Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

&a I It I WNW wiFIF-at Its I is ilwiirvlz"Tzlrtlvvvvm Ed wards" SAE '• • > I — • -1 DAILY DURING THIS WEEK —- I S i* • • At this Sale, now proceeding, our,Customers are reaping the j! benefit of the greatest underselling of reliable goods ever t • known in Swansea. > J Every department is clearing regular Winter Stock at J • 0 5 irresistible prices. So whatever we have that you may ?! desire, either for your own or your house needs, I you can secure it here at an unusual saving on • ordinary prices. J • • F C — I We close on Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays I !• M at 4B o'clock. rk ^— 23 i !M!? I ES D W- A- 1? D S, j 1 u> Jt/'t/mea i ????? i •

I YSTRADGYNLAIS POLICE COURT

YSTRADGYNLAIS POLICE COURT. Tuesday, before Messrs. J. E. Moore I Ghryn, E. G. Bent hull, Morgan Price, I Dd. Williams and Baron COOerstrom. I PUBLICANS' GOOD CONDUCT. I Tuesday was the day fixed ior the j annual Ilemaing w&gions, but very little time waa taken up in this r?- spect. Tke Clerk (Mr Jeatyn Jeffreys) read the annual report of Police Superin- tendent Joais. It was to the effect that there were in the district 36 fully licensed houses, and one beer house. Seventeen persons had been proceeded against for drunkenness, and 15 were convicted. Thia showed a decrease of 28 convictions over the corresponding period of 1914. The licensed houses h-ad been satisfactorily conducted during the year. The population of the district was 10,671. which gave an average of 399 persons to each house. The Chairman "id the magistrates were very pleased with the satisfactory report of the Superintendent. There was no objection on the part of the police to any house, and the licenses would all be renewed. D. AND D. Lewis Thomaa, a collier, was sum- moned for beink drunk and disorderly 011 Gough road, on January 14th. P.C. Turford gave eviaence, and a fine of 12a. was imposed. HUSBAND AND WIFE. PERSISTENT CRUELTY CASE FROM ABERCRAVE. John E. Jones, collier, of Brookland terraoa, Aborcr&ve, was summoned by his wife Margaret Ann Jones, for per- aisient cruelty on January 23rd, and other dates. Mr Yaughan Edwards (Swansea), ap- geared for complainant, and, Mr Jones Williams defended. Complainant said she had lived with the defendant up to January 23rd. Thev were married in 190ri. There were five children alive out of six. Her husband's earnings w<*re £ 2 a week. Defendant first started ill- treating her about two years ago. He came home drunk on that occasion, Mid ill-treated her badly. She left the house on that occasion for five days. As a result of interviews she went back to defendant. In July last, a month bef ore the last child was born he kicked her on the side, and he had flan given her black-eyes. Defendant's habit on a Sunday was to stay in bed 311 day, and he spent the time in drinking two cases of beer, which he had with him in the room. On Sunday, January 23rd. she went out to her sister's house, and when she returned defendant as ked what she had been doing over there. She said her sister had been very good to her during her confinement. Defend- ant thereupon picked up a knife, and threw it at her head. It struck her just above the eye. She produced the I knife. At this stage Mr Edwards read a letter from Dr. Watson to the effect that he was attending Mrs. Jones for pains in the aide, and a alight cut over the eye. In reply to Mr Williams, complain- ant said she had never neglected to cook dinner for her husband on any Sunday, and she had never been down to her sister's house for dinner on the Sunday. The summons had not been taken out at the instigation of her family. Asked how her little boy Willie had been burnt about the head, complainant said that the bey burnt himself. Mr Williams said he would < £ 11 the boy to prove that complainant burnt the boy. Morgan Griffiths, 1 Morgan street, Abercrave, brother-in-law of com- plainant, said that on the morning of January 24th, Mrs. Jones came to his house. Witness noticed a slight cut above the eye, and it was bleeding. Complainant was quite excited, and after the wound had been washed he took her to see the doctor. By Mr Williams: He had not ad- j vised her to take the proceedings. Mrs. Edith Griffiths, Mrs. Elizabeth David, Mrs. Hipkiss and Inspector Evans, N.S.P.C.C., were also called. The latter said he had asked defendant whether he had beaten his wife at all, and he said he had not done so of late. He had the complainant ex- amined by a medical man. He was of the opinion that the defendant was a neglectful parent. He found the beds dirty and insufficient. The children were well nourished, but badly clothed. Mr Jones Williams for the defence alleged that the real mischief was due to the complainant's family. He ad- mitted that there had been some family tiffs, but ho denied that there had been persistent cruelty. Defendant gave evidence. He denied striking his wife with a knife. He admitted reprimanding her be- cause she was spending so much time with her relations. Every time his wife left the house she left of her own accord. Mr Williams: You are an in- dustrious man ? Defendant: Yes, sir. You kill a pig every year?—Yes, sir (laughter). You have had to do the housework ? -Yes sir. I have had to do the wash- ing and baking. (More laughter). Is it true that you have been drink- ing two cases of flagons every Sunday ? —No, sir. Onlv twice I have had two oases in the house. Do you have any help to drink them? --No, sir. How long will two cases last you?— About three davs, sir. In reply to Mr Edwards defendant said that his wife had always left the house of her own accord. He admitted that his wife had had blackeyes. Mr Edwards: How did she got the blaekeyes? Defendant: On one occasion it was 

