Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 5 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. CHIEF OFFICE: HOLBORN BARS, LONDON. Summary of the Report presented at the Sixty-sixth Annual Meeting, held on 4th March, 1915. ORDINARY BRANCH.—The number of policies issued dur- ing the year was 65 751, assuring the sum of £ 6,318,843, and producing a new annual premium of £ 424,353. The premiums received during the year were zC5,035,625, being an increase of JB115,107 over the year 1913. In addition, £ 10,315 was re- ceived in premiums under the Sickness Insurance Tables. The claims of the year amounted to £ 4,014,658. The number cf deaths was 9,351. The number of endowment assurances matured was 24,966, the premium income of which was £ 136,735. The number of policies in force at the end of the year was 922,506. INDUSTRIAL BRANCH.—The premiums received during the year were CB,176,202, being an increase of £ 301,746. The claims of the year amounted to C3,373,850, including R398,360 bonus additions. The number of claims and surrenders, includ- ing 6,731 endowment as-surances matured, was 392,883. The number of free policies granted during the year to those policy- holders ef five years' standing and upwards, who desired to discontinue their payments, was 103,514, the number in force being 1,947,556. The number of free policies which became claims during the year was 46,364. The total number of policies in force in this Branch at the end of the year was 20,085,010; their average duration exceeds thirteen years. The assets of the Company, In; both branches, as shown in the balance sheet, are £ 91,202,344, being an increase of £ 4.209,341 over those of 1913. The outbreak of hostilities in August last placed upon the Directors the gTave responsibility of deciding what charge, if any, should be made to policyholders on active service. After careful consideration it was decided to charge nOt extra premium in respect of existing policies on the lives of those engaging for the period of the war, and in respect of existing policies on the jives of other members of the regular forces it was decided that jS250 of assurance on any life should be exempted from the payment of extra premium. In the Ordinary Branch a reversionary bonus at the rate of £ 1 lGs. per cent. on the original sums assured has been added to all classes of participating policies issued since the year 1876. In the Industrial Branch a bonus addition will be made to J the sums assured on polices of over five years' duration which II' become claims either by death or maturity of endowment from the 5th of March, 1915, to the 2nd of March, 1916, both dates inclusive, as follows :— Bonus Addition Premiums Paid For. To Sums Assured. 5 years and less than 10 years L- 2 10s. per cent. ¡' 10" 15 £5 15 „ „ „ „ 20 „ £5 I 23 „ „ „ „ 25 „ £7 10s 25" 30 ClO 30" „ „ „ 35 „ P,12 10s „ 35 „ „ „ 40 „ JB15 40 „ „ „ „ 45 „ 220 5" 50 vo 50 „ „ „ „ 55 „ jB40 I 55 „ „ „ „ 60 „ £ 50 „ 60 and upwards £ 60 The six Prudential Approved Societies formed under the National Insurance Act 1911 have done important work during the year and the membership continues to increase. Since the commencement of the Act the Agency Staff has distributed benefits exceeding V,000,000 to the members at their own homes. [ Balance Sheet of the Prudential Assurance Company, Limited, being the Summary of both Branches, on 31st December. 1914 ¡ LIABILITIES. £ a d Shareholders' capital 1,000,000 0 0 Life assurance fund—Ordin- a ary Branch L47,024,190 5 8 Sickness insurance fund 13,562 8 9 Life assurance fund—Indus- trial Branch 40,649,318 9 8 ————————— 87,687,071 4 1 Investments reserve funds 1,750,000 0 0 Courts (Emergency Powers) Act Reserve 300,000 0 0 Claims under life policies intimated and in course of payment 233,518 0 7 Annuities due and unpaid. 