Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

i L "THOROUGH" SIGHT-TESTING. R |Mr. ERI?REES ? F.R.M.S., F.S.M.C., Etc. (Lond.) > ) 26 CASTLE ST. SWANSEA i (Opposite CoUege St.). 'Phone Central, ?20. J Consultation & Expert Advice Free f

Advertising

t It t- 1': [ I çL, ■fW/P Oy '1 i) I :-?.n¡' !f ► THE ALL STEEL IULEIGN CYCLfS ( On v'a.'h vr Easy fer-ms. I t Best Value in the World t. t S(¡]t: ¡\gcnt-H. EVANS, Ystr:ldgynlaig,

Significant Reports from the Fatherland

Significant Reports from the Fatherland. REVOLT OF THE SOCIALISTS. i (By GEORGE A. GREENWOOD). The attitude of the German Social- ists towards the country's part in the great war, has aroused one of this most interesting and important discussions of the past ten months, & discijMdoa pregnant with lessons for the future activities of the pacifist movement. A great number of adherents to the Lab- our and Socialist Parties of Europe- and we do not Attempt to deny that we were among them,—held tenacious- ly to the hope,—if not the absolute -oonviction,-that in the event of a de- claration of war between the Triple Entente and the Triple Alliance, the conscious strength of the great demo- cratic movement would be instrumental in preserving peace. It should be par- ticularly noted that this was a hope .rather than a conviction, because think- ing people were only too well aware that considerations would obviously be introduced which would render a strong democratic resistance exceedingly diffi- cult, if not impossible. This is espec- ially clear in the case of Germany. [What happened in the Fatherland simply was that the entire populace were led to believe that the German mobilisation was merely a defensive action against Russian aggression, and that in rallying to the support of the Kaiser and the military party, the Social Democrats were engaging in a war of defence. It has to be remem- bered also that there was a keen cen- sorship in Germany, and that the truth was not then allowed to percolate through into those circles by means of which it might have become public property. And again, whatever the part of the German and Austrian Governments in the actual provocation of the conflict, let us try to remember that when war had actually commenced the Russian menace was no mere illus- ion to the Germans. It was stark reality. Th-a German Socialists believed that the Fatherland; was in danger, and they rallied gladly to the call for service, just as the great British democracy volunteered in their I hundreds of thousands to fight in de- fence of national independence.

THE AWAKENING I

THE AWAKENING. I So the International was temporarily smashed, and the living, vital national instinct triumphed. For a consider- able time, the German nation waa thoroughly united in the one supreme purpose of vanquishing the national enemy. Then by d-agi:,e? we began to perceive a gradual awakening to the true facts of the case. Various inci- dents occurring in the Fatherland ap- peared to indicate that some of the German Socialist leaders were being filled with doubt. We saw the bitter disappointni-ent experienced through- out the country at the refusal of the Government to consider the revision of the Franchise laws. There were dis- quieting rumours of appalling losses on the battlefield, the scarcity of good and wholesome food, the woman's protest outside the Reichstag, the refusal of some of the Social-Democratic members to vote for further war credits, and Herr Leibknecht's courageous utter- ances, leading Mr A. G. Gardiner to describe him as the greatest man in contemporary Europe —the real King of Potsdam. And so the awakening has proceeded. There is good reason to believe that the dis- illusioned Social Democrats and the Pacifists of Germany will eventually do a great deal towards the final collapse of the Central Empires, simply because they realise that if Germany and Austria gain a victory in this conflict, democracy in Europe is done for. We do not on the other hand suggest that the Social-Democrats want to see the Teutonic Powers ruthlessly crushed. That would be a clear affront to their nationial instinct, and it is well nigh certain that if the war resulted in the collective effort of the Allies to dismem- ber Germany, German Social Demo- crats would simply work together with I the Junkers to win back revenge.

