "It was a terrible day," she said. "The Germams were shoot- ing and burning all over the place in- -cliscrimmately. I saw qpe soldier who was standing near a statue turning round in a circle shooting everyone of whom he caught sight. "For three hours that afternoon I, with others, was rounded up by the **Uerimans who stood in a circle around us preventing our escape. They were shooting over our heads all the time. They told us to stoop and then to lie --down while they continued firing. I saw a great many civilians murdered in this way. "A group of men walking towards tthe German soldiers with tkeirhands albove their heads and without arms of any kind were ruthlessly shot down in -1the presence of women, many of whom must have seen their relatives mur- dered. MADE TO DIG FRIENDS' GRAVES. Afterwards the Germans made the young men dig graves for their friends, and in some cases for their ",fathers who had been shot. "As 'Belgian men marched towards; us with their hands up they were put 'in two rows and shot. One of our fards told us to tiurn our backs, but I refused, saying, 'If we qre to be •shot "let us face the bullets and not liave them in our backs.' Afterwards he said it was only 80 that we should not see the men executed. "Three hours latter we were re- leased, and spent the evening creep- ing about from garden to garden to -escape from the soldiers, but the fire got nearer and nearer, so we were obliged at last to make for the open country At last we reached a chateau where we remained for a fortnight. "We had to pass down one street with burning houses on either side and dead soldiers and horses lying all ground. We had to step over these picking our way. It was awful. I "ilost everything." Miss Bond, from Adlington, Lan- cashire, told me proudly how she had worn her 'Union Jack ever since Brus- sels was occupied. When she went for her passport a German officer demand- ed 'What is that thing?' "The Union Jack." she replied, "the best colours on earth." "Yes!" ho answered, "but your .ships dare not use it," a statement which Miss Bond promptly and to his face charactcrised as a lie. Another lady from South Africa told me how she had spent her time nursing the wounded, a.nd expressed her regret that she had been able to help only one Englishman wounded in Brussels. His name was Askew, and he had been wounded at La Bassee. He lost his arm, but was doing well. "I collected the wounded from the battlefield at Epperinghe. A German officer asked if I was a nurse, and when I said IYeR' he demanded how many barbarians 1 had killed. "Lately they would not let us nurse. We found out too much. "As we left Brussels several women "told me that one German officer shouted 'Au revoir. We wall see you in London when we mare], thpougbl, "Another German as a parting shot said. Yon think you are going to London, but you may fee blown sky nigh while crossing the Channel.'

No title

Having failed to arrange a settle- ment regarding a claim for a wa ad- vane", of 5s. per week as a special war bonin for a large number of steel- W'rl-ors. both employers and the Amal- Iron find Steel Workers' Societv have agreed to refer the mat- ter to the Government Committee for rhiirntion.

WHAT THE WAR HAS TAUGHT1 USI

WHAT THE WAR HAS TAUGHT1 US. MR. RAMSAY MACDQNALD ON THE WORKERS AS PEACEMAKERS. 1 • Discussing the war with members of the National Union of Boot and Shoe Operatives at Leicester, Mr. J. Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., said that on every oc- casion when the authorities had told them the facts, laid all their cards on the table, held nothing back, and said, "We want you," the workers had responded. His message to them was that they should do their duty to the country un- stintingly. "You ought to do it," he ,added, "although other classes are not doing theirs. Let us be able, when it is all over, to go through delinquency after delinquency of class after class and in- terest after interest, and let us be able til challenge the whole of the nation to point to any delinquency of thb working class. Then let us make our claims for the powers which it is necessary that we should exercise. "Do not let the war make you forget what your principles are. The moment the State suffered the pressure of having to fight for its existence railways were nationalised. State departments took over industry after industry, and at last have had to establish the national production of necessary requirements, with a nation- al committee settling the profits that are to be made, and deciding-what wages are to He paid to the men employed in these national workshops for the time being. "N ever has there been such a magnifi- cently conclusive demonstration of the ac- curacy of what we have been saying for years in time of peace. "Remember that after war comes peace. Do not imagine that the impulses and the passions of war are going to last you for the rest of the generation. Whatever you think of militarism—and you cannot hate it or despise it more than I do—remember that it is largely a matter of a coat and the subordination of the individual will, and that as soon as peace comes these units, which became mere putty under the control of the military authorities, will become citizens—shoemakers, cotton operatives, engineers—once again, with the same problems to solve that you have to solve, and the same desire for peace. Keep that door open. "If we are going to have peace the peoples must" make it, and not the kings, and the diplomatists, and the govern- ments." —————