3,171 13 4 Balance of bonus under life policies reserved for distribution 228,582 15 10 E91,202,343 13 10 =+ ASSETS. £ 8 d Mortgages on property within the United Kingdom ••• 8,882,486 o 4 Mortgages on property out of the United Kingdom 336,449 2 9 Loans on parochial and other publio rates 13,412,347 14 8 Loans on Life interests 1,193,287 0 11 Loans on Reversions 96,502 18 5 Loans on stocks and shares 76,385 2 0 Loans on Company's policies within their surrender values 3,221.385 7 9 J..oa.nø on Personal security Nil Loans to Educational institutions secured on income, etc. 43,969 19 1 InVe-%t.m,ent& Deposit with the High Court (£24,400 21 per cent. Consolidated stock) 17,568 0 0 Carried forward £ 27,280,391 10 9 ASSETS—coxTisuED. Brought forward 27,280,301 10 9 Investments (continued) d. I' JB s. d. British Government securities 1,413,368 1 5 Bank of England stock 143,117 2 10 í Municipal and county securities, United Kingdom 1,682,752 10 7 Indian and Colonial Government securities 4,621,551 12 10 Colonial provincial securities 1,371,547 15 11 Indian and Colonial municipal securities 3,577,816 8 5 Foreign Government securities 5,411,862 18 11 Foreign provincial securities 789,465 10 11 Foreign municipal securities 4,115,813 0 6 Railway and other debentures and debenture stocks &nd gold and sterling bond&- Home and Foreign. 21,247,943 14 5 Railway and other preference an d guaranteed stocks and shares I. 3,193,674 17 2 ¡ Railway and other ordinary Stocks and Shares 2,865,148 2 6 Rent charges 605,472 4 2 Freehold ground rents and Scotch feu duties 4,766,452 6 6 Leasehold ground rents 9,143 11 7 House p,roperty 4,200.467 19 11 Lifo interests 34,626 14 6 Reversions 1,338,434 10 7 Agents' balances 6,647 16 0 Outstanding premiums 627,723 11 8 Outstanding interest and rents. 115,010 13 4 Interest, dividends and rents accrued but not payable 522,743 1 0 Bills receivable Nil Cash—On deposit 20.000 0 0 In hand and on current account. 1,241,167 17 5 £ 91,202,343 13 10 The values of the Stock Exchange securities are determined, under th3 Regulations of the Company, by the Directors. These values have been compared with the middle market prices OIl 31st December, 1913.. subsequent purchases being taken at cost price, due allowance being made for accrued interest, and the difference is nior) than provided for by the Investments. Reserve Funds. We certify that in our belief the Assets set forth in the Balance Sheet (compared with standards available at the date indicated) are in the aggregate fully of the value stated therein less the Investments Reserve Funds taken into account. No part of any fund has been applied directly or indirectly for any purpose other than the claosi of business to which it is applicable. .T BURN. Acturay. A. C. THOMPSON, General Manager. G. E. MAY, Secretary. THOS. C. DEWEY, Chairman. W. J. LANCASTER. F. SCHOOLING, Directors. We report that with the assistance of the Chaxtered Accountants ar, stated below we have examined the foregoing accounts and have obtained all the iinformation and explanations that we have required and in our opinion such accounts are correct and the foregoing Balance Sheet is properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the state of the Company's affairs according to the best of our information and the explantions given to us and as shown by the books of the Company. No part of any fund has been applied directly or indirectly for any purpose other than the class of business to which it is appli- PHILIP SECRETAN,. W. H. NICHOLLS, Auditors. We have examined the Cash transactions (receipts and payments) affecting the accounts of the Assets and Investments for the year ended December 31, 1914, and we find the same in good order and properly vouched. We have also examined the Deeds and Securities, Certifisates, etc., representing the Asseis and Investments set out in the above account, and we certify; that they were in possessi on and safe custody as on December 31st, 1914. 16th February, 1915. DELOITTE, PLENDER, GRIFFITHS, and Co., Chartered Accountants. Superintendent L. HESLOP, District Office, Morriston. Assistant Superintendents G. W. TRIFFIT, "Brynheulog," Lower Cwmtwrch. C. D. THOMAS, Ma-nselton Road, Manselton. E. LOCKETT, Morriston. D. J. LEWIS, "The Hollies," Pontardawe.

