Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE WAR OF THE LANDLORDSI

THE WAR OF THE LANDLORDS I Scotland Draws the Sword. I (By W. C. Amxlerson, iNf. P.) I Rent-raising fsctora and iiooi&e-ownors have aroused keenest resentment thruugh- out Scotland. There had never beèn much aympatily in Scotland/ between landlord and tenant, whether the landlord was cmner of la-iwi or houses. Time wa., when fciie landlords had everything their own way, when they could bully and threaten I And domineer without challenge, when tenants appeared to accept their position as creatures of mean destiny and baser day. Who con forget the picture drawn with swift sure hand by Burns in cue of the most fam(nls of his poems :— "I've notie'd on our laird's court today, And mony a time my heart's been wae,  Poor t?najYt bodies, scant o' cash, HB> How they m&un thode a factor's smash He'll stamp am' threaten, curse an' swear, He'll apprehend them, poind their gep,r While they mAuji &taji', wi' aspect humble An' hoa;r. a', an' fear a.n' tremble!" THE NEW TENANT. I Whether there has been much change since in the spirit of landiordiarn may be doubted, but at all events there has been A big change in the spirit of the tenants. New a.nd liberating movements have been at work, the Socialist schoolmaster has been abroad, and the temper and outlook of the people have undergone something in the nature of a revolution. The land- lords are no longer looked upon as the custodians of a heaven-sent and eternal system not to be tampered with by the vulgar and profane. The present ar- rangement is definitely challenged by hun- dreds of thousands of discriminating minds. What is worae, theories are put into practice, and tenants in Glasgow and elsewhere steadfastly refuse to pay higher vent.s. And that, ae Lord Rosebery would put it, is the end of all things. A number of Scottish towne have linked up with each other, so that common ac- wcm may be lateen against rent-raisuig cinter-p-m-e. Tenants are advised to re- fuse to pay increased rent, efforts are made to protect them against eviction, and a call is made upon the Government for drastic and immediate action. A Leith speaker at a protest meeting st "toed that in one working-claes street in the burgh, rents had boon advanced bit 3Qs. and £2 a year on previous reTItal of S12 and -215. One woman, whose land- lord notified her of her increase in rent, bad two eons burned to death in tiie Gretna disaster, whilst her husband and remaining son are at present fighting in the Dardanelles. Men who have re- sponded to the plea that they should go And fight for their horooe will net hear with any special enthusiasm of these home attacks on their wives and children. Men who have Bacrificed everything, a good wage, security, health, the happiness and comfort of family life, in order to endure the long-drawn-out hell of the trenches, are hardly likely to understand why the landlord should not pay his own share of the increased burden of income tax. BL ABERDEEN AND DUNDEE. j Ir In Aberdeen the increase in rent equals from 10 to 15 per oent., and a strong and united appeal has gone from the Labour organisations to the Government. At a J packed and enthusiastic meeting held in she Music Hall buildings, Aberdeen, a resolution was adopted asking the Gov- ernment to suspend all increases of rent and also to etay proceedings against I teiuunts who were threatened with evic- tion, pending the result of the Govern- ment enquiry. The president of the Aber- ( deen Trad ea Council, who took the chair at the meeting, urged the tenants to: bake no notice whatever of the rent mis- sives by means of which tenants were being apprised of increase of from 10s. to ?2 a y«?r. There apptwo to be keen | feeling in Aberdeen on the rent question, and that dour and stubborn people, if they care to do so, cau give a lot of trouble to the factors. In Dundee the Rente Agitation Com- mittee are very active. Tenants have de- clined to pay more rent or to be evicted, and the local branch of the Scottish Horse 3-d Motor Men's Association have inti- mated that they will refuse to remove furniture from or to houses where tenants I' We on strike. Many monthly tenants nave got notice to quit or pay more Tent, but they will "sit tight," and the fur Kepreeentatioui Conunittoo and Trad es Council will be behind them and will pay for such. legal assistance as may be necessary. Mr. Llayd George, who haa been informed of the circumstances of the Dundee position, replies that the Government has the matter in hand. I "BEATEN TO A STANDSTILL." Happily the tenants also have the mat- Len- pretty well in hand themselves. Num- beta of landlords, taking alarm at the various developments, are endeavouring Gather to reach a compromise wiHi the t-t,s, or to beat a retr?At. In sev?r? caees the landlord has offered to accept j tJ4 his origins.] demand. "In another case, says the "Dundee Advertiser," "after repeated effurte to compromise matters had completely failed, the laud- j lorrd, who vrae much perturbed over the j exhibition of increase-resisting pla-cards in f the windows of his property, cancelled his d-enmad altogether." It ii-, a wife land- lord who knows when he is beaten. The Dundee and District Union of Jute and i; Workers have told the Prime Minis- ter, Lord Kitchener and other o'ficial people that, unless steps are instantly taken to protect the tenant?. serious j trouble may arise in the city. An official Glovernm&nt enquiry will be held in Dundee. Space forbids me to mention what is happening in Paisley. Ayr and other Scottish towns. As for Glasgow and dis- tinct, which has really been the generating -vtation of the whole movement of resis- tance, so much publicity has been given to the happenings thare that it is almost •»!$knece £ :s3.ry for me to allude to them. !? ?. rumon-ed. tJM?gh I canmt vouch ?br the truth cf the rumour, th?t German said is fitvly distributed among some (ihsgow lino lords >n or-cLer that they 11:;> cSux-o discont-fiit ttouMe y the CIvdc. At- rite, the rtern ard upberr?irg corsduct of the Clyde Iard- lord", ifa quoted v.ith warm approval in ifa" (vermin nuT'tariflfc press, and one jjirr-;?] goes so fir .16 to remark that sOrre Scotch ooqjld give points to »e:ar» it! raW-raVlling. But I repudiate emphatically this unjust as- persion, for the only thing a Glasgow I landlord takes a joy in rattling afpe the ba.wbees. PATHOS AND VALOUR IN GLASGOW. Councillor Dollan, of Glasgow, v. ho has I fought like a Trojan on this question, cites two cases showing tlil sort of people I v.'ho are threatened with eviction. I\i v. Andrew l-bod, the editor of the "Partick Gazette," was served with an ejectment notice, and on the day the eviction waB timed to take place, he had staying in the house with him a wounded brother frc-m the trenches. Another tenant threa- tened with eviction was Thomas Garvin, an old age pensioner, living by himself; whose fault was that he refused to pay the increase in his rent. It Lkes not a few eloquent recruiting speeches to wie I out the memory of these incidents. About ten thousand tenants in the Glasgow district are on strike against in- creased rents and the houses a.re strongly picketed when there is danger of evic- tion. It is clear from letters that have come from France that the question of housing and increased 'rentals ia being dis- cussed by many of the ScottiBh soldiers at the Front. As for the unrest at home, it haa b?Mi so great aa to lead to the Government enquiry before Lord Hunter and Professor Scott. Working-class hens- ing standards are far too low in Scotland. For a good many years before the war came, private enterprise was practically stagnant. The supply of houses did not keep pace with the demand, and many ten-mta were obliged to live in houses absolutely unfit for human habitation. Owing to the almost complete suspension of building operations and the great migration of munition workors to the Clyde Valley, the difficulties which exist- ed before the war have been very much aggravated since. Workers, bccausc, of the famine in houses, are put to no end of hardship and inconvenience; private enterprise has ooirpit tr-lv broken dOWJ)" and the one tiling the landlords can think of doing is to put up the rents. The Glasgow tenants ha.ve learned one quite sound lesion. Th:y have discovsrrd thank-* mainly to the teaching of the Labour men in Glasgow, that Govern- rrents help thuse w ho help themf-eivrs. Acoept inj ustice meekly, and nothing will be done; resist it g.trorgly, ajsd everything els-, enquiries, legislation, redress, will be added unto you. They conquer who believe they can. ————— O—