STEEL TRADE ACTIVITY I

STEEL TRADE ACTIVITY. I MORE WAGES WANTED FOR LOWER PAID MEN. 11- Local workers engaged in the Steel trade will be interested to know that from branches published in the monthly report of the British Steelsmelters' Asso- ciation show that the membership has in- creased by 93 since the previous report was issued, the total now being 34,508. "Central Office Notes" on trade and employment, which form part of the re- port, include the following :—"While the continued activity in the steel trade is due to Government orders, a satisfactory feature of the resent position is the signs of development in other directions. It is important that this should continue if the reaction which must inevitably follow the cessation of the war is to be counter- acted. Despite transport difficulties the United States appears to be making a strong bid for British home contracts. "Although some of our members were affected by the engineers' strike, unem- ployment during the month has been com- paratively slight, but in some of the tin- plate and sheet works short time is still being worked." EMPLOYERS' "FAIR SPIRIT." I After commenting on the effect on the workers of the increased cost of living the report says "We have submitted a num- ber of claims for advances in wages; some of these have been settled, and others are in process of negotiation. We have made every effort to keep the truce entered into at the outbreak of the war, but, in view of the greatly increased cost of living, the executive did not feel justified in resisting the claims of our lower-paid members for something to meet their re- duced spending power. "Up to the present the employers in the trades we represent have met us in that fair spirit we had good reason to anticipate, and if our members will show that confidence in their representatives the latter are accustomed to receive, the machinery of negotiation and conciliation at our disposal is adequate to provide a reasonable settlement of every legitimate claim without the loss of a single day's work." ————— —————

No title

If the sun was made of solid coal it would burn out in less than 5,000 yeaTs I Many of the members of the Cardi- ganshire Battery (R.F.A.) now in training at Cardiff, are keen theolog- ians. A Welsh paper tells a good story of a British soldier in Belgium. His colonel, observing him one morning wending his way to camp with a fine rooster in his.. arms, stopped him to know if he had been stealing chickens. "No, colonel," was the reply; "I just saw the old fellow sitting on the wall, and I ordered him to crow for Old England, and he wouldn't. So I just took him prisoner."

IWELSH ENGINEMEN

I WELSH ENGINEMEN. REQUEST FOR TWENTY PER CENT. A special conference of delegates of the Monmouthshire and South Wales Associa- tion of Colliery Enginemen, Stokers and Craftesmen was held at Cardiff. Mr. W. J. Wathan, Blaenavon, who presided over a large gathering, was supported by Mr. I W. Hopkina (the secretary and agent), M r.W. Davies and Mr. Woosman. The question of the increased cost of living since the commencement of the war was the principal matter under considera- tion, and delegates quoted figures showing how the price of c ommoditiee had gone np. It was stated that most of the trade organisations had approached their re- spective employers and had applied for increases in wages in order to meet the abnormal cost of living. Several of the delegates thought an application should be made for an advance of 20 per cent. on the present earnings, in order that the application might be similar to the one made by the Miners' Federation of Great Britain on behalf of other colliery work- men, but after considerable discussion the conference decided unanimously that the application should be for 20 per cent, upon the standard rates. COALFIELD AGREEMENT. I The conference also discussed the posi- tion of the associtian in view of the pro- bability of the workmen being included in the miners' new agreement. It should be explained that the Enginemen and Stokers\ Association has been outside the Conciliation Board agreement from the establishment of that board, but recently there has been an agitation for its in- clusion, and efforts have been made by the Miners' Federation and the Engine- men's Association, to merge the two organisations. Several ballots have taken place, and a majority of the Enginemen's Associa- tion have voted in favour of amalgama- tion, but as the majority did not reach two-thirds of the membership, the asso- ciation could not be disbanded, and the negotiations with the Miners' Federation fell through. Since then, however, the Miners' Feder- ation of South Wales have drafted their proposals for a new Conciliation Board agreement, and they ask that it shall apply to all gracfes of workmen employed in and about the collieries. The delegates at this meeting were somewhat divided on this point, and several stated that they had been author- ised by their lodges to vote against the proposal on the ground that their grievan- ces could be better dealt with by the present Coalowners' Enginemen's Wages Committee than by the Conciliation Board whose time was so fully taken u with matters appertaining to the miners. It was stated that the Durham Concilia- tion Board included three representatives of the enginemen, mechanics, and coke- men, and six representatives of the Miners' Federation. The conference agreed to adjourn the question of amalgamation with the Miners' Federation until after the war. A resolu- tion was, however, carried by 55 votes to 46 in favour of the miners' proposal that the new agreement should apply to the association provided the association was adequately represented on the Concilia- tion Board. ————— —————

