Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
YSTRADGYNLAIS NOTES

YSTRADGYNLAIS NOTES. Under the auspices of the Breconshire Education Authority lectures in agricul- ture will be delivered by Mr. David Thomas (county agricultural organiser) at Abercrave. Council School on Tuesday, February 15th on "Artificial Manures," and at Cynlais County School on Tuesday February 22nd, on "Feeding Stuffs." The lecture will commence each evening at 7.30, admission free. All interested in agriculture are invited to attend. On Tuesday evening at Tabernacle Ves- try, a meeting was held to consult as to the best method of forming a committee to extend a welcome to local men return- ing from the front. The meeting was called by the various ministers and clergy, and was composed of two members of each place of worship in the neighbour- hood. The many friends of- Mr. Idris Wil- liams will be glad to learn of his success in passing the L. V.C.M. Diploma recent- ly in the theory of music.' MT. Williams is sub-organist at Ystradgynlais Ch urch. and is a pupil of Professor T. G. $?mei, Y stalyf era. I The Advisory Committee met on Thurs- day afternoon at the new police station, to hear appeals from the next batch of Derby recruits. Mr. T. J. Davies,: J.P., Abercrave, occupied the chair. A number of cases were dealt with, most of the ap- pellaiits being put back to later" groups. Four young men from the district jour- neyed to Brecon on Tuesday to join their groups as Derby men. They were John Terry, son of Gwilym Cynlais, Ophi Wil- liams, Porth-y-Bryn; Dan Owen, Station- 1 road, and David Evans, Cloth Hall. The two last named have returned home re- jected as medically unfit for service. There was an excellent attendance at Sardis Chapel on Saturday evening on the occasion of a miscellaneous concert. The choir was under the conductorship of Mr. T. Williams, G. and L., whilst the artistes were, soprano, Miss Jennie El lies, Swansea; tenor, Mr. Ben Davies, Skewen, and bass, Mr. Gwilym Jones, Ystradgynlais. Miss Bessie Williams, one of the accompanists, was unable to attend, and Mr. E. H. Hughson, A.R.C.O., filled the vacant chair. The Rev. R. 1: Rhys, Sardis, presided. The choir rendered "Lift up your heads," "Y Clychau," "Bendigedig fyddo Arglwydd Dduw Israel," "Y Gwlithyn, "And the glory of the Lord," and "Yr Raf," with much fervour and effect, whilst Mme. Ellis was much appreciated in renderings of "The Jewel Song," "Vaunka Song," and "Friend o' Mine," and was encored. Mr Ben Davies's rendering of "To him who sorrows," and "Gwlad y Bryniau," left nothing to be desired. Mr. Gwilym. Jones was never in better form than when he rendered "The Toilers," by special re- quest, and "Y Dymhestl." He replied to the vociferous encore by singing "The old way and the new," a. song composed by Mr. E. H. Hughson. He also rendered "Y Marchog," and sang "Mae Cymru'n barod ar yr wy^$rith Mr. Ben Davies. Mr. Hughson also rendered selections on the organ. The concert was a complete success, and aa a rlt" the chapel funds will benefit to the extent of about E20. Mr. W. R. Williams presided over a crowded gathering on Monday evening last, when Mr. Hanson (" Casey"), the well-known I.L.P. propagandist, and Miss Dolly Pickard were the entainers for the evening. "Casey" lectured on ""The songs of the people," and he held his audience spellbound by his fine violin recitals. Miss Pickard accompanied on the piano. The entertainment was success- ful in every way, and new members were subsequently enrolled. We understand that an error was made in these notes last week. It was stated that Mrs. Williams, of the Temperance Hotel had met with an accident, where- as it should have been Mrs. Williams, of The Laurels. We regret that the mis- take should have occurred, but are glad to learn that Mrs. Williams has now re- covered.. i At a general meeting of the Chamber- of Trad 3 held last week the chair was occupied by Mr. EL E. Watkins, Royal Stores in the absence og