Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 5 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Severe Stomach Catarrh. 'Man who wanted to Serve his Country but was declared unfit Became so ill could take nothing solid. Intense pain prevented sleep. Cured Completely by Dr. Cassell's Tablets, "I think it is simply marvellous how Dr. Cassell's Tablets have eured me of gastric catarrh," says Mr. Ed. Jones, of 1, Riding's Yaird, Wood-street, fiddlet.on, i Manchester, "for if ever any poor soul suffered more than I did I pity them. "The trouble came <. on about a year .ag o," he continues, "with pain after every morsel I ate, and soon I was so ill I had to give up work. For a time I had medical treatment at home, but, my case proving VeTy severe. I was sent to hospital. There I was kept on special foods, for I could not take any- thing solid. I did. all camie back again. Sometimes I threw up even the medicine 4m  Mr. Jones, Manchester, ?h? ? 'r:"? given m&. And all the the time I was in terrible pain; I oould not sleep for it. After three months in hospital I ,-came out. They ha,ddone their best for Hie, I'm sure they could not have been kinder, but I was still far from well. Then I went to a convalescent home for a fortnight, and after that came home. I was not cured, but perhaps a little better, so last November, feeling that I would like to do my bit in the war, I went to a recruiting office. The rush was so great that I suppose that there was no time to examme me properly, but ¿ 1. very soon axver tuey j saw I was not fit, so I was put in hospital and then discharged., "I was still suffering atutely, and as thin as a shadow for want of nourishment. It was thought I would never work again. Then I chanced to read about Dr. Cassell's Tablets, and seeing what cures they had effected I got some. The wonder of the thing is that after -1 -1 I t about the fourth dose 1 isn oener, a?o I went on improving so fast that soon I felt well enough to look for work. I got work in a chemical works, where I have ) been since. I feel as fit as ever in I mv life, but "f I should again need I Dr. Cassell's Tablets I shall get them if it takes my last shilling." DR.CASSELL S TABLETS. f SEND FOR A FREE BOX. Send yonr na me and address & two penny stamps for postage, etc, to Dr. Cassell's Co., Ltd. Box R Rochester Road, Manchester, & you 

NTN POLI

NTN POL DIOiYN 0 ANNAS DAI A FINNA A R RYFAL. gan GLYNFAB. ufAwdwr "Scwt Ymlan"— Buddogol yn yr Eisteddfod Genedlaethol, 1911. Tafodi-aath Canol Rhondda.) Y BYDWARYDD-SHWRNA-AR- DDEG. -"DICCYN 0 SPEL FACH, WARA TEG ONTEFA?" W i'n clywad fod rhai o no chi yn .cyntach a chonach os na fydd Dai a fin- nau wrthi animar an' tongs yn cornda-cu'r Sossinjaa-s, yn apt o wispran wrth y'ch jplydd fel yn- "-Ala Ni'n Doi just ar ben; sdim gytta nw i weyd." Naccos a aj fencos i, rossweh diccyn bach, sa ni'n stoppo wmladd nawr, a starto 'i thrackan i sha dreckshwn y Red Cow ar unwaith, i fyssa'r annas yn siwr 

