Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

3 TIIOROUGH SIGHT-TESTING. R Mr. ERIC REES, I J F.R.M.S., F.S.M.C., Etc. (Lond.) 1 ? 26 CASTLE ST. SWANSEA ,topposite College St.). 'Phone Central, 520. v P Consultation & Expert Advice Free.

Advertising

• { I "MAKING THEIR BIT." SEE PAGE 5.

FROM FAR AND HEARI

FROM FAR AND HEAR. I ■CAME FROM JAPAN. I As an example of the manner in which the 24th Battalion of the London Regi- ment (the Queen's) has an attraction for men of London, two brothers, formerly "reaidents of Kennington, journeyed from Tokio to join. JELLICOE AND TENNIS. I The Bishop of London says bir John ..Jellicoe was a very keen lawn tennis player, and they had eften played to- gether. If Sir John played the great game of war as he played lawn tennis we were bound to win. WOMEN TICKET COLLECTORS. I Women ticket collectotg have com- i menced their duties at Euston Station, London. PRUSSIA'S MILLIONS. I M. Soukhomlinov, the Russian Minister ••of War, states that Russia, which up to ..the present had put into the field several million men, would still, if necessary, be .able to increase the numbers. 1869 MEN CALLED UP. I A telegram from Geneva* to the "Echo .,de Paris" says the equipment of the reeoond band of the Landstrum classes •from 1869 to 1875 who have never been -on active service now comes into force vin Germany. tDR. CLIFFORD'S SUCCESSOR. I It is freely rumoured in Birmingham NoncollformistcircléØ that Dr. Clifford- ,,will be sucooeded at Westbourne Park, "London, by the Rev. S. W. Hughes, of jSix Ways Baptist Church, Aston. He *:is a gifted preacher. • BOOTMAKERS IN THE ARMY. I TIn the April number of the National HJnion of Boot and Shoe Operatives' pub- lication it is recorded that there are now 3*557 financial members serving with the ■colours, an increase of 164 on the pre- vious month. There -are also a number of ■probationary members on active service, -the total number of those connected with -the society serving being approximately 34,500. LEW BACK WIfEN WOUNDED. I Second-Lieutenant William Barnard "Rhodes Moorhouse, Royal Flying Corps, "who died of wounds on Tuesday last, was well known as an aviator before the out- break of war. Although severely wounded while flying over the enemy's lines, the gallant officer brought his machine ba.ck to the base, a flistance of about 25 miles. EIFTY PER CENT. MORE EMPLOYED. I It was stated at the annual meeting •of Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., that the firm -was now employing 50 per cent. more men than it had employed at any pre- vious time. In addition, it is placing as -many orders as possible for half-finished sand even finished material with other en- gineering firms. BARBED WIRE STORY. I The commanding officer of a famous "Territorial regiment was returning to his I quaitc,m late one night last week when he lost his way and suddenly found himself j '8pinnin headlong d?wn a steep hill. Half i way down a æntry'8 voice challenged j Mm to "Halt. He ju?t managed to J gasp., "I can't halt. Lost control," and 'whizzed past, but not before he heard -the sentry, who had recognised his offi- ioer, call out ''AII right, sir; you'll halt "very soon. There's 'barbed wire at the I 'bottom. I «OYS REPLACED BY GIRLS. Girls are to be employed instead of boys in the stores department of the London I ,-County Council. DRINK RESTRICTIONS IN S. AFRICA. I A proclamation issued at Cape Town: restricts the sale of liquor, all bars in- • eluding those of cliibs, having to close .at 8 p.m. SWEDEN'S PERIL. I The King of Sweden stated at Gothen- burg that the danger of Sweden becoming I involved in the war was just as great as before. He was confident that in case, .()f necessity all the Swedish peol)le would-: 'be united to support him in defending I their country and liberty. «RIMSBY TRAWER LOST. I The Grimsby steam trawler Ferret, ) downed by Mr. Alfred Bannister, which J lleft Grimsby for the North Sea fishing14 219TOunds on March 20 with a crew of nine j iands, has been officially given up. Neither sh-ip nor crew has been heard of I since the date of sailing. "WAR BABIES." I The Prime Minister, replying in the Commons to a question of Mr. Dundas White asking for an early opportunity nor the discussion of a motion on legiti- imation of children Iby subsequent mar- iriage, said that this waf part of a large question into which the Government was mow making inquiries. 82,000 AUSTRIAN SURRENDERS. I An official investigation has been made into the abnormal surrenders of Austro- Hungarian troops to 'the Russians, and as the result it is computed that 70,000 Czechs, Slovaks, and Ruthanians and 12,000 Southern Slavs have surrendered without fighting since the beginning of the war. FAMOUS SINGER'S PLIGHT. A letter has been received by Jean de Reske, the famous tenor, from hi% brother Edouard, the well-known bass, stating that his splendid estate at Garnesk, in Poland, has been utterly destroyed and the whole region laid waste. He is living 1n a- cellar without fuel, oil, or coffee, and with scarcely any food. Jean de Resz- Tte fears that his brother will not survive liis terrible hardships. -T_