Mr. Dd. Lloyd. Many imp-tant matters were dealt with and new members were enrolled. The sec- retary was authorised to interview the local posttmaster for the purposes of con- sidering the improvement of local postal facilities. Steps are also being taken to got the authorities to move in the matter of local road improvement. Great things are expected of the Chamber of Trade in the district. It is with regret that we note the death of Tommy J. Davies, 18, son of Mr and Mrs. T. Davies, Cwmtawe-roadf which took place, oi* Saturday^after a very brief illness. Deceased was of a reserved disposition, and was much liked by his many friends. The interment took place on Tuesday, the Rev. D. J. Davies offi- ciating. There was a good attendance at Salemr Penahos, on Monday evening, when & competitive concert was held. The entires were good and credit is due to Mr. T. Jones, the able secretary, for the suc- cess of the meeting. Another concert will be held in a short time. The Ystradgynlais Colliery was idle on- Wednesday owing to a breakdown in the shaft, and the Gurnos Colliery was also rendered idle on Wednesday by short' ness of wagons. A meeting for the purpose of compli- menting Mr. E. H. Hughson was held on Wednesday evening on his attaining the degree of A.R.C.O. A full account will appear in our next issue. The Cinema was well filled on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, when Gwern- ydd Morgan's Company performed the Welsh drama "Changê." The actors and actresses were in good form and the play was thoroughly enjoyed. We regret to announce the death of Wm. Rees Alexander, tho little son of Mr. David Alexander, of Cwmgiedd, v. hich occurred on Monday last. The child who was only 2 years of age, wa sa- bright, bonny little lad, and since the death of his mother, -had been cared for by his grandmother, who was devoted to him very much. Deep sympathy is felt with the father and grandmother in their trial, coming as it does so soon after other famiiy bereavements. Trie funeral took place on Thursday at Ystradgynlais churchyard. Business men and others will be glad" to learn that the London City and Mid- land Bank have decided to open their branch at Ystradgynlais daily, in future,, namely 10 a. m. till 2 p. m., and 9.30 till 12 p.m. on Saturdays. This is a con- venience that will be greatly appreciated,. and the L. C. and M. are to be congratu- lated on their effort to accommodate the public even at the present moment when the conditions created by the war are given as the reason for many unnecessary public inconveniences. On Tuesday evening the Tabernacle Vestry was crowded, on the occasion of a competitive concert. A great number of entries were received, and much merri- ment and enjoyment were manifest dur- ing the proceedings. The awards were- as follows Champion solo (under 6). There were eight or nine competitors, and all re- ceived a prize. Four choirs competed on the tune "Arosfa. The winning choir being Mr Tom Lewis' Solo for girls, Miss Bessie Jones, Cwmgiedd. Duett Miss Maria Phillips and Mr Tudor Jones. Solo for girls under 14, 1st Miss Alioe Jones; 211d Miss Bessie James. Recita- tion, Mrs. G. Griffiths. Best stanza on zeppelins, Mr Llew Jones, near Station. Humourous dialogue, Messrs W Vaughan and Edgar Morgan. The chair was taken by the Rev. E. Jones; and the adjudicators were Music Mr SI. James, Moriah, Penrhos; reci- tations, Mr Hopkin Owen, Cynlais- School, Ystradgynlais. Both gentlemen are to be congratulated on the excellent manner iin which they dbelivered their adj udications. On -Sunday rooming last a vdry in- teresting servioo was conducted bv the Rev. Emlyn Jones at Tabernacle Chapel. Fofar infanta had been brought to be christened, and after the christening cere- mony the remained of the morning was devoted to the children. There were a large number present, and the excellent manner in which the little ones recited and sang, was evidence of the care with which they are being trained.