STREET BETTING AT CLY DACH

STREET BETTING AT CLY DACH. Heavy Fine Inflicted. I Thomas Loader, Vera-road, Clydach, was changed with loitering in Vardre-road Clydach, for the purpose of receiving bets. P.C. Marks said tha-t on October 27, he was on duty in Vardre-road, when between 1.30 and 1.35 a.m. he saw several men go up to defendant, and hand him something that appeared to be slips of paper, and money. Witness told him that he was going to arrest him for street betting, and he then ejaculated "What, me!" a.nd the constable replied "Yes." He took the man to the police station, and found that he had in his possession 26 bettin.g slips representing 96 bets, foot- bz;ll coupons, £5 6s. 6-1d. in money, and other things relating to horse racing. He charged and cautioned the man who made no reply. Defendant told the Bench that there liz..d been "a little arrangement" between himself and a few workmen at the Mond, where he also had been employed. De- fendant did not realise live seriousness of his offence. He was a married man and had already suffered punishment by being dismissed from his employment and or- dered to leave the company's house which he occupied. The company had given him an excellent character (which he pro- duced) and he urged the Bench to be lenient towards him. He had aerved many years in the army. The Bench imposed a fine of £ 10, and the Chairman said the money found on defendant would be used in part payment of the penalty. He must find the rest.

