Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

f 1 I Thomas Lewis & Co. i ♦ = I » Are now making a I GRAND DISPLAY I l Of ———— I 5 I I Early Spring Novelties a I I w I MILLINERY, COSTUMES, BLOUSES, SKIRTS, « x I MILLINERY COSTUMES, DER. I CLOTHING, GLOVES, NECKWEAR, &c. i Best Selection of Ladies' Tailor-made Costumes ss ♦ 1 $in Navy and Greys, with Fancy Silk Collars, $ ? ? ? THE NEWEST. S I 18/11, 21/11, 28/11, 42/- I ? s I BIG STOCK of LADIES' TWEED COSTUMES I1 6 in all the New Colours at J $ in all the New Colours at § ? 8/11, 10/11, 14/11, 18/11, 21/- | 1 I We are now showing the Smartest and most ¡ a Up-to-date Millinery in Town in Tagel, 5 Crinolenes, Tuscans, and Leghorns, Trimmed S Fancy Ribbons, Lancer Feathers, and Feather I Ruches. They are striking in appearance and i ? very reasonable in price. | .1 Pay us a visit before Easter and you will be I £ convinced that our Selection and Value | g is the best obtainable. | Oxford Street, Swansea. I S !i .=..+=.u=.==+==.=.a.a+n.a.=.=. t. Me Le wis & Co., LTD. GREAT SPRING SHOW or Wand Up-to-date Clothing Smartest Styles in Men's Suits In a Choice Variety of New Shades ot Greys, Browns, & Blues. STYLISHLY CUT AND WELL TAILORED. From 16/11* to 42/- -YOUT, HSI SUITS- Cut and made to meet the taste of the Modern Young Men of Fashion in a variety of New Styles and Materials. 9/11 to 35/- RUGBY, KENSINGTON AND NORFOLK SUITS In all the Newest Tweeds and Serges At the very Lowest Prices. The LATEST STYLES in BOYS' SPORTS SUITS Smart Tweed Mixtures, Stylish & Serviceable, From 6/6. :>0<>0 0 0 t:)o()oC:: A LARGE RANGE OF FANCY SUITS FOR THE YOUNGER BOYS NEW IN DESIGN AND MATERIAL. Velvets, Serges, Fancy Tweeds, &c. Remarkable Value. THE VERY LATEST IN Shirts, Ties, Collars, Eats & z Caps, &c. A Large Stock of these Goods to select from. WE offer YOU the SMARTEST GOODS, the GREATEST SELECTION, and the FINEST VALUE. || Oxford Street, Swansea