Advertising

NEW CISTEMA. Tstraflgyalais. COMING SHORTLY Look Out for the Great Exclusive Picture THE STONING

Advertising

Telephone Docks 35. W. WILLIAMS & CO. Jewellers, c. 29, g CASTLE STREET, SWANSEA. Specialities: Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lerer Watches. Good Foreign Watches. E-aglish and Foreign Clocka. English and Continental Novelties in Gold, Silver and Electro Plate, suitable for Christening. Birthday and Wedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for ali i Sights. It wiil pay you to come to us to buy for three reasons-Largest Variety, Best Quality, and Lowest Price. FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. „ =:= = = = = == 3 F WE lc h bRC ff The Up-to-date I LONDON TAILOR jv Who serves you personally and v Cuts All Garments Himself ¡ :-1°. I i } Specialists in MOURNING ORDERS. Ii 222, High Street I I SWANSEA c =:= ='1 I

CONSCIENCE AND COMMON SENSE

CONSCIENCE AND COMMON SENSE. Within the next few days the vo i ce Within t.h) nxt few dAYS the voice of the conscientious objector, like the voice of the turtle, will be heard in the land. The members of the No Con- scription Fellowship, otherwise the Won't Fight Gang, have canonised themselves in advance, and they wiU ap- peal to the Progressives in general, and to the Labour movement in particular, for sympathy on account of their self- imposed martyrdom. This body, as we have pointed out before, is controlled bv a few young men of the middle class.es, and there was point in a warn- ing uttered by Mr O'Gradv, M.P., at Leeds, to Labour men not to allow thernwlves to be made the tool of by these prigs and schemers. The Lab- our PArty has nothing to do with the young men who consider themselves too spiritual to fight. Objection to compulsory military service does not spring from the (Socialist philosophy. It is extreme individualism, a throw- back to the Manchester School, who, in the name of the sacred rights of the individual, opposed the factory acts and other measures that were obvious- ly for the good of the workers. Conscience is no criterion of truth. Atrocities ranging from the abomina- tions of Torquemada to the massacre of the Armenians, have been justified on the plea of conscience. A conscien- tious belief is. only a belief strongly held- It may be right, or it may be wrong, but the fact that an opinion is conscientious is no proof of its truth- fulness. A man's first duty to his conscience is not to indulge it, but to instruct it. These men who are flout- ing the general will think themselves the exponents of the higher morality: as a matter of fact they are the ex- emplars of the grossest immoralitv. If they had their way Prussian militar- ism, and the power of evil generally, would be allowed to subjugate the world. They are the enemies of democracy, and the friends of militarism. If they claim the right to escape obligations imposed on them in a constitutional wav bv a, democratic State. they can- not denv to others the right to object t,f, laws which violate the opinions which thev dignify with the epithet -conscientious. What can they say to Carson if he objects, in the sacred name of conscience, to Home Rule in Ireland, after the war ends, and pro- vokes an insurrection in Ulster? De- mocracy would go to pieces if every- lxxlv claimed the right to obey only the Laws he liked. If democracy went, our hopes of overcoming militarism would vanish. That. is one of the reasons why we say that the conscientious ob- jector is the* friend of militarism. As a means of ending war, conscien- tious objection is futile. M. Herve, the great French Socialist who has probed the problem of militarism more thorcvu'jhlv than any other man in Eu rope, dismisses it out of hand. It is purely inhibitory, negative, the moralitv of taboo. There have been conscientious objectors to war since the Middle Ages, and they have not ma de the slighest impression on mili- tarism. The Aztecs, who made a national practice of non-resista.noe, have disappeared from the face of the earth. Conscientious objection to military service as a means of ending war is parallel! with. and as futile as. Robert Owen's New Harmony, and Cabet's Icaria as a means of ending war. t Under the Military Service Act. per- sons who have a conscientious objec- tion, grounded in reigio-n" service have a right of total of partial exemption. It is not clear how fa.r the same right extend s to political objec- tors. The justification for the in- dulgence shown to the Quaker is that non-resistance is with him, at least, a lifelong creed, something that his mother taught him as a child, a tra- dition nourished and strengthened by all his religious exercises from the davs of infancy. This is a concession made to the Quaker not of right, but of generosity. If a German army landed on our shores the Quaker would have to "do his bit" like the rest of us. The political objector has no such claim as the Quaker on the public indul- gence. Local tribunals will have to use their own judgment as to how far they will exempt political objectors from combatant service, but we hope that they will not err on the side of leniency. A political objector ought to be compelled to serve the State in some capacity. That is our opinion, and we are convinced that it is also the opin- ion of the overwhelming majority of the w-orkirg- men in this district. To the local tribunal we say. "Keep your eyes open for the slacker, and do not be misled bv sophistical talk about the right of young men with uneducated consciences to sit at at home while'th«vjfl £ !5S of our youth is risking and daring all in the trenches, in the air. and on the high seas. air, and on biali,;Oq