Advertising

"OUT OF SORTS." Especially during the early part of the year, we all have days when we feel limp and list- less. not caring for our meals, and finding our work distasteful. We are not really ill, but we are out of sorts." At such times, some people to<>li-hiv By to stimulants, which simply spur the ti.ing energies for a tinal effort. Bnt after the effort, what then ? They arc wor"e off than before. What we all need when we are a little run down, is a tonic tha' will brace up the system, through the stomach. the only way in which the system can be toned up naturally. Try Mother Seigei's Svrup. The medicinal extracts contained in Mother Seigel's Syrup tone up and strengthen the stomach, and gently stimulate the liver and bowels to healthy activity. Next time you are out of sorts, have indigestion, bilious- ness, headaches, or constipation, take Mother Seigel's Syrup after your meals, and note how quickly your tone is restored, and how your energv incren«e«. bv dav,

SHOTFIRER FINED j

SHOT-FIRER FINED. j Wm. Thomas, a shot-firer, engap:ed 'I under the South Wales Anthracite Company, was summoned for a breach of the Coal Mines' Act. Defendant pleaded guilty. Mr Toulson, of Abeirdare, who prose- cuted, explained that Thomas had failed to examine a working place within a radius of 20 yards before firing a shot. The result on this oc- casion was that the gas in several cavities caught fire, and the defendant and others were injured. Defendant had admitted that he had not ex- amined the places referred to. De- fendant was liable to a fine of -C5. A letter was put in from. Mr Hy. Williams, secretary of the workmen's committee, to the effect that Thomas was a capable shot-firer, and that he held a clean character. Mr Toulson, for the Company, said that the defendant had acted as shot- firer for six years, and nothing was known against him. He had always been found to be honest, straightfor- ward, and an excellent workman. Mr Moore-Gwyn in fining defendant 40s., said he hoped it would be a warn- ing for him..

0b OBITUARY

————— .0b. .————— OBITUARY. ALAFON AND ISALED, TWO I WELSH BARDS. The Rev. O. G. Owen, widely known in bardic and literary circles as Alafon, died at his brother's residence at Aber- gele, on Tuesday morning. Mr Owen, who was pastor of the Calvinistic Methodist Church at Ysgoldy, near Carnarvon, was a prominent Eistedd- fodwr, and his compositions both in poetry and pro&e were of great literary merit. The death has also taken place at Carnarvon of Mr Morris Owen, soli<,it- or, whose bardic name was Isaled.

