Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

J "THOROUGH" SIGHT-TESTING. R jCRDi jMr. ERIC REES, I F.R.M.S., F.S.M.C., Etc. (Lond.) i 26 CASTLE ST. SWANSEA (Opposite College St.). 'Phone Central, 520. V 3 Consultation & Expert Advice Free.

Advertising

   ?-?  /1 {-,v" I Û/ ,-J:t1J }J r STEEL REIG!I CYCLES 'v I erms. J 1 TIIE A#. •. theWorH. ? f Cilh m' 'vnla!s ?? CMh?r '?vnta!s < Voilm-  ? ?t-? EtAt4gi Y9t???.

FROM FAR AND NEAR

FROM FAR AND NEAR. -WELSH MINISTER ENLISTS. The Rev. George Thomas, B.A. (Oxen) lias obtained leave of absence from his Church at Fishguard, and has joined the Royal Garrison Artillery. Mr. Thomas, who is a Calvinistic Methodist minister well-known in Wales, is the first Welsh Nonconformist minister to join the new Army as a soldier. ARMY AND FEMALE WORKERS. The 600 girls employed at Messrs. Vickers' works at Barrow on the manu- facture of munitions of war are to be immediately augmented by another 1,000. Huge buildings have been built and pre- parations are complete for the commence- ment of this army of female workers. A report that French girls were to be imported for vaacncies is officiallv de- nied. KITCHENER AND SWANSEA. Lord Kitchener, wiring to Swansea Chamber of Commerce, in reply to their telegram of confidence says "Please thank the Swansea Chamber of Com- merce for their kind resolution, which I much appreciate.—Kitchener." NO TIME FOR POLITICS. Bri gadier- general Owen Thomas has written withdrawing his name from the list of candidates from which the Liberal Associations of North Carnarvonshire will .select their nominee for the vacant seat. In his letter he says he cannot afford the time in oonatecjuence of tho exacting dutie ■ of his present command, and adds that in this all true patriots should be of one mind, concentrating all resources on defeating effectively and finally and at the earliest possible moment the ene- my who now threaten not only our coun- try, but every cherished principle and ideal of Welshmen and Britishers. CLYDACH FATALITY. A shocking fatality occurred at Cly- dach on Sunday, Tommy Manders, the seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Noah Manders, of Down-street, while playing in the street near his home, being run over by a passing milk cart. He died about three hours later. POST OFFICE RIFLES. During the week the 1st Battalion of the Post Office Rifles, now fighting in France, has lost a large number of otli- cers and men, and an appeal is made by the adjudant to postmen to ocme for- ward and fill their places. A third bat- talion is now being formed. INCURABLES AT THE FRONT. The Paris "Matin'' states that among the recent German prisoners taken by the French were many suffering from .11- curable maladies, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, etc. This, says the ''Matin," explains how the Germans have been able to resist so long on all their fronts, but at the same time indi- cates that their resistance has about reached -its limit. ANTI-GERMAN RIOTS. Ten colliers were, at Doncaster, com- mitted for trial at the Assizes for taking part in the anti-German riots at Gold- thorpe on the llt-h inst. FOOTBALLERS' COMMISSION. Mr. Charlie Pritchard, the Newport Rugby football captain and the Welsh International forward, has received a commission in the South Wales Border- ers. 164TH GRETNA VICTIM. Private James Wilson, a member of the Royal Scots injured in the Gretna rail- way collision, died in the Cumberland Infirmary at Carlise this week. This makes 164 deaths. BOOTMAKER SOLDIERS. According to the monthly report of the National Union of Boot and Shoe Operatives, there are approximately 5,000 members serving with the colours, an in-i; crease of 284 in the month. ITALIAN GIL SOLDIERS I Following the discovery of a girl sol- dier at Bologna, another was found in a troop train leaving Mi'lan. The girl ( was fully uniformed and equipped. She will be allowed to join the ambulance. I DEARER GAS AT GLASGOW. I The Finance Committee of Glasgow I Gas Department have agreed to recom- j mend that the price of household gas j be raised from Is. lid. to 2s. 6d. per 1,000 cubic feet, and other changes in proportion. I GAOLBIRDS FOR AUSTRIAN ARMY. I The Austrian authorities have released all male prisoners under 45 years of age, I and those who had committed the most monstrous acts are now in the ranks of tf the Austrian army fighting in the Car- I pathians. GERMAN PRISONER SHOT. I A German prisoner who attempted to escape from a concentration camp at Leigh, Lancashire, was shot dead on the roof of a weaving shed by the guard after being warned four times. At the inquest I -a verdict of Justifiable Homicide was re- I turned.