YSTRADGYNLAIS POLICEMAN ASSAULTED

YSTRADGYNLAIS POLICE- MAN ASSAULTED. TWO MONTHS' IJfPRISOX MENT. At the Ystradgyniais Police Court on Tuesday (E. H. BentJiall presiding), two meu named Llewellyn Jenkins, Gorof, and Richard Powell, Ystradgyniais, were charged with assaulting Police Constable, Davies, Ystradgyniais, in Glantawe-ro^d 1 on Saturd iy evening. The two men were j arrested in connection with the assault and were liberated on bail. According to the constable's appearance he seemed to have been roughly handled and has been unable to resume duty since. Mr. Jones-Williams proseucted for the police, and Mr. Glyn Morris ,Messrs. Viner Leeder and Morris) defended. Police-constable 55 Davies, Ystradgyn- iais said he had been on duty in the place for about two years in all. La&t Saturday night he was going dow n to- wards the Gough Arms, when he met four men coming up. Two of the men were defendants, and he knew them quite well. The men were using bad language and he told them to go home quietly and to use better language. After he had gone on a few yards Jenkins came after him and asked, "Who has got the most service, me or you ?" With this Jenkins tried to strike him, but w itness stepped aside. On the second occasion Jenkins struck him, with the result that they closed and fell to the ground. During the, struggle Powell ran on and kicked wit- ness on the side. He also struck him on the head, with the result that he (wit- ness) was knocked out for a few seconds. When he regained himself he drew his staff, and he believed he struck Jenkins. Witness went on to say that he was kicked on the right knee, nose and under the eye. He also received blows on the head and right shoulder. Some of his teeth were also smashed. In reply to Mr. Morris witness said he was positive as to the identity of the two defendants because they were well- known to the police. Inspector Williams gave evidence of arresting Jenkins at his home in Gough- buildings. He examined Jenkins and found a freeh abrasion on the left hand. He also discovered blood on the cuff of his shirt. Witness subsequently went in search of Powell, but failed to find him that night or SHnday morning. Powell, however, saw witnesa on Sunday night. Witness picked up a cap, handkerchief, glovea and a con- stable's staff near the place where the scuffle too place. Charles George, 18, College-row, said he was outside the houes about 7.30 on Saturday night, when he heard a row on the road. Witness ran down and there he saw Davies the policeman on the grouna, with the two defendants kicking him quite hard. The policeman wa.s shout- ing for held, and witness tried to help the officer. The men then ran up the road and across the foot bridge. The men did not have any caps on. Sergt. Williams and others also gave evidence. On the advice of Mr. Morris tlte two defendant's pleaded guilty. The magistrates sentenced defendants to two months imprisonment with hard labour. There were previous convictions against defendants, Powell having served 12 months in 1911 f<;r unlawful wounding.

GODRERGRAIG

———— ———— GODRE'RGRAIG- Dydd Mawrth, y cyntaf cyf., bu farw y brawd ieuanc tawel Richard Ivor, mab Mr. and Mrs. David Williams (tinhouae superintendent) Godre'rgraig. Dioddef- odd gystudd caled am yn agos bedwar mis, ac er gofal a thynerwch y teulu bu farw yn un-ar-ddeg oed. Claddwyd yn mynwent Pantteg, prydnawn Sadwrn canlynol. Daeth tori anarferol i'r cynheb- rwng. Canwyd tonau gan blant yr ysgol wrth y ty, ac ar lan y bedd yn effeithiol iavm. Gwasanaethwyd yn yr angladd gan y Parchn. Ellis Parry a Ben Davies, Pantteg. Nawdd y nef fyddo dros y teulu. Nac wylwch, deulu hawddgar Ar ol eich Ivor llon, Mae gyda'r Iesu tyner Yn pwyso ar ei fron, Lie mae rhyw fyrdd o ienctyd Yn iach heb friw na phoen, Yn canu'r anthem felus 0 glod i'r addfwyn oen. -Cyfaill,

CWMLLYXFELI MINERS RECEIVE NOTICES

CWMLLYXFELI MINERS RECEIVE NOTICES. TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY MEN AFFECTED. The men employed at the Cwmllynfell Colliery (Messrs. Ben Thomas and Son), have received 14 days' notice to terminate all contracts, the intention of the com- pany, it is stated, being only to drive the two main "bullies," which will mean the employment of about 12 workmen. Over 240 men are affected. We understand that this undertaking has been worked at a loss for some time past.

Advertising

George Scale, Crown Stores, PONTARUAWE, FOR WREATHS, CROSSES and SPRAYS. Made at Short Notice. Also a Large Stock of FLOWER PLANTS. Nat. Tel: 028.