GRAIN FROM ARCHANGELI

GRAIN FROM ARCHANGEL. THE ENORMOUS EXPANSION OF RUSSIA'S WHITE SEA PORlf "There has probably never been a more noteworthy expansion in the trado of any particular port in such a short time than haa occurred at Archangel during the last year (says the American Commercial At- tache at Petrograd. in a report to his Government). From a comparatively unimportant port about a year ago, dependent chiefly upon its sawmills and fishing fleet for the'pros- perity, it has suddenly become one of the nbost important ports in the world, rivaling even New York in the number and tonnage of ships arriving and de- parting between about May 1, and the clone of ice-free navigation. "Larger preparations than ever are be- i ig planned to meet the traffic for next spring. "Archangel haa become one of the most important wheat-exporting ports of the world; apparently much of the wheat formerly exported from Black Sea or Bal- tic ports is now shipped from here. In August it was said that about 1,000,000 poods (18,000 short tons) was lving in port, while 15,000,000 or 20,000,000 poods (270,000 to 360,000 short tons) had been shipped since May."

Advertising

j PIANOFORTE AND ORGAN TUNING. UEIMIRS of EVERY DESCRIPTION Tinrt ChifiB Work, Moderate Charges PIANOS TUNED FROM ;te.6d. JAMES TARR, Compton Terrace, Ystalylera

PONTARDAWE MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE

PONTARDAWE MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE. HEARING AT ASSIZES. I DISMISSED AFTER LONG HEARING. I The Ynysaneudwy manslaughter oharge came on for hearing at Glam- organ Assizes on Tuesday before the Right Hon. Lord Coleridge. Thomas Thomas (38), mason, was indicted for "that he did feloniously kill and siay David Thomas, his brother, on August 30th." Mr Marlav Samson (instructed by Mr Lawrence Richards) prosecuted, and Mr Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr Morgan Davies, Pontardawe) de- fended. Prisoner pleaded not guilty. The case for the prosecution was thsut deceased called at prisoner's house. He then appeared to be under the influ- ence of drink, and tried to get hold of prisoner's wife in a rough wa.y. Priaoner resented this, picked up a poker, amd struck his brother on the head. Later, deceased went to bed, and shortly afterwards it was discover- ed that he had fallen, downstairs, split- ting his skull. Dr. Evarfe was called in, but could do nothing, amd Thomas died ait about eleven o'clock that night, without regaining consciousness. Counsel argued that although de- ceased was sufficiently conscious to go home after receiving the blow, dizzi- ness 6ll9UOO later as the result of the blow, and this cwuwd him to fall dowm- ata-ii-s. Evidence bearing out counsel's state- ment was given by deceased's daugh- i ter, by John Thomas, brother of d&- ceased, am.d by Wyndham Thomas, son of the deceased. DOCTOR'S EVIDENCE. Dr. Evans, Ponuirdawe, gave the re- svfJit of his post-mortem examination, Ln his opinion, death was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull, due to the fall downstairs, and not to the blow on the head, which was not a severe one. He did not notice any j sign of drink. j Sergeant John Wood detailed prisoner's account of what happened as told to the police. "He came up here," said prisoner, "to make a row; he was going to strike my wife, and I hit him on the head with a- poker to defend myself." Prisoner, an oath, said that at the time of his brother's death he was working with his brother's son. His brotther came to his house and struck and aibused his wife. He told prisoner he would kill him if he caught him in his back yard again. Deceased struck his wife, giving her a black eye. Wit- iness told his brother to stand back, and, as he did so, the poker slipped amd hit his head. ) After a, long hearing, the case ended in a verdict of "Not Gruiity," and prisoner was discharged. j i

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, j can be consulted daily at the Victoria I Arcade (near tha Market), Swansea