VIEWS OF MR T RICHARDS

VIEWS OF MR T. RICHARDS South Wales Miners' Agree- ment Question. AN IMPORTANT INTERVIEW The immediate crisis in the miners' war bonus question is over (writes a special miming correspondent in the 'South Wales Daily News.") The Prime Minister has been invoked to find a mode of settlement. In all probability he will appoint someone to hear evidence from the owners' side and from the workmen's side, and give an early decision as to whether the work- men's demand for a 20 per cent. on actual earnings is a reasonable one, or whether the owners' offer of 10 per cent. on the standard rates will suffice to meet the increase in the cost of living. I saw Mr Thomaa Richards, M.P., the general secretary of the South Wales Miners' Federation, on his re- turn from the national conference dn London. He was somewhat indisposed, but he readily allowed himself to be interviewed on the position generally. He said, "The quest-ion we have sub- mitted to Mr Asquith is this: There has been afi increase in the cost of living. What is a suitable bonus to meet it ? The sole point submitted to him is the amount of advance the miners should receive." Knowing the views of most of the South Wales leaders and. of many of the workmen with regard to outside in- tervention. I asked Mr Richards if he anticipated any trouble with regard to the acceptance of Mr Asquith's den cision. "No, I thinknot," was the guarded reply. "Of course, it must be clearly understood that the miners, not only in South Wales, but generally as a body, have opposed anything in the nature of compulsory arbitration by the State, and it is entirely due to the great national crisis and their extreme anxiety to refrain, if possible, from doing anything, in th» n&turfc <>f im- peding the progress of the war that has led the miners on this occasion to aooept that form of intervention and settlement. They have also made it clear to Mr Asquith that this is not to be takena.s a precedent for dealing with diiaputes between employers and work- men in normal times. That is to say, they still retain the right to strike." NEW AGREEMENT QUESTION. I "Then Mr Asquith will have no power over the general question of the new agreement: P" "Oh, no. This matter has no bear- ing 1.1n the question of the negotia- tion or want of negotiation for the new agreement other than the fact that in the English federated are4 the owners and workmen have met anA completed and signed a new ConciliST tion Board agreement. That faot em- phasises the absurdity of the attitude taken up by the South Wales 000.1- owners in refusing even to meet for ,the purpose of discussing our proposals for the revision of the agreement; and seeing that already a month, of the three months' notice given to termin- ate the present, agreement has expired, and that with the termination of the three months' notice the contract aer- vice also expires, it is to be hoped that the South Wales owners will,, recon- sider, and at once, the non-possunvus attitude they have adopted, and at least meet the representatives of the workmen to make an effor to settle the terms for a new Conciliation, Board agreement. Otherwise both the Govern- ment and the general public must realise that the responsibility for a further crisis in the South Wales coal trade at the end of June must solely and entirely rest upon the coalowners, inasmuch as there can be no valid reneon for their refusal to meet to dis- cuss the situation." "Do you think the terms of the agreement arrived ait in the English Federated area would be satisfactory to South Wales?" "No, not altogether other than in its general principle--tbat a merging the 50 per cent. in the present standard rates, and the removal of the present maximum is, of course, a proposal that has been made generally by the whole of the districts connected with the Federation. There are, however, proposals in each district peculiar to its own coalfield, the most important in OUTS being the request to make the payment of six turns for five general throughout the whole coalfield." Mr Richards was of opinion that no time would be lost by the Government in dealing with the question of the war bonus, and in order to be pre- pared for eventualities the Executive Council of the South Wales Miners' Federation has been summoned to meet at Cardiff this week.

