Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
MERTHYR SEAT

MERTHYR SEAT. MR JAMES WINSTONE DEFINITELY CHOSEN. A Huge Majority. I MR STANTON RESOLVED TO GO TO THE POLL. By a card vote of 17.470 against 745, Mr James Winstome, president of the South Wales Miners' Federation, was adopted as the Labour candidate foT Merthyr Boroughs at a conference of the Labour Representation Committee «it Aberamman on Sa-turday evening. Three names had been sent in as fKxminatdoaie, viz., Mr James Wins:tome, Mr Toon (Griffiths, of the Steel JSmedters, Neath, and Mr C. B. Stam- ton. Mr Griffiths had notified his with- drawal, amd the press representatives gleanjed that Mr Stanton's nomination made by the Typographical Society, waB regarded ob being invalid, (not being axxxmr, anied by the requisite financial guarantee as to election ex- penses. There was consequently only one J name before the oomfereace, that of Mr Winston e. THE CONFERENCE. I It will be recalled that Mr Win- -sume's majority in the final voting of the recent balkvta of the miners was 1,600. The figures were:—Mr Win- atone, 7,932 j Mr Stanton, 6,232. The difference bctwew. the conference figures and those of the miners' ballot, Whidh shows such a substantial in- crease in Mr Wimstone's majority, may be explained as follows: Wheretw in the miners' baJlot each vote caet was an individual vote, the conference voting was a "card" re- turn, which means that delegates at- ttending the conference voted in ao- cordance with a mandate from thedr particular lodges, .which carried with it a, voting eitcnength not only of a majority, but the whole of the lodge membership. The conference was presided over by Oouincillkxr G. H. Hall, of Penrhiw- oeiber. After he had been adopted Mr Win- stone was welcomed by the conference, and delivered an address. "A TRUE BRITISHER." MR WINSTONE'S ADDRESS TO THE DELEGATES. Mr James Winstome, interviewed at his residence on Sunday, said he was more than satisfied and deeply moved by the very enthusiastic and umam- anous -reception given him at the con- ference at Aberamman on Saturdar night. He added: "I shall not easily for- get the gireat kindness shown to me, for which the only reason I can give is rtha4t I have remained true to my oocn- science and to the La.bour and demo- cratic principles,to which I pledged my life many years ago. A most remark- able feature of the conference was ifchat no word wjws spoken in any way detrimental to myself or my can- didature. It was admitted to be the best and most unanimous Labour oon- feremoe ever held in the Merthyr Boroughs, and it very favourably im- pressed Mr W. C. Robinson, J.P., Manchester, the representative of the National Labour party, who heard all that I had to say, and was perfectly satisfied. THE SPEECH. I "In my axldress I sand: "I have ail- ways ravocated and carried to success el sane, practical, industrial policy. I have never sacrificed the interests of the workers, although I have always paid due regard to the interests of the community. I have also advocated a cane, strong Labour movement, pro- moting all thait is noblest and best in the lives of our people, and I have pghyed my parfc in the religious, edu- cational, national, industrial, amd political life of Wales. On these points I take my at and. It JIs not my fault, trat rather my favour, that the miners' choice has fallen on me. I can only hope that I may be kept worthy i'n body, mind and spirit. True, I am- the nominee of the miners and have been elected in a siraigtfanvard, con- stitutional manner, and the conference is assured of the whole-hearted support of the Miners' Federation and Meithyr Boroughs labour Party. In, my opin- ion, the suggestion, that has been made that disloyalty prevails in one par-L of the constituency, and that the Labour party has been at no pains to dispel the suspicion incurred, is without foun- ,datio,n %nd irill if necessary, be satis- factorily dealt with. I say again tfhere is no need for me to publish my patriotism. A TRUE BRITISHER. 1 "Of course, I believe strongly in the I sacredness of human life, the oota.b- lishment^ of wound.and iust laws, and the rights of small rations. In Par- I liament or out of Parliament I shall be a tame Britisher, and therefore a. true patriot, not because I believe any the less in the futility of war as a civilising power, but because I love my country more. I want, and I shall work for a country with a people strong, clean and vv-ise in their de- liberations, and in their industrial and political progress." I QUESTION OF CONTEST. Asked if he thought there would be a contest, Mr Winstone replied:—"In the face of the world struggle between the military Powers I should think not. The essential policy for this country- is not to create difficulties or conteste between parties which might impair or perhaps destroy the true, and thus do irreparable injury to the unity of the forces which are engaged in the ardu- ous work of bringing the war to a speedy and successful termination. I undetratajid there has been no contest in any constituiency since the war com- menced. It wofuld hardly be good policy to faaat in the boroughs of Merthyr. I MR STANTON'S RESOLVE. I Seen, after the conclusion of the con- feremoo, Mr C. B. Stanton saJid :I am not surprised or alarmed at the vote. It shows that the L.R.C. is dominated by the I.L.P. When it comies to a ballot of those who have rotes in the electorate, and when I have a chanoe of getting around and putting my case, then there will be an opportunity of reversing the order. So far as I can. see now, the position is bright and cheerful. I learn from my friends that I have nothing to fear, and I shall go into this canitest whole- heartedly and forthwith." DEPUTATION TO MR STANTON. ] A deputation, of workmen in the Merthyr distriot wai-ted upon Mr C. B. Stanton at Aberda.re on Saturday evening to ask him to contest the con- etituency. Mr Stanrtjom replied, reiterating his dertjermixuation to come out and fight the seat. ——— + A « «

