Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
20 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
HENRYS CLAIMI

HENRY'S CLAIM. I THE WORKING OF THE LOCAL TRIBUNALS. "SINGLE MEN FIRST," I (The following has been written by —- Oapt. B. S. Torwnroe (Private Secre- tary to the Director-General of Rev oruitirLg) in order to explain clearly, and in homely phrase, how the Local Tribunals \i.U do their work). Henry stopped on his way back from work, and read the poster, headed "Single Men First," describing the group system introduced -by, the TV ar Office. He went home quickly and at tea a add to his mother, "Do you know, mother, I sthaN really have to go this time. They a.re going to take all single men first-. I would like to go as a volunteer. Mrs. Morris replied resignedly, "Very well, my dear, if you will, you will. I don't Ree though that it is right to take a widow's two sons. Still, if they want you to go and help beat -the Ka'ser, I suppose you must." Mrs. Morris showed visible signs .of tears, and Henry dropped the subject for the time being. Henry tha/t night could not get t.o 1 get-.p., Hia mind kept revolving over his attempts to join the Army since I 4tli, 1914. Since his brother, Robert, had enlisted, he had always wanted to join the local Territorials, but his toother, terrified at the idea of both her sons becoming soldiers, had -always persuaded him that his place was in her stationer's shop, and that drills at night would interfere with his work. Then when war broke out, he bes-grd hia mother to lot him go with his old pals. «Slie explained that busi- ness in the country had to be carried 

TREDEGAIt SOLDIERS SAD j CASE I

TREDEGAIt SOLDIER'S SAD j CASE- ATTEMPTED SUICIDE CYTARGE. j A sad c."se of a Tredegar sold ier's mental derangement, due apparently to grief over his mother's death has been unfolded before the Hereford justices. The case carne before the Bench in the form of a charge against Walter Davies, Charles-street, Trade gar JJ-of the South. Walea Borderers, of attempted suicide in an express train. After hear- ing the evidence, the Bench ordered that the defendant's state of mind should be inquired into. Defendant fought against the Germans at Tsing-Tau aond later in Gallipoli. He returned home, but found hi& mother had (Fed in his absence, and this had been a great grief to him. At the hearing the allegation was that he attempted to commit suicide by hang- ing himself in the lavatory of an express train at Hereford Railway Station on Monday afternoon. It was stated that Davids was on a journey to Conway, North Wales, and was discovered locked up in the lavatory with a pair of braces round his neck suspended from a brass hook. A porter reached through the lavatory window and cut the braces with a knife, but he only sucoeded in this ftel' a desperate fight. The lavatory door was afterwards forced open, and the dofendnt arrested. ] HAND PLUNGED INTO FIRE. After the porter had cut the braoes the man gathered them together and tied them tightly round his neck, but the biiidlng waa cut again Whilst being detained by the station- master for the arival of the police, defen- dant was offered a cigarette dui-ing an apparently rational movement, but he 1 lit it by plunging his hand in the fire and securing a handful of live coal. He made several attempts to escape, amd muttcTfd about his mother. > The Bench ordered that the man's state of mind be inquired into, all the witnesses agreeing that he was mentally deranged.

I I SWANSEA BIHTH RATE

I I SWANSEA BIHTH RATE. At a meeting bf the Swansea Health Committee Mr. David Williams was re- elected chairman and Mr. W. Owen! vice-chairman, the Medical Officer of i Health reported that for the eight weeks | ending November 20 there had been 381 births and 218 deaths—giving a birth rate of 20.9 and a death rate of 11.6. Last year the rates were 26.5 and 11.2 re- spectively. It would, he said, be noticed that the war was having its effect on the birth rate pretty substantially. i

No title

— According to the "New York Ameri- ean," further evidence has been un- earthed of the widespread German plots to blow up explosive factories and ships carrying munitions for the Allies. The financial headquarters of the plotters is in N?w York. A m", be- Hefvod to be the aowmp4ice of C. W. Crow ley, who was recently arrested in San Francisco on suspicion of cn- deavouring to blow up vessels, has been taken into custody at Detroit.