No title

I A Tommy had recently returned from the front on five days' leave. "How are you going to spend it?'' asked a friend. "Well," he Teplied, "I've saved enough money to 'ire a man to stand outside my bedroom window at 'arf-past five every morning and sound the reveille. When he does I shall just open the window and shout out 'Go to and turn in again. It'll be the 'holiday of my life."

I Shirts for the Soldiers

I Shirts for the Soldiers. FACTORY NEAR NEATH SECURES BIG CONTRACT. f A little while ago we gave interest- ing particulars of the work that is being done in South West Wales woollen factories in making khaki and flannel for the use of the soldiers. Now a special correspondent has written to a contemporary describing the work at another factory near Neath. The writer isavs:- In the old Welsh flannel mills of Coombe-Felin the men and women of Neath Abbey are playing a silent but important part in the great struggle for liberty. Never in its long history has it been such a busy hive of in- dustry. Khaki shirts for the brave soldiers are manufactured by the thou- sand cart loads of sheep's wool are constantly arriving, and leave the mill the finished article. Through the courtesy of the genial proprietor, Councillor J. R. Morgan, the correspondent was allowed to see the various processes necessary for the manufacture of a shirt. From the first stage to the last it was exceedingly interesting, and although modern methods of weaving have replaced the old, the huge water mill of 25 itorse power, is still retained to drive some of the machines. Mr Morgan has secured a Govern- ment contract for the manufacture of 10,000 Welsh flannel shirts, and the men and women are working at high pressure to complete the contract by the end of July. And it is a labour of love and duty During the presetofc week nearly 400 yards of khaki-colour- ed flannel have been woven and made into shirts of excellent^ shape and tex- ture by a loyal bana of women and girls, who make their spacious depart- ment throb with the music of their electrically-driven machines. DRESS PIECE FOR QUEEN VIC-  TORIA. ?l Ordinary work has been set aside; the machines for weaving shawls are silent, and all efforts are concentrated upon shirts for "Tommy Atkins." In a subsequent conversation at his delight- ful residence on the hill by the mill, Mr Morgan became reminiscent, and told the story of how his father was commanded by the late Queen Victoria to make her Majesty a dress of Welsh poplin. "I don't suppose a dozen people know about it," said Mr Morgan, "be- cause father was a typical Welshman, and although it pleased him to get a Royal command, he was too modest to proclaim the honour to the world." How did Queen Victoria know that he made Welsh poplin?"—"Well, at that time a gentleman named Mr Vaughan, an uncle to Colonel Edwards- Vaughan, Rheola, had a Scotch seat at Balmoral, and the Queen was interested in a Welsh poplin dress which his wife was wearing. And I suppose her I Majesty heard from her that- father made it, and he got an order from the Queen, who was so pleased with it that orders were repeated. And when I tell you that he charged the Queen tb,p same price as he would a collier's wife you will be able to form an opin- ion as to what sort of a man he was." WHAT MODERN METHODS HAVE I j DONE. Contrasting present-day methods of weaving with the old, Mr Morgan said a man 25 years ago would weave about 80 yards of flannel a week; now he had an eight-power loom which would weave 380 yards a week. The price of wool had advanced tremendously in consequence of the war, but there was no scarcity. "Taking it through and through," added Mr Morgan, "it has gone up 2 5per cent. since last Septem- ber.. For the next two months Coombe- felin will continue a busy hive of in- dustry, and the shirts flfech the old- iers will don as a result will i)-r the old-established stamp of the A\»ey Welsh Flannel Mills.

SOCIALIST DEFENCE COMMITTEE

SOCIALIST DEFENCE COM- MITTEE. An influential and representative Socialist National Defence Committee is in process of formation to oppose the "pro-German" and premature peace pro paganda of certain sections of Social- ists in Great Britain. Those respon- sible for the forma.tion of the new com- mi-ttee are convinced that those "pro- Gorman" Socialists represent only a smaill minority of the movement, and it is therefore deemed essential at the present crisis to organise and give expression to the contrary views and sympathies of the overwhelming majority. The -committee. advocates prosecution of the war to the complete and lasting overthrow of Prussian mili- tarism and Junker government. The full list of the original members of the committee will shortly be pub- lished, together with an explanatory manifesto. In the meantime, Socialists who desire further information should communicate with the hon secretary, Mr Victor Fisher, 19 Buckingham-st. Adelphi, London, W.C.