THE GUIDE TO PEACEI

THE GUIDE TO PEACE. I AN IMPORTANT POLITICAL EFFORT. I POLITICAL THOUGHT IN ENG- LAND: FROM HERBERT SPENCER TO THE PRESENT DAY. By Ernest Barker. (Home University Library: 286 pp. Is. and 2s.6d. net.) Williams and Norgate. When the whole political reconstruc- tion of Europe is approaching, it is the duty of every man and woman to t,hink wha.t should be done. This is no occasion when the future settlement, of the world can be left to politicians: the people must make their voice heard with no uncertain note. This genera- tion has the making or marring of civilisation for those that come after vs. No serious man can consider that the whole political past was buried in -the trenches. Yesterday telleth to- morrow, and to be able to judge of to- morrow it is essential that something should be known, about yesterday. Evolution and heredity are as potent in history and politics as in nature. Therefore it is impossible not to felici- tate the Editors of the fine Home Uni- versity Library on providing such a helpful guide to thinkers as Mr Bark- er's pregnant little book. Already a wide welcome has been accorded to Mr G. P. Grooch for his contribution in the same .1. series on English Political Thought from Bacon to Halifax. That was of historical and instructive value; its sequel by Mr Barker is a vita:l epitome of the doctrine of the thinkers erbill aihong us or who have recently passed away. Mr Barker starts from that year of revolution, 1848. and shows us a world Jess in turmoil than it is to-day. But with cataclysms around, men were then trying to solve the problems ahead just as they are to-day. The accepted creed was that derived from Adam Smith and Jeremy Bentham, which had been a corrosive solvent of everything that clogged the free play of in- dividual activity. The way in which politdcal thought has permeated modern men is proved when sociolo- gists like Graham Wallas and Mao- Dougall, dra-matists like Shaw and Glasworthy, novelists like Wells. Mal- lock and Bellamy, writers such as Hilaire Belloc, Norman Angell, Lowes Dickenson and Blatchford take the ideas in the air and dn varying direc- tion spread them broadcast, so that even the man' buying cheap books can learn more than a philosopher of old in his costly library. Those mentioned and others have called the wisdom of their forefathers and besides giving their gospel, Mr Barker ably sets forth the tenets of their progenitors. We are shown the prospects of the idealistic school led by T. H. Green, then his more known successors, Bradley and Bosanquet, their advance towards a Hegelian State. Thus we reach the scientific school, incomparably led by Horbert Spencer, the philospher whose works still command a large public. Thence we are led to Huxley, Kidd and Rus- sell Wallace, with Bagehot on a side- track. From Galton we are borne to the lawyers, Maine, Stephens and the rest. So we reaoh the political theory of literature in which Carlyle is the dominant spirit, but where Ruskin also exercised a ooamterating influence. The wonderful figure of William Morris then looms large in its titanic comprehensiveness, nor is the Fabian Society to be discounted, whilst the influence on politics of Trade Union- ism has to be estimated. All these things are contained in this versatile little volume, the bulk of which is in the inverse ratio to its value. The shilling it costs is worth expending if only to obtain the illustrative biblio- graphy which forms the epilogue and is also the mo^t suggestive "resume" of modern ideas yet collected on a couple of pages. I

MR D A THOMAS ANDI BUSINESS IN AMERICA

MR D. A. THOMAS AND I BUSINESS IN AMERICA. THE COMPETITION IN COAL. I Mr. D. A. Thomaa, in the course of an interview with a South Wales journal's representative, said that he was not in New York particularly for business, but for rest, although he would, naturally, renew old acquaint- ances and study the question of coal shipping. He considered that the coal trade in the United StateG was in a decidedly bad condition, and he did not believe that United States coal would partici- pate to any extent in the present big foreign commerce, the reason being that transportation and freight rates precluded competition with British coalfields. He poimted out that the present Cardiff vessel rate to South American ports was about three dollars less than the United States rate. The advantage was to the British, because the vessels could get a retuirn cargo. This indicated that the United States would not get much of the South American ooal trade. Asked if he intended to purchase coal or land in the United States, he fought shy, bift replied, "If I see a chance of bargain I may take it." Mr Thomas declined to talk at any length.