Advertising

'9.+.+.+.+. + ? ? Lewis Lewis & Co.,? !? | Lewis Lewis < & Co. ?????————?—————————?—————— ? ? Our various Departments are now replete with the Newest Goods suitable for Winter Wear. MILLINERY DEPARTMENT. | Smart and Inexpensive Ladies' Velours and f Black Velvet Hats. ? 

MEANING OF MERTHYRJ I

MEANING OF MERTHYR. J I COMPULSION HAS NO TERRORS FOR WELSH MINER. J A 6.- The parliamentary correspondent of "The Times," writing on the Mertlhyr election says:—One of the most initer- j eating events of the Paxlimme-ntary week will be ilie introduction of Mr. Stanton, tihe new member for Merthyr at. to-day's sitting of the House of Commons. He is a big, burlv picturesque figure of a man, young as I^abour members g"e is only 42-a miner of the miners. At the time of the national coal strike the railing-point of the extreme Socialists heaviilly defeated at the last election as an orthodox Labour candi- date in East Glamorgan, he has found himself in t.he achievement of what, ac- cording to all the laws of electioneer- ing, was a virtually impossible task. He has shown that mere party, with ita money, its machine, and its orators has lost its power in our politics for the duration of the war. He has, incidentally, performed a. useful service to the Labour party by exposing the absurdity of their pre- Liminary local ballots for the selec- ton of candidates. The miners' lodges in the constitu- ency gave Mr Win*#one a majority of 7,832 votes; ait the flection he only, polled 6.080—-fewer tfhan the ballot gave Mr Stanton. The Labour, party was palpably mii»- led by the voice of a large number of miners who had no Parliamentary rotes. This bye-election will 'have a bracing effect on the House of Commons. It has revealed in a, flash the spirit of the nation, and will strengthen the hands of those who are all out for the prose- cution of the war by all the means in our power. The result throws a flood of light on the feeling of the moss of the people towards compulsion. Mr Winstone stood for no conscription at any price. Mr Stanton was denounced high and low as a oonscri ptioniist. v Mr Jowetot. the Socialist M.P., speak: ing for Mr Winatone last week, went: so far as to say that conscription or no conscription was the one vital issue in the conflict. According to this interpretation, oonsoripti

No title

One of the very few Greek churches J in the kingdom is found ?t Cardiff. ¡ ————— ————— ¡

No title

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, ¡ can be consufwd daily at the Victoria Arcade (near the Market), Swansea

GERMAN SUBMARINES J

GERMAN SUBMARINES. J I 58 CAPTURED OR SUNK. REMARKABLE AMERICAN STORIES i The Now York correspondent of uhe Central News writes:— | The New York newspapers, mostly the "Herald," the "World," and tlhe "Times" publish a number of striking statements concerning recent develop- ments of the submarine war. Reference is made to tlhe British Admiralty's policy of secrecy concerning which opinions differ here, though on the whole it is felt to have been justifiable by results so far as the latter c&n be judged. Bult it is pointed out here that it is impossible to impose secrecy upon the captains of neutral steamships who as one may see from the columns of the American papers, have narraited many interestJing and lurid accounts of events whirih find no mention in the British Press though they caainot fail to reach Germany. Mr Robert Moointsier, in an article published by the "World," makes a series of disclosures, based, as he says, on information gleaned by him person- aUy during a joua-ney. from Constanti- nople to New York, via Sofia, Buchar- est, Berlin, The Hague, and London. Quoting the "Koelnische Zeitung" and the "Berliner Tagcblatt" for state- ments proving that Germany admits the failure of her U boat campaign, he asserts— I BRITISH USING "U" BOATS. (1) Since February 18th, the British Fleet has captured or sunk 58 sub- marines, while 20 more are listed as "most probably destroyed." (2) The British submarines which have played so much havoc in tjhe Baltic include ex-G erman U boats, operated by British crews, the Ger- man patrol boats having failed to dis- cover the read identity of these crafts as they passed through the Sound. In this connection Mr Mountsier says: "The British public little realises what part in the suddent. reversal of the submarine situation has been played by tihe brilliant ooup of the .British Admiralty in capturing and making use of a valuable flotrtila of U boats, onoe the pride of Von Tirpitz amd the Kaiser. Officers of the Ounard liner Pqnruwi- ia are quoted in the "Times" for the statement that during the vessels last voyage three German su bmarines were sighted disabled off the French coast, French torpedo boats were cruising along the ooastt at the time.