I Government Purchases

I Government Purchases. NO DEALING WITH MIDDLE- MEN. The counties of Glamorgan, Brecon, Radnor, Flint, Mont' niery, and Den- bigh for the eastem et of Wales for the purchasing by the Government of forage for military purposes. Capt. Riley, of Wrexham, is in charge of the ^district, and Lieutenant S. Myer is now making purchases in the counties of Glamorgan, Brecon, and Radnor, and intends to opeII am office probably at Cardiff. Lieutenant Myer attended a meeting of the Vale of Glamorgan Agricultural Society at Cowbridge on Tuesday, and expllained to the farmers the Govern- ment's scheme for purcha&ing hay, straw, and oats. He said that the original method of purchasing supplies was to obtain them from contractors inl Ixmdon, but it was found that the prices the Government were paying were so much greater than the con- tractors paid to the farmers that the Board of Agriculture, in conjunction with the War Office, had now adopted a scheme of dealing with the farmers direct. The oontrartors in London had not dealt with th*. farmers direct, but had Bub-contractdJ* with dealers in the country, and thus' money which might have gone to the benefit of the farming community had gone instead into the pockets of middlemen. The scheme of dealing direct with the farmers was in- tended to continue not only for the period of the war, but afterwards; it was a permanent scheme, and it was i hoped that the farmers would recog- nise the advantage it- would be to them and co-operate with the Government. It was imperative that the Government should have the pick of the forage of the country. EVERY OUNCE REQUIRED. The Government would buy only the good hay, but the farmers must not run away with the. idea that all the sides of the ricks MW be cut off and only the cream taken. The Government wanted every ounce of good hay that was obtainable, and they were anxious to deal with the farmer as liberally as possible. If any of the Government bailers and pressors did anything they ought not to do he hoped the farmers would report it. The cutting and press- ing would be done by Government men, and all the farmers had to do was to put the produce on rail at the nearest station. Wherever possible the Govern- ment would study the convenience of the farmers, as it was recognised there was a shortage of labour. He knew the patriotism of the farmers of Wales and did not think they would try to make any abnormal profit out of the market. -The authority had the legal right to commandeer supplies of forage, but it was hoped there would be no necessity to exercise that right. Should there be any wastage the Government would, if the farmer desired, press it at cost price amd it cfnrld be put aside by the farmer for winter use. Mr Daniel Jenkins said that sug- gestions had been made in some quar- ters that agriciiituralists were not doing their best for the country and that corn had been held up by them. As far as the Vale of Glamorgan was con- cerned not a single bushel had been held, but the farmers had been handi- capped and delayed by the want of lab- our and horses.

I I SWANSEA MINISTERS RETIREMENT

SWANSEA MINISTER'S RETIREMENT. On Sunday the Rev. Evan Jenkins, who has completed 33 years' efficient minis- try at the Walter-road Congregational Church, Swansea, announced to his con- gregation his intention to resign the pas- torate at the end of the present year. His i reason is that he feels that his health, is not what it used to be, and that he needs a Jong rest free from pastoral care. The decision was received- with consider- able concern by the congregation. Mr. Jenkins is one of the most learned divines in the district, and his removal from the religious life of the town will be keenly felt amongst all sections of the communi- ty. 40

ITHE OLD GENERALS ORDERS

THE OLD GENERAL'S ORDERS. A singular incident occurred recently at one of the big hospitals at which our wounded Indian soldiers are being tended. One of these men suddenly turned over in his bed and refused to hold further intercourse with anyone, intending to give himself up to death. He had remained thus for two days when a retired General who had once commanded the regiment to which the man belonged chanced to visit the ward. His attention being directed to the strange patient, he scanned the medical chart over the bed, and re- marked to the nurse, "Oh, I see you have one of thope cases; they are quite common in India." Instantly the ma.n became animated, having recognised the General's voice, and, rousing himself, said, "Why, General, I never expected to see your face again!" After a con- versation with the man in his native dialect, the officer informed the nurse that, she would have no further trouble with him aa he had received his General's orders.

