Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
GLANRHYD

GLANRHYD. OBITUARY. We regret to record the death of Phyllis, the four-year old daughter of Mr and Mrs. Stanley Davies, of Glan- rhyd road, which took place on Tues- day morning. The little one had only been ill for a short time, death being caused by brain fever. The interment will take place on Thursday afternoon, at Holy Trinity churchyard.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be consulted daily at the Victoria I Arcade (near the Market), Swansea

MINERS AND HOLIDAYS

MINERS AND HOLIDAYS. The South Wales Miners' Federation have issued a poster giving the particu- lars of the arrangement made with regard t) the forthcoming holidays. It reads as follows Consequent upon the supreme national importance that the output of coal shall not be curtailed more than is absolutely necessary at the present time, the Con- ciliation Board has decided to limit the Easter holidays to two days, Monday and Tuesday, April 5th and 6th. Lord Kitchener, the Home Office offi- cials, and our Naval authorities realise that two days' holidays from the arduous toil of the coal mines is not unreasonable. But all of them agree in impressing up- on us that if the holidays are. extended beyond the two days, it may cause a cur- tailment of the output of toal that would be disastrous to the interest of the coun- try. The representatives urge the importance of this upon every workman, that he may realise that to neglect to return to b¡i8 working place on Wednesday morning after the holidays may be frought with as serious consequences as the neglect of hi* oomrade at the front to return to the trenches or the firing line. The supply of ammunition to our heroic soldiers on the continent, the efficiency and success of the naval operations in the North Sea and the Dardanelles, the home comforts of the poor of this coun- try, are all dependent in a very large degree upon the extent and regularity of the supply of coal. The agpeal is to every workman to re- turn to work on Wednesday morning af- ter the holidays, and thenceforth to work as regularly as possible, with the assur- ance that his work in the mine is as necessary as the operations in the tren- ches in this great national crisis. Your country needs you at your post on Wednesday, April 7th, and every working day possible during the war. (Signed) Thomas Richards, Secretary.

Advertising

Telephone Docks 35. W, WILLIAMS & CO. Jewellers, &c. 29, CASTLE STREET, SWANSEA. Specialities: Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lever Watches. Good Foreign Watches. English and Foreign Clocks. English and ContinentaJ Novelties in Gold, Silver and Electro Plate, suitable for Christening. Birthday and Wedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for all Sights. It will pay you to come to us to buy for three reasons—Largest Variety, liest Quality, and Lowest Price. FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. IgaasKTs-s :s:T-i-;r- v/i's sassa F. Welch Lacy The Up-to-date LONDON TAILOR Who serves you personally and Cuts All Garments Himself Specialists in I MOURNING ORDERS. S 222, High Street SWANSEA

