Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
26 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
TERRIBLE PLIGHT OF REFUGEES

TERRIBLE PLIGHT OF REFUGEES. ENGLISH NURSE'S LONG TRAMP. The New York United Press publishes a further dispatch from its special corres- pondent, Mr William G. Shepherd, dated Salonika, November 27, depicting the ter- rible sufferings of the Serbian population now fleeing through Albania before the advance of the invaders. The oorrespon- d.e.nt writes The entire world must prepare to shud- der when all that is happening on the Albanian refugee trails finally comes to light. The horrors of the flight of the hapless Serbian people are growing with the arrival here of each new contingent from the devastated district. They saw that nearly the whole route from Priz- rend to Monastix is lined with corpses of human beings and the carcases of horses and mules dead of starvation, while thou- sands of old men, women, and children are lying on the rocks and in the thickets beside the trail exhausted and foodlees awaiting the end. 50,000 AUSTRIAN PRISONERS. The hordes cf Serbians and Albanians, as well as the Austrian prisoners, of whom there are 50,000, who have been moving through this desolate country, have in some places, like vultures, stripped the flesh from dead animals to appease their hunger. At night the wo- men and children, ill-clad and numbed with cold, struggle pitifully about meagre fires of mountain shrub beside the trail, in the morning to resume the weary ma.roh toward their supposed goal of safcty-Monagt.ir. But by the time this dispatch is print- ed Monastir too, may be in the hands of the enemy. This will leave them to the mercy of the inhospitable mountain fast- nesses, where for the past two days a terrific blizzard has been raging—or to the Bulgarians. ENGLISH NURSES' LONG TRAMP. Among those who, after experiencing the terrors of the trail, have arrived safe- ly in Salonika are Dr. G. Landsborough Findlay and his wife, Lady Blanche Sibyl Findlay. They travelled in com- pany with a party of eight English doc- tors and sixteen English women nurses. All had trudged afoot for seven days through the Albaiiian mountains, MrJog paths buried in snow and mud. They were wofully short of supplies, even at the start of thoir journey, their food con- sisting only of bread, a small quantity of which they had commandeered. Fifteen of their twenty pn.ck mules died of hun- ger on the way. On the last day's march, whan within sight of Monastir, they parsed three dead men on the trail. Heroic efforts have been made by the Britir,h in Greece to alleviate the distress of the trail sufferers. Twenty motor-cars loaded with flour are now fighting their way through the blizzard towards Dibra. —Exchange Telegram.

FIGHTING NON UNIONISM I

FIGHTING NON UNIONISM. 2,500 COLLIERS IDLE IN THE RHONDDA. The Rhondda mom-Unionist difficulty has not boon overcome, and severalpitts are idle. At the Park and Dare Col- lieries, Treorky, tihe task of bringing all the men into line should not prove a difficult task, for only about 30 of the workmen can. be classed as non- Unkmists At a meeting held at the Institute on Monday evening a report of the posi- tion was given. Ultimately, it was re- solved that the previous resolution "That we do not resume work until all the non-Unionists have toed the line," be stiriotily adhered to. The number erf men affected is about 2,500, but it is expected that such satisfactory progress has been made in reducing the number wflio wore QUIt, of ocunrpiliance, and it, was reported at a mass meeting on Monday evening that only fourteen of the 2,000 work- men had failed to come into line. TJie meeting unanimously decided to cease work until every man was a financial member. j

BRECON POLICE WITH THE COLOURS 1

BRECON POLICE WITH THE COLOURS 1 There are altogether 16 members of the Breconshiire Police Force with the colours. The Chief Constable, Major C. G. Cole- Hamilton, D. S. O., is with the 12th Bat- talion Royal Irish Rifles, and has been in action in France. Five members are with the Welsh Guards, and of these P.C. Griffiths (of Hay) and P.C. Hibbert (of Ystradgynlais) took part in the recent offensive. P.C. Mitchell (Brynmawr) who is with the Coldstream Gaards, and P.C. Talbot (Brynmawr), of the Dragoon Guards, have also been wounded twice, &nr are at present in hospital. A fund has been started by the force to provide mem- bers on active service with small com- forts, and various articles are being sent out weekly.

No title

Iodo Morganwg wrote between 2,000 and 3,000 hymns. A larrge selection were published in book form, and ran into ipaveral editions.