IHAY DAY CELEBRATIONS I I

I HAY DAY CELEBRATIONS. Speech by Mr. Ramsay Macdonald. IMPOSING GATHERING IN GLASGOW. To most of us, the mere mention of May Day, the day set apart for the ce le- brating and repledging of our interna- tionaJ faith" appeared this year to be the- greatest of ironies. What recognition of the international spirit could there be,. what demonstration of the unity of the workers of the NNorld, when the workers of the world; are engaged in deadly com- bat on the plains of Europe ? Butt inevitably we have to- take the long view of the present disruption in our internat- tional delations, and looking fdrwamd to the days when the war shall have ended, we must seek to rebuild our old alliance upon a firm and enduring foundation. There were many May Day gather- ings in various parts of the kingdom. A particularly impressive demonstration took place at Leicester, when Mir. JL Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., spoke impress* ingly, chiefly on the question of the out- look at home. At present he pointed out, we were working for the nation and not. for- the employers. That was Socialism. The thing we had always been told could not be done had been done. Events had shown that with an ideal to work for men would put far more heart and self- sacrifice into their labour than if they were working merely for private em- ployers. Although they were asking higher wages now, they were not doing so because they wished to take advantage of their economic opportunity. They had been forced because the cost of living had increased so much, and for that they were not responsible. The coming of peace was, going to give as great an economic shock as the coming of war. The nation would have to re- adjust itself to civil production as it had to readjust itself last August to military production. He thought in every industry that there should be a committee of reconstruction appointed with the duty of seeing that all condi- tions of industry before the war were re- stored, so TMt the workman's) willingness to sacrifice himself would not be taken ad- vantage of. The advances in national is- ation would have to be made permanent. Railways ought never to be allowed to go back under private control, and the assistance given to trade unions in con- flict with employers should be maintained Far more would have to be done by way of fixing fair wages, not only for Government but for private contracts. Workmen would require to pay special attention to the operation of pensions to see that they were adequate, and to take care they were not used for the pur- posb of forcing down wages. Capitalism could easily use a large pensioned section in the labour market at a lower standard of pay than that given to the non- pensioned section. SOCIAL REFORM NEEDS. t When peace came the country would be poorer than last August. The cost of living would remain high, and there would be great pressure to reduce wages and a great temptation to call a halt in socials reform, because both rates and taxes would be considerably higher than last summer. The working classes must not allow that to be, for they would want more social reform than ever. The financial problem would stare them in the face, and Tariff Reform wyuld be held up to them as an item in a patri- otic programme. They must never forget however, that Tariff Reform, whether the result of war or of a Chamberlain propaganda, meant low wages, high prices, trusts, and monopolies; in other words, a strengthening of capital and a weakening of Labour. They of the Labour Party had nothing new to pro- pose. in this respect. The money that was required must be raised in exactly the way that they had always advocated —the taxation of unearned incomes and appropriation by the State of those mono- polies which yielded profits that in no way represented services given to the country. The speech-making in the Market-place was preceded by a procession of trade- unionists, with bands and banners, through some of the central streets of the town. A collection was taken for the Belgian, trade unionists. IMMENSE PROCESSION IN GLAS-I GOW. II A correspondent writing from Glasgow l on Sunday night said :— Favoured with ideal weather Labour Day was celebrated in Glasgow to-day with great success. On all sides it was agreed that the procession and the de- monstration* beat all previous records for number and enthusiasm. The pro- cession, which took 40 minutes to pass a given point, was taken part in by 170 organisations, an increase of 10 com- pared with last year, and represented about 25,000 members, while it is esti- mated that the route traversed' was lined by over 70,000 onlookers, the majority of whom wore red flowers or favours. The rendezvous was George-square, which presented an animated sight as each trade union or Socialist section marched in from the outlying districts, accompanied by a band and carrying their banners and mottoes. The banner of the Scottish Horse and motorman's union conveyed a striking lesson with its simple truism, "Union is strength; all (Continued at bottom of next oolunna)

