Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE I GOMPMY 1

PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE, I GOMPMY. 1 A visitor to .,ondodn for thc; first time, happening Ho pass along Holbom. on Thursday of 'a. week, would doubt- less have fcis attention drawn by the magtiifioeWt I-Rii4.ding which, pimidly float- ing the flag -of Great Britain, gives threat distinction 4m that noble thoroughfare. Should he of an inq-uiring tit-rn of izind., he v-otild quickly leam that it was th-e headqwartters of a j^reat national tm&wTtior.. the Prudential; also that the -special occasion was the dnnual meeting, which, we presume io ftav, was the most •important in not1 hiitoty of the 'company. 1 5 of the -company. it is h.rdly necessary to explain why. The aB-fmbrecing foci that the nation, "is -in the throes of tSt-e greatest war in history, creating, a* it does, an unp,re- 

I CANADIAN NEWS ITEMS I

I CANADIAN NEWS ITEMS. I GREECE BUYS FROM CANADA. I After allowing for seed and domestic Tin,uire,neiv,t%, official estimates show that Canada has a surplus 'of 28,174,973 bushels tit w heat and flour available for exportation to Great Britain and else- where. A Winnipeg firm has received an order from the Greek Government for no less then 40,000 barrels of flour, while the demands thatj are being made by the Allies on the resources of the Dominion are tnormous and are proportionately benefiting the country "THE PRIMROSE PATS." A touch of the plain an3 the prairie, A bit of the Motherland, too A strain of the fur trapper wary, A blend of the old and the new. A bit, of the pioneer splendour That opened the wilderness flats, A touch of the home-lover tender You'll find in 'the boys they call 'Pats' The glory and strength of the maple, The courage that's born of the wheat, The pride of the stock that is staple, The bronze of the midsummer heat. A mixture of wisdom and daring, The best of a new land, and that's The regiment gallantly bearing The neat little title of 'Pats.' A bit of the man who has neighboured With mountains, and forests, and streams, A touch of the man who has laboured To model and fashion his dreams, The strength of an age of clean living, Of right-minded fatherly chats, The best that a 14nd could be giving Is there in the breasts of the 'Pats.' "The Daily Courier," Brantford, Ontario. TEN YEARS' BRIDGE BUILDING. As showing how rapidly Western Cana- da is developing, it is interesting to note that since the Province of Alberta was organised in 1905, no fewer than 2,524 bridges have been erected. At the pre- sent time work of this description has naturally been interfered with to some extent, but the steady influx of settlers to these Tich farming lands, due largely to the improved prospects for farmers in Canada, will call for still further en- gineering development in the near future. TOBACCO GROWING IN ONTARIO. The cultivation and manufacture of native tobacco in the Province of On- tario has developed into a considerable industry. Each year the acreage under cultivation continues to increase, and many of the farmers are entering the busi- ness on an extensive plan. It is stated that the equality of the plant is steadily improving and finds a ready sale.

Advertising

? ? Lewis Lewis & Co. I vv t <♦ i? ♦ —— ♦ !?SPR!NG SHOW z .-e.. OF t t  ? Millinery, Costumes, Dress Materials, f. ? ? Blouses, t ouses, e c. ♦ < ♦ IN THE LATEST STYLES AND COLOURS. IN THE LATEST STy LESANDCOLOUITS. ft— t—?  A. t SELECTION OF ♦ A L? RGE SELECTION OF COVERT 008 ME 8 SPORTS COATS I T £ THE LEADING SPECIALITIES FOR THIS SEASON. ♦ J? L THE LEADING SPECIALITIES FOR THIS SEASON. ▼ $ =====================? {ynwch we led Ein Ffenetri, a chewch elch argyhoeddi nas geilir rhagori ❖  ( arnom mewn Dullwedd ac Ansawdd. l, ♦ 4 h _=——————===== t 27, 28, 29, HIGH STREET f S-W- ANSEA- II I i LEWIS LEWIS (Swansea) Ltd. <4 + + I