No title

"Glorious Welsh Fusiliers," is the '"Telegraph's" description of that famous regiment's recent operations in the war. About 500 Italian Reservists left Vic- toria Station, London, on Tuesday to re- join their regiments. The scenes attend- ing their departure were of a most en- thusiastic character. A child has been saved from drowning near Kidwelly by the intelligence and bravery of a dog. The child fell into a pool, and, getting into trouble, screamed j for help. The dog, which was close by, j instantly rushed to the child, seized its I clothes by the teeth, and pulled the little JI one out of danger.

ISOUTH WALES MINERS I

I SOUTH WALES MINERS. I NEW AGREEMENT QUES- TION. CONCILIATION BOARD AT WORK. The South Wales Coal Concilia- tion Board met at Cardiff, on Mon- day, to consider the question of a new wage agreement for the coal- field, to take the place of the existing agreement which expires- on notices tendered by the work- men's representatives— at the end of June. The miners' leaders submitted arguments in support of the labour proposals. In reply the owners again urged the workmen to waive the issue during the period of the war. As the workmen's representatives were not disposed to do this, the owners undertook to give con*- sideration to the proposals, and it was agreed to hold a meeting of the Board on June 9th, to go fully into the question. THE CONFERENCE. ARGUMENTS IN SUPPORT OF THE I WORKMEN'S CASE. At the Conciliation Board, on Mon- day, Mr F. L. Davis presided over the owners' side and Mr W. Brace, M.P. (Under-Secretary Home Office), over the workmen's representatives. The board had under consideration the workmen's proposal for a new agree- ment, the main object of which is to secure a new standard rate of wage.s 50 per cent. above the old standard of 1879, and a minimum of 10 per cent. upon the new standard. The workmen's proposals also in- clude the abolition of the maximum, and the payment of a minimum of 5s. a day to surface workmen, the pay- ment at the rate of six turns for five worked by men on the afternoon and night shifts, and equal payment to night and day hauliers. OLD STANDARD OBSOLETE. The workmen's representatives con- tended that the 01d standard was ob- solete and not suited to the present requirements. It was argued that there was a real need for a uniform and well-arranged system, for the old standard were fixed in 1877 and 1879, when the standard of living and the cost of living were far below what they are to-day. During the past seven or eight years the percentages paid had not fallen be- low the 50 per cent. mark, and during a considerable portion of that period a percentage of 60 had been paid; there- fore it would be no hardship upon the owners if a new standard was created 50 per cent. above the old, with an ad- ditional 10 per cent. as a minimum. As a matter of fact, with the war bonus of 174 granted last month, the workmen would be receiving, as things stood at present, about 12, per cent. more than they asked, because, where- as their demands only represented a minimum of 65 per cent. above the standard of 1879, their present actual wages was 77! above. The proposed alteration would be of no money value to the workmen and would cost the coalowners nothing. SIX TURNS FOR FIVE. With regard to the application for the general payment of six turns for five for afternoon and night work, it was argued that this was no new prin- ciple, for the practice was already in operation in many of the collieries, and the workmen simply asked for uni- formity of treatment. The demand that all surfacemen should be paid a minimum rate of 5s. was also a modest one, it was argued, and simply meant that each r, man should receive 3s.4d. upon the 1879 standard. OWNERS'. APPEAL. I The owners once more urged the workmen to postpone their demands until after the war, as it was very de- sirable that. they should work together in harmony. It would be injurious to the interests of the whole community to enter into controversial matters which would endanger the peace of the coalfield and tend to reduce the out- put of coal, so very necessary for the energetic conduct of the war. The workmen's representatives, how- ever, were not disposed to agree to a policy of delay, and intimated that peace in the coalfield would be more likely to be preserved if they faced the problem courageously and endeavoured to arrive at a settlement. Thereupon the owners, though not accepting the arguments set forth by the workmen's representatives, agreed to give the proposals further considera- tion, and suggested that a further meeting of the Conciliation Boa,rd should be held to discuss them more fully. WAR BONUS ISSUE. I Another matter which came up for consideration was a point raised in a letter sent by Mr Thomas Richards, M.P. calling attention to the fact that the men working upon light employ- ment under the Workmen's Compen- sation Act were not paid the war bonus, and asking the owners to grant it according to Lord St. Aldwyn's award. (Continued at bottom of next column)