I GERMAN SOCIALISTS I

I GERMAN SOCIALISTS. I ———.——— LIEBKNECHT'S PARTY IN CREASING. I KAUTSKY'S WARNING TO 'COMRADES' OF THE KAISER. A very significant discussion is now going on in the German Socialist Party. As is well known, its attitude on the war has not been homogeneous. There is the "left" wing, commonly associated with thenaane of Dr. Lieb- knecht, which is opposed to the war; there is a "riigjht" wing which has ac- j oepted the war, and is supporting the Government; and there is between the two wings a "Centre," which shares, more or less, tlhe views of the "left," but which has hitherto passively sided with the "right" wing in order to save the party from a split. This "Centre'' group, of whicih the intellectual leader is Herr K. Kaut- siky, the foremost theoretical writer of the party, has all along been the most important of the three, by reasons of both its auithfxrity and members, and by reason of its actuaj posirtion as the potential aNy of one or the other wing. It is sufficient to mention that- it counts among its members Herr Be-r- ?tain and Herr Hease, one of the chair- men of the party. Its attitude, as already poirnted. out, was at first dictated by considerations of pairty unity, ibut it gradually be- came aware that even unity can be bought a.t too high a prioe if it is ac- companied by the suppression of the views of tiho minority, and leads to the transformation of the party into a mere handmaiden of Kaiserism and Im- perialism I OPPOSING THE WAR. In consequence the "Centre" de- cided to put an end to its equivocal position by breaking away from the "right" wing, and coming out in the open as am Qpponentt of the war. As all ordinary avenues of public ex- pression are now closed by the Censor- ship and military authorities, Herr Kau/tsky has suggested in his weekly organ "Neue Zeit" that the "Centre" party slitould next t.ime not only cast Its vote -99aanlut the war credits, but also make a public statement in the Reichstag of its articles of belief. By su<;h means, he argues, two things would bo achieved: the conspiracy of silence and of sham solidarity in the party itself would be broken, and the masses of the people outside would learn that not only a small wing, but actually the great majority of the party in Parliament is opposed to the war. He says in one of his articles (quoted by the "Voesische Zeitung"): The existence of the party is at I stake. In order to save it the minor- ity (Left) must no longer allow itself to be excluded from publicity—even at the risk that the majority may be led not only to raise its protest, as would only be .too natural, but even go fur- tlheIj and have recourse to acts of in- tolerance. Of course, every unguarded. action on the part of the minority will revenge itself on it, but. fftill more so will every act of weakness. It must not act in a provocative way, but ,n,edthor must it allow itself to be intimi- dated by threats. KAUTSKY CAUTIONS CHAUVIN- ISTS. This is significant from the pen of such a cautious politician and party mam as Horr Kautsky. At the begin- ning it was the r-evolt of the minority that atellled the existence of the pairty; now iris suppression by t'he Chauvinist majority has become such a menace to the existence of tihe parity that the minority moist openly disso- ciate its elf from it, even if the majority should decide to exped the Left from tlhe party. A split, then, is prefer- able to the acqui escence of the minori- ty in the pro-war policy of the majority. But axe the Chauvinists in a real majoaity? Herr Kauteky says: On which side the mijority of the party (in the country) is, nobody knows. Certain only it, is that the "minority" is constantly growing in the Parliamentary Party. Apart from the majority of those who (as Imperial- ists) ha.ve placed themselves in a posi- tion that would have led to their ex- pulsion from the party before the war --if we should count only those who have remained true to the traditional policy of the party, we may already find thiat the apparent "minority" "n the Parliamentary Party is really the majority. APPEAL TO THE CENTRE. Herr Kaut-sky even appeals to the "Centre" group to have the courage of its opinions and to act regardless of consequences: It (the "Centre") naturally has no credit with the "Right" wing. It al so disappoints the "Left" wing. It can only die consoling itsclif with the consciousness that it does so in obed- ionce to tihe love of party discipline. But should the Radical elements of the party be expelled from membership, then the "Rigiht" wing would become all-powerful. It would, then become the party. OUT party, therefore, -would split in/to two extreme sections, which would have nothing in oammom,, amd of wlhicl1 h wOUiIid be free from all tram- mels that hitherto kept it back from (Continued at bottom of next column)

I GERMAN SOCIALISTS I

(Continuing from preceding column). a policy of adventure, sought by onto in the streets and by the etiher at Roya;l courts and ante-chambers of Ministers. Considering that Herr Kautsky him- self has been hitherto the intellectual leader of the "Centre" group, and was apparently prepared to "die in dbed- iencei to the law of party discipline," j his present calil for a change of policy is of the iltimost significance and im- portance. It shows precisely the change wihidh has como over the great bulk of t'he Socialist party, the most powerful political organisation in the Gerrman: Empire.