IHAY DAY CELEBRATIONS I I

4Continued from preceding column). men are brothers." That was the key- note of the procession, which was led by 2,000 children, prettily attired, singing Edward Carpenter's inspiring Labour hymn, "England arise." Among these children was a section of the young Socialist Crusaders, clad in green relieved with a sash of red, and bearing on their breasts a crest design by Walter Crane, on which was displayed the white dove of Liberty. After the children came men and women of many trades and occupa- tions, from labourers to civil servants, while for the first time the farmworkers from the country made common cause with their city comrades. A feature was the Lithuanian section, which contained over a thousand men and women, while here and there could be seen khaki-clad warriors marching behind Labour em- blems. One of these soldiers was a non- commissioned officer, whose most promi- nent decoration was a Socialist rosette of scarlet hue. From start to finish there was not one hitch, and the spectators must have been impresaed with the fine appearance of the processionists, who, as one observer I said, "Looked as if they could get any- 1 thing they wanted if they set their minds on securing it."

i WHEII THE WAII IS OVER

i WHEII THE WAII IS OVER. Problems Soon to be Faced. WHAT THE TBABE UNION- ISTS MUST DO. r The first problem is to secure for the Allies such a victory as will enabLe them to arrange a peace which will safeguard the rights of th& smaller nationaliti es and eliminate ^proba- bility of further European war Iat leaBt. during the lifetime of the who aje living now. The second greatest problem is that connected with the return of the British troops to civil life and employment. These who have studied industrial problems and who possess that quality which the French term "prevoyaaee" have anticipated a situation similaar to the one that is arising, but it is doubt- fu1 whether any one of them ever an- ticipated a situation of such inagnivmde. It is idle to expect that the colonies will be able to absorb the surplus quan- tities of labour which may be upon tke market in 1917. They will have their own problems to deal with; they have spent freely of their capital during the war and will continue to spend more, and though possessing the best will in the world their ability to render assistance in this direction will be very limited indeed. NEW RESPONSIBILITIES. There is, alwavs a tendency in to wait and see what is likely to hap- pen. If this tendency is given any latitude the consequences must be very serious indeed. These consequeneft will affect every phase of social, indus- trial, and political life, but they will most profoundly affect the trade union movement. During a pleasant chat I had with Eric Gill he told me that 95 per cent, of the men in his company 10th South Wales Borderers) were already trade unionists, and tha.t this proportion practically ran through the whole regi- ment. Nearly every family in the United Kingdom and in Ireland has its representative with the Army, which is in a peculiar sense a people's Army. These facta, introduce new considera- tions and imply new responsibilities. It will be quite impossible in future to regard the Army as a thing apart from the rest. of the community. In face of the grave probability of serious industrial and commercial red- action the importance of arranging for the systematic discharge and absorp- tion into the ordinary life of the com- munity cannot be over-estimated. The trade unlion movement must bestir it- self to prevent the exploitation of these discharged soldiers or they will cer- tainly be used to reduce wages. No other section of the community can be so affected by this problem as the trade unions, but hitherto, in spite of warnings, they have made no sys- tematic and organised attempt to deal with it. It is imperative tha.t they make up their minds what they intend to do, and that they insist upon con- sideration by themselves of any scheme before it is adopted. They should at once face the situation and act with generous wisdom, never overlooking the fact that their social and political ex- istence has been safeguarded by the sons and brothers who have risked their lives in the defence of Britain and her institutions. While acting generously, they must fight to the end any attempt to place the control of any scheme of reassocia- tion with industrial life in the hands of unrepresenrtative bodies, or of Government officials; the latter may be sympathetic to-day, but the movement has a long way to go, and if it is to maintain fair rates and fair conditions, together with that standard of life Which the exigencies of a great Empire demand, it must possess adequate re- presentation on any body dealing with the problem, and it ought to insist that such a body is in some way directly amenable to public opinion Unless this is done we shall have the whole situa- tion domino-ted by bodies quite in- dependent of any democratic influence. -Mr W. A. Appleton, general secre- tary of the Federation of Trade Unions, in the "Daily Citizen."