EMPLOYERS OF LABOUR AND PUBLIC HOUSES

EMPLOYERS OF LABOUR AND PUBLIC HOUSES. Appeal to the Chancellor for Total Prohibition of Drink. MR. LLOYD GEORGE PRO- MISES DRASTIC MEASURES. A very important deputation from the Shipbuilding Employers' Federation, with regard to excessive drinking, was received at the Treasury on Monday by the Chan- cellor of the Exchequer and the Secretary for Scotland. In the view of the deputation, in order to meet the requirements of the present urgent time, it is essential that there should be a total prohibition of the sale of excisable drink during the period of the war. It was stated that in many cases men were working fewer hours than before the war, and this was principally due to the question of drink. Mr. Lloyd George in his reply admitted that a very strong case had been made out by the deputation. He felt that noth- ing but xoot-and-brancli methods would be of the slightest avail in dealing with the evil. If we were to settle with Ger- man militarism we must first of all settlo with drink. The Chancellor mentioned that he had that day had an audience of the King, and he was permitted to say that his Majesty was very deeply concerned on this question. CASE FOR PROHIBITION. I An official account of the deputation's visit was issued from the Treasury. The deputation, says the report, was unanimous in urging that ip order to meet the national requirements there should be a total prohibition during the period of the war of the sale of excisable liquors. It was represented by them that mere restriction of hours or even total pro- hibition within certain work areas was not sufficient, as certain classes would be entirely unaffected, and it was felt by the deputation that total prohibition should apply as an emergency war measure not only to public-houses but to private clubs and other licensed premises, so as to operate equally for all classes of the community. In putting forward these views those who spoke on behalf of the deputation expressed themselves as satisfied that there was a general concensus of opinion on the part of the workers favourable to total prohibition along the lines indicated. It was stated that in many cases the number of hours being worked was ac- tually less than before the war, and, in spite of Sunday labour and all other time, the total time worked on the average in almost all yards waa belo wthe normal number of hours per week. In spite of working night and day seven days a week less productiveness was being secured from the men. I INCREASED SALE OF DRINK. I The deputation was of opinion that this was principally due to the question of drink. There were many men doing splendid and strenuous work probably as good as the men in the trenches. But so many were not working anything like full hours that the average was thua disas- trously reduced. The members of the deputation stated that speaking with the experience ôf from 25 to 40 years they believed that 80 per cent, of the present avoidable loss could be ascribed to no other cause than drink. The figures of weekly takings in public houses near the yards were convincing evidence of the increased sale of liquor. Allowing for the enhanced price of in. toxicants and for the greater number of men now employed in shipbuilding, the takings had in one cade under observa- tion risen 20 per cent., in another 40 per cent. Curtailment in the opinion of the depu- tation resulted in excessive drinking dur- ing the shortened hours. The takings If certain public houses which had had their hours reduced from ten to nine had actu- ally increased, and there had been a con- siderable growth in the pernicious habit of buying spirits by the bottle and taking it away to drink elsewhere. It was this drinking habit rather than drunkenness) that the deputation had to face. The cost of the drink habit was sufficiently illustrated by the case of a battleship coming in for immediate re- pairs and having these repairs delayed a whole day through the absence of the riveters for the purpose of drink and con- viviality. The case was one of hundreds. REASONS FOR PROHIBITION. I This was not the only reason in favour of prohibition as against curtailment. As long as public houses were open there would be found men to break the rules of the yard and come late to work in order to secure drink beforehand. And the in- disposition to work after the consump- tion of excessive alcohol was too obvious to need elaboration. Different members of the deputation gave different hours for their week's total of labour, but it was emphasised that the important factor was not the average time worked but the time worked by certain of the most important branches. In one yard, for example, the riveters had only been working on the average 40 hours per week, in another only 36 hours. The deputation drew attention to the example which Russia and France had set us, and urged upon the Chancellor of the Exchequer the need of strong and immediate action. Chancellor's Reply. I ROOT AND BRANCH METHODS I NECESSARY. I The Chancellor of the Exchequer, in I reply, said You certainly need not offer any apology to any of us for the time which you have occupied, because the statements which you lyive made are oi the gravest possible character in the na- tional interests. But although your state- ments are very startling you