A LABOUR VIEW OF THE WARI

A LABOUR VIEW OF THE WAR I MR JAMES PARKER, M.P. ON OUR IMMEDIATE DUTY. I ISPECIAL INTERVIEW. I Mr James Parker, the popular Lab- our member for Halifax (Yorks), whose fine speech at the Ystalyfera recruit- ing meeting was reported in our last issue, has some very decided views as to Labour's part in the present National crisis. He holds firmly to the confession of faith in his memor- able speech. Mr Parker is first an Englishman, his allegiance to creed or party he places in a position of secondary importance. Last week-end he accorded an interesting interview to a representative of this journal, in the course of which he made interest- ing reference to Labour's duty in the present erisis, and enlarged on his ex- pression of opinion that to-day, the claims of country should come before the claim of party. Mr Parker began by pointing out that the whole of his political career had been taken up in working for schemes of social reform in the Trade Union, would, and in general activity in all those movements making for human brotherhood and the peace of the world. "And" went on Mr Parker, "I have not taken up this work of seeking to persuade the men to join the Army with a Light heart, but be- cause I realise the extreme peril in whioh our nation and the Empire is placed to-day. There is no need for us to be Pharasaical, and to put for- ward the idea that in our Empire, things had never been done which were wrong That would not be true, but the fact was that with all our faults, the last word had been said regarding England when she was spoken of as the land which stood for all those things making for a higher and better form of civilisation, and it would be true to say that no nation had in these directions done so much." I "WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE." We are not responsible as a nation for tiiis war. Prussian militarism has for the pa&t thirty or forty years been a continual menace to the peace of Europe. So far as I am capable of understanding the immediate causes which brought about this war, our nation was certainly not to blame. We sought no territory. We had no quarrel with any nation at the time when war broke out. We were obliged in defence of our own honour to up- hold the integrity of the smaller nations of Europe. It is true to say that the war was imposed upon us, and upon our Allies, by Germany, whose ambitions to attain world fame and Teutonic domimance had brought mat- ters to a crisis." "You have no doubt about the duty of our youncr men Mr Parker?" ".N,,one. I-Ve require more men, and must have them. In the early stages of the war, there were those who thought victory would be won within three months. The great Russian Army wag going to roll the Germans out flat in no time. These ideas have not materialised, and those acquainted with German military preparations must last for a considerable period. Our small Army has fought heroically, and our losses in killed and wounded have been great. The sacrifice of the man- hood of the nations is really terrible to contemplate, and when we realise wh-at defeat would mean to us as a nation, and to every class in the com- muni,tv,-the working class no less than every other class,—it is, I think, imperative that we shall have more and more men until victory is com- plete." OURSELVES AND OUR COLONIES I Une more point I desire to em- phise" (said Mr Parker). "Believing as I do that our own country stands for all that is highest in the world's civilisation, I am desirous that when the war is over, and the question of ar- riving at the terms of settlement are being considered by the Powers in- volved in the war, we should have a sufficient Army, controlled, equipped, and ready in order that our idea as to what are equitable terms should be backed up. Assuming the truth of the idea that our Nation stands, as we believe it does stand, in the fore front of the colonising nations of the world: we have proved oureslves such because we have carried our own liberalising institutions fco the Colonies, which have taken up those institutions, and this liberty and freedom has been carried forward by them to even greater lengths than at home. Agree- ing as to these things, our duty is clear. We have not regarded our Colonies as oranges to be squeezed, or lemons to be sucked to get their last resources for ourselves, but we have sought to assist them in developing within themselves their own resources, and thus they are only bound to us bv mere gossamer threads. They are not held by any cast iron restrictions on the part of the mother country, but by bonds of love and sympathy, and be- cause this is so whatever may be our views, however advanced we may be regarding matters of politics, econom- ics, peace or war, the great thing for us torealise as a working class is that our Empire has stood for these things, and under these conditions, our colon- ies have made progress, and when we were in need they came forward to hslp us to uphold our liberty and free-, dom. handed down from generation to generat,ion! This we have something tangible t-o fight for, and something we must preserve."

No title

General Owen Thomas tells the farmers of Anglesey, that if they kee their sons and labourers at home to help with the harvest it is quite possible the Germans will come over and reap the harvest for them. Two ladies have been apointed on the staff of the Friars Schools at Bangor to take the place of male teachers who have obtained commissions with the colours. This is a new departure in the history of the school, which is one of the oldest in the country.