r Pontardawe Employer and the War

r Pontardawe Employer and the War; J STRIKING ADDRESS AT SWANSEA. Coal Strike A Heavy Dis- grace." » Mr Gilbertson and Employers' Profits. The twenty-eighth annual general meeting of the Incorporated Swansea. Met.1J. Exchange was held at that, build- ing on Tuesday afternoon, presided over by the president, Mr F. W. Gil- berteon, J. P., head of the firm of W. G-ilberusom and Co., Ltd., steol manu- facturers and tin and sheet makers, Pontardawe. There was a large at- tendance. Mr Gilbertson, in the course of his ajddress from the chair remarked upon the improvements effected in the build- ings and premises of the Exchange since the last meeting. The new i offices rented by the Tinjplate Associa^ tion have also been a great convenience I to them. He did not make any observations upon the course of their trades since the last annual meeting. The present was not the time to measure production I I amd demand, and the commercial pro- speote of their industries, and he thought they were influenced in thedr actions by one consi deration only-how beat they could serve the country's needs and assist in the paneecution of war. NATURE OF STRUGGLE REALISED I Since the last meeting, the serious nature of the struggle had been better realised, and the disregard of nearly akll t-hat distinguiahes Christian from Pagan habits of life, and civilisation from barbarism, by our enemies, had united our people and our Allies in a stem determination to fight on until victory is won, whatever the sacrifice may be. Our Government had seen fit to use the powers of the Censor to preverut general knowledge of unpalatable fams, a policy he considered foolish in dealing with men of our race, and the result had been that those who did not probe dieepfly imo the news given us, who read the headlines of the evening papers, and who had no acquaintance with men connected in some way with the conduct of affairs, were only now beginning to realise-many have not yet reaili-sed-rhat we are fighting for our lives, and nothing but the full illation's effort could be expected to bring victory against enemies so well RMpaj-ed, so efficient amd well organ- iwd and aD muncrous as our enemies were. GREED AND NARROW OUTLOOK. Proceeding, Mr Gilbertson said: "The record of strikes and the dread- I ful experience we all have had of greed, selfishness, and narrow outlook among lrurge groups of our working classes during the past year need any excuse we cam properly furnish, or in years to come will be remembered with bitter shame by those who have so acted, and contrasted with the extra- ordinary bravery, self-sacrifice, and the extraordina-rily patient suffering of hardship and pain displayed by the mil- lions who have not stayed at home, but have volunteered to fight the battle of civilisation. "An increase in the wages of the working class, sufficient to enable them to meet the extra cost of living, had only to be asked to be granted by the employers of the country generally, but increases that act/ually added to the purchasing power and the means of procuring pleasure of the working class were resisted, and rightly so, as no country can bear the present cost of a long war without general sacrifice and the limitation of expenditure upon pleasures amd luxuries. ATTACK ON THE MINERS. I "In this matter the behaviour of the men engaged in the industries carried on by members of this Exchange has been altogether better than that of the colliers of South Wales, who have dis- graced them-,elves in"a manner that will never be forgotten. It is unfor- tunate that Wales will have to bear this heavy disgrace in (history, since Welshmen no longer predominate in our coalfield, and the majority are as alien to Wa,les 38 the names of the majority of their leaders. "All these displays of solfishness wem, in my opinion, simply the result of ig- I' cnorance, and would never have occurred if our people had not been deildberately led to believe that the odds against us were lees than they are, and I think I see signs that, now the bare facts of the situation can no longer be cloaked, our working men are not going to let the country dowtn, and can be counted on to bear themselves in the manner which, as the King has reminded them, is but' their heritage. I EMPLOYERS' PROFITS. I "It is also probable that much harm has rmilt-ed from the country's ignor- ance of the Government's intentions in regard to employers' profits. If a de- finite policy had been announced at the commencement of the war the suspic- ion that the capitalist was exploiting the country and the working man, would not have gained the currency it did. I think I can ask your indulgence while I briefly state the experience of employers in the tirades of which I have knowledge. "When the war started their chief object was to keep thedr men employed and avoid the perils of general want, and they therefore made long sales at the low prices then ruling, not gener- ally foreseeing the coming rise of pricam amd the huge war demands. Some few industries and some individuals made very large profits before the Govern- ment plan of taxation was known, and not unnaturally such examples were taken to be representative of all. but in the industries in which I am en- ¡ gaged the pi-ofits during the first year of war were generally leas than normal. At the present time, however, the pro- fits in these industries are large, but the Government oi dealing with tliom is not yet kriown, except in the case of Contrailed Establishments. "The last Finance Act with its heavy income tax and snii-plus profits tax tells us how profits are to be dealt witli that accrued in tlie financial year that end- ed not later than July last, t.he period in which abnormal profits were not made in the indusftries represented here, but we do not yet know wliaf.-the surplus profits tax inay be in the cur- rent year in which tlhe demand on iron amd steel is iJikelv to exceed all records. I hold strongly that our working man cannot be expected to form a sound public opinion when this knowledge is denied us. I. TAXED TO EXTINCTION. I "If the net profits allowed to be re- tained by Capital are large, the work- men can justly claim a share, but if they are eventually taXed. to extinction, both workmen and employers have lived together in a fool's paradise, with the difference that, the employer's profits are still available for confiscation, but not tihe increased watgea that may have been demanded and granted in miscon- ception of the ultimate issue. "I think it is not open to question. that, the employers in ovir metal trades do not desire to make increased profits out of the war, and the larger sums they can return the Exchequer, taxed from their profits, the easier their cmfc sciences will be when in the future they look back upon their part in the war. "Ln the case of controlled establish- ments, the surpluis profits tax does not apply, the whole of the profits beyotud tihe standard being forfei-t to the State, and the only criticism I have to make is that by having announced two plans of dealing with surplus profits, one ap- plicable to last year to all, and the other applicable to controlled establish- ments only, and having still to an- nounce a plan for dealing with surplus profits in the current year, the Govern- ment is not dealing with am. even hand, and is still continuing that state of un- certainty which is so detrimental to. the relations existing between em- ployers and employed. "To sum up, what I wish to urge is that we all know how controlled estab- lishments stand, employers and work- men, too, and we know such works stand for the benefit of the State and not of individuals, but we do not know how the other establishments stand. Are they to be subjeot only to a 50 per cent. surplus profits tax in the next Finance Act, or are they to be sub- ject to a 100 per cent. surplus profits or what ? "If we knew, and if our working dlass knew, how much easier it would be to put selfish interrests aside and make bargains that aimed solely at the I na,t,ioned interest. A SPLENDID SPIRIT. I "I think mention should be made in our annual records of the splendid, spirit that now exists among the iron and steel manufacturers. No one. grudges time or (trouble, and many who posseasod jealously gua