J WEST WALES SHELLS I

J WEST WALES SHELLS. I WORKERS fiLAD TO 'MAKE PRESENTS I FOR fiEBMANY." Shell workers at West Wales Munition Works—the steel oases are being made at a considerable number of establishments— do not disguise the fact that their heart and soul is in the wørk, of making "presents for Germany." The "presents" vary from different works in the country, though in West Wales a standard shell is produced pretty evenly. It is oommonly known as the 18 pounder a beautifully turned work of skill, drilled from a solid bar, and subse- quently filled with high explosives. So true is the mechanical part of the process that on placing the counterpart of what has been drilled out—in the form of a solid bar with cross handle attached for, convenience—into the shell case, it gra- dually sinks with a bobbly movement and fits with not a hair's breath to spare. The story of the shells is a romance of industry, and the nnished article berk.Z the highest form of technical skill. "Why' it is often asked, "are not unskilled men put on to this work ?''—and to glance at the processes simplicity would seem to almost cover technique. The answer is as simple as the question. To put unskilled men on would require more skilled super- intendence than involved by skilful labour at the machines. Much might be written of the production of the raw material, the careful analysis that are made, and the drills and lathes that fashion the solid steel into the stubby looking shells. The acme of skill is represented in the construction of the machines—it is said in the up-to-date engineering workshops to-day machines are automatically engaged making other machines. One sees for in- stance how the highly tempered drills are kept in their positions, how water follows the .revolutions to ease the friction—it goes in cold and comes out hot-and how the impassive solidneas of the metal is whisped up to the surface in thin cone- like forms, attached together sometimes like spiral shavings six inch es long. The tools that do this work do it so quietly and effectively and quickly that one ad- mires the mechanism as though it were endowed with life. And take the hollowed shell, with its grooved neck awaiting to receive the cap. You can peer inside by means of a globule of electric light, which shows you the perfectly moulded silver aides and bottom. There is not a whisper of a. crease, a line or a stain. Its smoothness is of velvet, with its perfect sheen of white- ness. The men w ho make these things say little—enquiries are not invited,-but they do much; they, with all of us, want to see more engaged upon this work up and down the land, but very often the best fitters and mechanics are the best fighters, and there comes a little diffi- culty that is slowly but surely being solved. Nothing impres-qea you more about a shell than its perfection. In our work- shops they all work to definite' pattern a.nd weight. And so if you balance two shectf3 and to weigh them you would find in all proha-bility that there was not a difference of the turn of the scale be- tween them. And these are our "presents" to Ger- many.