ITHE ELH

I THE "E.L.H." "Oh, yes," said the tram conductor, "I'r going to join up under the Derby sdheme. But I'm getting on for forty- one now; so I aha

I MR C B STANTONJ I I

I MR C. B. STANTON. J I —.— I I HOUSE OF COMMONS WELCOME. I Mr C. B. Stanton, the newly-elected member to the House of "Commons for Mertliyr Barougha, was introduced in the House of Commons on Tuesday iaft-ornoon by Mr Edgar Jones, the senior member for Merthyr, and Mr G. Roberts, the Labour Whip. Mr Stanton was the last of four new members to be introduced. As he ad- vanced to the floor of the House he was greeted with a tremendous cheer from all pairtg of the Chamber. Having taken the oath and signed his name, he wias again loudly cheered as he shook hands with the Speaker. Mr William Brace, who was seated on the Treasury Bench, also. shook hands with him as he passed out from behilnd the Speaker's Chair. Mrs. Stanton journeyed to London on Monday in order to witness the ceremony. The correspondent of the "South Wales Daily News" writing on the above, says— Seldom has a most picturesque por- ao'n"I' than that of Mr Stanton wstk:Y up the floor of t'he House. Liberals, Unionists, and staunch patriotic Trade Unionists alike claim the victor of Merthyr as their own candidate, and they gazed with eager- ness and interest at the stalwart figure standing at the Bar waiting for the Speaker's summons. Mr Stanton is a big man, but he looked unusually big this after- noon for, bv a freak of chance, his in- troducø N?,ecre very ahort of stature. Mr George Roberts, who was on his fright, and Mr Edgar Jones, who was on his left, acne both small men, amd the new member at onoe dwarfed them and emphasised his own stature. He was greeted with welcoming cheers from every quarter of the House, and only in one spot in fhe House was I there silence. Mr Ramsay Macdonald, Mr Snowden, amd Mr Andersoai sat to- gether, and their only greeting was a sour smile. They know better than I anyone else what Mr Stanton's vic- tory meant for them.

No title

r STROKED WINDOW INSTEAD OF I CHILD. I Mary Emptage a. soldier's wife, re- ceiving 28s. a week separation aJlow- ance, was at Margate sentenced to six | months' hard labour for grossly neglect, ing her four children. She was so drunk that when the baby cri ed she j stroked the window instead of rtihe dhild. I WOMAN RECOVERS HER VOICE. The wife of a machinist art West Hartlepool named Bowran has re- covered her voice, which she lost through shock during t'he bombard- in December last, when a shell wrecked the house next door. Since tihe bombardment she had been unable i to speak above the merest whisper. She was at the local theatre when an imii- tation navaj gun was discharged. The sudden shock oaaised her to ex- claim: "Oh, dear," and to her joy she found that she could once more speak aloud.