i SLANDERING THE WOTRKING CLASSES f

i SLANDERING THE WOTRK- ING CLASSES. f It is claimed that the war has pro- duced a new heaven and a new earth: it certainly has not produced a new "Tmnes. That once-great organ dis- played in a recent article all that purse-proud arrogance and contempt for democracy that have been ÍttB dia- jtinguiahing traits for more than a century. It accused the working classes of a moral "dry rot," the re- sult it stupidly argued, of appeals by Labour leaders in the paet to all the evil passions, the greed, vanity and self-uidujgenee of working men. That was a double libel-e. slander on the workers and their leaders. But itfbe British working man is not only morally rotten (the "Times" made a clumsy qualification by saying that the rot had not gone very far),—but I he is a pampered individual who pays 100 rates and no income taxes. It was an amazing exhibition of the spleen of the haves against the have- nots, and the ignorance betrayed by the leader-writer was as exceptional as the malice. No one who knows British Labour leaders and their work will accuse them of paadering to the mob. Time iafter time leaders at variance with their followers have readily sacrificed their positions, and temporarily their authority, rather than acquiesce in what they considered to be a wroug policy. Mr G. H. Barnes, M.P., re- signed his secretaryship of the A.S.E. because he could net agree to a cer- tain course of act-ion. Than Mr. Barnes no more honest, straight- forward, and courageous man has-ever pat pen to paper for the "Times," or any other capitalist newspaper. A Labour leader, too- unlike a journalist, who shoots from behind cover, has to do his work in the open. When Messrs. Hardie, Macdonald, Snowden, and Glasaer, disagreed with the rank and file of the I.L.P. over the policy ef Grayson, they resigned their respon- sible positions. Even the Lib.-Lab. leaders, wrong aa we believe them to be, have given notable signs of their independence and of refusal to fall in with a policy which they think mis- taken. Does the "Times" forget the courageous stand of Mr J. H. Thomas, M.P., over the Llanelly strike, which spread over practically the whole of the G.W.R. system in South Wales? And does the organ of Printing-House Square withdraw its .eulogies of the speeches of Mr Stephen Walsh that ran counter to the prevailing sentiment At the end of the national coal strike ef 1912? Has the "Times" the effront- ery to suggest that men like Brace, Hartshorn, Tillett, Robert Williams, Robert Smillie, and, John Hodge would hesitate a moment in recommending to their followers an unpopular policy that they (the leader) deemed right? The "Times" ought to withdraw its foul slander of the-repremntatives of ,Labour. With respect to the working classes themselves, our answer is that the men whose valour, adaptability, and re- source the "Times" never tires of praisi,ng--our soldiers at the front- come from the working classes. There may be a certain amount of slaokness and drunkennes among a very small section of industrial workers at the present time, but the great majority of the working classes are toiling like Trojans to provide munitions of war. Some engineers have worked so long and hard that they have collapsed at their benches, and have had to be carried home. If the "Times" points the finger of contempt at the Birken- head dockers, all we have to say is t'hat the dockers' leaders are not to blame, but those supporters of a sys- tem which haa used them as castinl labourers, and kept them in destitu- tion for years. When the "Times" comes to de- scribe the privileges of the British working man, it is too stnpid for words. It is no*, merely an error, but an outrageous falseh ood to say that any section of the British working- class householders pays no rates. Every ,y e no rateg. Every workman who occupies a house pays rates either directly, or indirectly as rent. If he does not pay incomes tax he pays in direct taxation a sum that proportionately to his income is far greater than that payed by income- tax payers in direct and indirect taxation. We have seldom seen in any newspaper anything so utterly indefensible as the tirade in the "Times." The irony of it is that the working-classes thus maligned are the very men now laying down their lives in the trenches so that the "Times" may continue to publish in peace from Printing House Square, and its pro- prietors to reap their fat incomes. Is gratitude utterly alien to the capitalist mind?

NO SECTIONALISM

NO SECTIONALISM. It is said that the coalownera, at a national conference, have agreed to tell the miners that they cannot discuss the demand for a. war bonus of 20 per cent. nationally, but they are prepared to dis- cuss it by distfricta. If this is true it is not improbable that the decision has largely been influenced by the Welsh coal- owners. During the national strike of 1912, they intimated very clearly that they did not like negotiating as part of a national body of employers. Finding this attitude fruitless, they resolved to stiffen the resistance of the more tractable section of their brother capitalists, and mainly as a result of the obduracy of Mr. D. A. Thomas and his followers, the Govern- men were forced to end the strike by legislation. The coalowners in the Federated English District are an un- usually fair body of capitalists, and they led the way in making concessions to the men. It is fairly certain that they, and perhaps some others, will have neither part nor lot in making such a mean and miserly offer as a 6! per cent. increase to their workmen. Consequently the Welsh coalowners, eager to be removed from the moderating influence of their more liberal colleagues, desire to negotiate sectionally. We do not think there is the fainteet possibility of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain acceding to this jejune request. The days of section- alism are gone. There is to be no settling by districts. Like the Allies the ininea-e are going to make their peace agreement together or not at all. With coal at its present price, and colliery shares changing hands at unprecedented figures, the sur- prising thing is that the coalowners have not instantly conceded the demand for a 20 per cent. bonus, an increase which is far below the increase in the cost of living in most mining aTeas.