CHECKWEIGHER MAY ACT AS INSPECTOR

CHECKWEIGHER MAY ACT AS INSPECTOR. IMPORTANT JUDGMENT UPHELD The Court of Appeal on Friday unanimously decided that a check- weigher in a mine was eligible to act also as an, inspector appointed by the miners. This decision upheld a de- claration by Mr Justice Bailhache, from which the Gas Coal Collieries, Ltd., Llanharan, appealed. The re- spondent was Wm. Date, employed at the Meiros Colliery, whose case was presented by the South Wales Miners' Federation. The Lord Chief Justice said he saw nothing in the statute which prohibited a checkweigher from acting as inspector, provided he had the necessary qualifications. Mr Justice Swinfen-Eady said it was urged that the appointmfent of in- spector must necessarily involve inter- ference with the management of the mine, and therefore was inconsistent with the limitations placed on the duties of the checkweigher, but he did not agree with that.' It might be the Legislature did not anticipate that a ohookweigher would be appointed in- spector, and sometimes difficulties might arise through the two offices being held up by the same person, but nevertheless, he did not think a check- weigher was ineligible to act as in- spector. Even if there were not a deputy-checkweigher, his Lordship thought it was for the men to take the risk of the men being without a checkweigher whilst* he C, was away carrying out his duties as inspector. Mr Justice Bray said there was no expressed disqualification in the Act preventing a man from holding both offices. x The appeal was dismissed with costs.

No title

North Staffordshire Miners' Federa, tion have agreed with the local Col- liery Owners' Association that Easter holidays shall be confined to one day, Easter Monday There was a time when concertina I accompanied congregational singing at Welsh chapels.

CHARGED TWENTY GERMANS

CHARGED TWENTY GERMANS I HOW 2nd WELSH MAN WON THE D.C.M. Private Lewis Rogers, 2nd Welsh, who was recently awarded the Die- tinguished Conduct Medal for con- spicuous bravery in the field, is now ) staying with his sister at Llanidloes (Mont.) I Describing the incident for which he was recognised, Private Rogers said: —"We were in the trex. hee when the enemy advanced to att,,ck, and were firing away as hard as "e could, when a young officer came up and took ) twenty of us to try and drive the Germans from the village in front of i us. He took us to a farm, which was I loopholed, but there no loophole for j me, so I went out on my own into a j graveyard which was higher than the j road, and on my right I caught sight j of about twenty of the enemy in some j houses. I started firing mto them, and they ran like the devil; then I ran across into an orchard. I pepper- ed the Germans, and they took refuge ¡ in a big empty house the other side of I th? road. I kept nring when I saw any sign of them, and then decided to rush the house. I made my charge. When I got to the corner of the house I saw six hiding away. I banged four rounds at them when I was close up to them. One German was sitting down, and when he closed his bolt I thought I was done for. I dropped down just in time, 'bu,; my rifle was smashed and the front of my cap blown away, but I nnisJttfd him off. I then went to the front, and the remaining four came out and held up their hands. As I had only my broken rifle to de- fend myself I thought it was a trick of theirs, but I chanoed it and took them prisoners, two men of the Black Watch assisting me in marching them off. Every man of the Welsh acted like a hero that day. Since then we had a general inspection, and General Munroe shook hands with me, and noticing that I was a pretty old 'un>— for I was 51 last September-repeated 'I the old saying that 'many a good tune I waa played on an old fiddle.' Private Rogers is an old campaigner I having seen service in Burma He left the Army years ago. He has now been in hispital, having beun blown up an the aar from- a trench which the enemy had mined. .————- I