ISOUTH WALES MINERS I

(Continued from preceding column). I To this application the owners re- plied that it was a matter for the Con- ciliation Board to decide, and if those workmen receiving compensation felt that they had a grievance they should seek redress elsewhere. In all probability there will be test cases for the courts to decide whether workmen receiving compensation are entitled to the war bonus. -t: -'

But Wanted the Gaps Filled

But Wanted the Gaps Filled A recruiting party and full band of the 12th Welsh Regiment visited Am- manford and the Amman Valley on Monday, inaugurating a campaign for men. Rousing appeals were delivered by Alderman W. N. Jones, J.P., and Mr Towyn Jones, M.P., at open air meet- ings at Cwmamman and Ammanford. At the latter place on Monday night, several concert items. were provided by members of the party, Private Jones, Private Parry and, Private Daniels, the last named also making an effective Welsh appeal. In the course of a stirring address, Alderman W. N. Jones said Amman- ford and the district had already sent many men to the ranks The locality had done well, but they would not be satisfied un til it had done its best. Mr Towyn Jones, in an eloquent speech in the vernacular, said he made no apology for his appearance, al- though a man of peace, on that plat- form. The war was a inevitable war, undertaken to vindicate treaties and national honour. The tramp of the armies ad thunder of the cannon had hushed the janglings and the- wrang- lings of the political parties in the House of Commons, and he wished the country as a whol e would awake to a I sense of its danger in the greatest crisis in its long history as well as to a sense of its responsibility. Lieutenant Clause Lewis, in command of the party, said they were all ready to spill their blood for their country, and lay down theirl lives as dearly as possible to the Germans, but they wanted to feel, before they crossed, that there were men coming forward I from Carmarthenshire and Pembroke- shire to fill the gaps that will have been created in their ranks. A number of recruits were secured.

I LLANSAMLET MYSTERY I

I LLANSAMLET MYSTERY. I I BODY FOUND AT CRUMLIN BUR- ROWS. On Tuesday night the body of a man was recovered from the Tennant Canal, at Crumlin Burrows, near Jersey 1 Marine. The hoch- was later identified as that of David Jones, collier, aged 37, married, Llan-terrace. Halfway, LJan- samlet. Mr Jones disappeared from his home on the morning of May 27th, stating that. he was going to Crumlin Burows. He was in a depressed con- dition, having suffered from illness for some time. P.S. Haw-tin, of Llansamlet, secured a bloodhound to trace him, but without success.

I SWANSEA GAS PRICES I

I SWANSEA GAS PRICES. ELECTRICITY MOOTED FOR ALL STREET LIGHTING. At a meeting of Swansea. Highways Committee, it was reported that the increase in the prices to be charged for gas in the borough would represent for street lighting an additional ex- penditure of £ 665 per annum, but there would be a contra account of from £180 ¡ to L200 saved by the reduced lighting during the war. It was decided to ob- tain a report on the position under the agreement with the Gas Company, and to consider the question of carrying out all the street lighting by electricity.

LINERS SAFETOYAGE FROM CANADA

LINER'S SAFETOYAGE FROM CANADA. The Allan liner Corsican arrived at Glasgow) on Tuesday from Canada, with 1.070 passengers,, including 700 women and 300 children, 77 of the latter being infants. The majority of the women are the wives and relatives of Canadian soldiers, and have been sent home by the Canadian Patriotic Asociation.