WORK ON WEDNESDAYI

WORK ON WEDNESDAY. I We hope no miner will disregard the of the Federation to work next Wed- nesday. These are no ordinary times, and it behoves every man who remains at home to do all in his power to render effective the work of our troops at-the front. Behind the fighting army there is an industrial army, and the work of the latter ia no whit less important than the former. It is necessary to serve the country in the stalls as well as in the trenches. Unlike workers in tool, ex- plosives, or ordnance factories, the miner does not directly supply the soldier in the field, but nevertheless all the impor- tant industries depend on the output of coal. If that is seriously reduced those working on munitions are correspondingly hampered. In war time as in p eace, coal is the life-blood of industry. Therefore it is incumbent on every individual miner to be at his working place on Wednesday. The Easter holiday has not been wan- tonly curtailed. More, perhaps, than in any other industry, a periodic absence from work for some days is necessary in the mining industry, and it is significant that the miners' representatives have un- animously agreed to the curtailment of a holiday that is less a luxury than a neces- sity. If Prussian militarism, which threatens death to democracy and liberty, is to be destroyed, every man must do his bit. "Work on Wednesday" then must be the motto of every miner in the coalfield. ————— —————

No title

The jingo was earnestly orating. I want," he said, "conscription—military reform. I want rating reform. I want Tariff Reform. I want- "Chloroform," interrupted an un- kind "voice." Tha.t there is a vital differenece be- tween German ad English conceptions of liberty is illustrated by the treat- ment of newspapers in the land of Haters. The Socialist organ at Konigs- berg, in East Prussia, was suspended for three weeks for stating that the last victory of Marshal von Hinden- burg over the Russians was due to the fact that the German soldiers were mostly working men, with a full sense of their political rights and powers, whereas the Russian soldiers were the mere slaves of Petrograd despotism. This was regarded 4s a slight on the Kaiser and Hindenburg, and as a punishment the paper has been sup- pressed for three weeks This is a joke from a music-hall in Vienna: "It costs more to shave in England" says first Funny Man. '"Why?" asks his partner. "Bocause the English arc wearing such long faces."