I300 WOMEN FARMERS I

300 WOMEN FARMERS. I GOVERNMENT TAKING FARMS I FOR 'EXPERIMENT. I To train 300 women for farm work the Government have taken four or five farms. The experiment was dis- cussed on Friday with other aspects of the land problem, at a meeting con- vened by the National Political League vened by the National Political League, held in London. Working on non-party lines, the league aims C1.t, relieV!Ïng unemploy- ment by getting men aId women back to the land i,mproving, as a conse- quence, the food supply, and settling the land problem on a satisfactory basis by co-operation in fruit-farming, general market-gardening, cattle and dairy work, and intensive gardening. Lady Denman expressed the view that on small holdings women would find profitable, healthy and congtruo tive occupation; but conditions must be improved to attract women of the right class. "If I had to choose be- tween being a typist or a laundress, a.nd working on the land, I should choose the land unhesitatingly, she said. Miss A. M. Broadhurst, M.A., president of .he league, said the Government were about to make an experiment in the employment of women on the land. They had pro- vided four or five farms, and were going to train 300 women. At present farmers were not looking on the movement with favour, and their op- position had perturbed the Govern- ment very much. Speaking of land cultivation in Russia, Mr Stephen Graham said there was there an association of the people with the Land, which was not found in any other country. Russia's great national wealth was her preponderant nural population Much was hoped from the great encouragement to small-holders now being given by the Russian Government. Although the war broke out in the middle of the harvest everything was safely gather- ed in by the women, who were as trained and as capable ag, the men. The next harvest in Russia would not suffer owing to the absence of men, because the work would be done by the women.

No title

The tired captain descended the gang- j way stairs and addressed the terrified j passengers. "Friends," said he, "we j have done all that sailors can do; we are •. now in the hands of the Almighty." "Oh, < captain, cried a minister, "do not say that it is as bad as that." I am told on excellent authority (says the London correspondent of the "Daily Citizen") that Mr Winston Churchill is to be the next Viceroy of India. It is interesting to note that Jesus ¡ OoJge. Oxford. owes its origin to the j' son of a Welsh butcher, who was a native of Brecon. it

I A TRADE UNION REGIMENT

I A TRADE UNION REGIMENT. Organising the "Die-Bards" I INTERESTING INSPECTION. f (By Labour Leader.) Everybody acquainted with Labour and Trade Union work knows John Ward, the f anious Navvies' M.P. He has done yeoman service for his class in the realm of industry, now he is serving his coun- try against its many enemies. He has been mainly instrumental in organising the 118th (Pioneer) Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment ("The Die-Hards"), and addressing these men on parade at Alexandra Park, London, last week, Capt. Ward said "Comrades, you have been inspected to-day by your own friends and fellow-workers, the Management Commit- tee of the Federation of Trade Unions. They represent considerably over 1,000, 000 organised workers, and they wish you, the workers of yesterday, the workers of to-day, and the fighters of to-morrow, good luck." Eight hundred men, constituting the biggest and deepest-chested battalion in the British Army, stood like Guardsmen on parade, and nearly 80 per cent. were members of the Navvies' Union—experts in the use of pick and shovel. Democrati- cally officered (nearly every officer has served in the ranks) the battalion promi- ses to go far and tp do much. The visitors were Messrs. Appleton (sec- retary, General Federation), J. O'Grady, M.P. (Furnishing Trades' Association), Alec Wilkie (Shipwrights), James Crinion (Card and Blowing-room Operatives),. Allan Gee (Yorkshire Textile Workers), Joe Cross (Northern Counties' Weavers), Ivor Gwynne (Tin and Sheet Millmen). J. N. Bell (N.A. Union of Labour), Alf Short (Boilermakers and Shipbuilders), Fred Richards (Boot and Shoe Operatives) Ben Cooper (Cigar-makers), W. M arsland Amalgamated Cotton Spinners), and John Taylor (Midland Counties' Federation). They took a particularly keen interest in all they saw, and Mr. Fred Richards had I pungent comment to offer upon a number of infetior boots which had been rejected by the officers. "Six hundred of the men you have seen to-day," said Captain John Ward to a press representative, "àrè in khaki be- cause of their loyalty to their union. Their union invited them to enlist, and they t did. The Government could get many more reliable men were it to approach. the trade union movement. "You must get at the men through their elected leaders in civil life. Let the lead- ers call the men together and look after them during the training, and the men will respond all right. We've gotTiranch officials serving as privates and the regi- mental policeman on the gate is Mawby, branch secretary of Doncaster. "Our arms and equipment? Well, if we could get rifles t he men could now be put through their manual and musketry courses. HOW TO EQUIP A REGIMENT. i "The men have no fault to find with their clothes or food. I saw to that. You see, I eliminated the contractor. A firm of good standing has got to give the men varied fare equal to the standard of the men best paid in civil life. In return the firm receives every penny of the money allocated by the Government, and if the firm does not give satisfaction to the men, well, the firm will cease to cater. "There is one article, however, which, if issued to the men, will save hundreds of pounds in boots, and that is the small steel plate worn under the arch of the boot in civil life. It enables a man to press with his full weight and energy on his spade, and prevents injury to the boot. We must certainly try to get some. "Recruits? Well, we could do with a few, but they must be strong, healthy navvies. There is room too, for a few general builders and carpenters and join- ers." The officer commanding is Colonel H. Aplin, D.S.O., of the Indian Pioneers, who has seen 30 years' service on the Indian frontier. Captain Ward is the senior captain and commands "A" Com- pany, while the adjudant is Captain Irons, an officer of considerable ex- perience. The majority of the company officers are ex-non-oommissioned officers of the Royal Engineers. The pay of a private is Is. 4d. a, day and all found. —————