GREAT STRIKE RECALLED

GREAT STRIKE RE-CALLED. DEATH OF WELL-E i WN SWANSEA PHOTOGRAPHER. I MR H. A. CHAPMAN, J.P. The death took place at Swanse-t on Tuesday morning of Mr Henry Alfred Chapman, an old and highly-esteemed Swansea public man, who had carried on one of the most prominent artistic amd ph-otographi-c businesses in South Wales for many years. He became president of the Professional Photo- graphers, Association, and was 0001-, sidered as the doyen of the profession, By request he photographed the late King and his Consort before they were maTTied. Up to about twenty years ago he took a leading part in the public affairs of the borough. He sat in the council as councillor and alderman for a con- siderable period, and in 1892 became mayor. This was during the great ooail strike. This industzial strike cul- minated in a great procession of miners and other workers into the borough from the v-alley, and Mr Chapman, as mayor, determined that they should (not cross the borough boundary. The miliit.ary .(against his desire) were sta- tioned in the town., but, taking a fonce of mounted police, he stopped the pro- cessionists at Morriston, blocked their way, and refused to let them into the borough. A serious conflict was ttbreatened, the strikers being breast to breast with tlhe police, but owing to Mr Chapman's personal appeals and his anxiety to prevent the military beiinig used the strikers desisted in time to prevent a breach of the peace, and were diverted to Neath. Mr Chapman was aj magistrate for the borough, and after his retirement, from the council he frequently sat on the bench. He was also chairman of the free library committee. He was a painter of no mean ability, amd has painted capital pictures of Swansea celebrities, which hang in the council- cham ber, and he painted a picture of the whole council when Sir John Llewelyn was mayor. Mr Chapman, who was 71 years of age, leaves A widow atnd several SOillS I and daughters. am d sev ral sons ——.——

ISHELLS FOR THEM ALLI

SHELLS FOR THEM ALL. I MR LLOYD GEORGE BUSY WITH I MUNITIONS DELEGATIONS. Mr Lloyd George has been extremely j busy for over a week with continuous 'I conferences with Admiral Roussin and the officers of the Russi an Munitions Delegation, with General Marafini and ?he Italian OfHcera making up tJ11e! Italian Munitions Delegation, and with M. Thomas and the French Munitions Delegation. The whole question of munitions sup- plies to the allies lias been, gone into and satisfactory arraaif-oments trrived at for obtaining supplies of ailms and munitions claiM kimds.

iI MR BRACE AS MINISTER

i MR BRACE AS MINISTER. LOCAL LABOUR PARTY'S SUP- j PORT. J » A conference of the West Monmouth- shire Labour Party was held at New- port to consider the position of Mr W Brace, M. P with respect to his can- didature in West Monmouth. Mr Goo. Barker (miners' agent) presided. The official report, supplied by Mr W. Harris, stated that correspondence which had passed between himself and Mr Brace was read. In one of his letters Mr Brace explained that 'It was not until after the resolution of the National Executive of the Labour Party that we should be represented in the Coalition Government that I accepted .otSce. In &D doing ir tli grave national emergency my Labour co lleagues and I, liike representatives other parities, are enabled to act for j the comm-on good without any sacri- fice, or inltEmltion of sacrificing, the principles for whiah we gtmid." A long discussion followed. A pro- posal was moved and seconded that Mr Brace's services as candidate be re- ,tainoo. A direct negatiive wa-s moved and seconded, but ultimately here- solution was carried.