AN ACADEMIC RESOLUTION J I

AN ACADEMIC RESOLUTION J After -a protracted discussion at 1 Lane-ast.er, Jlie. Miners' Federation of Great Britain passed the following re- solution:— That this ,conforence, expresses its opposition to the spirit of conscrip- tion, and. determines to exercise a vigiLant scrutiny of any proposed ex- tension of the Military Service Act. This resolution is being sent to the Districts as a recommendation, and the Districts are requested to send to the general secretary within one month their decisions concerning it. Obvious- ly the decision should be one of cordial agreement. It is the business of all Labour men to oppose th spirit of conscription, and the spirit of war, but when war is upon us we have to take whatever measures are necessary to cope with the ev-il Nor is it cus- tomary to take a bigger dose of the medicine than circumstances dictate. Compulsion is an evil, albeit a neces- sary evil. Like the Miners' Federation, we wish it were not nece-s-iarv to com- pel mineowners to adopt the Eight Hour Act or to pay a minimum wage. Perhaps in an ideal world it will not be necessary to com pel non-unionists to join the Federation. If there are, eventually, proposals to extend the present Act, we shall subject them to a vigilant scrutiny. Of course, we shall. We shall just ask ourselves whether we can beat the Germans without extending the Act. If after a vigilant scrutiny, we decide that we cannot, we shall extend it, in spite of our opposition to the spirit of con- scription. In the peaceful months of 1848, James Russell Lowell wrote a poem satirizing the recruiting sergeant and declaring Ez for war I call it murder,- There you hev it plain and flat; I don't need to go no furder, Than my Testy merit fer that! But fourteen years' later, during the American Civil War, he wrote other poems upholding the North, support- ing Lincoln's proclamation of con- scription, brushing aside sentiments that were irrelevant to the crisis and prejudicial to the common good. He reminded his fellow-citizens that the conflict was between system not parties. He .jeered at the pacifists who would hand tracts to "mad buffalo-hordes," and asked Wut's words to them whose faith an' truth On War's red techstone rang true metal, Who ventured life an' love an' youth Fur the great .prize o' death in battle? The Miners' Federation need not fear that they are betraying liberty in fol- lowing thf^ .path of James Russell Lo- well and'ftA'hn Stuart Mill. They have passed ? academic resolution for which antbMv almost, from the ex- treme pacinst' to the extreme jingo, c? vote. We believe that the Miners' Federation is one of the greatest, as it is one of the most powerful trade *It is 0 -1?l( l the wcr l d, unions.-W the world, add "e expected something better from it than a colour- less, equivocal resolution. The dele- gates would have done wiser to have accepted the Act. and made no bones about it.

No title

General Sir j.-juwline Wodehouse at Guildford opened » building—said to be the first of its kind in the country —constructed of walls of rammed etrth bv the members of V.T .C. The build- ing, which 4s 22ft. square, with walls 18in. thick 'and-1 about 2ft. high, and has a corrugated iron Toof, was put up in ten hours by fifty-two men. The object of the experiment was to show how easily a platoon could build itself in.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be consulted daily at the Victoria I Arcade (near the Market), Swansea. SPECIAL THIS WEEK. 500 PAIRS OF TOWELS TO HAND, 6|d. lljj'd; ls.5kl; ls7d £ the Pair. LAST FEW DAYS OF SALE. A Few Pieces of the BEST DRILL PRINTS LEFT at fj-J-d. per yard. + + + J.T.OWEN THE SQUARE YSTALYFERA.