ITHE WELSH GUARDS

I THE WELSH GUARDS. Recruiting Demonstration at Ystalyfera. CAPT. RHYS WILLIAMS TELLS ABOUT WORK IN THE TRENCHES. The Ystalyfera Recruiting Committee have for some time past been endeavour- ing to hold a demonstration in the town, but circumstances have repeatedly arisen t? frustrate their endeavours. On Monday morning, however, intimation was re- ceived that a meeting might be held the following evening. With great prompti- tude, Mr. Woodman, the local recruiting officer, set to work, and the triumph of his organising endeavours was seen on Tuesday, when a crowded audience gathered at the Coliseum. The meeting was held to stimulate recruiting in the district for the Welsh Guards, and in the point of numbers and enthusiasm the meeting was everything that could be desired. Mr. H. J. Powell, J.P. (chair- man of the committee) presided, supported by Mr. G. H. Strick, J.P., and Mr. Woodman, and the principal speakers were Major Anderson, R.A., and Capt. Rhys Williams, K.C., of Miskin Manor, who now holds a commission in the Guards. Alderman Dd. Davies (Swansea), and Lieut. German were unable to attend as announced. Mr. Powell said that he was sure the recruiting committee were delighted to see the large audience that had gathered there that evening. It was only the pre- vious day that they had get to learn that the meeting was to be held and that that was somewhat short notice, but the result was very satisfactory. He thought they as Welshmen were proud that the King had honoured the nation by the formation of the Guards. pHear, hear.) Capt. Wil- liams, who was in the Guards, had al- ready been to the front and in the trenches. He would no doubt convince the audience that men were wanted And wanted immediately. The district had al- ready sent seven men to the Welsh Guards and indeed, the very first man to enlist for the regiment was an Ystalyfera boy, Mr. Sid'. Edwands, of Pantteg. (Ap- plause.) He handed his name in four days before the first meeting in Cardiff. MR. STRICK AND THE SLACKERS. I Mr. G. H. Strick, who was called upon t) speak, said he felt it difficult to speak on the spur of the moment, but he thought h9 could say that however little one ceuld do, and whatever one's capacity or vocation in life was, every man should do what within him lay in his duty to his country at the present moment. (Hear hear.) He did not knew whether he would be treading on anyone's toes, but one matter he wanted to impress upon them. He did not allude to the murder- ous attack on the liners the previous day but he thought, something even more dangerous and important. It was the mat- ter concerning which Mr. Lloyd George had made his great pronouncement. Whatever may be their politics, they had to acknowledge that he was one of the finest men in Great Britan, and he had pointed out to them that the essential thing to fight was the slackness that existed in some parts of the country, aa well as what gave rise to it. He hoped that it would bring home to the people the enormous and stupendous crisis the nation had to face. People must sink feelings of habit and comfort and come out to do their duty at the call of neces- sity. Capt. Rhys Williams had done his duty for his county; now he was doing it for the country. He was older than he looked, and they were glad to see him looking so well. (Hear, hear.) He (the speaker) hoped that everybody of what- ever sphere in life, would do their part in an endeavour to emulate Capt. Wil- liams' example. (Applause.) After an eloquent appeal in Welsh from Mr. J. Walter Jones, B.A., Major Anderson also spoke briefly. Major Anderson said he was sorry that ho did not think he had anything to say that would interest them, and probably they were all awaiting to hear what Capt. Rhys Williams had to say. What he (the speaker) had got to tell them as recruit- ing officer for the Swansea district, was that he had gone there to try and get names for the Welsh Guards, and he hoped that they would be successful. They were not dissatisfied with the re- sponse they had had from that district. (Hear, hear.) They had had over 3,500 men from the district for the regulars, and a.considerable proportion were from Ystalyfera. (Applause.) At the same time h" understood that a considerable num- ber had gone into a neighbouring coun- ty to enlist, therefore they would not be reckoned with the number included in the Swansea area. The locality had done very well indeed, yet there was still need for more men fn the present emer- gency. The country needed men, and unless they came forward now they could not be trained, and if they were not trained they would be worse than useless. An armed mob was one of the most dan- gerous things, both to itself and to other people that it was possible to have. It had been stated that there was no more necessity for men. He did not know where people who talked like that got their sense from. They could not be paying attention to reports in the public press. Life was being lost in great numbers as was shown in the recent engagement of Neuve Chapelle, and the necessity for more men was a very real one, and he trusted they would have a good, re- sponse. If men were not suitable for the Welsh Guards they could be passed on to another unit. (Applause.) I CAPT. RHYS WILLIAMS. I Capt. Rhys Williams, K.C., said that before he started to speak he wanted to deliver a message from General Sir Fran- cis Lloyd. Sir Francis was most eagor to come to Ystalyfera, and was gratified by the invitation, but although he had endeavoured to do so on three occasions he had found it impossible. He was a busy man, in charge of the entire defences of London, and