I THRILLING DARDANELLES STORY

THRILLING DARDANELLES STORY. —iV A remarkable story of the heroism of IVelsh soldiers at Gallipoli is told by a writer in the "Fortnightly Review." He retails a narrative given him by a "Major in the Royal Welsh." "Only the man who leads can ex- perience the sensation of his life at the first charge, said the Major. "It is neither fear, excitement, nor the novelty. It is simply t. great fatherly ainxiety and pride in the men whom you have watched from their infancy in soldiering to maturity. "I never knew how closely allied in heart and soul I was with my men until the moment when I gave the order to 'charge.' 'How will they shape P How will they conduct them- selves?' These questions came upper- most and with insistence in my mind. Nothing else seemed. to matter "It seemed to me that we were iai a huge arena with everybody in the world watching us breathlessly, saying: 'Now we shall see what the ikoyal Welsh are made of.' And then they—and I—mw what they were made of. Mind you, the men were dead beat. "The rapid advance and the pre- liminary fighting had taken it all out of them, and even glory is a poofr anti- dote to exhaustion; A BRAVE ACTION "We were supposed to be relieved, but the Brigade in reserve was done up. So we had to go on. When we thought we had just done enough for the time being, we were warned that another difficult trench was to be taken. From a prominence we could see the Turks ooncenitrating. They looked like a muRi(Lude of ants. Their number was overwhelming. "The Welsh Headquarteris Staff were in the firing line, and it was at half- past three in the morning that the General came a-long and spoke a few words of encorurngemvrut to the men. The brief simple address, delivered by a man NAlh-o showed he was not afraid of his own life by standing on the parapet as he spoke, acted like a toric to the men. T,.m' the glint in their eyes and the <1 -termiaed clutch on their rifles. "ORDEAL OF THEIR LIVES." "Five o'ol odk came and I gave the word. With a cheer that still rings in my ears the men bounded forward. Nothing could stop them. The Turks literally flew. The slaughter was terrible. The Major stopped. "And what happened in the end?" I asked. "Oh, reinforcements failed to come to our aid. We held on as long as we could. But that wasn't very long." "Yes, battle is a wi,xlorful tonic," he added, reflectively> The Welsh did some more fierce fighting next day, and positions wore won, lost, and won a jain. It was al- ways an wphill fight, but the Terriers fought stubbornly, ajid ca-me out of the ordeal of their fives very credit- ably. ————— e-

BURNING ELOQUENCE 4

BURNING ELOQUENCE. 4 • CHAPEL CHIMNEY ON FIRE. E/nima Miles appeared .8tt Newport Police Court on a charge of allowing tlhe chimney of Stowpaurk Presbyterian Church to take fire. "I was preaching at the time, said the Rev. Arnold Evans, B.A. "I don't know that t?t. had anything to d? wiuh the conflagration. The caretaker told me that as it was coJd, she put an am extra fire." Defendant was ordered, to pay 4a. the money bediy- «aid by Alder- man S. N. JoaMt;, J.P., one of the deacons of the churoh. —————

I TALKS IN THE TRENCHES I

TALKS IN THE TRENCHES. SERGEANT'S TRIBUTE TO WELSH DEPUTATION. In a letiter to Mr T. Griffiths, of the Abera.von Workmen's Club, Sergeant W. Crealock, 2nd Welsh Regiment., of Aberavon, states that on November 20 they had some visitors in the trenches belonging to the Munitions Committee, They wene alll old friends, namely, Messrs. Tom Richards, M.P., Vemon Hartshorn, Fraak Hodges, -Itobinson, Wm. Jenkins, and others. "It was laughable" 'he states "to hear the conversation between them and our chaps in the tronohes-most, of it in Welsh. "Wihat are you lot doing out in this hole?" asked one of the iboys. "Ve have come out to see ,how you are getting on,' was the reply. 'Then you must be fools to risk it,' eame the answer in Welsh. "Whilst they were there the guns were sending over some beauties, but the visitors showed pJenty of pluck and nerve, boblying up and down a.nd walk- ing about the trenches all the time." Sergeant Crealock adds that re- cenitly he has met several old pals be- longing to the 0th Welsh.