ILLITERATE YOUTHS I

ILLITERATE YOUTHS. I NEATH DOCTOR COMPLAINS OF NEGLIGENCE. Alderman Dr. Davies called attention at Neath Education Committee OIL Tues- day to the number of scholars who left school and were unable to read. For the I past twenty years he had, he said, been examining these boys who stepped from school into the ranks of labour, and he had never discovered so many p-ractiondly illiterate as recently. The Chairman (Alderman Hopkin Morgan) Were they all from the borough ? Dr. Davies said some were from the district. It seemed to him that they wore as negligent elsewhere as here. "My point is," concluded the doctor, "that there is negligence somewhere, and this must be remedied." Mr. W. E. llees did not think the committee should summon the widow of the soldier who had laid down his life for his country. It they did then the committee should pay the fine. Mr. J. R. Jones The sentiment may be all right, but we are working in the best interests of the child. It was decided to summon all the parents reported.

THE CURE OF CONSUMPTION I ASTHMA BRONCHITIS AND i AND NASAL CATARRH

THE CURE OF CONSUMPTION I ASTHMA, BRONCHITIS, AND i AND NASAL CATARRH ,] DR. EDWIN W. ALABONE'S TREAT- MENT. To any of our readers who may be interested in seeking a. cure for him- self or those to wlhoan he may be at- tached by family ties, we would ask a careful perusal of this article. The amount of mortality from con- sumption alone demands the thought and co-operation of all right-thinking people. Possibly there is as muoh need as ever there was to strike a great blow at this disease, and it should be carefully borne in mind that the liigh-pressure system under which we are compelled to live nowadays is certainly conducive in aiding the spread of "the white plague, as the disease luas so aptly been termed. There was a time when pulmonary complaints took rank among the mys- terious and irremediable agents off mortality; their origin defied the re- sources of medical science, and their cure, when such happened to be effected, was candidly attributed to happy accident rather than to skilful treatmenft based upon an intimate knowledge of the disease 8;nd tlhe proper methods of dealing with it. Of late years a flood of light has been thrown up the subject and all its re- lations. The causes of consumption and its allied diseases have been fol- lowed by the adoption, of more appro- priate remedies amd much more satis- factory results. It is now an established fact that consumption is curable, and although the time has not yet arrived when the whdle of the great body of the medical profession will endorse his statement, there is no doubt that this view is steadily gaining grovnd, and many well-known public and professional .men have ,in tlhe public interest pub- lished their experience and opinions in our leading journals as to the wonder- ful success attending the treatment promulgated by Dr. Edwin W. Ala- bone. The enormous value of this specific treatment, which has been instrument- al in restoring of perfect health to some thousands of persons who, but for its aid, would have met prematura death from phthisis, lies in the fact that the inhailations are administered bv a method which ensures t'heir penetra- ting to the actual seat of the disease, and consequently treat it locally, which in by far the greater number of cases mans complete eradiction. Up to the present time an incalcul- able amount of permanent good has been accomplished by the use of tlieee inhalations, not only in instances of persons suffering from actual consump- tion, but also in cases of bronchitis, asthma, and similar ailments. and there is no doubt that as time goes on the treatment remiommended by Dr. Alabone (known as the ALabone' treatment of Consumption and Asthma.) wtifll become still more ex- tensively employed, and will be con, sideded a "sine qua non" in all our great hospitals and institutions where phthisical patients are treated. Did space penmit we could publish an enormous number of letters from grateful patients, but for further par- ticulars We would refer ouir readers to The Edwin W. Alabone Treatment, Highbury Quadrant, London, N., from whom can be obtained any infortma- tion a.nd irrefutable evidence fully war- ranting the claims made as to the suc- | cesaful results obtained by the Ala- bone Treatment. I

No title

PITCHED OUT OF BED. An alarming explosion occurred im Dublin on Saturday in the electric lighting district station. The whole of tlhe brickwork of the building was scattered a distance of a 100ft. in every direction. Many people in the neighbouring houses were pitched out | of their beds. PUNCTUALITY AND PATRIOTISM Five workmen ar Liverpool were fined 40a. for bad timekeeping. It was stated that one firm had received a letter of complaint from the Minister of Munitions. The Court issued a wa-miing that heavier fines would be imposed in the future, £ 7,000 RAISED BY AUCTCION Over L7,000 has been raised by auc- tion sales im Huntingdonshire for the SuM- and Garter and Allies' Agricul- tural Relief Funds. A cockerel worth ls.6d. realised £165.