EFFORTS FOR PEACE t

EFFORTS FOR PEACE. t It is, however, from the various re- ports to hand during the past few days, daylight .ou,r tha-t the German Social- ists are endeavouring so to prepare that when peace comes, it shall do a just peaeg, whoever the victors may be. There does not appear to be any areat, weight of opinion in favour of an im- mediate peace, but the remarkable scenes witnessed in the Lower Hoitse of the Prussian Diet on Thursday last is striking indication of the prevailing temper of tleo Sooialist leadem, in fatoe of all the Governmental Tfhere is Cite strong leitdor, H-einemmu trlao favours a continuance of the war, and the progressive deputy, Wieme-r, I said he was convinced that the majority ,of the Party shared his views the flgayaafc the views of Herr Liebknecht and his friends. Dr Liebknecht and Herr Braun replied in very vigorous speeches, demanding an: early and a just peace. Commenting on the proceedings in the Diet, the "Daily News" said the importance of the these speeches lies in the assertion that they voice the will of the mass of the Socialist Party. Under present conditions it is impossible to determine the justice of such a claim, but is supported by the manifesto of Bernstein, Haase, and other Socialists of tjie Centre, and by such news as has beenallowoo to escape of Socialist demonstrations at Frankfort and else- where, at which the demand for an early peace and a policy of no annexa- tion was unanimously endorsed. These manifestations, whatever their value, must clearly be read as a commentary on the King of Bavaria's notorious de- claration. It is significant, too, that the signal for the Socialists to become once more articulate is the relaxation of the menace from Russia, probably the supreme factor in cementing the unity of the German nation at the beginning of August.

A BEEMERGENCE OF SANITYI

A BE-EMERGENCE OF SANITY. It cannot be too strongly insisted I upon that the German Socialists' actions are in no sense to be attributed to fear or cowardice, or a thought of weakening. Apparently they are in full accord with the optimism of the entire nation, and their clamour for a just and early peace is simply the fruits of a re-emergence of sanity and the re-birth of their democratic con- victions. The papers on Monday an- nounced that the Daily Socialist organ, "Vorwaerts" had again been sup- pressed for giving publicity to the mani- festo issued by the pacifist leaders de- manding an homourable end of the war, and the statement by the Government of the terms upon which the Govern- ment is prepared to negotiate for peace. The suppression of "V orwaerts" indi- cates that this discussion is not accept- able to the Government. Indeed, the semi-official "Nordeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung" says the Socialist manifesto may be interpreted abroad as war weariness, which is not existing in Germany, and concludes:— "If progress of military events and the political situation offer prospects of successful peace deliberations the German Government, on its own accord will do what is necessary. Till then, there can only be one watchword for Germany, viz., "hold out. The points to which attention should be directed, however, are (1) that de- spite the suppression of "Vorwaerts," the voice of the dissentients is being heard, and (2) that that voice is direct- ing opinion in. the best and most hope- ful channels. Messages to hand on Monday appear to make it plain that there is a very strong body of support behind the manifesto. Had it been otherwise, it is improbable that the German Government would have been so enraged at its publication, but they see that the Socialist demand is one which cannot go unheeded, and as the loss of life becomes greater, and in- ternal privation more severe, the Socialist demand will become more dangerously insistent. Imagine the portent of this passage from the mani- festo:—- "If the war, which daily demands new sacrifices, is not to go on inde- finitely until all the nations have been completely exhausted, one of the Powers taking part must stretch out its hand to peace. Germany has already proved itself unconquerable, and can, therefore, take the first step towards peace. In the name of humanity and culture, supported by the bravery of our men in arms, who have created a favourable situation, we demand of the Government that it shall announce its willingness to eater into negofiations for peace in order to make an end of the bloody struggle. We expect that our mem- bers in the other warring countries will use their influence in the same way upon their Governments.