have been able to support them, I am almost sorry to say, with evidence which appears to me to be quite irrefutable. I almost wish it were possible even to cast doubt upon statements which are ro alarming. But not merely what you have told me to-day, but fact which have come to my knowledge more especially since I have interested myself in the labour diffi- culty, have convinced me that what you have told us here to-day simply repre- sents the truth. I notice a certain amount of impatience and I do not regret it, at the fact that the Government have not up to the present taken even more drastic action than that which they have taken. But that is due to one or two causes. The first, and per- haps the most important, is that before you take steps of this kind you must feel confident that you are not going in ad- vance of the general sentiment, otherwise more harm will be done than good. You must feel that you have every class in the community behind you when you are taking action which interferes and must interfere very severely with the individual liberties of men of all sections. But I am sure that the country is beginning to realise the gravity of the position. (Hear, hear.) It is very difficult for Ministers to teli the country how serious it is. WORKERS' ATTITUDE. I You, who are employed in the yards connected with the output of war material can draw a very fair interference as to the gravity of the position; and I am glad that the workmen themselves are beginning to be impressed with it, and that' they are getting more and more prepared to accept very drastic action in reference to the question of drink. You have come to the conclusion that the mere curtailment of the hours of drink- ing would be an inadequate step. Some ef you think it would hardly have an appreciable influence upon the evil. Others think that 'perhaps it might be of some use; but you are all agreed that it would be insufficient-(hear, hear)—to oope with the great injury which is being inflicted upon the country in consequence of the excessive drinking that takes place amongst, a section, maybe a small section, but a very important section, of work- men, who are engaged in the production of munitions of war and the equipments for war in this country. I was glad from that point of view, but only from that point of view, that Mr. Henderson stated quite clearly at the start that there were no teetotalers amongst you. Mr. Carter We could have brought aonfa. The Chancellor of the Exchequer Your appeal, and the decision you have come to, will carry all the greater weight for that reason that you have not approached it from the point of view of men who have a particular theory to promote. You have approached it from the point of view of men who have just got one end and aim in view, that is to help the country at the present moment successfully through its troubles. (Hear, hear.) That is what will appeal to the country. THREE DEADLY FOES. I have a growing conviction, based on accumulating evidence, that nothing but root and branch methods will be of the slightest avail in dealing with this evil. (Hear, hear.) I believe that to be the general feeling. The feeling is that if we are to settle German militarism we must first of all settle with the drink. (Hear, hear.) We are fighting Germany, Austria, and Drink and, as far I can see, the greatest of these three deadly foes is Drink. (Hear, hear.) Success in the war is now purely a question of munition I say that, not only on my own authority, but on the authori- ty of our gteat General, Sir John French. He has made it quite clear what his conviction is on the subject. I think I can venture to say that that is also the conviction of the Secretary of State for War, and it is also the convic- tion of all those who know anything about the military problem; that in order to enable us to win, all, we require is an increase, and an enormous increase, in the shells, rifles, and all the other muni- tions and equipment which are necessary to carry through a great war. You have proved to us to-day quite clearly that the excessive drinking in the works connect- ed with these operations is interfering seriously with that output. (Hear, hear.) I can only promise you this at the pre- sent moment, that the words which you hate addressed to my colleagues and my- self will be taken into the most careful consideration by my colleagues when we come to our 'final decision on this ques- tion. Coming as they do' from those who know what the facts are, and have spoken with a due sense of their responsibility, they will, I am certain, carry very great weight in these quarters. I had the privilege of an audience with his Majesty this morning, and I am per- mitted to say by him that he is very deeply concerned on this vert question— very deeply concerned—and the concern which is felt by him is, I am certain, shared by all his subjects in this oountry. I am exceedingly obliged to you for the facts which you have put before me, and for the brave suggestions which you have also urged. If you have any further figures or facts beyond those which you have submitted to me now, _I shall be very glad if you will let me have them, because I should like to summarise them and submit them to my colleagues with a view to their consulting the important suggestions which you have made.