Advertising

.ÿ+.++.+. + :L L .c.C i Lewis Lewis Af4009 t 9' 0 t t i Our various Departments are now replete I; with the Newest Goods suitable for Winter Wear. MILLINERY DEPARTMENT. 4 Smart and Inexpensive Ladies' Velours and | Black Velvet Hats. .1 Black Velvet Hats. ❖ T MANTLE DEPARTMENT. T ? A Varied Selection of Furs, Costumes, Blouses, +  Nap Coats, Coney Seal Coats, Children's Tunics.  Nap Coats, Coney Seal Coats, Children's Tunics. ? ? ❖ Dress Department.$ ? ——————————? ❖ t Nap Cloths in all colours, Covert & Serge Coatings f Nap Cloths in all colours, Covert a S.erge Coatings 1; ? A ? ? ? ? A Large ?c!ect!?n of Ladies' Striped ami Self Ct?oured SUk K'j?ed Scarves.  :v-<>><ç->-c: f O All the above Goods are marked at Prices which * ? All the above Goods are marked at Prices which ? J meet the present day requirements for Economy. ❖ ? meet the present day requirements ibr Eco?iomy. ? 27, 28, 29, HIGH STREET, S-WANS A. v LEWIS LEWIS (Swansea), Ltd. V

i I BUFFALOES FREE BRINES1 I

BUFFALOES FREE BRINES. INCIDENT OF A CHURCH PARADE. Margaret Iloes, Ecensoo of the Afon Vale Hotel, Cymmer, Afon Valley, was summoned at Aber-avon on Monday for supplying drink on her licensed premises on Sunday evening, October 17. Super- intendent Ben Evans prosecuted on be- half of the police, and Mr. Lewis M. Thomas defended. Superintendent Evans said that on the premises of the hotel a Buffaloe Club was held. On the date in question there was a Church parade by the Cymmer jund Glyncorrwg Buffaloes. One of the members went. to the local sergeant and got pormission from him for thl) members to fetch their regalia provided that no drink wiz supplied. When the membera returned at 6 p.m. from Glyncorrwg the police-sergeant went to the hotel and ) found eight men with drink in front of them. When the sergeant spoke to de- j fe.'idint she said that she had given the drinks to the members without change, j If the jus-tioea found that the d-rinks were free there was a provision in the licensing law to exonerate defendant. Mr. Lewis Thomas remarked upon the scrupulous fairness with which the prose- cution had put their case. The facts < were aa indicated in the evidence, and the police had no difficulty in getting in- to the hotel. J These men had, he said, gono to Glyn- corrwg to make a collection for Netley Hospita: -"heir motor-car had broken down, ai..i they had to walk back from Giyncorrwg, and Mrs Reos in a spirit of kindness gave the men a little refresh- i n, c-rit. The Bench held that defendant had shown great indiscretion in the matter, but Uio caa-s would bedismissod on pay- > mlt of costs with a. warning. I The eight men found on the licensed j premises were discharged on payment of I. costs. I

Advertising

HERBERT ROGERS. PRACTICAL SANITARY PLUMBER, GAS AND HOT WATER FITTER,