WELSH WOOLLENS AND THE WAR

WELSH WOOLLENS AND THE WAR. Reminiscences of the Old Industry. KHAKI FOR SOLDIERS. In spite of the onward march of pro- gress (says a writer in the "Daily News and Leader"), with the thousand and one mechanical inventions of our modern civilisation, there are still to be found, scattered over England and Wales, relics of the old rural industries. The making of flannels used to be one of the chief rural industries of Wales. Homespun flannel formed the chief fabric in the national costume, and no farm of cottage was complete without its spinning wheel, on which the women prepared the wool for their own clothes, often taking it to a neighbouring weaver to be dyed and woven. I FLANNEL FAIR DEPARTED. This is still one of the staple Welsh in- dustries, but the town factory has super- seded the country weaver's shed, and the old "Flannel Fairs," to which the country folk, in their picturesque costumes, used to jog on horseback, ape dying out. What need to go to a fiannelfaiT when a halfpenny postcard to one of the "big shops" will bring a collection of patterns far exceeding in range of colour and fine, nesa of weave anything the handloom weavers could produce? The old folk, it is true, claim, contemptuously, that there is "no wear" in the factor-made material. Wear a dress made of factory-made stuff for two years, say they, and it is not fit to look at! Whereas, a dress made on a loom looks as good as new after twenty years' wear and innumerable visits to the wash-tub. The rising generation, however, do not seem too eager to wear the same gown fpr twenty years; they are fascinated by the dainty colours and the fine textures, and so the "big shops" gain an ever-in- creasing number of customers every year and the country weavers find less and less demand for their weaves of everlast- ing wear. Here and there are to be found the real old-fashioned weavers who look upon the new-fangled machinery with hatred and s--rn, and these will show you with great pride the looms and the spinning wheels which their grandmothers and great- grandmothers used. In a certain little village in Carmarthenshire lives one of the last of the weavers of this type. I ONE OF THE LAST. Mrs. Edwards is over 85 years of age, and has worked at her spinning-wheel in the same weaving-shed for over half a century. In spite of her great age she does her share of work in the shed, wind- ing the wool to hand to the weaver whose loom is just behind her. Husband and wife used to work to- gether now the old weaver is dead, and, his son has taken his place-at the loom, which his father, grandfather, -andgreftoo-I grandfather worked before him! These weavers are well known in this part of Wales, and they have many visi- tors. Americans seems to have a special knack of finding them out, and tourists from Lancashire find an extraordinary fascination in the handloom. It would be difficult to find a greater contrast than that between the factories of Lancashire and this weaver's environ- ment. On each side of the road leading to the cottage lush fields lie. The cottage stands a little way back from the road, it is solidly built, and there is a roominess about it that is lack- ing in the modern cottage. The passage is so wide as to form a small hall, and the first thing the eye lights upon is a fiddle-back* chair of old* oak, polished till it gleams like some dark jewel. The weav- ing shed is built in the garden over which the encircling hills look5" down. In the spring and summer every available space is gay with flowers, and a fairylike aspect stretched over the green box hedges to dry. The old dame rises from her spinning wheel and greets her visitors with the dignity of a great lady. Her homespun gown is open at the throat, showing a spotless white kerchief, her silver hair shines through a black lace cap, and a shapely foot encased in a white stocking and buckled shoo peeps out under her dress. Fascinated, one watches the brown knotted arm of the old lady briskly turn- ing the wheel and handing the bobbins as she fills them to her son at the loom behind her. He inserts them in the shuttle, and the clink-clank of the loom fills the shed. IN THE FACTORY. I "I went to a factory last week," said her daughter, in an awestruck voioe, "and saw them patting in a yarn one end and it came out cloth at the other, and no work whatever to do with it." Thus spoke the yflunger generation. The old lady's face darkened, and she placed her hand with an almost fiercely protecting air upon the old spinning wheel. "No, indeed! Not till I die!" she said with grim determination. And when that happens the day of the hand loom will be over, too; though not just yet. For it is strange that the great- est war in history is helping to keep alive this primitive industry KHAKI! KHAKI!! I Gone from the hand loom to-day are the gay striped flannels of divers colours. The lasses must wait for their new shawls and frocks, while theivheel turn and the loom clink-clanks to the tune of "Tipper- ary." Many a soldier in the new Welsh army will be clad in khaki of this old lady's weaving. Many a blood-stained, mud-caked suit amid the inferno of shot and shell was woven in this garden of exquisite peace and beauty. Can there be a more ironic commentary upon the ambitions of a mad militarism, and of peaceful industry?

Advertising

II W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be consulted daily at the Victoria I Arcade (near the Market), Swansea