I PAYING FOR THE WAR

PAYING FOR THE WAR. MR PHILIP SNOWDEN CRITICISES GOVERNMENT METHOD. NATIONAL DEBT POLICY CON- DEMNED Mr Philip Snow den, M.P., on Sun- day afternoon addressed a largely at- tended meeting (ovetr which Councillor David Williams presided at the Ely- sium, Swansea. Mr Snowdeui spoke on 'The Budget,' and he condemned the policy of piling up the national debt, and advocated the policy which Pitt so successfully adopted during the last ten years of war which terminated with Waterloo, viz., that of raising funds required cfrom taxation. Amongst the ineivitable results. which would follow the piling: up of -the national debt, he said, would be the stoppage of such schemes as had for their object the improvement of the condition of the masses and permanent increase in house rents. I RATES OF INTEREST. Dealing with the increased rates of interest which the present policy would he said, make on borrowed money- which would not decrease after the war, and would be as high as 8 per oen/t. for ind/usitrial enterprises—he went on to say that people who pro- filed from wars must be the people to pay for war. So far tihe wealthy and property classes of the community had not paid one half of half per cent, of their capital wealth towards the war, and assuming that the wealth of the nation was between 10,.000 millions and 15,000 millions there was still plenty left there for the purpose of paying for the war. Our method of raising taxation had always been quite wrong. We had begun the wrong way. The place to pratise economy was not with the underpaid agricultural labour- er, hut where there had been an aJ- together unwarraated and private ex- penditure in the past. At these times no man ought to have means to spend in luxuries, while many people were making sacri fices they could ill afford to make. It had been said thait the man with an income of £ 100,000 a year had to pay as much as L33,000 a year in income tax. But he still had £67,000 to live on, while the man earn- ing 30s. a week had to contribute in ih- direct taxation E10 a year, or 4s a week; and a man could not afford 4s in t&xation with increased prices of the necessaries of life; the result was do- terioration ini the physical condition of the people, amd unless we were careful we should have a terrible decline in the physical condition of our people such as occurred in France after the Napole- oftuc wars. Anything tending to bring about such a result- should be opposed by every power-we had. I CONSCRIPTION. I As to conscription, he said, as far as many advocates of this was concerned, its advocacy was actuated by a desire mot so much to win the war as a de- liberate policy to raise a permanent obstacle to the onward march of the democratic movement. AVar was al- ways a time w hen the liberties of the people were filched away. Concluding, he said they all waited to see this waa- brought to a spedy and successful issue, but we must so ocm- centrate ou £ efforts and thoughts as to protect all the other important things we want. He might have been re- garded as something like a Jeremiah or a" Job, but he asked his audience not to think he was a pessimist. He was not. He believed ultimately some good might ooane out of this terrible war. There was never a black cloud tha,t had not some spot of silver lining, and the darkest hour was that before dawn, and he thought when e waa- was over they would see that there had been saved from the wreckage a good deal of the spirit of universal goodwill, and those who had been try- ing to do something for international charity and goodwill were the people who were making conditions for a pesr- mn-nent peace possible. This was a time,wdion principles were being tested. Those built on sand had been swept away, and those built on rock stood though the heavens shook. Later in the day, Mr Snowdon ad- dressed a crowded audience at the Pub- lic Hall, Briton Ferry, under the pices of the local I.L.P. Councillor Gv H. Oolwill, Swansea, presided.

TEACHERS DOWNFALL

TEACHER'S DOWNFALL. A labourer named David John Rees, who had ben arrested at the Pembrey Munition Works, was charged at Am- ma.nford on Monday with larceny, ag a bailee of 30s. for Alexander Harvey, fore- man quarryman at Llandebie Quarry. Prisoner lodged and worked with the pro- secutor and on the pretence of buying a pig for the latter secured 30s. from his wife. It transpired that the prisoner was a native of Rhyiraiey, Mon., had been edu- cated -at Pontlottvn, and afterward s at Ystradmourig Colloge and Aberystwyth Collage. He became a teacher at Pont- 1 brt, drink had been 'his down- fall. J He was sentenced to one month's im- prisonment.