THE KAISERS ATTITUDE I

THE KAISER'S ATTITUDE. Tile action of the German Socialists ought, to be oemsidered in conjunction with the Kaiser's letter to a Bavarian friend. His communication surreyed ike European situation, and suggested that peace may be concluded sooner than ii adding "it coul4 Be signed to-morrow if I wished it." This is, of course, bombast, character- istic of the man:, but it is true. Of Germany could have peace this week if sh e willed it, Vut en what tntinued at bottom of neat rolunlIfy

IUNIONS AND THE LOAN I

UNIONS AND THE LOAN. I DECISION OF LABOUR TO DO THEIR I BIT. i The management committee of the I General Federation of Trade Unions have decided to advise the general council of the federation, which meets in Derby on July 1, to invest C20,000 in the War Loan. It was decided also to strongly advise its a. bated membership to take up the scrip as offered through the Post Office. It also instructed the secretary to bring to the notice of Air. McKenna the neces- sity for a simplification of the procedure, so far as Trade Union investments were concerned, frs-t, to prevent "ultra vires" actions, and, secondly, to permit the in- vestmentby, and in the name of, the Trade Union, so as to provide continuity oi ownership without the expense and trouble of transfer when the trustees were changed, i They suggest the advisability of simpli- fying the income-tax procedure so that there would be no deductions from the dividends accruing to small investors, and, consequently, no necessity for the complicated and irritating applications for rebates, and also that small nivestors be advised to open Post Office Savings Bank accounts, to which small dividends j could be automatically transferred, so as to ensure the purchasers of stock being credited with even the smallest dividend at a minimum of cost and trouble. They asked also that forms similar to those which enable the Post Office deposi- tor to contribute pence should also be provided for the poorer subscribers to the War Loan, ordinary stamps to be used until the forms held 5s., when it could be exchanged for scrip; to a.sk that some assurance should be given to workmen that, in the event of personal or indus- trial crisis, the State would facilitate the 1 transfer of stock to Pest Office account, ■ Q|i"

IUNIONS AND THE LOAN I

(Continued from preceding column). terms? No sane person will imagine for one moment that the Emperor lab- ours under the delusion that he could dictate peace terms, and that he must j compromise. To what extent? He must know that the Allies would accept nothing less than those guiding principles laid down in the Socialist manifesto, together with clear guaran- tees against future aggression on the part of the Central Empires. I On the other hand these disclosures covering the prevailing sentmnent in, Germany should stimulate peace dis-! cussiona in the Allied countries. We do not for a moment suggest an agita- ¡I tion that would result in & premature peace, but it is clearly desirable that the people of Great Britain in particu- lar should be prepared to urge the Government to state our own peace terms. We are hearing nearly every day of speeches delivered by men in high authority who demand that British policy at the conclusion of hostilities should emulate all bIle moro reprehensible features of Prussian mili- tarism. The mass of the German de- mocracy who are still rendering uncon- ditional support to their Government are doing so because they have been taught to believe that. the policy e-f the Allies is one of wholesale annexations, —not simply the stripping of the Fatherland of all hflT colonies, but the giving up of East Prussia to Russia, and South West German States to France. If the Allied Govern meets > make it clear that tkey fighting for the future estaBLi«km«»n,t of a stable peace, a liIetttfflnnt oo the line* of [ true Nationality with no a,nn«rati

FIXING OF COAL PRICES I

FIXING OF COAL PRICES. pnOBABIJ LINE OF ACTION BY THE OWNERS. The fixing of coal prices, which has been under the consideration of the Government for some time, is now (writes the Lobby correspondent of the "Raily News") within the realm of practical politics. The Midland coal- owners, as has been stated, met last Friday, and are communicating with the Board of Trade. Other coalowners are also consider- ing the question. The line of advance will probably bo as follows:- It is not deemed feasible to fix ab- solutely the retail price of coal, but it is expected that the majority of the coalowners will come to an agreement as to an average pit-head price. To get at it the equivalent contract price this time last year will be taken, and to this an addition will be made for reasonable profit in these difficult times, for increased cost of stores, and the increased cost of working owing to shortage of labour and other causes. If a good proportion of coalowners agree on such a charge, then it may bo necessary to make it statutory by in- troducing a temporary Bill in Parlia- ment, as, owing to the vary varied conditions, it is unlikely that any agree- ment would command assent all through the country.