FORETOLD BY MOSES

FORETOLD BY MOSES. BELGIUM S FATE PARALLED IN DEUTORONOMY. Much has been heard of the astonish- ing prophecies of Brother Johannes, but I do not think that attention has yet been called to the extraordinary paral- lel between the fate of Belgium and the narrative given by Moses, in the second chapter of Deuteronomy, of the destruc- tion of Heshbon, the country ruled by Sihon, the Amorite (says Mr Chas Frank- lin in the "Daily Express). Almost every incident finds its place I in the story of the patriarch-the Ger- man ultimatum to Belgium, King Albert's reply, the attack on Antwerp and other towns, the sack of cities, and the slaugh- ter of the people—"the men, and the women, and the little ones." The verses are as follows Rise ye up, take your journey, and pass over the river Arhon behold, I have given into thine hand Sihon the Amorite King, king of Heshbon, and his land begin to possess it, and con- tend with him in battle. ¡ This day will I begin to put the dread of thee and the fear of thee upon the 1 nations that are under the whole heaven, who shall tremble, and be in anguish be- cause of thee. And I sent messengers out of the wil- derness of Kedemoth into Sihon, king of Heshbon, with words of peace, saying. Let me pass through thy land I will go along by the highway, I will neither unto the right hand nor tp the left. Thou shalt eell me meat for money, that I may eat; and give me water for money that I may drink only I will pass through on my feet. But Sihon, king of Heshbon, would not let us pass by himi And the Lord said unto me, Behold I have begun to give Sihon and his land before thee begin to possess, that thou mayest inherit his land. Then Sihon came out against us, he and his all his people, to fight at Jahaz and we smote him, and his eons, and all his people. And we took all his cities at that time, and utterly destroyed the men, and the women, and the little ones, of every city, we left none to remain. Only the cattle we took for a prey unto ourselves, and the spoil of the cities which we took. From Aroer, which is by the brink of the river of Arnon, and from the city that is by the river, even unto Gilead, there was not one city too strong for us the Lord our God delivered all unto us Only unto the land of the children of Ammon thou earnest not, nor unto any place of the river Jabbok, nor unto the cities in the mountains, nor unto what- soever the Lord our God forbade us.

No title

I An American- Welshman finds him- self in an awkward position- It came about in this way. Rejected by the girl of his choice, he retaliated by marrying her mother. "Then," he says, "my father married the girl. Now I don't know who I am. When I married the girl's mother the girl became my daughter, and when my father married my daughter he is my son. When my father married my daughter, she is my mother. If my father is my son and my daughter is my mother, who in the world am I ? My mother's mother (which is my wife) I must be my grandmother, and I, being my grandmother's husband, am my own grandfather."

FRIENDLY SOCIETIES ACT I1896

FRIENDLY SOCIETIES ACT I- 1896. ADVERTISEMENT OF DISSOLU- TION BY INSTRUMENT. Notaoe is here/by given that the I Cyrwen Bee Friendly Society, Regis- ter No. 162, held at the Gwauncae- gurwen Public Hall, Gwauncaegurwen, in the County of Glamorgan, is dis- solved by Instrument, registered at this Office, the 25th day of March, j 1915, unJess within three months from the date of the "Gazette" in which this advertisement appears proceed- inga be commenced by a member or other person interested in, or having any claim on, the funds of the Society, to set aside such dissolution, and the same be set aside accordingly. j G. STUART ROBERTSON, Chief Registrar. Dean Stanley Street, Westminster. 25tli day of Maroh, 1915.

Advertising

—. I       fsr???N ?t?!' )?Jt L Y???' '/?m jNr ?BL. ??? .JCB? ?B? i ??.?? .? jmMMm!m)?n)?