DICCYN 0 ANNAS DAI A FINNA AR RYF AL

DICCYN 0 ANNAS DAI A FINNA AR RYF AL. Gan GLYNFAB. (Awdwr "Scwt Ymlan"—Buddugol yn yr Eisteddfod Genedlaethol, 1911.-Tabod- iaith Canol Rhondda.) Y DDECFAD SHWRNA. I YN NES AT WILL Y KAISAR. Off a'r train a ninna'n canu "Mae yn bell i Gwm-y-Rhondda ac i Lian- fair P. G." "Bachan," mynta Dai, "beth yw'r P G. na?" "Wn i yn y byd, os nacca Pot/tin' Germans yw a," wettas i. "Wel, na fydd i Shoni. Di ni ddim yn cal llawar o aansar i gal spel ar y partin dwpwl nawr: ma ryw ddrams gwa.g o yd yn weeto idd i llanw,' mynta Dai, "a nes at Will i ni'n mynd. Ma'r shifto o bothdi ma yn y'n ela i i gofio am Dai Evans Pen Steps. "A finna efyd," myntwn i, "Shifto o yd odd Dai." "Ia, ia," myntwn i; "o nw'n gweyd fod y ieir a'r cilocood wetti arfadd cal i shifto o dy i dy mor amal sa nw'n gweld fwrniture van yn dod yn accos i'r ty o nw'n ryttag i'r back yard ac yn cwmpo ar i cefna a'u bagla i lan yn barod i'r dynon i glwmi i coesa nw." "Na fydd annas Will cymphoir go- beetho," mvnta Dai, "a fi glymma i i fagla fa Shoni." Wyrthinws Dai, a mynta fa—"Rwy short o Arry Laudar fyssat ti sa t'n oal cwnnad ar gyfar y m-Li,ic alls!" "Right oh," myn-twn i vn canu "Mae yn bell i Gwm-y-Rhondda." "Ettrych ar yr ecclws na yn yfflon jibbardares; dishgwl ar y ffarm co," myntwn i. Ddishgwlws Dai. "Na effeth German kulture," wettas i. "Beth yw wnna, bachan, rwy freed o fowls," mynta. Dai, yn werthin. "Well, nacce, Dai," myntwn i, "nid ffowls efyd, ond raid lwo mod i wetti darlIan yn y pappra lawar gwaith am German ffoul deed. Nacce, Dai, annodd gwppod beth i weyd, rwy short o grefydd allwn i feddwl yw kultur." "Short yw a, myn yffrvd i," mynta Dai, "rwy grefydd od sy'n dishtrwyo Cathedrals, a plialasa, a ti y Belgians' bach; yn lladd en ddynon a gwallt fel eir.a, a phlant bach wrth y cannodd. Os short o grefydd yw kultur, cad wad Billy's Kaisar i yn i fambox ar fences i. W i ddim yn i mofyn i, there you John Mcrgans." "Ana i ofan fod peth o na wetti cyradd y wlad on ishws," myntwn i. "Wetti cyradd bachan! Wei, ma fachan bach gymrith i nockeelato y "shawns gynt-a gaiff a yn lIe bo fa yn c-al y complaint. Sa well da fi gal y lwmbago, y sciatica, a'r byngaloo na'r clefyd na, wath clefyd yw crefydd 0.'1' short." "Otti Dai, ma fa wetti cyrradd, na beth yw igher criticism," myntwn i, "fuodd fel influensa drw'r pwlpitta ys diocyn o flynydda nol. Rwppat-h o Ger- many, mynta nw. Odd y boys ifanc a'r gwaJh cwrlwg a'r trilby at, a'r collars round, a'r chaps ifanc ar Jim Crows odd a.'u llieced ar fynd yn fferaton want roi trial i'r "made in Gormany religion.' Ond short o dan shavins odd a, a fi ddiffottws am dro. Ma lot o'r prygethwrs ar fferaton a teitla 'made in Germany, Ph.G., i7 a felly yn y blan. Ond cofia di, dw i'n gweyd dim yn erbyn y teitla, ma'r boys ddicon teyypg wett-i passo examinations itha calad, 0 ottin, ottin." "WTel," mynta Dai, "wettast fod Billy'r Kaisar a'i efficars wetti settlo ela'r medals geson nw o Bryttan yn ol. Os nethon nw, giiigora i'r iboys. sy wetti cal teitla o Germany ela'r teitla nol i Germany ef mwyn bod yn gwits a Will. "W i'n cretti, myntwn i, fod rwppath teppyg wetti i annar setlo. Ta bath, mai rai o foys y cwrdda. yn gwed na. 1j randawa nw ddim ar bregethwr na ffoorad yn pregethu os ceson nw i teitla o ffact-ri Will o Berlin. A beth sy miwn teitl? W iln, cofio am gwrdd politics yn Rummy a lot o'rl big bugs yr M.A.'s, y D.D.'s, a felly yn y blan yn brygawthan. On ma fachan bach o weethwr yn cal i alw i wilia. "Ma. ish'a