DUMB SOLDIER SPEAKSI

DUMB SOLDIER SPEAKS. I Corporal C. Stevens, of the King's Royal Rifles, whose recovery of speech and hearing at at a Bristol concert was reported on Saturday, was sitting in the doorway of a dug-out in France when a "Jack Johnson" burst at the back, with the result that Stevens was partly buried. On the following morn- ing he found that he was deaf and dumb. On Thursday evening he went to a hospital concert, when, suddenly, to the amazement of his comrades, he exclaimed, "Good!" "It almost frightened me out of my life," he re- remarked. "Then I said a few words, and next morning I could speak fine." A comrade endorsed the statement, and jokingly taxed Stevens with being so proud of his recovered powers that on that night he kept the whole ward awake with his talking! ————

No title

Mistress "I see that another soldier ha.s called for you, Mary. I thought you only had one sweetheart?" Cook: "Oh, no, mum. Two. You see, one's a Regular and the other's a Reserve.

IN A NUTSHELL

IN A NUTSHELL. I It is said that Mr. Winston ChurchiH will probably be the next Viceroy of India. Ann Boleyn, one of the wives of Henry VIII. lived at Parthcawl. It has been decided to give Belgian I refugees of suitable age a free secondary t education in Montgomeryshire. A certain religious leader attributes I the war to the holding of concerts, whist I drives, etc., in connection with the churches! There are statues of St. David to be seen in many of the churches of Brittany, in France. The son of a former postmaster of Car- marthen has been appointed head of the Indian hospital at Brighton. The Indian hospital at Brighton is fit- ted with 1,500 beds. It is definitely announced that there will be no Easter excursions this year. The petition for the reprieve of Sergt. Hopper was signed by 50,000 people. The firms of Buchanan and Dewar, the famous whiskey manufacturers, have am- algamated. A woman has been tried for witchcraft in Nova Scotia. Bread tick&ta are to be issued at Vienna and Upper Austria shortly. The first burial at the new Morriston cemetey was that of a Belgian child last week. There is still a great demand for war nurses, and the Army Medical Service ap- peal for more helpers. Little Tich, the famous comedian, has had to pay E103 for broach of contract. Ladies of the South Wales Nursing Association are rendering valuable help to local detachments of the British Red Society. There will be no hot cross buns in some parts of England this Good Friday owing to a shortage of labour. What is called "blind to the world," in ( this country as a degree of drunkenness, is known as "Sabbath calm" in America. A German schoolmaster has been fined for allowing the school-children to play mock battles. Five of the boys, during the "battle" were stabbed with table knives. An American recently claimed JE500 for being kissed by an actress at a New York theatre in the presence of his wife. Women are being employed in ammuni- tion factories to assist in the making of shells and other explosives. Newport seamen have received a wage of JB8 per month as a result of a strike. They refused to join the as. "Newqueen." A Londoner, of forty-six years of age, has spent twenty years of his life in prison. It has been decided to press forward • the aniline dye project. The shortage of the meat supply is Ue-, ly to assume a serious aspect. The North Wales Miners' Association has recommended the men to take only one day's holiday this spring, viz. Good Friday. Mr. Llewelyn Williams, K.C.,M.P., has moved from Chelsea and taken a flat in South West London. The receipts of the Bath and West of England Show, held at Swansea laAt year amounted to £1,381 13s. 3d. while a profit to the society of £ 800 was made. The offer, for the use of some of the Swansea schools as military hospitals, has been accepted. The men at the Chatham dockyards ar6 to have four days' holidays at Easter on full pay, as a recognition of arduous and loyal service rendered since the out- break of the war. A movement is on foot to stop the supply of rum to men on active service. The South Wales and Monmouthshire's Society of Enginemen and Stokers have decided to ask for an advance of twenty per cent. in wages. It is said that Germany will not be brought to her knees by starvation but by shortage