Liners Sunk oil Welsh Coast

Liners Sunk oil Welsh Coast. BARBAROUS TREATMENT BY SUBMARINE CREW. I Heavy Death-Rolls. Two of the worst crimes of the Ger- man piracy yet recorded have been perpetrated almost within sight of the Welsh coast, the sinking of two large steamers being attended with the most appalling barbarity. In the first case the victim was the Elder Dempster steamer Falaba, which was torpedoed by a German sub- marine fifty-five miles west of St. Anne's JIead. The death-roll is esti- mated at 110, for of her 160 pa&- sengers and 90 crew only about 140 survived The other vesesel was Augila, of the {Yorward Line, torpedoed off Pem- broke at six p.m. on Saturday. Twenty-three of the crew and three passengers are missing. In both cases survivors tell harrow- ing stories of the callous conduct of the submarine's commander and crew. Some of the Falaba's boats were swamped, and the submarine circled round the drowning men and women, laughing derisively at them, and offer- ing not the slightest assistance. I The Aguila was subjected to a hail of shrapnel, and the enemy fired on the boats as they were beinp, launched. I A lady was among the victims of the firing, and another was an a missing boat. It is also announced by the Admir- alty that a Dutch steamer has been struck by a mine off Flamborough. During Monday several of the res- cued passengers and crew of the Fal- aba were interviewed either at Milford or at Swansea and Cardif when on their way home after their terrible ex- perience. In some of the details there are, naturally, little discrepancies, but there is complete agreement on the point that the commander of the enemy submarine and his men behaved more like fiends than human beings. Of all the Hunnish inhuman floutings of the rules of warfare there is no worse re- cord than that to be now charged against these men. Unfortunately, none of the survivors seem to have fixed the identity of the submarine, and the probability is that her initial and number had been painted out. Had she been identified and her crew captured later there would undoubted- ly be raised a cry for vengeance on the gibbet, as advocated by Lord Charles Beresford. Those guilty of the murder of innocent men and women are outside the pale of con- sidera.t..ion I M prisoners of war. One of the passengers who wished to remain anonymous, said:— "We were about 79 miles south- west of Milford when the submarine came within hailing distance after a run in which we were overtaken by superior speed. The Falaba cfeuld only steam twelve or thirteen knots, but the submarine was much faster. We watched her approach with agita- ted feelings, and when she was near enough to hail us her oommonder shouted in English that the Falaba must stop, and that he would sink us if his order were not immediately obeyed. Captain Davies had no alter- native, and hove the ship to. The submarine commander then shouted, again in English, that we would be given five miruutes in which to leave the ship. Suiting his actions to his words, he swung the submarine on to our starboard quarter, about 300 yards away, and trained her bow ri-ht on the Falabflt amidships. While this was going on our crew was lowering the Falaba's boats as quickly as they could, but several of them did not get down properly and were upset. Three of them were swamped, and passengers were struggling in the water. Anothei* boat was actually half-way down in the davits, full of passengers, when the submarine fired the torpedo, with- out further warning. I was one of a small party of passengers and officers who had not got into the boats, and I distinctly saw the torpedo coming- in fact, it came straight towards where we were standing, and we ran to the fore part of the ship to escape it. The torpedo struck our vessel about mid- ships, and she immediately gave a list to starboard, and went down about ten minutes after. There was a slight explosion when she was struck, but it was not a very big noimore like that of a small gun. The party, of whom I was one, jumped off the steamer int othe water about four minutes before she sank. The main deck was then awsh. I had previous- ly grabbed the lifebelt which was in my cabin—in fact, all the passengers had been served with lifebelts—and when I not into the water I seized hold of a, floating buoy. I was in the water for about an hour, swimming, a.nd floating, and had to swim through wreckage and a number of dead bodies. 4last I was picked up by one of ir own bo at 3 together with four others including the first officer. I had all my clothes on, the same that you see me wearing now—cap, overcoat, tencnis shoes, and clothing complete—and I should never have survived but for the lifebelt and buoy. POSITIVELY MURDEROUS. I The narrator was naturally not in- clined to mince words when he de- scribed the atrociousness of the c-me. "It was positively murderous," he said, "and almost incredible in its fiendishness. A five minutes' warning was too short, and most calculating in its heinous object. People were swimming around the ship, and the boat that was half-way down the davits was sent flying into the water from the shock of the torpedo, which snapped the davits. If the Germans had given us only another ten minutes I believe all the passengers and crew would have been saved. As it was, if the trawlers had not come up very few of us would have been alive to tell the tale. Not only did the submarine torpedo us so soon after the warning, but we could see her crew laughing at us as the people were struggling in the water. I could.. not see her number, which I believe had been painted out. She waited to, see the Falaba sink, and then went off in chase of another steamer which was some distance away—the Dundee, I believe. Many of those who had lifebelts were drowned or died of ex- i hattetion. The boat in which I was picked up transferred us to a trawler,. which was in sight when we were tor- pedoed. She came round as elose as she could to us, and also sent out her dinghy to pick up people who were struggling in the water. Later oa three or four more trawlers came up. The crew of the trawler on which I was taken were very good to us, sup- plying us with warm food and clothing and rubbing down those who were half perished. I cannot speak too highly of what they did for us. The main lot of survivors, numbering about 70, were transferred to a torpedo de- stroyer which came up afterwards." LAUGHED AND JEERED. One of the survivors of the steam- ship Falaba (named Blair, an engineer) was interviewed in passing through Swansea from Milford. He said that about five o'clock on Sunday morning they sighted the submarine, who ordered them to heave to The skipper (Captain Davies), however, replied by putting on full speed, but about 2.31 o'clock they were overhauled, and the captain of the submarine said they were going to sink her. The Germanlt on board kJaghed and jeered at them as they launched the boats. Their wiro- less operator tried hard to tet oom- munication with Land's End, and after- wards said what he had done, and that two destroyers were being despatched, When the boats were being lowered the submarine torpedoed the vessel. Some of the boats fell into the water. The captain was on the bridge at the time, and jumped into the water, and was picked up. but died afterwards. The trawlers Eilleen Emma and Or- ient were sighted, and came to the assistance of the crew in the boats, and so far as the interviewed man (Blair) knew, all except one or two were saved, including six women.