URGES A FIGHT TO A FINISH

URGES "A FIGHT TO A FINISH." I ENGLAND'S PARTWHEN PEACE COMES. The chief features of the concluding sitting of the National Union of Rail- waymen's congress at "V jttingham on Friday was a speech óy Mr J. H. Thomas, M.P., on the need for fight- ing Germany to the bitter end. Mr Thomas, speaking to a resolu- tion, which was carried, deploring the carnage of war, lamenting the loss of those who had fallen, and urging the Government to make provision for those who had fallen and their dependents, said the Labour Party had stood stead- fastly to the conviction that the piling up of armaments meant one of two things, either bankruptcy or explos- ion. (Hear, hear). Labour members made no apology for the stand they had always made in favour of universal peace. What, he asked, was Eng- land's justification in this crisis? It was that she was found unprepared for the conflict, and thus gave the strong- est possible proof that she harboured no agressive designs. (Hear, hear). While he took a broad, humanitarian view, speaking as a Member of Parlia- ment he declared there ought to be no sickly sentiment in this matter of the war when the time for peace ar- rived. The issue must be fought to a conclusion, or there would inevitably be war in the future. (Hear, hear). "A FAIR CHANCE. I They deplored the in-human methods I of the enemy. Some undoubtedly were I surprised that he, an ardent supporter of peace, had advocated the use of gas by our own troops. He had not only 1 advocated it, but he stood by it to-day with a. knowledge of all the horrors that it entailed. Why? He had wit- nessed some of the suffering, and the only complaint of our men was: "W e are not having a fair chance." They must have a fair chance. (Cheers). We must see to it that by German bar- barity the moral of our defenders was not destroyed. (Renewed cheers). Many appeals to the people, he added, wore being made at the-present time, but there must be also appeals to those capitalists who were making inhuman profits out of blood and treasure. (Hear, hear). A resolution was passed instructing the executive committee to continue to press the Association's full claims of February last upon the railway com- panies, and asking the Labour Party to use every means to persuade the Government to take over the entire I! control of food and fuel supplies. The congress expressed its high ap- preciation of the services rendered by the "Daily Citizen'' and its deep re- I gret that in an important crisis like the I present the trade union movement should have been so apathetic in the support of their own daily paper as to be the sole cause of its suspension. It was also resolved not to lose sight of the departmental inquiry opened in 1914 (but postponed owing to the war) to inquire into the prevention of acci- dents to railwaymen. THE TRIPLE ALLIANCE. The congress reaffirmed its previous decisions approving of the negotiations, between the representatives of the Miners' Federation, the "Transport Workers' Federation, and the railway- men's organisation for a closer working agreement among the workers covered by these unions, and expressed the de- sire that the negotiations should be re- opened immediately the war was over. A discussion followed on Mr Hud- son's Bill to secure to trade unionists the right to representation at coroner's inquiries. Mr Hudson, explaining the abuses of the present system, said the coroner was master in his own court, and a solicitor's right to appear there as a matter of ordinary practice was assumed. It had never been settled in I law. It was generally reco gnisetl that a coroner's court was not a court of law, but a court of inquiry, and unless I the coroner himself intervened the or- ganising secretary of that union had as good a locus standi as the moat dis- tinguished lawyer in the country. The next annual meeting will be held at Bath. °

COMPULSORY SERVICE I

COMPULSORY SERVICE. I Mft. JESSE COLLINGS* REPLY TO 1 RESOLUTION The secreteury of the Birmingham Branch of the Railway Clerks' Asso«ia- trion having aeni to Mr. JesM Colliligs & resolution passed by the branch strenjly opposing compulsory military service, Mr Colling* replied in a letter dafce-d Juna 24 in scathing terms. The Teteran politi. oian declares tllat the opposition ts compulsory military service is "wardly a,t,d mi4patTiotle, unworthy of Englishman and a slaade-r asnd an ia.lruU on the :mooble nien ef all «la,*a>es who have voluntarily responded be the nation's e*U. He cox- elvdc-m "I do not believe tlfe rmiolu- tion represents the views of the ialajority 0f your association, bst if it does, they t ought is be uhamod of themselves."