I REFUGEES UNLAWFUL VISITI

REFUGEES' UNLAWFUL VISIT. Two. Belgian refugees, Henri Pieters and Jonna Pieters were charged at Newport on Saturday with being found in a prohibited area without the per- mission of the chief-constable of Mon- mouthshire. Superintendent Porter said defendants lived at Brynmawr, Breconshire, and on the 27th ult.. they visited Risca without the permission of the chief-constable. The magistrates decided to hand the defendants over the Belgian Refugees' Committee, with a warning that if there were further offences they would be seriously dealt with.

MR WILLIAM BRACE M P j

MR WILLIAM BRACE, M P* j The Romance of a Welsh Pit-Boy. One of the most vivid Parliamentary recollections that I have of Mr. William Brace, M.P., the Welsh miners' leader (writes Mr. H. R. S. Phillpott in the "Daily Citizen") who now steps into the official ranks of th. Coalition Govern- ment, is of when, one night last year, he held the House of Commons in saddened silence, while, with swift, sure phrase and burning human eloquence, he pic- tured the awfulness of the Senghenydd colliery disaster. Scores of men had gone, some of them suddenly, others after s low, drawn-out agony, to black death in the tunnels and subterranean passages of the Welsh pit, and this man, who at 12 years of age had gone to work in a coalmine, and who himself had several times narrowly escaped from dread disas- ters that dog the daily round of the most perilous industrial calling in the world, was showing the House of Commons a picture of horror as few others could have shown it. He talked of leaping, lurid flame that sprang greedily towards imprisoned men, of slow-rolling gas that wrapped itself in a deatfh embrace around others, and of how others yet waited for death that would have been less horrible had it been more speedy. It was the style and personality of the man as much as the story itself that made what he had to tell so vividly real. Seeing him thf}, and listening to a speech that at "times became literature, one found it difficult to realise that it came from a man who spent half of the first 24 years of his life working in a coalmine. But one soon realises the qualities that have )ed him from the coal-pit to the fringe of the Cabinet. j I should like to see a meeting between Mr. Brace and one of the not few minór novelists who, knowing nothing of Labour and less of its leaders, have a, habit of presenting a. caricature that purports to be a delineation in every book they turn out. This Welsh miner is about as foreign to this class of notion about Labour leaders as a German official com- munique is to accuracy. There is about him an air of fine dignity (the more pleas- ing because it is unasserted), a spacious, easy manner, a breadth of thought and expression (and, incidentally, of figure) that would sadly upset the novelist's calculations. If one did not know Mr. Brace, with his alertness of mind, his substantial and reassuring presence, his infectious geniality, his well-groomed ap- pearance, and (one must not forget) the great black moustache that would make him noticeable in a thousand, one might write him down as the manager of a particularly prosperous bank. Had he been brought up in other circumstances I am sure he would have been a success- ful bank manager. The whole make-up of tire man compels confidence. One would simply have to open an account with him. A STRENUOUS BOYHOOD. I All this is rather difficult to under- stand when one remembers his early life. Half a century ago he was born at the village of Risca, Monmouthshire. For a boy born then, in such a district and of working parents, there was only one occupation. He celebrated his 12th birth- day none too opulently one imagines, and on the next day started work in the collieries. A couple of years later he escaped from a big explosion. He showed a promising wisdom even in those days, for he promptly went to work in an- other oolliery, and some time later worked in the Prince of Wales Colliery at Aber- earn, at the mention of which some men in Wales shudder now because of the ghastly explosion there that laid such a grim toll on miners' lives and hurled the fragments of 250 bodies among under- ground wreckage from which they were never recovered. No one but a man I who has lived and worked where things like this happen could have held the I House of Commons as I once saw him do. After 12 years in the mines he started active trade union work as a miners' agent. In the following years he did i much to help lay the foundations of the I South Wales Miners' Federation, which was formed in 1889. It was some years after that that the South Wales Federation saw the wisdom of identifying themselves with the Miners' Federation of Great Britain, and when this alliance did come about after agitation and indus- trial trouble with owners in Wales, Mr. Brace was vice-president of the South Wales section, under the presidency of "Mabon" (Mr. William Abraham, M.P.), eventually stepping himself into the pre- sidency of what is the largest sectional miners' organisation in the country. On mining matters Mr. Brace is a power to be reckoned with. He has a wonderful grasp of the whole of the com- plications with which the mining indus- try, its trade union organisation and its legal supervision, is hedged around. It would be impossible, I suppose, to tell the complete story of all the industrial work he has done, the concessions he has helped to gain, the negotiations he has helped to put through, the organisa- tion (land the miners' organisation is the most complete in the kingdom) he has helped to build tip. One notable work that he undertook was five years' service on the Royal Commission that investi- gated the mining industry in this coun- try. (Continued at bottom of next column)