PRESENTATIONS TO I SOLDIERS I

PRESENTATIONS TO I SOLDIERS. AMMANFORD MAGISTRATES AND LICENSED HOUSES. The annual licensing session at Am- manford was held on Mondav, before Mr A. E. du Buisson and other mao-is- trates. The Deputy-Chief-constable (Mr John Evans) presented his annual report, which stated that there were 53 liceii- sed premises in the division. There was one public-house (including the two off-licences for wille and spirits) to every 470 of the populaton. Two licensed persons were proceeded against for infringing the licensing laws, resulting* in one conviction and one dismissal. During the year ended December 31, 1915, 126 proceedings were taken for drunkenness, resulting in 117 convictions, against 215 pro- ceedings, resulting in 203 convictions, during the preceding year, showing a decrease of 89 in the number of pro- ceedings and 86 in thellumoor of con- victions. The Deputy-Chief-constable. added that the majority of public-houses during the year had given entire satis- faction to the police, but there was one thing he would like to call atten- tion to in reference to which he had received complaints. This was the frequency with which licensed premises were used for concerts, etc., to make presentations to soldiers returning from the front on leave through sick- ness or otherwise. He had made in- quiries, and found there was ample accommodation in the various locali- ties where these concerts, which were very commendable, could be held and it would be an advantage if they were held outside public-houses. The Chairman said the magistrates were thoroughly in acoord with the deputy-chief-constable, and thought the practice should be very much dis- couraged; these entertainments should not be held in public-houses at all. There were several organisations about to be, or had been, started where these social enteretinments and concerts could be held, in the Y.M.C.A. or other premiges not licensed.

4500 NATIONAL VOLUNTEERS

.———— -———— 4.500 NATIONAL VOLUN- TEERS. FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM IN FRANCE AND THE BALKANS. Mr Joseph Devlin, M.P., speaking at Belfast, said that 4,500 members of the local regiment of National V olun- teers were at present fighting tho battle of Ireland, of liberty, and of humanity in France and the Balkan States. Although their ranks had been thinned, those left behind were re- solved to keep the regiment together and to maintain it as strong and as efficient as was possible in the cir- cumstances. They felt that nothing they could do would tend more to cheer the hearts of their gallant comrades than to know that the old flag would be kept flying in their absence.

Advertising

To the Inhabitants of Ystradgvnia-ie, Abercrave and Cwmtwrch. D. THOMAS, M.P.S., PHARMACIST. DISPENSING AND CONSULTING CHEMIST, CHURCH ST., YSTRADGYNLAIS Desires to announce that he has open- ed business at the above address, where special attention is given to dis- T)pn?i n'? urd the National Insurnnce '?' —?J?y'