TRIBUTE TO REMARKABLE FRENCHMAN I

TRIBUTE -TO REMARKABLE FRENCHMAN. i M. Herve, the redoubtable French t Socialist, is the subject of an enthusi- astix; character sketch in the "Daily Chronicle, by Dr. Arthin Lynch, M P | Herve is a, Breton, and therefore a ICelt. One feels thait he is a native of Brittany, says Dr. Lynch, by his oro-d- ial welcome, his sparkling eyes, his vibrant style, his voice and face, the | warmth of his affections, his idealism, This is the same terrible M. Herve who not long ago was detested by all the militarists, who was imprisoned for refusing to discontinue his peace propaganda, who alarmed even the followers of Jaures, who was unrepent- ant and untamed after imprisonment, but who is now iloved even by tihe Cliauvins (the French Jingoes). And yet M. Herve has not changed. He is a lover of peace, but when the safety of France is threatened his will defend her to the last. He hates Militarism; but that makes him the less inclined to eee Kaiserism victorious in Europe. Better die than that! EDITORIAL ROOM IN BACK PAR- I LOUR. And, therefore, whereas before the war "La. Guerre Sociale" was an ad- vanced Socialist and peace organ, making a modest weekly appearance, now "La Guerre Sociale" flames out day by day with heartening messages, and reveals itself an organ of comfort totholllSialllds. I found the famous editor in a back parlour of a modest building, in an umpretentaous street; but Wherever M. Herve might be found the atmosphere could not be dull. Short, thick-set, square-headed, with a pointed beard, short-sighted eyes, M. Herve looks on the world with the eyes of the mind, and he glows with Celtic spirit. "La Guerre Sociale" is a one-man paper, although Citizen Herve, as he calls himself, and not Monsieur Herve, makes all his collaiborateus his friends. "THIS IS OUR TRENCH." A vast amount of toil fa:& on his shoulders, but he does not flinch. Thus, all day long he may be found, often with a sandwich, for his dinner, but wdjj. the wine of life, and the love of great thoughts, as refreshers, "This our trench," 'he said, inddea- tinig his bare little room. It is a trench of attack as well as of defence. M. Herve sees in this war the fight of the great ideas of the Re- volution against the power of Imper- ial Despotism, and he will not let him- self think otherwise than that these great ideals must prevail. Hohem- aollernism must be scourged out of Europe. I j Certainly that fit will be severe, but we are here to fight, he says. The erst-while anti-militarist has sharpened his sword of battle. The light of combat is in his eye. He is on the path of the Dragon, Brute-Force. ——————— .———————

I I J COLLIERY SUBSIDENCE ACTION

J COLLIERY SUBSIDENCE ACTION. TINPLATE WORKER'S CLAIM FOR I DAMAGES. j Mr Justice Scrutton heard in the King's Bench Division the action of Walter Jones, tiinflLate worker, of Walter Jones, linplate worker,, of Conoolidat-ed Anthracite Collieries, Ltd and Lord Dynevor. The action was for damage to two houses in Coronation road, Garnant, alleged to be done by improper work- ing of defemdiamts' company's colliery beneath. Lord Dynevor was joined as defend- ant and damages claimed against him altieamatively, being the lessor of the land. Defendants denied liability. On TInu-ada-y his Lordship intitnated that he. would have to refer questions ais to the extent of the damage and cause of the damage to a practical milJJling engineer with local knowledge, and this was acceded to by all parties, His Lordship stated that, he would hoax arguments on the legal aspects, more particularly on the point as to the defendants' liability, assuming that the houses were so built that they were more liable to be damaged by col- liery working beneath than they other- wise would have been. JUDGMENT RESERVED. Mr LesOie Scott, K.C., for the Col- liery Company, said no doubt it was because Lord Dynevor knew he had gi HID to the mineral workers the right to let down the sun-face in the lease of 1896 that in the lease of 1909 granted to the plaintiff lie reserved the right to work down the mines even if the surface were let down. The defendant company wore perfectly right in work- ing the mines on the Jong wall system, which was the custom in the Amman Valley. Addressing the court on behalf of Lord Dynevor, Mr Gore Browne, K. C., argued that under no circumstances could his clj, be held responsible as the lanv now stood. The lessees of the mines (the defendant company) had not the right to let down the surface to such a.n extent as to cause injury to the surface, and if that were so tihe plaintiff could not blame Lord Dynevor for what the colliery company had done. After a Jong argument which ex- tended the whole of the day, his Lord- ship reserved judgment OIl the legal paints of the case. (