MR WILLIAM BRACE M P j

(Continued from preceding column). I A MAN OF PARTS. I In the House of Commons. he is quite I a figure, although he is not heard as often as the House generally would like. On mining matters the House list-ens to him with the serious attention it always gives to a man who knows what he is talking about, and with the pleasure it always displays in listening to a man who can say what he wants to say elo- quently, picturesquely, and forcefully. It was in the great political year of 1906 that he entered Parliament as the mem- ber for South Glamorgan. That in it- self was a rather wonderful achievement, for the seat had always been a Tory one. He captured it with a majority of almost 4,500, and has comfortably held it ever since. I believe the next General Elec- tion will see his retirement from this con- stituency, chiefly on the score of ex- pense, and that he will then go to West Monmouthshire, which differs from the other in that it is a wholly Labour con- stituency. Another side of Mr. Brace's very full and active life is shown by his religious work. The Baptist denomination is the one that claims his adherence, but he is often to be found in the pulpit of this or that church in different parts of the country, while P.S.A.'s and Brother- hoods claim a good deal of the time that he devotes to religious activities. In the pulpit and on the platform, whether it be a political, a social, a trade union, I or a religious one, hi is at his best. He has the power of capturing his audience or his congregations both by the matter of his sermon or speech and by com- pelling, attractive personality of the man himself. To his new position he will carry ener- gy, high ability, sterling honesty, a wide but level-headed outlook, and a rare knowledge of the practical side of life that will be of value to the Government, the class from which he springs, and the country. ————— —————

GERMAN PRISONER SHOT

GERMAN PRISONER SHOT. Attempt at Escape. The inquest concerning the death of Friedrich Wilhelm Karl Schmidt, of the 35th German Infantry Regiment, was held at the Leigh (Lanes.) Police Court, before Mr Barlow, the Deputy- Coroner. Major Tarry, the commandant of the concentration camp at Leigh, where over 1,800 German military and naval prisoners are interned, said the. de- ceased was twenty-five years old, and was brought to Templemore, in Ireland on September 22, from somewhere in France. Subsequently prisoner, along with hundreds of others, was brought to Leigh. His conduct there had been satisfactory. Some refractory conduct among prisoners occurred on Sunday afternoon. Some of them made an at- tempt to escape by penetrating through the wall of their dormitory. The attempt was discovered, the sentries were doubled, 'the strictest vigilance was imposed upon them, and every precaution taken. Those pre- parations had just been completed, when about a quarter past ten lie heard a summons for the guard to turn out. He rushed ont and proceeded with a guard to number nine post, and there found the deceased lving ap- parently dead, with the medical officer attending to him. Ho received a report from the sentries (Privates Richardson and Thompson), and found that they had acted under a Royal Warrant issued in August last regarding the regulations for the main- tenance of discipline among prisoners of war. These rules had been issued to the prisoners themselves, and were perfectly well known by them. Under those regulations if prisoners attempted without permission of the command- ant to pass a boundary, and disregard- ed warnings, they could be fired upon. The deceased was found on the top of the boundary of his dormitory, a very high partition close to the glass roof, and he was warned not once but four times to come down. He disregarded the warnings, whereupon the sentry Thompson fired upon and killed him. "Private John Richardson said he went on duty with Private Thompson at nine o'clock on Sunday evening. At a quarter past ten lie allowed a prison- er out in the compound. This prisoner was done. Witness's attention was then drawn to Schmidt, who was up towards the ceiling on a baricade. From that point deceased could have got on to the glass roof of the shed and got free. He ordered deceased to come down, and called for Private Thomp- son, who stood just inside the doorway, a,i-i,d ordered him three times to come down but lie never moved. He knew perfectly what the order was. Thomp- son then fired and deceased dropped into B dormitory. Witness then called the guard out and locked the doors. Dr. Webb said deceased received the I bullet in his right side, and died im- mediately. A verdict of justifiable homicide was I returned by the jury.