diccyn o gwmpshon," mynta, fa, "i gwni ar yn nrad i wilia yn goeddus yn genol dynon y dygrees, on walla naggich i chi ddim. yn gwppod fod teitl da fi, fi alia i scryfenu C.C. wrth gwt y'n enw. Pan boch chi'n scryfenu ato i o yn i mas dottwch 'John Jones, C.C.' Cistal teitl a un sy ma eno. A pheth arall, alia i ddangos o leia wyth d fedals nillas i wrth gal y* dygree o C.C. C.C.. ia 'common colliar,' a wyth corn I calM ar y neel(t i—Mabon s Medals!" "Ear, ear, ar fencos i,' mynta Dai, "wy ti a fi Shoni a eysitificats o'r oolledge na, on ottin ni?" "Itha right, Shoni pwy isha mynd i Germany i foyn orefydd a gweil stwff da na yn nre." "Allswn i weyd raccor, Dai," myn- twn i, "on fi wetta fel y prygethwr yn dop Shir Gar 'nis ymelaothaf.' Bachan i ni'n tynu it y Base, siwr o fod, on a.1Ia. i ddim peedo cofio stori 'nis ym- helaethaf. "Beth yw onno bachan," mynta Dai, yn glusta i gyd. "Gwinittog myn cwrdd, myntwn i, "yn hrygethwr da, a en wraig odd yn eelod da fa yn cretti nac odd i short a i gal. 'Na brygethwr,' mynta i, 'yw y'n gwiptoog ni. Ia. chi." "Twt, mynta bachan odd yn diccyn o wag, twt, preccath o baypr sy da fa." "Nacce, nacce," mynta Mari yn werwi. "la, ia, watchwch chi a, Mari," mynta'r wag. "Gna," mynta i, "i a i ochor y gallary dy Shul nesa." I ath Mari fel y gwetfws i, a fi ddychreuws y prygethwr i breccath cympohir. Prynawn poth yn yr af odd i, a gorffod aocor ffenast wrth gefan y pwlpit. Cyn diwadd y taregeth fi ddath pwff o wynt yn syttan a fi wthws rai o ddail y breccath mas drw's ffenast. Chollws y prygethwr ddim o'i ben on fi wettws yn itha cool—"Yn bimmad ac yn olaf—on nis ymelaot-hof." Gwnnws Mari ar i thrad ar ochr yl gallarya fi wett,ws.Sdim diolch i chi ser, fi ath ych pimmad ac yn ola chi mas drw'r ffenas gytta pwff o wynt. Do, do, wath i gwelas a'n mynd yn fflyan. I ddicciws wrth y gwinittog, a rwng poppath fi wnnw ddim yn ir cyn cwnni i back ar i gefan i wilo am da] can arall. Stoppws y train am diccyn, ishp. ewl glir, a na ni'n cal pip ar y North o Ffrainc. Dodd dim llawar o ol clecs y Germans i weld. 0 na, o nw wetti cyrradd yd at 30 miles i Paris on wetti gorffod troi nol, a wrth fyned nol odd genti nw fawr amsar i ela clecs na gneud avoc. 0 nw'n ry deppyg i Mock Cefen-Bryn yn ryttag sha thre achos fod tarw Tycocli am stidio patrwm i drowsis a! Wistlws yr ingin a off a ni. Yn fora, cyn bo'r oil wetti clipo'i leced, o ni'n landed yn y Base. Mas a ni, boys yn ryttag i shigglo deelo; motors yn toot-toot; showdwrs fel 'gwlith y bora wawrddydd,' fel i ni'n canu yn y cwrdd; tramcars o Picca- dilly; cyffvla, da, a phoppath allach feddwl am dano--sharug-di-fang drw i Olv,dd. "Ma ni." mynta Dai, "yn y Bath an West of England Show, Shoni!" Tents fel mush-rooms; mwg fel gwitha Llandwr, a phob un ar i ora yn cisho ffindo mas lie odd a i fod. Diolch am Ted; fi ddath 'my lor'" cymphoir a fi'n arwinws ni i'n lodgins, a odd yn dda da ni gal snwffan diccyn ar smell soup. Geson diccyn o gleppran am awr ne ddwy, fel y gwettws yr officar pena, i gal jest nappod y'n gilydd. "You will be comrades soon in the trenches," mynta fa; "form a comrade- ship now that will make you stick it to the end." 0 ni'n Hoi yn smoko yn itha jokose pan ddath bachan o Sais yn mlan. "Ow ar you," mynta fa, "ave you got a bit o bacca to spare, I ave left my pouch on the sheffoneer in Bou- longe," Dwymas at y bloke ar unwath, os dim yn well na diccyn o joke i symento calonna, a naccos. "Ay, ay," mynta Dai, yn estyn i fox bacco. 