YSTALYFERA NOTES i

YSTALYFERA NOTES. The many friends of Mr. J. M. Roberts, chemist, will regret. to learn of his con- tinued indisposition. Several weeks ago Mr. Roberts went on a visit to North Wales, but unfortunately met with an accident and sustained injury to the patella. As this necessitates complete rest Mr. Roberts has been unable to return home. He is fortunate in having the ser- vices of Mi. Jones, his late assistant, who is conducting his business until his re- covery. Jerusalem Chapel has sustained a loss this we. k. Mr. Evan D .ivies, signalman, who was a faithful member of the chapel, lias left Ystalyfera viith his wife and family to take up his new duties as caretaker of the Pontardawe Public Hall and Institute. Mr. and Mrs. Davies take with them the best wishes of their many friends for success in their new sphere. The usual meeting of the Zoar Young People's Society took place on Tuesday evening, Mr. Fredk. Re-es in the chair. Two very able papers were read by Miss Annie Williams on "Rhai o Enwogicn y Ffydd," and by Miss Mary Williams on "Cwymp Jerico." Those who spoke to the merits of the papers were the Rev. Wm. Jones, Messrs. Dan Daniels, John Davies, E. J. Evans, John Powell Thomas, and Mrs. F. R-ees. The latter is to be con- gratulated on the fact that both young ladies have been for many years scholars in her Sunday-school class and have evi- dently profited by her careful and pains- taking methods of imparting instruction. The friends of Private Edwin Jones, of Wern, have be-en anxious as to his weil- being for some time past. No news was received from him for upwards two months, but this week a let tea- has come to hand saying that Private Jones is now in Salonika. A meeting of the Christian Endeavour Society in connection with the English Congregational Church was held on Wed- nesday evening, when an interesting paper was read by Mrs. James on "The Bread of Lit-1." The meeting was fairly well attend sd, and it is pleasing to note that the band of Endeavourers is gradually in- creasing in numbers. At Gurnos Young People's Society on Monday evening, under the auspices of the above society, a debat-e took place at the chapel vestry on the subject "Is war justified?" Mr. Dd. Williams took the affirmative, and Mr. J. Roberts the negative, and both gentlemen upheld their opinions with ability and zeal. The Rev. J. Thomas afterwards treated the subject in a very interesting manner. There was a good .attendance, and the duties of pre- sident were carried out by Air. D. R. Williams, M.E., in his usual able man- ner. After the debate Mr. Dd. Jenkins read extracts from the life of "Matthews Ewenni," which were highly appreciated. The above society are busy working at a comedy, "Machgen Mawr I," which they intend to produce at an early date. This comedy was written by the Rev. Dyfnallt Owen, who of course, is well known in the district. It is desired to call attention to the lecture under the auspices of the above society on Monday next when the Rev. Ben Davies, Pantteg, will speak on "Barddoniaeth yr Hen Weinidog" (the late Rev. Benj. Thomas). This will certainly be of absorbing interest, and a large audience is confidently expected. On Friday last Mr. Marcel Gcrmonpre, one of the Belgian Boy Scouts (who has been e: joying the hospitality of Lieut. and Mrs. W. H. Woodliffe, of Alltygrug- road, since the outbreak of war, which caused them to flee from Belgium) jour- neyed to London and joined a cavalry regiment of the Belgian Army. He re- turned on Monday on a week's leave, and next Monday will leave Ystalyfera again fo- London, en route for France, where he will enter upon his military training. We wish him God speed. Private John Levshon, of Chemical- row, has now commenced training as a wireless operator in H.M. Navy. Leyshon was formerly a teacher at Godre'rgraig School, and in October last entered Car- marthen College. A short time afterwards, in company with most of the other stu- dents, he joined the colours, since which time he has been in training at the Crys- tal Palace. Now we learn that he is one of three. successful in an examination (where upwards of 50 oompeted) for pro- motion as wireless telegraphist. We wish him success in his naval career. On Tuesday evening Mr. D. Clydach Thomas lectured at the Pantteg Mutual Society on "Will Bryan," one of the characters in "Rhys Lewis." The lecturer gave a very descriptive sketch of the character, which was highly appreciated by the members .The Rev. Ben Davies occupied the chair, and at the ojose de- scribed the lecturer as an elocutionist of high order, who had handled his subject in an exceptionally able manner. Mr. D. S. Williams proposed a vote of thanks to the lecturer and this was seconded by Mr. Llew. Evans. Private Elwyn Clee, son of Mr. David Clee, of Mount Hill, Pantteg, is home on his last leave. He is in the Welsh Guards, of which regiment a further con- tingent of 120 will be leaving for France an Friday. The Guards are certainly "doing their bit," and have been in the trenches for a considerable time with only a few days' rest occasionally. Private Leslie Thomas, of Pantteg, had a narrow escape the other day. The button of his shoulder lapel w&s shot off by a sniper. Private Thomas happily escaped even a scratch. The self-denial week in connecthsn with the Salvation Army commences Febru- ary 26th to March. 2nd, and the com- manding officers, local ofifcers, and sal- diers will be out collecting during the next few weeks. The commanding officers desire DO thank all those who have sup- ported in the past in this great work, and hope they will give them every sup- port again, as funds are urgently needed this year more so than ever to arry on the work -of the Salvation Army. The General proposes supplying five more Motor Ambulances for work in connec- tion with the present great war, and which he is most anxious to provide. General and Mrs. Booth are making a i personal appeal -to all to do their utmost on this occasion. The usual weekly meet- ings will be held on Sunday, and to be conducted by the commanding officers, Ensign Piggott and Captain Pearce. A hearty invitation is extended to all. Hymn bocks a.re provided and all seats are free. The annual licensing meeting for the petty sessional division will be held in Pontardawe on Friday. "A Competitor" writes :—"May I ask the secretaries of the St. David's Church Eisteddfod, held on New Year's Day, kindly to publish the adjudication- on the essay, as was promised would be done in "The Labour Voice" at the time?" The death took place very suddenly on Sunday morning last at 125, Cyfyng- road, Ystalyfera. of Mr. Richard Thomas, who was a well-known figure in the dis- trict. Mr. Thomas was about 60 years of age, and had been subject to fiti for a number of years. About 5 o'clock on | Sunday morning he was found in an un- conscious state in the back yard. Dr. W. J. Lewis was sent for but death had occurred before his arrival. The inquest wns held at Ystalyfera on Wednesday, before Mr. R. Boer, the deputy-coroner. Dr. W. J. Lev, is attributed death to syncope, and a verdict to this effect was returned. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon at St. David's church- yard. There were a large number present, and amongst the wreaths was one sub- scribed for by his friends from the locali- ty. Private Williams, son of Mr. and ^Irs. Philip Williams, Alltygrug-Toad, of the Swansea Battalion, writing to his parents tells how his steel helmet saved him from what might easily have been a fatal wound. A large piece of shell hit his helmet, denting it considerably.