TUSSLE WITH CANADIAN IMINISTER

TUSSLE WITH CANADIAN MINISTER. Mr D. A. Thomas, of the Cambrdam, Combine, who has been repre,&enttng. the Minister of Munitions in America, has had a difference of opinion with GenenaJ Sir Sam Hughes. Minister of Militia. in Canada, and the General has been beaten. Sir Sam Hughes wanted to retain in his own hands the control of munition I, manufacture in Canada; but Mr D. A. Thomas wanted it controlled from London by too Minister of Munitions. The Canadian Minister made a pub- lie attack on Mr D. A. Thomas. The ] "Welsh Coal King" however, did not quarrel with the General. He imitated Brer Rabbit, by lying low and sayin' mufrmy. For four months Mr Thomas maun- taimed an uncanny silence, and then he upamd spoke about his scheme, and the Canadian newspapers supported him. j "There had beem," says the j "World" for maaiy months rumours of excessive profits being made by Canad- ian manufacturers engaged in the shell industry. Several manufacturers were members of the Shell Committee. Con- cerns wiith which these men were said to ibe identified were filling large con- tracts, given through the Shell Com- mitJtee. All contracts in Canada formerly had ( been left by the War Office, and in recent months they have asked for and opened their tenders almost independ- ent of British control. The laxity of this anmn gement, from the mother- Hand's viewpoint, is apparent when it is remembered that all the shells were paid for by the British Treasury. The Committee was responsible only to the Canadian Minister of Militia. "Now Mr Thomas has eliminated these manufacturers. Orders are now taken by cable from Lloyd George in London, and not from General Hughes in Ottawa. And all this D. A. Thomas has accomplished without any more than a ripple on the surface of the political pond in Canada." So for the present Sitr Sam Hughes is one down to our coal magniate.

IDARING PARACHUTE FALL I

I DARING PARACHUTE FALL I COLONEL'S DESCENT FROM I HEIGHT OF 10.000 FEET. Lieutenant-oolonel Maitaond, Royal Naval Air Service, has just made a daring parachute descent over London from a height of 10,000 feet. Colonel Maitland was fifteen miniates making the descent, and he landed, "somewhere in Surrey." The feat was all the more remarkable on account of the colcl weather and the fact that CoJ. Maitlaind is well over forty. The pant- dilute fell some hundreds of feets before it opened. The colonel's hands got n- tensely cold, and at one time he I thought he must let go, but the descent I I was safely accomplished.

ISAW HIS SON KILIED I

SAW HIS SON KILIED. I A distressing accident took place at the Owmcam Colliery when Ifehemiath Churchill (14), son- of Nehemiah Churchill, North-road, Pontywain, was killed. Father and son were working together when a fall in the roof oc- curred, killing ohe lad almost im- mediately. The father escaped in- Jury.

THUMB CUT CAUSES DEA TIT I

THUMB CUT CAUSES DEA TIT I At a Ffonestfach inquest on the death of John Daviies, repairer, of Gcndros, it was staged that While at work a thumb was cut by a stone. It was dressed, but septic poisoning super- I vened, due to the entry of a germ in- to the cut, and septic pneumonia fol- lowed, and caused death. Verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was given.

I STOPPAGE AVERTED I

I STOPPAGE AVERTED. I I NON-UNIONIST TROUBLE AT I AMMANFORD. A stoppage has been averted at the Ammanford collieries, at whieh notices terminated it was found that there was only one non-Unionist working at the collieries, and he at once became a member, and tlhe collieries were kept going.

I TWOWORDS SPEECH

I TWO-WORDS SPEECH. The new Mayor of Cambridge (Mr Councillor Turner, M.A.) is report.ed to have expressed his determination not to nia-ke a speech during his year of office. He presided at. a concert recently and confined him- self to announcing the items and say- ing, "Thank you," to a vote of thanks. -————

No title

By the irony of events, Mr. T. 1. Ma-rdy Jones, Mr. James Winston's elec- tion agent, was Mr. Stanton's election at the last general election,