No title

As the celebrated soprano began to I sing Johnnie became greatly excited over the gesticulations of the orchestra con- ductor. "What's that man shaking his stick at her for?" he demanded, indig- nantly. "Sh-h! He's not shaking his stick at her. But Johnnie was not con- vinced. "Then what in thunder's she holler in' for?" t

USEFUL EXPERIMENT WHEN IN THE WAR ZONE

USEFUL EXPERIMENT WHEN IN THE WAR ZONE. ''Submarine drill" is the latest diver- sion for ocean passengers. The lead in this interesting and very practical in- novation has been 'taken by the Pacific Liner the Orita, which arrived at Liver pool this week, being the first big liner on which systematic instruction has been given tlie passengers on the method of leaving the ship in case of attack by a submarine. It happened that in the Irish Sea a submarine was sighted, but the ship escaped attack. There were three hundred passengers on board, and Commander Cumming, in view of the fact that his ship at the end of her long voyage from the Pacific had to pass through the "war zone," decided that a rehearsal of the measures to be taken in case the worst came to the worst would be a useful way of passing part of the time. FINE WEATHER AND CALM SEA. Fine weather and a calm sea favour- ed the idea, and it was taken up with enthusiasm by the passengers. The per- formance, complete in every detail apart from the boats being actually lowered into the water, proved a g" success. Lifebelts were served out and .in- structions given as to how they were to be worn—a revelation to most of the people, who had never troubled to initiate themselves into this very im- portant duty—and generally what was the best thing to be done in case of emergency. Then all the lifeboats were swung out and lowered to the level of the saloon deck, the passengers being lined nt) in orderly groups and shown just how everything should be done in the "perfect wreck." SUBMARINE SIGHTED. More than once the drill was re- peated until when the danger zone was reached on Sunday everybody was drill- perfect. Then it was that the pas- sengers realised how useful as well as enlertaining had been their pastime on the voyage, for a submarine was sight- ed, and in real earnest this time they were called uoon to don the lifebelts and stand by the boats already slung out. There was no excitement, and everybody did his drill in record time. Happily the Orita quickly shook the submarine off, and arrived at Liver- pooJ safely, when the passengers form- ally thanked Commander Cumming for his foi-e-sigilt. I

MRS LLOYD GEORGE

———— .———— MRS. LLOYD GEORGE CONDEMNS THE DRINK EVIL. Mrs. Lloyd George, when presiding at a temperance military concert at Criccieth on Thursday night (at which several Swansea. Valley boys were pre- sent), congratulated those soldiers of the Welsh Royal Field Artillery bil- leted in the district who had recently taken the temperance p ledge to the number of 2,000. Russia, France and our King, she stated, had banned the drink, but the House of Commons had not yet had the strength to abolish it from its own table. John Bull, how- ever was slow to move, but the day was not far off when lie would deal effectively with this evil, for he was already showing sings of anger at the havoc it created. Mr Lloyd George re- cently asked the Russian Finance Minister how they fared there after abolishing the drink, and he replied, "If anybody attempted to reintroduce drink inito the country there would be a revolution." That revolution would ocme from people who were prone to drink, and who had awakened to a sense of its extreme peril to their nation. (Applause.)

STEELWORKERS HOURS

STEELWORKERS' HOURS. CONFERENCE AT SWANSEA. I There was a conference at Swansea on Tuesday to consider the question of shifts in steel works. The Siemens steel smelters and bar millmen in South Wales and Monmouthshire, as a result of the efforts of the Steel Smelt- ers' Union, are at present in the em- ployment of eight, hours shift. A strike occurred a short time ago at the Upper Forest Works owing to the millmen objecting to revert to a 12 hours' shift. On Tuesday the members of the Smelters' Union met in conference re- presentatives of the Steel Masters' As- sociation, who had submitted for con- sideration the question whether eight hours shifts at steel works should be continued- The men were represented by Mr John Hodge, M.P., Mr Thomas Griffiths, and a strong deputation of workmen. The men, through Mr. Hodge, expressed strong disinclination to alter conditions, which had Qnly been secured as the result of years of effort and which, up to now, had given satisfaction. c