THE ROSARY AT YSTALYFERA

THE ROSARY" AT YSTALY- FERA. A TREAT FOR LOCAL THEATRE GOERS. MISS INEZ HOWARD'S NO. I. COM- PANY AT THE COLISEUM. It is with great pleasure we announce a return visit of one of Miss Inez Howard's principal company in one of the most successful dramatic productions of the day, namely "The Rosary." Miss Howard's companies are well known in the district, having introduced to Coli- seum audiences such well known drama- tic productions as "The Life Guardsman," "The Midnight," "Her Love Against the World," and "The Bad Girl of the Family." Miss Howard's company which presents "The Rosary," is one of exceptional bril- liancy, and includes Mr. Henry Chatt-ell, who plays the magnificent part of Father Brian Kelly. Mr. Chattell needs no in- troduction to Ystalyfera audiences, as he has been seert on previous occasions in most of Miss Howard's companies. The company also includes that brilliant young afrtor, Mr. Charles A. Baker, who has been seen on more than one occasion in Miss Howard's military productions. The leading lady with "The Rosary" is MissCamale Rona.la, who will make her first debut to Ystalyfera patrons, in the sympathetic role of Vera Wilton. Miss Ronald's wonderful impersonation of the twin sisters, Vera Wilton and Alice Marsh is a performance of exceptional j brilliancy, and should not be missed. j The story of the play is easy to under- stand. Bruee Wilton has amassed a for- tune, which ha lavished on his wife, Vera. Their household is a happy ene, but into it creeps a note of menace, which no one heeds at first, save Father Kelly, a priest, the former tutor of Bruce. I Quietly he goes to work with his sharp- ened mental sense to find the person who is causing the adverse influence in the household. Almost on the verge of dis- covering the cause calamity descends upon :i the Wilton house. Bruce's fortune is swept away, and in such a manner that he be- lieves his wife the cause of his ruin. Hus- band and wife are separated, the home is destroyed, and yet the cause of all this disaster is unknown. But Father Kelly, with a faith that moves mountains, goes on quietly, serenely, confidently, with but one perpose in view, the happiness of those he loves. He solves the mystery, and lets the white light of truth into II the minds that have been darkened by evil. More than this, he finds the one who has caused all the misery, and re- stores the home. Unlike most plays based upon a reli- g ious subject, (The Rosary" has abun- dance of humorous situations and charac- ters. Father Kelly himself makes a genial comedy as well spiritual appeal, and the characters of Skeeters, Lesura Watkins (the girl who never smiles), Kathleen O'Connor, aid funny Little Charlie Hairow are full of humorous features. Intending patrons will do well to book their seats in advance, so as to avoid disappointment, as a full house is almost certain to be the rule next Wednesday, February 16th. Seats may be booked at Mr. Sam Baker, Newsagent, or at the Coliseum.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, I oan be consulted d&Hy at the Victoria I Arcade (near the Market), Swansea