AMMAK VALLEY LAND OWNER AND COUNCIL

AMMAK VALLEY LAND- OWNER AND COUNCIL. BIG PRICE. FOR SOHOOL SITE. At a meeting of the Amman Valley school managezu the chairman (Mr. Jno. Harries) read extracts from the report of H.M. Inspector on- the schools of the county. Reference was made to the need V for new school accommodation at Am- manford. The authority had proposed to build a school at Poniamman for 500 children, but the sciwmo was in abey- ance, the price of the site being too ex- COMTt. The chairman, commenting on the qaes- tion of the Ammanford site, said the County Council had to meet t he diffi- culty of rising Yates, and also the diffi- culty in connection with landlordism. In Amw-anford they had to pay L600 per acre, which was ridiculous. The land in Amma.nford belonged practically to one landlord. He (the chairman) thought the Welsh Board should tackle this question, and compel landlords to give their land for a reasonable price. Mr. B. R. Evans said what they wanted was a division of the county into indus- trial and agricultural parts, aa at present everything proposed for the industrial districts was defeated by the overwhelm- ing majority from the agricultural dis- tricts. The Chairman agreed that there should be an agitation to get the ed ucation of the valley under the control of a Board, so that they could tackle urgent quea- tkm* themselves. „ Air. 1. V. Jones said with regard to the site, the progress of education was being barred by Lord Dynevor.

ILIEUT ONIONS KILLED

I LIEUT. ONIONS KILLED I WHILE LEADING HIS MEN to MEET GERMAN ATTACK. Official intimation has now come to hand that Lieutenant Wilfred Onions, of the 3rd Monmouths (son of Mr Alfred Onions, J.P., C.C., treasurer of the South Wales Miners' Federation, and prospective Labour candidate for Eaac Glamorgan), who was previously re- ported wounded, has heon killed in action. It appears that his company waa called out at night because it was re- ported that the Germans were break- ing through. He led his men into the open, and while crossing a piece of ground about six yards in front of the taiench, he was shot in. the head, dying almost immediately. He was a popu- lar and beloved officer, 26 years of age, and received his commission on Oct. 14. His wounds were received at Y Dres on April 25, where he is buried with many of his colleagues. Lieutenant L. D. Whitehead, of the 3rd Monmouth. writing to Mr Onions, said that Lieutenant Onions was ex- ceedingly weill liked, and was very con- scientious in his military duties. Sergeant Ellaway, of the 3rd Mon- mouths, also pays a tribute to the young officer, who. he says, when the time came stepped out of the trench without the slightest hesitation, and showed all the qualities which men expect of their officers.

IBRECONSHIRE ACCEPTS ROAD BOARDS OFFER

I BRECONSHIRE ACCEPTS ROAD BOARD'S OFFER. At. a meeting of the Bneoonshire County Council on Friday, Mr Owen Price in the chair, it was stated that Breconshire had applied to the Road Board for grants .towards works esti- mated to cost £ 2,513, of which £1,289 was for road improvements and the re- mainder for tar-spraying. The Rood Board replied they were anxious to give as much assistance as possible to the improvement of important roads where injury would be caused by the postponement of the work. As to tar- spraying, grants had been given for four years for this purpose, and the local authorities ought now to be satis- fied to make it a maintenance charge. If the Breconshife County Council would drop that part of their applica- tion for tar-spraying, the Board would he prepared to make a grant of 75 per cent. towards the cost of road improve- ments estimated at £ 1,289. It. was decided to accept this offer. The county rate was fixed at ls.9d. in the pound, the same amount as last year.

I I BRECON FAIR

I BRECON FAIR. A very large crowd was present at Brecon Pleasure and Hiring Fair on Tuesday, composed of farm hands, and, notwithstanding the war, there were a. large number of strapping young men knocking about, but there were only a few responses to the "calls' of the re- cruiting officers. On the whole, farm hands were scarce, and the wages asked for the men servants was j540 per annum and niaids 02 and J656 per annum. There waa also a large attendance at the cattle and horse fair held the same day, but the horses were few and far between, there being very few horses in the county. Prices Bulls £20 .— C attle Bulls £ 20 t oL24, cows and calves L15 to jB21, best beef 8fd. per lb. store cattle JE11 to JB14, calves 35s. to 38s, sheep 10d., lambs lid. to Is. per lb. porkers 13s. 6d. to 13s. 9d. per score, carters 20s. to 23s. each. Horses Agricultural zC45 to £ 50, oolliera S25 to 230, yearlings £15 to £23. 1 and ponies L10 to 915.