I TRADE UNIONIST MANIFESTO

I TRADE UNIONIST MANIFESTO I NATION'S HOUR OF NEED. RIGHTS AND CUSTOMS GUARANTEED The following manifesto haa been issued to Trade Unionists:- Fellow Trade Unionists,—We are faced with a great responsibility and at the sa.me time presented with a mag- nificent opportunity. We are called upon to assist in saving our nation and its Allies, who are fighting for civilization and International law as against the barbarism of brute force. After eleven months of unprecedented struggle the position of the British and Russian armies-in the field, in conse- quence of a shortage of munitions, as stated by the Minister of Munitions, is indeed very serious. It is essential that the skilled workers should realise the extreme gravity and danger of the present position together with the supreme urgency of the national need. The production of munitions must be I accelerated and increased so as to place the issue of the war beyond all doubt. In this gigantic effort organ- ised skilled labour must take an in- dispensable part, for with unselfishness and enthusiasm it can render an in- valuable national service. Arrangements have been made be- tween the Minister of Munitions and I the representatives of many Trade Unionists, together with the Parlia- mentary Committee of the Trades I n- ion Congress and the Management Committee of the General Federat ion of Trade Unionis, the Engineering and I' Ship Building Federation, and the Transport Workers' Federation, for the enrolment of a large number of war munitions volunteers. We earnestly appeal to every skilled workman of the engineering and allied trades who is not at pre-scnt engaged upon war work to enrol himsolf as a volunteer in this hour of need. We do so with confidence, for we can assure him that everything that can be done is being done to safeguard his economic position and to see that every ounce of energy he devotes to tne ser- vice of the country will be applied to the interests of the country. His de- votion to duty will not be exploited for the purpose of excessive profits. He will not be worsened financially, and the status .of.his. Trade Union and his craft will not suffer. The Munitions of War (Supply) Bill, when it becomes an Act of Parliament will be a guarantee for the restoration of Trade Union rights and customs when victory has been achieved. We therefore urge every eligible man to rally to the call and demon- strate to his comrades in the trenches and to the whole world that British Trade Unionism stands for all that is best in national life, national freedom, and national security. (Signed) On behalf of the National Advisory Committee on War Output, Arthur Henderson (Chairman). C. W. Bowerma.n, J. T. Brownlie, J. Hill, F. Smith, A. Wilkie, W. Mosses (Secretary). On behalf of the Parliamentary Com- mittee of the Trades Union Congress. James A. Seddon (Chairman). On behalf of the Management Com- mittee of the C-eneral Federation cf Trade Unions. (Chairman).

GEN SIR FRANCIS LLOYD

GEN. SIR FRANCIS LLOYD. "TALK LESS AND DO MOKE" I SPEECH. Sir H. Craik called attention in Par- liament on Monday to a speech made by Major-General Sir Francis Lloyd re- cently, in which that officer was reported to have given expression to partisan opin. ions on the question of compulsory and voluntary service, and condemned those holding opinions different from his own. Mr. Teoinant said Sh. Francis Lloyd had assured him he addressed no con- demnation of those who differed from him and expressed no views of his own. He merely spoke of the desirability of doiug more and talking less. (Loud cheers. ) Sir Henry Craik Did he not say tb-t the utterances of certain people drove him stark mad ? Mr. Tenaant What I iindteratood he was referring to were people who were occupied in discussing questions in the air and not acting upon tiiepowers which they have at present. t t.iU' J

WORKS TO IIZEOPIBX I

WORKS TO IIZE-OPIBX. I GRATIFYING NEWS FOR RORRY I PORT, The AsbburnhiftM. Ti»pki>*> ■ > Burry Post, hu, it us atafcecf, eokl bv Mo"rg Themas Boweci fMíltl C." ta a new •OTfipany. nli& ww ka has been closed for some meathe, bui fche new proprietors, among whom Mr J. Thomas, Verindre,, Kidwelly, a prominent igure, iateii-d trl « re- start as Dom u yesaiMQ,