had therefore to bear great responsibility. He regretted he could not be present, but had to ask to bb excused. He (the speaker) was there as a recruiting officer for the Welsh Guards, formed by the consent of King George as a recognition of the grave fight- ing of Welsh regiments at the front. (Hear hear, and applause.) He went out to the front at the beginning of November and had been there until about three weeks ago. He thought the experience had done him no harm; many people had found it most interesting work, and never from any man during the whole time he had been out had he heard a single com- plaint. What did appear regarding the adverse conditions of life in the trenches, usually came from female relatives at home, and they had imagined it. He had to censor the letters of 160 men under his immediate command since Christmas, and had never found a word as to the hard- ships of the life of the soldiers in them. All said it was interesting, and all claimed to have killed an enormous Rum- ber of Germans—or if not it was not for want of trying to-(Iaught-er)-because they did not like the Germans. I ALLEGED TREACHERY. They had (continued the speaker) seen something of the Germans during the progress of the war, and it had not been very pleasant. During Christmas they, had a truce, and the trenches of the British and Germans being only about 90 yeards from each other, no shots were fired and gifts of tobacco were exohanged, Britishers also giving some white bread for the horrid black German stuff. Whibt this was proceeding (jit was kept up for four or five days) a treacherous Gi.rnian shot one of the British officers in the back. A farmer had shown him bullet marks in a tree where his brother had been shot by the enemy because he was in possession of a gun at his house which was harmless and unloaded. An officer staying with him (Capt. Williams) who had been all through Neuve Chapelle had told how, whilst the enemy in one of trenches had surrendered, and were being taken away, one of the men endeavoured to shoot a British officer, but he was glad to say that the shot missed. His friend had told him that the German treachery was inconceivable. Continuing, the speaker said he did not think any man would make a mistake by joining the Welsh Guards. He did not wish to serve with a finer body of men. After a reference to th3 results of his work in the Rhondda, Capt. Williams went on to say that he knew Welshmen liked to serve together, and he did not think it would be very difficult to raise two battalions of Guards. OUT TO THE FRONT IMMEDIATELY When they were preparing to form the regiment, they were told it must be ready at once, becajuse Simmtediately it was ready it was going out to the front. Now they had 850 men in preparation at the White City. Nearly half the Grenadier Guards were Welsh; many had been transferred, and now they wanted to fill the ranks up. As soon as they got enough men and a certain number of reserves they would be off to the war where every man of military age ought to be. The enemy was well trained, and the Allies had a great work to do. The German dis- cipline was quite wonderful. They were fine soldiers, and they were very numer- ous, and all these things had to be reckoned with. The French, who had a splendid intelligence department, said that the Germans had four million men in the fighting line, and they had enough reserves for a further eight months at that strength, allowing for the same losses in the future as had been sustained during the first five months. These things should make Britishers think. The French had 2i million men in the fighting line and li million men at the back. That was not enough, yet they held 180 miles of front, and we, the British Empire, only held 20 miles. Reckoning our Colonies, the French had nine mex at the front to every one of ours. Britain was not do- ing her duty towards heT Allies and to her own army at the front, at this rate. TWELVE DAYS IN THE TRENCHES. When he (the speaker) went out with his regiment they relieved men who had been in the trenches 12 days without rest. The trenches were only 90 yards from those of the enemy, and there was con- stant firing going on. His regiment were in the trenches seven days, and that waa too long in view of the terrible tension that they had to undergo. Now they were taking it four days in the trenches an d four days out, but were not idle the time they were out; they were kept digging, etc., and it had all to be done during the night. The finest thing of all was that the men did it without oomplaint, even the wounded men did not repine. We had not enough men, however, and we must have more. Despite what was teingaaid recruiting was.mot a$it should be con- sidering what was before the nation. The Neuve Chapelle victory would have been a real victory if there had been more men to take up the work when the others were exhausted. We had to keep a good many men at home because we could not take the risk of a foreign invasion in case of anything going wrong with the Navy. An invasion by the Prussians of England would be more terrible than the invasion of Belgium, because the Prus- sians hated us so intensely. Therefore the risk of invasion could not be left unpro- vided for. The French were fighting like tigers. (Applause.) We owed a great duty to them. He urged the young men to join either the Welsh Guards or any other regiment for which they were eligible. The more men we got, the speedier the war would be brought to a conclusion, and he trusted that that fact would elicit a good response. (Loud applause.) The gathering terminated with the sing- ing of the National Anthem.