CABINET AND SlMStilFTSQNf

CABINET AND SlMStilFTSQNf NATIONAL SERVICE REGIS- TER SHORTLY. Mr A. P. Nicholson writ sag, in the "Daily News" says:— The Cabinet, have had before them the advisability of resort to some form of conscription or national service, the- question having been raised by Union- ist. Ministers. As a result some inteleost. ing discussions have taken place. It is a fact that some of the vital elements in the problem had not hitherto been taken into account by Unionists. They had not, for example, seriously weighed the possible situation in Ireland. It may be pointed out that if this country's fighting strength be compared with Germany, by ratio of population, the number of men we could contribute on the basis of Ger- many's contribution would be only two- thirds of the armies Germany can put in, the field. But this would take no- count of the special position of this country, and its strength, which lies in its ability to produce and to finance as well as in its Navy and Army. Whether a million or a million and a. half more men are needed for our armies, this number, it is believed, will be readily forthcoming under the- I voluntary system. The men are at present coming in steadily. I REGISTER OF SERVICE MEN. I In the meantime, the advisability It •; Vcovi discussed of taking a regis- ter of all the men serving with the forces, or engaging in manufactures, including munitions, or available for enlistment. Such a register would give the data which are necessary for a proper judgment as to whether com- pulsory service sliotild oi- not be resorted to, and would enable t h-3 Government to decide what proportion of men should be kept engaged in the manufacture of munitions and ot her vital State services. The probabilities point to the de- cision by the Government that such a. register shall be made shortly. But it must be remembered that if this coun- try is to finance the v,t, iii(I we, are financing our Allies as well as our- selves, and that to a degree not gener- ally appreciated- we must keep a much larger proportion of men engaged in the business of the country than the rabid eonseriptionists suppose, or else our financial strength, which is a vital factor in the war. would collapse.

1OMINOUS PROSPECT

1 OMINOUS PROSPECT." MR FREDERIC, HARRISON'S WARNING AFTER A VISIT TO THE BATTLE ZONE. Mr Frederic Harrison, who for many years was a. strong opponent of a sys- tem of Conscription, has visited the battle zone in France, and has re- turned convinced that fresh measures must be taken to secure a proper or- ganisation of our resources. "It is," he states in the "Times," "with a profound sense of humiliation and consternation that one passes from rii-,ince--a country facing a desperate war with its whole soul-its entire manhood—to cur own country, which, co the eye at least, seems taking this tremendous peril with the easy optim- ism of 'business as usual,' 'pleasures as usual,' 'no need to hurry yet!' Unless we listen to warnings in time—rather we must say at once-t-be very exist- ence of our country and all that we love in it arc within measurable dis- tance of ruin. "Not that I ever heard from any one in Fntnee a touch of depression or doubt of the issue, much less complaints against 'the slackers at home.' 1 saw daily hundreds of our men of every arm just from the front as gay as birds, the picture of the poet's 'happy war- ior.' Still, the impression left on my mind by the coolly-weighed utterances, even by the silences of those- who know, made me feel how ominous is the pro- spect of another winter with Germans still holding Belgian. French, and Russian soil."

MR HENDERSON OX HIS APPOINTMENT

———— ———— MR. HENDERSON OX HIS APPOINT- MENT. Speaking at Bishop Auckland, Mr. Arthur Henderson said that a full ex- planation was due to the members of the Barnard Castle Labour and Progressive Association in regard to his acceptance yf a. Cabinet rank and his association with the Government. He admitted that the policy which led to his appearing there seeking re-election did not receive the full approval of the Labour party, or even a section of the Labour movement, but he claimed that it was in perfect accord with the position taken up in the early stages of the war. Mr. Henderson contended that the dan- ger at the present moment was so great that if we were worthy of Britishers we should be deeply concerned as to the maintenance of national unity, and get the necessary forces both on land and in the factory so as to place the issue be- yond all doubt. His message to the workers was that every Trade Union should give the greatest possible latitude to the men so that the hope they had in common in regard to the wax might.. be effectively realised. -1.'1'