I SHIRKERS IN MINES I II

I SHIRKERS IN MINES. I II MR BRACE SAYS TH-E PRAC- TICE IS TO BE STOPPED. » THE BADGE OF UNFITNESS. I Mr William Brace, M.P., the Under- Secretary of State for Home Affaire, accompanied by Mr Henry Herbert, representing the MiL "try of Munit- ions, addressed a m.e, ilg at the Town- hail, Pontypridd, on Sunday. Mr Ben Davies, J.P. miners' agent, presided. The Chairman, referring to the pro- posed badge to be worn by the men, said it was bad enough for a young man to be inflicted with a physical in- capar-ity without having to parade that fact about the street. He was willing to a badge of exemption, but not for rejection. (Applause). Besides, those men might suffer in being deharred the minimum wage. Mr Brace remarked that he was sure the Government did not desire physically unfit men to wear a. badge which would mark them out, and pos- sibly prevent them from obtaining work when they sought it. One badge should be suffident for aJI men to wear, wbothet upon work at munitions or rejected as unfit. There were people, he said, who spent their time in belittling their country and praising the deeds of their enemies. No man had the right to accept the privileges of the British Commonwealth unless in the days of stress avid trial he took his share of the responsibilities. In oammeautahg upon. Gerjaany over- running Belgium, Mr Brace was dramatic. "My God," he said, "what a world it is unless it can be made im- possible for anyone again to wipe away little nations as if they never existed a^ all. (Applause). They had been tJold that men- were emigrating to those valleys in order to avoid their military obligations. That must be stopped. (Cheers). He was an anti-comeoriptian- ist, but how could he be unless they were given men by voluntary means to throw back the German attack on liberty and humanityP (Applause). Speaking of his recent visit to the front, Mr Brace said he did not. find there any gsrumblens or naggers. Our Army was growit

PROMOTION FROM RANKS

PROMOTION FROM RANKS. THIRTEEN BRECONSHIRE TER. RITORIALS RECOMMENDED. Lord Glanusk, the commanding officer of the Brecknock Battalion of the South WaJea Borderers, has recommended the following non-commissioned officers and men of his battalion for commissions as second-lieutenants in the new armies. The men have already reached home from Mhow India :— Sergeants D. G. Webster (Brecon), Grant (Hay), Clarke, a schoolmaster of Brynmawr; Privates Yorath (law student, Cardiff, and a son of the Cardiff City coroner) J. G. Bussel. (Cardiff), D. M. Cule (Cardiff), Gerald Tudor (Brecon), A. Coppage (Brecon), Leslie Heins (Bre- con), H. H. Davies (Merthyr), T. Lloyd (Aberdare), W. L. Hughes (Brecon), D. Bemon Davies (Usk), Powell (Here- ford). Relating some of hia experiences, one of the men told a reporter that at Aden, to which the battalion first went at the end of October of laat year, the heat was terribly trying, and there was a good deal of sickness. They are now in a, cooler climate, surrounded by green trees and grass, which remind them of home. The beneficial results of the removal soon be- came apparent in the improvement in the men's physical condition, and they are now thoroughly fit. The conditions at their present station are very favourable for training on a large scale. .————-

IWASTE IN THE TRENCHES

I WASTE IN THE TRENCHES. Much has been heard in Parliament and out of it in reoent weeks about the seiriousi amount of waste of various kinds which is alleged to be going on in the trenches, and officers (.tl1 leave from the front have provided first-hand informa- tion on the subject. Now, however, it is announced that Mr. John Hodge, M.P., who has just returned from France, has brought with him a perfect armoury of evidence as to how public money is being wasted wholesale in that most important centre of hostilities.. His information, gained from officers and men of our I Expeditionary Force, goes to show that "thousands" of tins of bully beef and "millions" of unfired cartridges are lying wasted and spoilt about the trenches. The supplies of the former are apparent- ly invariably dealt with little or no re- 1 gard to the varying nature of the de- mand, and it is the exception rather than the rule to find any check whatever placed upon the careless losing of the latter. Mr. Hodge, who is well-known in Wales as the agent of steel smelters, will find an opportunity to draw the at- tention of the War Office to this sub- ject during the forthcoming Vote of Credit debate.