GRUFFYDD OR GLYN

GRUFFYDD O'R GLYN" FINE PERFORMANCES AT YSTALY I FERA COLISEUM. I The Welsh-speaking people of the Ys- talyfera district demonstrated their anxiety to foster Welsh drama by turn- ing up in large numbers at the Coliseum on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday last when the Llaethferch Dramatic Company, of Ynismeudwy, gave three fine perform- ances of "Grulfydd o'r Glyn." The drama is the work of Alarch Ogwy, of Skewen, and it has been taken up with great en- thusiasm by Miss M. J. Francis (Llaeth- ferch) who is the conductress of the com- pany. The perfection with which the drama was performed was ample proof of the sacrifice and labour of Llaethferch and each act was followed by the audien- 0eS with the deepest interest. The prin- cipal parts were taken by Mr. Tom John as "Gryffydd o'r Glyn," and Miss M. J. Francis (Llaethferch) as the wife of Gruffydd. Both of them created an ex- collent impression. It was generally ac- knowledged that their acting served a better lesson on the the question of tem- perance than any address ever delivered in the district. Others who took their parts in a most creditable manner were I Miss Ada John and Miss Irene Griths as Arianwen and Blodwen (daughters of Gruffydd), Miss Catherine Griffiths as Betsy Robeits and Ceinwn; Mr. D. E. j Jones as Arthur (son of Gruffydd), Mr. D. Bowen Bevan, lis the landlord of the I Harp Inn, and Dr. Thomas; Mr. D. J. Davies as David Roberts (cobbler), Mr. David James as the'Rev. John Rees; Mr. George Lloyd as the policeman ;and Messrs. D. T. Williams, D. Thomas, and J. D. Morgan as Huw, Will and Ifan, customers at the Harp Inn. Negotiations are in progress for the presentation of the drama in other parts of the Valley. —