'Elp yourself, mate." "We might as well smoke bacca to- gether now," mynta fa; it is the smoke of Black Marias we'll ave soon." "Black Maria," mynta Dai, yn staran, "otti onno ma "Pwy," myntwn i. "Black Maria," mynta Dai. "Bachan wy i ddim yn cofio yr en fenyw ni odd yn byw yn dy top 'Enry Street? Odd i'n arfedd gweetho ar ben y tips. la, allu fentro fod i ma." "Bachan, paid wilia nonsance, Dai" myntwn i. "Nonsance! Black Maria o nw'n galw onno, ta beth. 0 nw'n gweyd i bod i mor frwnt a byssa raid cal un o'r lamps na sy gytta'r paintars yn craffu paint off o ar y drws, cyn dychra i wmJoch i." "Sdim mynywod yn wmladd bachan" myntwn i. "Wel," mynta Dai, "walla gwettid di nac 1GB Jack Johnsons yn ymladd. Droias at y b"ban-"Wot is Black Marias an Jack Johnsons?" "Cannons, my lads," mynta fa. "O," mynta Dai, "she is not a ooman then ?" "No, of course. I am blow'd, you Welsh chaps can sing and fight, but af-t-ar all you are conundrums." Ma DID ar i drad, "Wot," mynta. fa. "Wot? You call us conundrums agen an I'll knock you into small coal!" Odd i got a off myn wincad. (I'w Barhau.) ———— ————

CAUSE OF EPIDEMICS

CAUSE OF EPIDEMICS. "FILTHY" AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOLS. At the annual meeting of the Managers of the Amman Valley Group of Schools was held at Ammanford. Mr. Jno. Har- ries (Irlwyn), Bettws, who was appointed chairman for the ensuing year, said the great barrier to progress was the Educa- tion Committee, but in the future, as the whole County Council was going to com- pose the committee, they might be able to get more from them. It was reported that Parcyrhyn In- fants' School, Ammanford, and the Coun- cil School, Saron, had been closed on account of diphthfria and scarlet fever. Mr. W. J. Willfems said the sanitary inspector for the district informed him that nearly all the schools were not pro- perly cleaned ;in fact, he was quite con- viiiced the oases of diphtheria and scar- let fever and other infectious diseases were due to the filthy states of the schools in the group. If they took a walk into Ammanford School back pre- mises they would find they were in a filthy sta,fe, and w hen the question of caretakers cropped up it would be well for them to emphasise the conditions of their employment. The schools should be washed out monthly, but that was very rarely done. He knew schools that were full of dust and dirt from one year's end to another. The Chairman said they were met with the difficulty that the caretakers were not properly treated by the Education Com- mittee. The managers-felt that nearly all the caretakers were underpaid by the Carmarthenshire Education Committee. They should ask the caretakers, for the sake of the children, to be careful in cleaning the school. Mr. W. J. Williams said he was not trying to cloak the fact that they were underpaid in some instances. Some of the caretakers, instead of asking for an increase of salary, should clean themselves, as they were in a filthy state. It was notified that for the new school II at Ystradowen, which is to be opened next month, Mr. Lemuel Powell, from Caio Council School, Llanwrda, had been I appointed headmaster, at a salary of £ 125; and Miss Sarah Ellen Jones, Llan- j dilo-road, Brynamman, headmistress of the infant school, at JB85. I

No title

Messrs. Palmer's Shipbuilding and (Iron Oompajruy, Limited, J arrow-on- ) Tyne, hAve granted a further wages advance of 2! per cent, to the gas- j producer men employed at their steel- works, making a toftal increase since August of 17-1 per cent.