rIVORW ART AGAlfl

.r. I "VORW ART AGAlfl. BERLIN SOCIALIST PAPER SUSPENDED. ITS INDICTMENT OF THE KAISER'S GOVERNMENT. The German Socialist paper "V or- waerts," which has been suspended for pointing articles criticising the Govern- ment's policy regarding the food supply and other maft.ters, sent out. handbills stating that the Sunday edition was ready for distribution in time, but that the permission of the, Censor for its sale could 'not be obtained." (A French official note circulated by the Wireless Press mentions that the "Vorwaertg" declared that the towns of Germ.any are scarce of pavvisions in spite of all the requisitioning on the part of the Government. Flour, milk, meat and fat substances are especially scarce ). I HUNGER CRIES. A message from Lausanne quotes a manifesto issued by German Social De- mocrats oca the subject of the high prices of food, and published in "Vor- waerts. It says: "The situation of the labouring class is becoming intoler- a.ble. Great misery already prevails in Germany. Winter is at hand and the situation will become worse. Enough of promises. Enough of words. It is the time far energetic measures." The following manifesto calling upon the people of Leipzig to attend a public meeting of protest against high prices has just appeared in the Leipzig "Vel- kszeitung" "Women and men consumers, the exploiting of the people must stop. From day to day the prices of the necessities of life mount up. Whilst the sons of the workers, are bleeding on the battlefields intolerable famine oppresses the people everywhere at home. It is for us to protest against this state of things. Roll up in your numbers to the protest meeting. Everybody over 18 years of age will be admitted." In reproducing this manifesto, a Swiss Stxrialist new says: "Wan hunger stalks through Germany. POTSDAM POLICY AT- 1 S'TAfJITET). "WAR, WHY?" AND "PEACE, I WHEN?" T (The article quoted ibelow appeared, in the "Vorwaerts" before its suspen- sion) The "Vorwaerts" of Berlin published an article last Friday entitled "The War to a Finish." For boldness of utterance this iaaicl has never been surpassed since the beginning of the war. "Vorwaerts" at once makes it clear that neither England nor France shows amy desire for yielding, and that all the talk of peace, so far at least as France and England are concerned, is absolutely without foundation. The leading statesmen of France and England says "V orwaerts" are as firmly determined as the Imperial Chancellor to continue the war until victory has crowned their arms. I LONDON AND PARIS VIEWS. On November 2 and 3, Mr Asquith and M. Briamd explained to the' repre- sentatives of England and France the aspect which the events of the war had in their eyes. They pointed out that the German troops had not been able for months to advance beyond the lines which they had held, that in certain places in fact the Allies had driven the German troops back. They pointed out that the Russians were immovable, that the Dardanelles campaign, allthough in some respects, a failure, help up a large Turkish army that in the Caucasus and in Mesopo- tamia the Russians and the British were reaffly dangerous, and that in the Balkans, although the advance of the Germans and Bulgarians caused some anxiety, there was nothing which need bring despair to the Allies. WHO SAID "PEACE THIS YEAR?" I "Vorwaerts'' points out that it al- togefther depends on how such mat-t-ers a.re presented- The British and French present ations are, of course (says the Berlin paper), erroneous, nonsetnsical, and ridiculous, foait there they are, and to speak of an immediarte peace in pre- e-ence of such statements is jvorse tiban ridiculous. "And who was it that spoke of peace before Christmas? "The question for us (Germany) to consider it: What is this victory to which we are looking forward to be like ? What objects are to be obtained ? Victory is a relative term, and different statesmen mean different things when they use this word. "In autumn 1914 Mr Asquith de- clared that England would not sheathe her sword until Belgium had been com- pensat-ed for all the sacrifices she had madte, until France was assured against every threa,t of attack, until the smaller nationalities of Europe were safe in their existence, and unril the military domination of Prussia had been completely and finally destroyed. "This programme," says 'Vorwaerts/ "is not quite clear, and contains too an any phrases. 7 1 WHY? WHITHER? One would have thought (continues the German. Socialist writer) that, after 15 months of the most terrible war which the world has ever seen, statesmen ought to be able to render a, more precise aiiswer to uhis question. One would haye tJlOught that they might have been Able to tell the nations why they are shedding their blood, wliatt what tlio P-i-izo is for which they are striving; but instead of ail this we have nothing but phrases like "the de- fence of one's Fatherland," "Free- dom, "Justice, "Kultur"—- phrases which mean nothing to-day. They arc simply wo j vis, nothing more. Does it not really appear as though these statesmen of all parties feared to betray their plains r' And it is not France and England alone who veil their conditions of peace in fog. I UNTRUTH AN-1) CONCEAL- I MENT. The German Government is just as reserved, and whenever it has ex- pressed iteelf regarding the objects of this war it has confined itself to rhrasc-s w!hich, however suitable they may be in firing the enthusiasm of ■soldiers when about to mafce an attack, are nevertheless wanting in the neces- sary clearaces which we wculd like to havje with regard to !Gcrrx,any e, in- tentions. For 12 months we have been listening to what is not true. Surely it cannot be taken amiss if we express a, desire to hear once in a way wliat IS true, and what the Ge.rman Government really consider is th eir object in this war. This cannc.t go on for ever, that battle after battle is fought, that our troops are carried to new theatres of war, and that the people through all this complexity of war iiever get to know what is happening, or what we arc striving to aitain in order that the belli, of peace may sound foavh. WANTED—A PROGRAMME. I We are told that it is "the others" who must ibeg for peace, for we are the victors; but unfortunately "the others" do not feel themselves vanquished, in this way we come to no rebuilt. The war goes ooi unendingly, because bhotb parties are anxious not to limit, and not even to utter their demands. They are afraid lest- this opeuflafiss might be regarded as a sign of weak- ness, and: so it may happen that this mar may end with the complete ex- haustion of aN. If that is to be pre- vented, the Governments must. leave the region, of genoralisatioDs and get hoid Qf 1\ i>ci?mre programme. If they are unable to do this, if they themselves have no clear picture of their aims and intent-ions, then let the flood gates of public discussion be opened In that case there would soon be clearness, and we hope that there would soon be peace.