I ENCAMPED IN SERVIA

ENCAMPED IN SERVIA. I PICTURESQUE SURROUNDINGS. Writing from Serbia under date Nov, 9, Pte. Harold Gray, B.A., who previous to the war, 1'taa a teacher at the Glad- stone Schools, Cardiff, states :— We are no longer in Franoeo--we have gone East. Kipling said once, "Whew. you've 'e.a.r the East a-oallin' you won't 'eed nothin' else." Well, give me the West any time. It is picturesque oub here, a sort of mixture of "Kismet" and the "Chocolate Soldier" rolled into one. I have seen the most gorgeous sunsets and daybreaks I had ever dream/t of; I've seen more gorgeous costumes than you ever saw in the "Balkan Princess." But, oh! give me France. Our trip out was pleasant. We basked on the bluest water for eight days—far bluer than you ever saw at Clovelly. It wag hotter than our mid-summer, although it was November, and I was sorry to leave the bcqt. I had enjoyed it all so much. You would be amused if you saw me now. I am sitting on an empty biscuit tin. It is the sole piece of furniture in our "caboosh." I do not know exactly what "caboosh" means, but here every- one lives in one with two or three pals, according to the size of the thing; I have heard of regiments encamping and build- ing then ^lves shelters from surrounding wood, b- aches, etc., but we have bested the othft. -we have encamped under the "bullrushes. Some distance from our camp is a. swampy district where thrives a species of huge reed, with thick, tough "bendy" stems. These have been com- mattdeered, and we have erected small huts of reeds. They vary in size and shape according to the artistic sentiments of the designers; ours is like a "wig- wam" (at lea&t what I imagine a wigwam would be like). It is quite large enough to accommodate three of us at a pinch. The long leaves are interlaced in the framework, and this makes a cosy little hut. One enters on all fours, and as it is necessary to go out backwards you can imagine how oosy it really is. The sun rises here remarkably beauti- ful. The sullen-looking ridges show up grey in the mist. Gradually it cfteaim and they show a rich purple, streaked with silver and flecked with touches of fleecy cloud. The animal life was queer in France, but here it is far queerer. There I had got quite used to the rats that infested the trenches. Here tortoises seem the correct, thing, and they are nearly as common in the fields as the rats were in France. This morning when I woke I found that a good-sized tortoise had slept next to me. Lizards (green, and about a foot long) are common, and they flash and curl about all over the place, with queer little frogs hopping round merrily. Water is very scarce here, so I should like some chemical "thirst quenchers," Lrst quenc h er, and please send me something that will help me to fopget bully beef and bis- cuits.

FRENCH MINES SUPERIOR TO WELSH

FRENCH MINES SUPERIOR TO WELSH. Writing to his family at Clynder- wen, Private D. Phillips, who is serv- ing with the maohine-gun, 1st Battal- ion Welsh Guards, says: -"Yeeterday'l paid a visit to a French colliery, aiiid had the pleasure of enjoying a nice hot shower bath. These collieries Dm admirably arranged, and &ro far ia admncp of the South Wales Mines in msuny respeats."

SOUTH WALES STEEL WORKS

SOUTH WALES STEEL WORKS. SUNDAY WORK ARRANGEMENT As a veenM, of the conference held. Swanaea. bet-ween steel workers anil their employers for the purpose of ar- ranging for Sunday work during the war, all arrangements have now b$>en satisfactorily adjusted. The men agreed to work three eight-hour shifts during tfhe week-end, which gives theim an interval of ten hours on the Sruit- dAy, that is to say, there will be np work between 2 p.m. Sunday and iriid. night. The men are to receive time amd half for one of the shafts, anxi double time for the other two shifts. A small committee of three on eadi side hae been set up to deal with any small points that may arise and cause friction.

EIGHT WELSH BROTHERS IN KHAKI

EIGHT WELSH BROTHERS IN KHAKI. The iilinees of their mother brougSk to Llandudno five out of the eigltl soldier soms of Mr Reuben Roberts, the Welsh harpist. Mr and Mrs. Roberts had eight sons in the Army soon after the outbreak of war. One has beds killed in Gallipoli, another invalided hmne, emd two wounded in Franoo. The ninth aon will enlist as soon as be is of military age. Mr Roberts's three daughters married soldiers who aro now witlh the coimu-s.

No title

During the canvassing campaign a Welsh miners 'agent interviewed a pom- pous young fellow, who said he was quiie prepared to enlist if the Government would agree to take over his 'business obligations and responsibilities. The can- vassed worutai-ed what were t'f. obliga- tions and T-j»poaisibilities of which this eligible yotrng man talked so gl h'v, and he was not altogether disappointed t'l find that they consisted entirely in the man- agement of a small dancing class.