Advertising

PEACE PRICES IN WAR TIMES I FOR PEDAL AND MOTOR CYCLES you will ——— do well to inspect the STOCK of Tom G. Williams c. Who have opened a Depot at The Square, Ystradgyrilais. Where They Have a Fine Selection of the Leading Makes Rudge Whitworths, Royal Enfields, Premiers, and Sun Pedal and Motor Cycles. Easy Terms Arranged. Cycles from f 2/19/6 or 10/- per month. Motor Cycles from .123 or 10/- per week. FIRST CLASS MOTOR CARS FOR HIRE, at any time, Day or Night. Cheapest way to travel. Phone 30 P.O. Ystradgyntais Repairs promptly and efficiently Attended to. Accessories at Lowest Prices Bargains in Second-hand Cycles and Motors. Cycles for Hire. NOTE ADDRESS- NEW CYCLE DEPOT, THE SgUARE, YSTRADGYNLAIS. Q??.??.????.e?*?*??*?*?*? ??*?*? ? ? t pc Corner Shop. ? ?? Corner Shop. "?B j ? Castle and Temple Streets, i I SWANSEA T ♦ N D THOMAS f Jeweller, 1 ? Jeweller, I ♦ i i Has REMOVED from the temporary I premises at 26a, CASTLE STREET, to I Temple Street Tem PI e Street ++ I Round the Corner from the old Premises | I Gymry, Cofiwch am y Cymro. I .+.+.iI PAINLESS DENTISTRY Why risk the Dangers of Decayed Teeth ? Why endure the Pain they Cause ? When you can have them quite Painlessly Extracted by means of OUR NEW AND PERFECTED PROCESS, which is the most Successful known. LISTER'S TEETH are noted for their natural appearance and per- fect fit. Other makers' Teeth not fitti ng, can be made to fit in four hours; Repairs done in two hours. Patients visited at their own homes on receipt of postcard, or other I request, and without anyext.ra. charge. Distance no object. Addresses— YSTRADGYNLAIS: LISTER'S DENTAL SURGERY, COMMERCIAL STREET (Lately occupied by Mr A. Webb). Attendance Daily by Lady Operators. Hours: 9 to 9. IYSTALYFERA: AT MRS. WILLIAMS, STATION HOUSE, Near YSTALYFERA STATION. or- Every Monday from 4 to 9 o'clock. j IMIHI -III.. -_& <7ort1fp your$? j \;ortifp ,ourStlf 3 against the assaults of disease by maintaining the safe and sure defence of a • good appetite and a sound digestion. These form, after all, the best 1 protection against the attacks of the enemies of health. So important is i i this safeguard, that no one can hope to escape the disaster of damage to [ 3 health if the functions of digestion and nutrition are imperfectly carried out. Those people are saved a world of trouble who remember in time that » j valuable assistance is rendered towards the maintenance of sound health ] by the famous digestive medicine— Piece am$ Pill$ Prepared only by THOMAS BEECHAM, St. Helens, Lane. ;| Sold everywhere In boxes, price Illi (56 pills) A 2(9 (168 plllt). ;j