JA BOGUS HERO

A BOGUS HERO. I FUSS MADE OF NEATH IMPOSTER I At Gloucester police court Walter Gibbon Davies, alias Hopkins, whose address wa.s giv-en as Bastga.te-terrace, Neath, was charged with unlawfully wearing the D.C.M. military decoration contrary to section 41 of the Defence of the Realm Act. There were other chaj^ec of obtaining board and lodging under false pretences. Prisoner, who is a one-logged man, pleaded guilty to the first charge, but not guilty to the others. Inspector John Why ton, stationed at Gloucester, said prisoner had been living in Gloucester for the past five weeks, representing himself as an cx- corporal in the South Wales Borderers, and had been made a great fuss of. On the 13t.h of October he met him in So uth gato-srfcreet, a aid asked him to give (him some proof that he was an ex-Army man. Prisoner asstired him he lost his leg in the retreat, from Moais to Paris, amd was an ex-corporal in the South Wales Borderers, receiving his pension, from Shrewsbury. On taking him to. the police station he ad- mitted he had never been in the Army, and said, "The game's up." He alt-P boasited he had presented the Mayor of Bristol with two dum-dum bullets. I Prisoner, who admitted losing his leg in a. break aceidetnt eight years ago, said his intention wais to get recruits for the Army. Several preViious con- victions at. Neath were proved, includ- ing assa,ults on his father. Prisoner was fined £ 10, or two mcoKths' hard labour.