Advertising

1 CARLTON 1 WOMAN MONDAY. a

No title

The management of the Carlton Cinema Swansea, are to be congratulated on their j attractions for the Easter Holidays. [ "Woman," a three-part "Celio" produc- tion is said to be amongst the best half- dozen film-plays that have been present- e d v

Advertising

SPECIAL THIS WEEK. Hundreds of Lace Collars. Bows, Pinafores, Ladies' Overalls & Aprons FOR THE EASTER TRADE. See Windows for SHOW OF MILLIJVERY Finest Stock in the Valley. NOTE THE ADDRESS— J. T. OWEN The Swansea Valley Draper, THE SQUARE YSTALYFERA.

YSTALYFERA NOTES

YSTALYFERA NOTES. For beauty, charm, and general em- joyment, the entertainment given at the Coliseum on Thursday evening last under the auspices of the local troop of Glirl Guides equalled, if it did not ex- ceed anything produced in Ystaly- fera for many a long day. Rarely has An entertainment in the place aroused such delight and discussion, and we are not at all surprised to know that yielding to the insistent clamour of friends, the performance is to be repeated to-night Thursday). The entertainment was a triumph for the able organising efforts of Miss Jessie Williams (the energetic leader of the troop), as well as for all those who took part, and all are to be heartily con- gratulated on the results of their efforts. A considerable time before the doors were open a large number of people had assembled at the Hall, and before the performance commenced every I seat in the building was occupied. To- wards the close of the proceedings the building was quite uncomfortably crowded The proceedings opened with a pianoforte solo by Miss Violet Keen after which the girls gave the song "Caller Herring." The song and chorus "Braid the Raven Hair," by a number of the girls in Japanese costume, was heartily received, as was a recital by Miss Mary Jones. Following a series of excellent pictures and statuary by the girls, they gave the chorus "Quaker Girl" (in quaint cos- tume) in delightful manner, whilst the song "Amanda," by Miss Carey Evans and Mr. George E. Davies evoked a round of well merited applause. No less hearty was the reception accorded the pretty, old fashioned duet, 'Keys of Heaven," by Misses Bessie Clee and May Myfanwy Williams. We imagine that this tuneful piece will be heard throughout the dis- trict for many weeks to come. The first half of the programme closed with a song, "Japanese Butterfly Land" by Miss Min- nie Davies and chorus. The second part rendered by Misses May and Jennie Wil- liams, followed by a eolo "When Maiden Loves," given in Miss Bessie Clee's most excellent style. The song "Yen How," by Mr. G. E. Davies with chorus, and the picturesque tableau "England and Her Allies," were also greatly appreciated. Perhaps the chief item of interest, how- eviefr, was the sketch "Between the Soup and the Savoury," a most amusing kitchen episode given by Misses Millicent Jones, Florence Mitchell and Carrie Cope. It was hugely enjoyed. We ought to add that all the costuniea--and some were very beautiful and elaborate—were made by the Girl Guides themselves or by Miss Williams. There was a further hearing in the Chancery Division of the Law Courts on Friday when Mr. Tyldesley Jones men- tioned the action of Sant and Young against the Cambrian Mercantile Syndi- cate and Western Engineering Company. The action is to restrain defendants from moving colliery plant from pits at Ynysy- geinon, Ystalyfera. The parties, counsel said, were still negotiating and it was hoped a settlement would be arrived at to meet everyone's views. He asked that the motion might stand over till Wednes- day, the injunction already granted to remain.—The application was acceded to. We are sure that many readers will be interested and gratified to know that Dr. W. J. Lewis, the popular local prac- titioner, has sent the last cheque he re- ceived for fees for examining recruits, to the Serbian Relief Fund. Dr. Lewis is devoting all the money he receives for this work to the alleviation of distress, and is to be commended for his generosi- ty. The Ystalyfera Branch of the Women's Labour League on Thursday passed "That in view of the recent meeting in Paris between the Finance Ministers of the Allied Powers, the main object of which appears to have been the assistance of Russia by means of a join loan, this meeting of the Ystalyfera Branch of the Women's Labour League records its opin- ion that when financial aid is given to Russia by England or France, the Govern- ments of those countries should use their influence to secure that Russia observes the rights of Finland as secured in her constitution, ceases her persecution of the Jews, and accords to all her subjects the recognised rights of democratic govern- ment. A baptismal service took place at Caersalem Cha,pel on Sunday evening, when there was a large and interested j congregation. The service was conducted by the Rev. E. D. Lewis (the pastor) who also preached the sermon. Those who were baptised were Misses Bessie Mor- gan, H. L. Williams, Maggie Davies, C. Jünes, Rachel A. Lewis, and Mr. Elwyn Gape. The proceedings were of a very in- spiring character. A few local recruits have been home from their regiments during the past few days. Among them were Mr. Leslie Thomas (son of Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas, of the Grocery Stores), Pantteg, who is in the Welsh Guards, and Messrs. W. H. Jones and Wm. John Walters, also of Pantteg, who are in the Army Service Corps. A large number of wreaths were taken to the graves at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Godre'Tgraig, on Sunday, and there would have been a fine display but for the fact that come mischevioua persons stole a large number of the tributes. This is sacrilege of a particularly odious nature, and we hope the offenders will be brought to book. Last week we referred in these columns to the businesslike enterprise of the management of the Premier Cinema in securing that magnificent picture "The Ordeal" or "A Patriot of France," to show their patrons. The film was screened on Monday and Tuesday evenings, and after having seen the picture we can hardly find words with which to express an adequate appreciation of its worth. The film is undoubtedly one of the most remarkable ever screened, and it was viewed on Monday and Tuesday evenings by what were probably the largest audiences yet seen at the Premier. This very pathetic story of the Franco-German war based on the poem "The Ballad of Splendid Silence" by E. Neebit, is un- speakably sad, but arresting, vivid, and throbbing with true love of country. In four reels, it constitutes one of the most notable of the many remarkable films shown at the Premier and Mr. Temple Evans is to be congratulated on the re- sult of his endeavours. We would point "4, that this week-end the fourth part "Trey O'Hearts" is to be shown. It is of deepest interest to all patrorut-Old and new.