WAR THE MONEYEATER

WAR: THE MONEY-EATER. A capital loss of 8,000 million pounda should the war last only eighteen months, is prophesied by 141'. J. Annan Bryoe, M.P. The present expenditure could not, if the war lasted only eighteen months, fall short of 5,000 million pounds. The expenditure by neutrals, said Mr. Bryce, added another 100 millions; the destruction of property 1,000 millions; the loss of non-creation of wealth from the labour of at least 12 million fighting men fbr eighteen months at the low esti- mate of L50 per man another 100 mil- lions; and the permanent loss by non- creation of wealth of 4 millions of fighting men another 1,000 millions. "You get the appalling total of 8,000 millions of pounds," remarked Mr. Bryce. "It will oertamly take the world a generation to recover, and its purchasing power must be vastly lessened in the im- mediate future."

PAPERSOLED BOOTS FOR AUSTRIANS

PAPER-SOLED BOOTS FOR AUS- TRIANS. A telegram from Viennn states that in connection with the scandal con- cerning army boots 30 arrests have been made. Many officers are included About 175,000 pa.irs of boots delivered to the army now fighting in the Car- pathians are worthless, as the soles are made paper.

KEEPING IT DARK

KEEPING IT DARK. The Paris "Matdn" states that, ap- parently with the object of hiding the loss sustained, the Germans transport- ed into the interior the debris of the Zeppelin recently wrecked near Tirle- mont in wagons, each of which bore an inscription that it contained por- tions of a wrecked French airship.

LONDON RECRUITING CAMPAIGN

LONDON RECRUITING CAMPAIGN. The proposed monster recruiting campaign in the London area, is re- ceiving unanimous support. The Lord Mayor and the mayors of the great London. boroughs are lending their aid, and between 1,200 and 1,500 meet- ings w,,i'.Il be held during the fortnight ending April 25. SOCIALIST PAPER SUSPENDED. The Socialist paper "V olkszeitung," published at Dusseldorf, has been sus- pended for three days for having issued an article entitled "England and We.' Mr Esaith Jordan, of Bryncaredig, Pontardawe, chemist and druggist, who died 18th July last, aged 67 years left estate of the gross value of 241,727, of which the net personalty has been sworn at £ 3,243. The testator left the good-will of hia business as & chemist to his eon Herbert Emlyn, charged with the payment of R25 to his wife during her life, and on her decease with the payment of L100 to his daughter Gwendoline Mary. The residue of his property he left to his wife for life, and subject thereto his shares in the Capital and Counties Bank, Ltd., to his daughter Gwen- doline Mary, his shares in the Rhon- dda and Swansea Bay Railway Co. to his son Mansel Albert, and his shares in the London and Provincial Bank. Ltd., to his son Arthur Isaac. The ultimate residue of his property he left to his said four children in equal shares. Only two have enlisted from th^ Llevn peninsula, whioh has a popular tion of 1,500 excluding Pwllheli. Printed and Published by "Llais Llafur" Co. Ltd., Ystalyfera. in the County of Glamorgan, April 3, 1915