WITH THE NEW ARMY ON SALISBURY PLAIN

WITH THE NEW ARMY ON SALISBURY PLAIN, Incidents of Camp Life I i By J.D. I After ten months of Y.M.C.A. activity among the soldiers of the New Army, I am glad to say that my interest has not abated one jot; on the contrary it is keener and deeper. My friends aver that I am peculiarly Celtic in my tem- perament that lam given to periods of great enthusiasm, after which there is a period of reaction, when my mood takes the other extreme. But whatever the variableness of my moods, Tommy of the New Army continues to absorb my in- terest. The New Army is certainly new in every respect, and in my opinion bears but little resemblance to the old. The variety of type in the new is remarkable, and to-day it is truer than ever, that "duke's son, and cook's son" march together in the ranks. A son of a peer of the realm is, or was until recently, a. private in the ranks, doing all sorts of unpleasant duties ¡ (among them, acquiring a taste for beer) in a camp near Codford, St. Mary, in I Wiltshire. There are hosts of men with ample private means doing likewise. In a certain sergeants' mess there are nine Socialists, one of them being a Merthyr man, who has plumped at every election for the veteran Keir Hardie. The only complaint he has to-day against the Labour stalwart is that fie is not revolu- tionary endugh. A large number of new Tommies have a most choice vocabulary, an "accom- plishment" they are quite unconscious of. At a concert held a while ago in a Y.M. C.A. tent, a private volunteered to sing. He was a little hoarse, and desiring to apologise to his comrades for this draw- back to his performance he Eaid: "Boys, you must excuse me to-night, I am blanketty well hoarse, and can't blanketty well sing at all." The chairman, a serious ministerial student from Bristol, j jumped to his feet instantly in shocked surprise and said, "We can't have that j sort of language here." The soldier was j abject in his apologies, and turning i round to the chairman-his regret being I evident on his face—said "Sir, I am blanketty well sorry. I didn't blanketty mean anything." He was simply un- conscious that he was repeating his of- j fence. j There are some people who affect to believe that the new Tommy doesn't know why he enlisted. I am prepared to agree that in very few instances the question has been argued out. The new Tommy for the most part trusted to his intuitions. He heard the call of country and without regard for anything, an- swered. It is not for the civilian to cavil at this=. As a matter of fact this trusting to intaition had developed into some- thing of a philosophy in the Labaur 1 movement during the days when the Syndicalists appeared to be dominant. In one of the Scottish Brigades with 1\ which I was quartered for three months, there are two splendid fellows, who are twins. THEY are inseparable, and some- ,times it is difficult to distinguish one from the other. I became very friendly with both, and one day I asked the younger (by 15 minutes) why he had en- listed. He replied that when at home, in a remote part of Dumfrieshire, he had read of the German atrocities in Belgium, and as soon as he had put the paper down he rushed to the nearest recruiting station. Knowing the young fellow well, I could understand how the action was in complete accord with his chivalrous nature. Another Scotsman, hailing from I Paisley-a very fine fellow, and a married man to boot (not al- ways synonomous !)—when asked the I same question replied "After I had joined my s'ster wrote saying that she was very surprised to find that I had joined the army. I replied by return of po?t say tag 'So was I!' It is becoming the prevailing opinion in Y.M.C.A. circles that a Welshman can get on better with Scotsmen than can Englishmen. This is put down to racial affinities. It takes a few weeks to get intimate with the Scot, but when he has become your chum, no more loyal chum could be found. The Scotsman does not take anything' for granted. He must test both men aiiii institutions be- fore he develops faith in either. Miss Margaret Bondfield had told me some years before of this trait in the Scot's character. It was borne in upon Miss Bondfield as the result of organising tours in the north country in behalf of the Shop Assistants' Union. The same truth has been borne in upon me as the result of a three months' sojoura among the men of a Scottish Brigade. But thoy are Sjttt teHows Ur all that, maybe because of aM that. There. tv« fear but that the" men wil eu?aiB 