Advertising

Æ.1r. -.a.R"t ;.i ;1:t::¡"i: .< I l UNDER SWANSEA'S OLD CASTLE 9 TOWER. B At Alftater a co., I The Old Established i LONDON CITY TAILORS, I I I I jS^1 Have Removed to Messrs. Ben Evans fl| & Old SpQrts Department URdor th c ti gB?,. IAl T&C 'LIIRS Where they will be very pleased to see B I their old P-Atrons. I NEW SEASON'S GOODS B Have just Arrived. All Garmeuls cut by B London (City) Tailors. S CARLTON. 4 Cinema de Luxe, Oxford Street, Swansea. GREAT HOLIDAY PROGRAMMEr Easter Monday and Tuesday, April 5th and 6th, 1915. 12-0 CONTINUOUSLY 10-30. Special Three Part Exclusive Feature- pr- A magnificent play of thrills and sensation. FRANCESCA BERTINI. Italy's leading and most highly paid Actress, in the principal part. KEYSTONE COMEDY EDISON COMEDY Mabel's Latest Prank. I A Millinery Mix-up. JOKER COMEDY LASSOING A LION His Doctor's Orders. I Exciting wild animal Drama. PATHE'S ANIMATED GAZETTE. Prices: 3d., 6d., gd., and 1/ Children, 3d. and 6d. I YOU SHOULD GO TO I ) 9?- PANKS I §8 H ? There you will find the LARGEST RANGE of everything needful S ss In the way of S 1 OUTFITTING for Man or BOY. ? The Stock of New Spring Goods is uusurpassed 1 H in Swansea, and the prices are RIGHT. I 1 17, High Street, Swansea. if 2c =