LOCAL PROPERTY SALEIi II I

LOCAL PROPERTY SALE. I WELL KNOWN LICENSED HOUSES OFFERED. I At the Hotel Metropele, Swansea, on Tuesday, Messrs. J. M. Leeder and Son offered two fully-licensed hotel and a num ber of freehold ground rents at Ystalyfera and Y stra.dgynlais on behalf of Colonel Gough, Yniscedwyn House. The ground rents offered amount to L199 17s. per annum. The following prices were real- ised Freehold ground rent of £10 10s. per. annum on public-house and premises, the Golden Lion, Godre'rgraig, Ystalyfera, with reversion in 95 years—sold to Mr. Evans Bevan, Neath, for £290. Freehold ground rent of L7 per annum on public- House, the Bird-in-hand, and a dwelling- house, Clyngwyn, situaet at Godre'rgraig, reversion in 89 years—sold to Mr. Arthur Hopkin, solicitor, Pontardawe, for a client at J6195. Freehold ground of £ 5 per an- num on public-house, the Wern Fawr I iiii, Ystalyfera, with reversion in 89 years—purchased by Mr. Evans Bevan at JB150. Freehold ground rent at E20 per annum on the Red Cow Inn and two shops adjoining, Nos. 18 and 20, Wern- road, Ystailyfera, reversion in 95 years— sold to Mr. Evans Bevan for £540. Free- hold ground rent of E25 per annum on licensed house, the Bush Inn, Pantteg, with five cottages adjoinging in Pantteg, Ystalyfera, reversion in 48 years, to about £100 per annum—sold to Mr. Evans Bevan for L700. The freehold ground rent of JB1 15s. on the Tinman's Arms, Ystal- yfera, was bought in. Mr. Daniel Mere- j dith was the purchaser at E240 of a free- hold gr £ ound rent of JS8 per annum on the Ystalyfera Arms, reversion in 97 years. Mr. Evans Bevan bought for E500 the freehold ground rent of £ 20 on the Ystalyfera Hotel and three shops adjoin- ing at Ystalyfera, with reversion in 96i years. The freehold ground rent of £ 2 6s. per annum on the Railway Inn and four lock-up shops adjoining in Commercial- street, Ystalyfera, with reversion in six- teen years to rack rents of L130 per an- num, was sold to Mr. Simon Thomas for £900. Freehold ground rent of E35 per annum on the New Swan Inn, Ystaly- fera, reversion in 96 years—sold to Mr. E. Evans Bevan at JB900. Freehold ground rent of £ 13 per annum on the Old Swan was bought in. Freehold ground rent of £4 12s. peir annum on the Traveller's Rest, Ystradgynlais, rever- sion in 48 years—sold to Mr. Evans Bevan for £160. Freehold ground; rent of JE6 per annum on the Gough Arms, Ys- tradgynlais, and 22 cottages adjoinging, with reversion in 37 years to rents of £250 18s. was bought in. Freehold ground rent of 24 4s. per annum on the Star Inn, Ystradgynlais, reversion in 89 years --sold to Mr. E. Evans for L140. Free- hold ground rent of j31 10s. on the Miners Arms, Ystradgynlais, reversion in 96 year&bought by Mr. Thos. Watkins at 945. Freehold ground rent of JB56 per annum on the Crown Inn, Cwmtwrch- bought in. The freehold fully-licensed public house known as the Aubrey Arms, Gurnoa, Ys- talyfera, let .at B20 a year to an old- sta-nding tenant, realised R2,650 from Mr Joseph D. Williams, Old Swan, Ystaly- fera. The freehold fully-licensedi hotel, the Yniscedwyn Arms, Ystradgynlais, leased for fourteen years from March, 1914, at JB60 per annum, was sold private- ly after the sale for £ 2,000. The solicitor for the vendors (the Ynis- 'cedwyn Estate) was Mr. George Tudor, 1 Brecon. I 0

DIVORCE FOR SNORERS I

DIVORCE FOR SNORERS. I According to the French law courts a woman afflicted with a snoring hus- band has good grounds for a divorce. Some time ago a newly-married couple, both of whom were confirmed snorors, found it impossible to get a good night's rest as each woke the other by unpleasant snorting noises. At first they tried sleeping in differ- ent rooms, gradually increasing the distance between them. But they both snored so vigorously that the flat was not big enough to cure the devil. Finally they mutually decided on divorce as the only solution of their common trouble.

Advertising

 f ? The A!!twen and Pontardawc ? t Co,-operative Society. =-——————— T h Y You are a Trades Unionist,—but you are not a Co-operator VET? ————— $If you are a Trades Unionist by conviction, how *4* J can you still remain outside the great movement? You t believe in collective bargaining for better Waies and £ conditions, why not apply the same collective bargaining ♦^♦♦ T in spending your wages ? Think it over seriously, # 2 v 4. Of what avail is a rise in your wages if you allow. ? exploiters on all sides forthwith to raise the price of ♦> ? commodities, or in other words, to lower the purchasing ? ? value of your wages ? ———— The remedy is in your own hands. JOIN THE t SOCIETY TO-DAY. Y + T ———— BRANCHES -;AT(E===- Rhos, Po 7it'a,rd aloe, Ystalyfera & Ystradgynlais J .v..v.v..v.v..