TAKEN AT HIS WORD

[ TAKEN AT HIS WORD- a I THE NATION AND THE COALOWNER. I The London "Star" has a telling car- toon, hitting off the ei-ie-is, entitled, "Out of His Own Mouth. The Ittii'Tpress beneath is as follows :— The Coalowner I am working for next to nothing, look you- All I get of it is Is. a ton. John Bull I take you at your word. You shall have Is. a. to-n and I vsill have the coal. In a leading article on the subject of the nation's trouble with the cdalowrers and the middlemen, cur contempoiary says the nation "regards with. scorn all their attempts to prove that nobody makes a. bloated profit out of bleated prices. "With regard to the trouble xa Wales (the article proceed;), the uni ver- fal feeling is disgust. These coalowners are past praying for. They cannot get oil wtih the public, and the public h.iv& i-i confidence in either their patriotism or their competence. The miners have proved their patriotism by enlisting. More than 200.000 of them are? in the Army. There is something wrong with the management which menaces the Navy v. ith a stoppage of work at a moment when f.uch a cahstrüphe simply eouId lut be tolerated. We are not going to plunge into th3 maddening maze of de- tails. We take our stand on the simple fact that the ccal barcns are public eno- n s are p,,iblic e n ?2 mies, who have forfeited the confidence cv t'v: nntion. The nation has a right to sweep them aside." Government action is strongly urgc-d.

WESTERN AREA SHELL FACTORY

"WESTERN AREA SHELL FACTORY. HEARTY CO-OPERATION OF MEN AND EMPLOYERS Official intimation has now been re- ceived from the War Office authorising the establishment of a national shell factory in the Western area of South Wales in accordance with the ocheme submitted last week and on the lines a.lready indicated in these-columns. The following gentlemen have been appoint- ed to form a Board of Management :— Mr 1. C. Davies (Messrs. Bakisv:,n, Liinitod)j Mr T. W. Gibbins (chairman Welsh Plate and Sheet Manufacturers Association), Mr Fra.nk W. Gilbertson (vice chairman. South Siemon's Steel Manufacturers' Association), and Mr John Hodge, M.P. (secretary Steel Smelters' Association), who will con- duct the business on behalf of H.M. Government. The Board of Manage- ment has appointed Mr Henry Clement (secretary of the South Wales Tin and Sheet Plate Manufacturers' Assoc;a- tion) to act as secretary. It is the proposal of the Board to co-cperato with other works who possess suitable tools, and it is also their intention t,,) use works in the district as far as possible to accelerate a, large prcduc- tion of shells as quickly as possible. The employers and workmen in the district are in full sympathy with tho movement, and there will he hearty co- operation to make the Western area national shell factory a great success.

WESTERN AREA SHELL FACTORY

(Continued from preceding column). was distributing a periodical of his own, adviting the men tho while to a copy homo to their mothers. After the meeting the young Scot approached me saying, with a. break in his voice "Mr. C— told us to send the paper home to our mothers. I didn't like to tell him. but I have no parents. I was brought up in a lads' home in Glasgow. I will send ifehe paper to the superintendent." It meant a great deal for a Scottish lad- die to mak e that confession. Life in vs up is full of incidents, but it is difficult to remember them on the r.pnr of the moment. But before I conclude I may say that our Hut is known among Y.M.C.A. Huts as the Wekh Hut. The writer, a Welshman, is in charge, and every member of the staff is a Welehmau, in fact, they all hail from Ystalvfera. One is from Pantteg, and the other is from Gurnos. The Gurncsite has be. come a very keen fisherman, and every moment he can get he hies himself with his rod to the riverside. There are splendid fish in the Wylie, but, sad to say, as far as the Gurncsite is concerned they remain in the Wylie. For about a fortnight we were eagerly looking forwaid to some splendid freshwater fish for our breakfasts, but alas, the first meal we had of these delectable fish we had to buy—a Temmy had done the trick the Gurnosite had fuilod to do. But the lat- ter fe made of the right stuff, and stiJl persists in his fishing expeditions. The other evening he returned to the list wi high. glee. Ho had becii out over two hours, and was delighted with what he had accomplished "Mi ges dPooi blwc," was his triumphant ejneukatien. Owe of the moafc sfcrfdng features of life among the. new sol dfiws is th»ir fi-thejfeic eagerness the trM?'h-e? W ladders. They are bent, f?getJ?, :iRÀirHl!ly Iv-jut. on the Gieat Adr^HtiiBe, a«d «very sacrifice that prepares tbe#a foi- iiiiis is tolerated. They undergo twin- ivg willingly and gladly, because it flia tht-ai for the work A"d. But vrheu the time o»me# to ship tbe.sievef to 5j