CWMTWRCH CWMLLYNFELL I FI

CWMTWRCH CWMLLYNFELL I F ,-Saved by His Bible" was the title of an interesting lantern lecture at the Tem- perance Hall 011 Tuesday, which proved a great success. Mr Evan Kinsey, as usual, explained the views to the audience. Mr. Gibson, a Canadian evangelist, visited the Mission Hall on Saturday and Sunday last and conducted a series of meetings. The hall was well attended dur- ing all the services. Rev. Llewelyn Bowyer, of Danygraig, I Alltwen, Pontardawe^ will preach at Ebenezcr Chapel on Sunday next. The rev. gentleman is well known as a very forceful pulpiteer, and his visit is eagerly looked forward to. On Sunday last Coun- cillor Lewis occupied the pulpit, and his power discource3 were greatly appreciat- ed. On Sunday the councillor will con- duct the services at Ebenezer, Brynam- man. Mr. Dannie Jones, Rainbow-hill, fourth son of the late Gwilym Wyn, Cwmllyn- fell, left ior London on Monday, where he will commence duties under the mili- tary authorities. He has been successful in obtaining a sanitary inspector's post. Mr. Jones is very popular in this dis- trict, and all wish him the b^st of for- tune. Mr. Delahay, stationmastw at Cwm- llynfell, left the place last week to take up similar duties at Hereford. Mr. De- laT lahav was highly esteemed by all who came in oontact with him through the district. He left with the best wishes of his numerous friends. j We are glad to learn that Mr. Morgans, M.E., late manager of the Cwmllynfell Collieries, has been appointed manager of a big concern in Pontrhvdyfen, and commenced duties there last Mon- day. Mr. Morgan was highly respected in this locality, and was a prominent literary figures in the literary and bardic world. We wish him every success in his new circle The local collieries have been idle lt week owing to trade depression, but we are pleased to state they have all re- started this week. Bryn Gwilym.—'Taith y Pererin" oedd testyn y darluniau ar y canfas yn y lie uchod nos Lun diweddaf. Bu rhai o'r ieuenctyd perthynol i Eglwys Bryn Seion mor garedig a rhorldi benthyg eu hud- lusern er mwyn vhodiii gwlcdd ddarlun- iadol i blant bychxin Gobeithlu Bryn Gwilym. Cafwyd noson ddyddorol, a'r lie yn orawn o bobl mewn oed a phlant. Eglwrwyd y gwahanol ddarluniau gan y Parch. G. R. Davies mewn modd effeith- iol. Da genym ddeall fod y Parch J. Rees, Cwmllynfell, yn well y dyddiau hyn. Hyderwn y gwelir ef eto yn rhodio oddi- amgylch fel cynt. Mae cydymdeimlad dyfnaf yr ardal L'r cylch gydag ef yn ei gyatudd blin. English Mission Hall.—Terfynwyd y gyfreB gyfarfodydd perthynol i'r achos uchod nos Iau diweddaf. Cafwyd oedfaon gwlithiog ar hyd yr wythnos. Yr oedd y ddaa efeugylwr, Mri. Griffiths a Mathews ar eu hnclielfanau, a naws y nef i'w deimlo yn amlwg drwy eu cenndwri. Traddedodd Mr. Mathews anerchiad rhag- orol nos Iau, mewn perthynas a'r rhyfel bresenol i lond capel o bobl. Yr oedd y canu mor atdyniol nes gwefreiddio yr holl Gwm. Erys rhai o'r emynau ganwyd yn fyw yn eih oof am amser hir. Yn Nghapel Ebenezer cynaliwyd y cyfarfodydd hyn, ac ni welwyd y capel mor orlawn er's llawer dydd. Sior fod ymweliad y ddau efengylwr hyn wedi bod o fendith i'r ardal a'r cylch. Cyfarfcd Amrywiol.—Nos Sul cafwyd eyfarfod amrywiaethol yn Nghapel Eben- ewr, pryd y dadganodd cor yr eglwys lu o ddarnau allan o oratorio "Josiah) (W. A. Ogden), dan arweiniad Mr. Dd. Davies, L.T.S.C. Yr oedd y cyfarfod yn un o rhai goreu a gawsom er's llawer dydd. Canodd y cor y darnau "As the mountains," "Our God shall come," "For even Christ," a "Sing unto the Lord." Hefyd, yn ystod y cyfarfod cafwyd ad- roddiadau gan Alwyn Thomas, Ceinwen Davies. a arerchiadau gan Mri. Tom H. Williams, Evan Kinsey, T. R. Thomas, a Griffith Davies; unawd gan Mrs. Mary Williams, duett gan Dd. J. Williams a Griffith W. George. Cawsom ddadganiad bvw gan y cor o'r anthemau canlynol "Eieteddai teithl wr blin," "Teyrnasa Iesu m.awT," a "Dyddiau dvn sydd fel glas- welltyn." Mae clod yn ddyledus i Mr. Dd Davies am ei ymdrech gyda'r canu cynulleidfaol, ac am y rhaglen arddsreh- og oedd wedi ddarparu ar gyfer nos Sul. Yr organydd cedd Mr. Tom W. Davies, a gwnaeth ei orchwyl i foddlonrwydd. Y llywydd oedd y Cynghorydd L. Thomas. Cymdeithas Gymraeg Gwvs.—N os lau nesaf disgwylir i Mr. Lewis Williams ddarllen papur aT "Ambrose Lloyd," hefyd gwna oor, o dan ei arweinyddiaeth, ganu rhai o donau ac anthemau o waith yr awdwr poblogaidd. Sicr y hydd y cyfar- fod hwn yn un o rhai mwyaf dyddorol y gymdeithas. Mae Mr. Williams yn gerdd- or o fri ei hun, ac wedi bo dyn nglyn a cherddoriaeth ar hyd ei oes. Lovers of the drama are reminded of the performance of "Jac Martin," at the Hall on Saturday by the Amman Valley Dramatic Society. The Company has gained a reputation for masterly acting an d a treat is assured.