THE MERTHYR BYEELECTION

THE MERTHYR BYE-ELEC- TION. In connection with the Moit-hyr- Tydfil bye-election, the President of tjio Merthyr Liberal Federation stated that they did not propose to bring out their second prospective candi date, Mr Arte, mus Jones. The Unionists have con- vened a meeting of their Association, but it is not expected that they wilt take any aftioa, and so if there will be any contest, ilt will be between Mr C. B. Stanton, who will run independ- ently, and Mr J. Winstone, the candi- date of the Merthyr Boroughs Labosur

IMINERS AND ENLISTMENTI

I MINERS AND ENLISTMENT. SERIOUS I FFECT ON COAL SUPPLY. <. I GOVtRNMENT ACTION. —————— The following official notice w h' ch is being posted at coal mines, Is itsucd by the Frets Bureau "The ooalminers hava already joined the Army in such large numbers that the supply of coaJ, which is of vital national interest, ie seriously affected. Miners one a.nd all must remember that upon their efforts tho success of the country depends- no less than upon the men who are serv- ing: with the forces. "Those who offer themselves as rn-ruita will onlybe accepttd on the condition that. they go back to work in the mine until they are called upon. They will be given armlets to show th-t they axe wiilu.g Ur obey the call, ajid do whatever will rciost. help their country, but in the meantime it is vitcl that they should not desist from producing the coal, without which, vic- tory is impossible. "The notice applies to all men who .a.r&. working below ground, and the following- classes of surface workers winding en- ginemen, pumpmen, weighmen, electri- cians, fitters and mechanics." JOHN SIMON, Home Secretry. DERBY, Director-general of Re- cruiting. Homo Office, Nov. 8. Great efforts have been made to main- tain and increase the production of coal, but the problem of the coal supply is still critical, asys the Press Association. It is not merely that coal is vital for th&- Navy and for the manufacture of muni- tions, it is equally vital for transport, and for carrying on manufactures, the- export of which is eesential to financing the war. his nooded not only for our own country, but also for the Allies, and at. the present time large supplies of coat are neede4 for France, which must coma from this country. Coal miners as & class have aloady responded to the call for recruits in such largo numbers, that no less than 259,000 had joined th," new armies by mid-summr, and this rumbr- had since increased. In these eiteum* stance the necessity of ma.int.1,inin our coal supply, and ak the same time of re- guhiVng further recruiting in the raining industry, has callcd for caj^ful (}C;:idq atlon.

I THOUSAND MEN WANTED FOR TIE WELSH GUADS r

I THOUSAND MEN WANTED FOR T.IE WELSH GUADS. r Cohwiel Storey Clitheroe, who La in comman d of the Reserve Battalion uf tlia, Welsh Guards, together with Captain. Rhys Williams, D.S.O., have visited Car- diff for the purpose of consulting the Lord Mayor and the recruitng authorities in- Clan-iorgau with regard to raising a thou- sand men for the Welsh Guards. It was felt that by consultation w;th the.. recruiting authorities a.nd the lcrd Mayor suggestions might be obtained as- to how the additional ir

I CYPRUS AND THE WAR

I CYPRUS AND THE WAR. A YEAR OF, BRITISH RULE. A report on the affairs of Cyprus few the year 1914-15 has just been issued. The island wae annexed just a >^ear ago, immediately on fhe outbreak of war with Turkey, and the announcement of annexation was received generally with enthusiasm, not only by the Christian population, but by a large majority of the Moslem On the outbreak of war in August, 1914, martial ilaw was proclaimed in Cyprus, and has continued in foreo ever eincte. In no way, however, has its existence impeded the normal liberties of the general public. Since the outbreak of war the island has givem its assistance in a variety of ways. The services of several officials have been lent to his Majesty's Naval and Military Force, and assistance, and special facilities an d permits for ex- port have been given in the matter of purchasing supplies of live stock, food- stuffs. and other products for troops in f^ypt,#Malta, and elsewhere.