of ammunition. It has been decided to exercise lenien- cy towards the leaders of the recent South African rebellion. The first book published in Glamorgan- shire was printed at Cowbridge. The author of "Twm Shon Catti died at Swansea in 1870. Mr. Arthur Henderson, M.P. has had to cancel many engagements owing to ill health. The new regulations with regard to passports to France have proved so very confusing that the old order has been reverted to. It is a fact that children in the seventh standard in some schools are unable t? read. read. The baking of cakes has been prohibited in Berlin. Several thousands of people attended a demonstration in Berlin to demand a ter- mination of the war. Tickets to the number of 8,000 have been sold for the Mountain Ash eistedd- fod this year. There were 75 ordinations in Welsh dio- ceses last year. Sir Alfred Mond, M.P. has contri- buted C3,000 towards the Queen Alexan- dra's hospital for officers in London. He has also promised jSZOO per month towards. its upkeep during the war. A body of 500 Greek volunteers have arrived at Marseilles in order to engage for service in the French Army. It is reported that Great Britain is seeking to establish a credit of £20,000,000 at New York for the purchase of war stores. Telegrams from Constantinople state that efforts are being energetically pur- sued by Turkey to found an Islamitic union between Afghanistan, Persia, and the Ottoman Empire. Liecester Municipal Employees' Associ- ation has passed a resolution protesting against the iiacteaw in the necessities of life, and calling for action by the Prime Minister. An all-round advance of 2s. has been conceded to the maltmen employed by the various Glasgow brewery and malt- ing companies. The Local Government Board has au- thorised an increase of 15 per cent. in the amount dispursed to recipients of relief from Liverpool Prince of Wales Fund, so as to meet the increased cost of living. The new finance committee of the Swansea Hospital met on ThursdaYi anti unanimously elected Alderman Evan Evans, of Beresford House, chairman for the ensuing year. Three hundred of the 500 organised shop assistants of Swansea are men, and of these over 100 have joined the colours. In view of the increased cost of pro- duction owing to the war, it has been decided to raise the price of electricity in London from April 1st. Welshmen from Canada, India, China. and South America, are now stationed Rhyl. The Rev. R. J. Campbell, who preach- ed at Swansea on Tuesday, motored from London to fulfil his engagement. Captain Conway Lloyd, has been home on furlough. He has be&n in the trenches on several occasions. The Brass Band Contests at the Mountain Ash eisteddfod are considered t} be the best in Wales. At the end of January 1,511 Irishmen had joined the colours in Cardiff alono. The Liberals were defeated at the re- cent South Australian elections. The Labourites gained a majority. Damage to the extent of £ 30,000 was done to a furniture stores and garage by fire at Glasgow. Palm Sunday celebrations are on the decline annually. All available space at the Swansea Hospital is to be utilised for the reception of wounded soldieris direct from the front. Anstralia has sent 60,000 men on activo service. About 600 soldiers are to be encamped at Pembrey. The explosive factory of Messrs. NoW. at Pembrey, will find employment for 800 to 1,000 men. The wages of the steelsmelters are to be advanced 2* per cent. A Rochester man has recently died at the age of 100. At an eisteddfod near Henllan last week a Belgian, named Mons. Henri van Loock, caused great surprise among the audience by giving an excellent rendering of "Hea WIad fy Nhadau." General Bramwell Booth will visit Cardiff on Monday. The North Staffordshire Miners have agreed to confine their holidays to oae day, Easter Monday. German children are requested by the authorities to bring lead, brass copper, etc., to school, to be used in the making of ammunition. Theatres and Cinemas are to be closed at Liverpool on Good Friday. The German casualties amount to about 260,000 per month. The Bishop of St. Asaph has enter- ed on his 27th year of his episcopate. The demand for charcoal has greatly increased since the commencement of the war. There were sixteen funerals at Oar- diff cement ry on Saturday.