SWANSEA MEN AVENGE COMRADES

SWANSEA MEN AVENGE COMRADES. Letters from the Swansea Battalion, now part of the British Expeditionary Force, indicate that the members were soon afforded an opportunity of aveng- ing the death of five and the wounding of six of their comrades recently report- ed through a shell dropping on a dug- out, for on the 29th they "strafed" a Ger- man working party engaged in repairing parapet and wire entanglements. The men seem much indebted to the chaplain, the Rev. Alban Davies, for his ministrations, the rev. gentleman going even to the men in the front line with the observation that "if th ebovs cannot come to the church the church will come to the boys." The men have a portablr piano, which was used for tho first time at this memor- !) s rrve.

Advertising

MASTERS ?Td! jf?A A ?P C OVERCOATS Again lead the way for Style, Value and Variety. Whether for Man, Youth or Boy, we can please every taste at prices which will suit every pocket. NOTE THE ADDRESSES- MASTERS & Co. CLOTHIERS Lta, 18 & 19 Castle Street 282 Oxford Street Swansea 3 Green Street, NCSttl 17 Stepney Street, ■ ■ Llanelly, etc. H B  ? !| CmnltiDll. i Castle Coir, j i ? uuiitiJitiUuH t)t u?m! fnrnpp ? SWANSEA J j i. 1 DAVID IHC?S! i i (Y 6?

COLONELS BEADY WIT

COLONEL'S BEADY WIT. Colonel • Pearson, ex-commas der of the 8b la Welsh Divisional Royal Engineers, who is now engaged on the recruiting staff in the Swansea district is bringing his weight of experience to bear on the recruiting, arbitration, and mining tribunals. In his capacity as military repre- sentative, Colonel Pearson was con- fronted with a hairdresser of 21 years, who appea oed to be excused on the ground that he would "lose his busi- ness." Promptly replied Colonel Pearson: Let your customers grow their beards until you come back. You will be of more Value to your country in the trenches." The advice was accepted, for the man is now serving with the colours, A young undertaker who appealed for exemption was told by the colonel, "Let the dead bury the dead, unless you can get someone older than your- self to provide the coffins." A single man appealed to the colonel to be excused as he was "an only son. "I have only one son myself," replied the colonel, "and he is in the trenchetf. He is better off than being in a feather bed at night." "What would you do if this man w.-to dead?" asked Colonel Pearson of an employer, who claimed exemption for one of his workmen. "I suppose I would have to maki some sort of a shift then," said thf, employer. Another works manager claimed as "indispensable" one of his workmen who had joined tho colours a fortnight ago. "Has the works been idle since tbif, iman joined?" asked the colonel. "Oh, no," came the reply. "Then he is not indispensable," .re-- torted the colonel. "Ddaw dim cattS o fola ci.