Advertising

HERBERT ROGERS, I I PRACTICAL SANITARY PLUMBER, GAS AND HOT WATER FITTER, GLANRHYD ROAD. ^YSTRADGYNLAIS r. All orders promptly attend to. Garden Tools. Garden Too S. Lloyd & Sons Having large Stocks of Garden Tools, are offering same for this Season at Old Prices. The Stocks include Spades, Digging Forks, Garden Shovels, Shovel Handles, Rakes., Hoes, Shears, Pruners, &c. Also Large Stocks of Galvanized Wire Netting (all sizesj, Galvanized Plain Fencing Wire, Barb Wire, Wood Trellis, Barrows, Lawn Mowers. &c. CALL fiOR YOUR REQUIREMENTS AND SAVE HONE, Y NOTE THE ADDRESS- IT LLOYD S SONS, -9S Ystalyfera and Ystradgynlais. Webber & Son Ltd., 266, Oxford St., Swansea.. Immense Stock of the most Fashonable and Up-to-date JEWELLERY Gem Rings, Bracelets,Necklets,Pendants, Lockets,Long Chains, Alberts,Gold ancS, SilverWatches, Sterling Silver, Electro-plate, Marble, Hall and Chiming Clockst OCCULIST OPTICIANS AND SPECIALISTS IN SPECTACLES. Manufacturers of Scientific Instruments, Mining Dials, Levels, Theodolites, Anemometers, Barometers, Telescopes and Field Glasses. WEBBER & SON, Ltd.) 266, Oxford Street, Swansea OPPOSITE THE MARKET. DO YOU REQUIRE A MEMORIAL STONE Mr. W. J. Williams has a larg e assortment in most artistic design, kept in stock at Ystalyfera and Ystradgynlais and Brynamman. ANY DESIGN EXECUTED TO CUSTOMERS" CHOICE. ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. Note the Address:— W J Williams Ystalyfera, Ystradgynlais WW.V.w???.tMt??d Brynamman. is THE PEN MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORDP r This is a question which might well be asked at the present time, and probably at the moment most people would give the pen the second place. But although the demand for swords has so mightily increased, there is no corresponding decrease in the demand for pens. On the contrary, there is, for obvious reasons, a very much increased demand in this country just now, more particu- larly for fountain pens. It should be borne in mind that Pens of all kinds, Writ- ing Pads, Compendiums, and all other lines in Stationery and Fancy Goods, may be obtained advantageously from 6. D L AKE Ystradgynlais. C-0 D. LAKE? STAT,ON,R, a18.

VERSES FROM THE TRENCHES

VERSES FROM THE TRENCHES. P.S. Botting, of the Merthyr Borough Police, has been at the front with the Lancers since the outbreak of war, and has so far escaped injury. He was in the battle at Mons, and was also in the great fight at Neuve Chapelle. Writing from "Somewhere" to P.S. Hunter, he en- closes a poetic effort which he picked up about 40 yards from the German trenches. The lines written by a soldier from Broadlands, Newport, Isle of Wight, were as follows:- To the Kaisar. Do you hear the bitter weeping? Do you hear the anguished moan ? Do you know you'll soon be reaping Harvest of the seed you've sown ? Do you hear the maddened mothers Lifting up their bitter cry? • • See, 0 Kaisar, see the writing On the wall, it faceth thee. Though the mills of God grind slowly, Yet they grind exceeding small. Thou has sore oppressed the lowly, Thou shalt pay-yes, pay for all "I expect," comments Sergenat Bot- ting, "the soldier w ho wrote those lines has not forgotten what he is out here for, and made good use of his bayonet.

No title

Mr Rees Phillips, of 47, Fforchaman- rowl, Cwmamman, who died on Nov. 4, left estate valued at JE503 gross, with net personalty J6487. It is estimated that some 12,000 Jews in England have already enlisted, and the Jewish community in London is making every effort to increase the number. A mass meeting has been ar- ranged to take place in Shoreditch Town Hall on Wednesday evening, April 14, when the Lord Chief Justice (Lord Reading) has consented to oc- cupy the chair.

Advertising

Welsh Flannel and Wool Stores LONGTON HOUSE, Herbert Str, Pontardawe- I ——— STOCKINGS RE FOOTED ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. lOd. PER PAIR. POST FREE. Send for patterns and price lists for alfc kinds of Wool and Flannel. Note Address— J. W. MORGAN, Pontardawe & Seven Sisters;. Atmrnrnwrmmmi, W. ERNEST TATE. DENTAL SURGERIES • [ j* 128 LONDON ROAD t- § NEATH. j: PAINLESS EXTRACTIONS GUARANTEED ;• 'TRAIN FARE ALLOWED TO •[ g COUNTRY PATIENTS. E ATTENDANCE DAILY: £ 9 Lm. to 9 p.m. •' S —— 'Phone, No. 13.