Advertising

WE ARE PREPARED FOR WINTER. 300 Men's and Youths' Nap Overcoats 30/- The KINGS-COAT for Style. The name PENHALE on your Overcoat is the HALL M ARK. of VALUE. It will pay you to call at Penhale's as he is well stocked- Owing to the scarcity of Wool, It is only those who bought early can show you a good variety. Penhale's 232 High Street, Swansea.

BACK FROM GERMANY

BACK FROM: GERMANY. WOUNDED BROTHER'S MUTUAI* I EXPERIENCE. Captain Leyshon Llewellyn, 1st Morns, (son of Col. J. C. LleweMyn and Mrs. Llewellin, Caerleon), who returned t- this country same weeks ago as one ci the exchanged prisone-rs of war, ife gradually recovering. When he re- turned he was paralysed and una.ble t. read, WTite or speak. He is now ablo to walk a.nd use his left hand. Refer- ring to the engagement in which he was wounded he states t.ha.t. the battal- ion were under terrible fire, and a "Jack Johnson" exploded near him, shattered the trench and buried him. He was dug out by his own men, 1m, wftien they had to retreat he was lefb wounded and helpless on the field. A German soldier kicked him in the cheat took his watch and revolver, and waa going to shoot him when another Ger- main interceded and give him some water. It is somewhat remarkable, that his brother, Captain Mostyn Llewellin, also had a narrow escape of being shoro after lie was eaptuml. According to some of the returned prisoners a Ger- man was pointing a revolver at rota as he la.y wounded, and was about to fire when a German officer knocked the revolver out of his hand, and tdius saved Captain Mostyn's life.

DEFECTIVE SHELLS

DEFECTIVE SHELLS. A COMPLAINT FROM THE FRONT. The lyondon deputation of niiinitios. workers, in a report of their visit te tihe front, stat-e thaft the outstanding feature was the spirit of t'he men. 'fIh8 hardships of trench life are cheerfully borne, but all the party were impressed by the tremendous strain such a iifw must have on the men. "While we hoard from some the necessity for in- creased supplies of shells, from others- we were congratulated on improved and present supply. AN were in agreement that, the supply must be maintained and, if possible, improved, as it ia safer to have a surplus to meet- exxn- tingencies. "A complaint as to inaccuracy in the weight of shells, which gave muck trouble to the officer in charge amd necosst-ated re-weighing and adjust- ment, also rough turning, were othes: points made. These, complaints should be noted as indicating that- it is pos- sible to get a big supply and yet riot one so effective as a smaller supply of accurate work. We believe it to be im. pontajnt that the supervision of meat and the inspection of work should only be undertaken by practical men."

No title

ILLUMINATED POLICEMEN. Wiuhin the last few days two boys. ,have been killed by motor-cars in the Leeds streets, and in order to mini- mise the danger arising from t'he light- ing restrictions police-oonstables on point duty are to carry white a.nd and red white light in front, a red light* behind. SEVEN BROTHERS SERVING The Rev. E. G. Burrough, vicar of Ripley, Surrey, who is acting as a naval cliapiain at S'hatlley Barracks, ie one of a family of seven brothers now scit-vikig tlieir country. GERMAN-AMERICAN COUPLE IM- PRISONED. Six months' imprisonment was the- sentence passed at Bow Street on Lucy Wumsche, a. Germain, and Ed. Hodg- son, an American, who were arrested at t-he Grand Palace Hotel. They had registered themselves as man and wife, tihe woman having in her possession at. passport issued in Berlin last montlh.

No title

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be consulted daily at the Victoria Arcade (near the Market), Swansea Printed MID Published by "Llaia Llafur" Co. Ltd., Ysrtalyfera, in the Oou/nty of Glamorgan, Dec. 4, 1915.