METHODIST OPPOSITION TO BILLIARDS

METHODIST OPPOSITION TO BILLIARDS- CAPEL IIEYDRK APPLICA- TION FOR LICENSE FAILS. At the Ammanford licensing Sessions on Monday, objection was raised to an application for a new billiard license at Capel Hendre by William Atkins. The Rev. Thos. Francis, Methodist minister, handed in a petition- against it, signed by 295 of the people in the district. He said he had personally witnessed the signature of every one. He also handed in a resolution passed by the Capel Hen- dre Methodist Church. He pointed out that these billiard houses led to much un- necessary spending, which should be dis- couraged and also sa.id the petitioners had complaints continually brought to their notice where young men spent the greater part of their earnings on billiards. It was also found that DETERIORATED THE YOUNG I manhood in the neighbourhood. The rev. gentleman gave an instance of the home life being adversely affected. Cross-examined by Mr. Henry Noyes, who appeared for the applicant, he stated I. he had personally taken the petition round to his flock and others. Mr. Noyes I suppose none of your II flock would refuse to sign it. Witness One or two have. Mr. Noyeg They were strong-minded enough to refuse. Witness Yes, if you like to call it strong-minded. Continuing, witnes3 said in the words of the petition they wanted to take the young men's minds from pleasure and make them prize more the spirit of justice mercy, and love in the country. Mr. Noyes Would you be surprised to hear we also have a petition of 400 names ? Witness I should like very much for the petitions to bs compared as to the character of the petitions and the area taken. I SANE AND REASONABLE GAME. I Mr. Noyes told the Bench that what Mr. Francis had told them was simply his personal view. There was no billiard hundreds of young men in the district, and he submitted the game of billiards was a most sane and reasonable recrea- tion in fact it was the king of indoor games. So long as it was played properly there was nothing at all in the game which could in any way demoralise young people. The Bench, after retiring, intimated they had come to the conclusion that they could not grant the application.

I LOCAL WILLI

I LOCAL WILL. I DR. D. THOMAS, J.P. (LATE OF I YSTALYFERA. I Dr. David Thomas. J.P., M.D., of Beulah, Bettws Evan, Cardiganshire (late of Ytitalyfara), who died on the Ist October iast,, left estate of the gross value of £ 12,653, of which f,6,613 is net personalty, and probate of his will, dated 6th April li)12, has been j granted to his widow and his nephew, the Rev. Edwin Phillip Davies, of St. Matthew's, Borth. The estator left I' his estat-eupoll trust for his wife for life, and subject to her interest lie left i his shares in the Great Western Rail- I way and in Bucklev's Brewery upon trust for his niece May Jones, his shares in Ben Evans and Co., Ltd. up- on trust for his nephew Barrett Owen, a.nd his shares in the Swansea. Harb- our Trust upon trust for- his n-c-oe Amelia Evans. He bequeathed the gold watch pre- sented to him bv Madame Adelina Patti to his nephew the Rev. Edwin I Phillip Davies, to devolve as an heir- loom. He left his shares in the Phoenix Tinplate Co., Ltd., upon trnst for his sister Margaret Evans, blocks of real estate upon trust for each of his sis- ters Rachel Davies and Margaret Evans. He left £1 to each servant for each year of service, and he direc- ted that thev shall be provided with mouring. and that his funeral should be simple, only men attending. The ultimate residue of his estate he left as to one-sixth to his nephew Barrett Owen and Amelia Evans, one-third to his niece May Jones, and one-fourth to each of his sisters Margaret Evans and Rachel Davies.

I SWANSEA VALLEY TRADE

I SWANSEA VALLEY TRADE. ) I Trade in the Swansea. Valley showed increasing activity. Both the Anthra- cite and bituminous pits worked full time, and outputs were heavier. All hands were kept fully employed at the blast furnace, and the production of pig-iron was satisfactory. The steel trade was very brisk. Copper re- fineries continued to do well, previous outpts being maintained all round. There was some improvement in the tinplate departments, and outputs were growing. Several mills resumed operations, and most of the sheet mills were fully operating. At the various spelter establishments briskness was shown in all departments, and the out- put reached a high level. There was a. record trade in sulphuric acid and lead piping. The Mond Nickel Works again showed activity; a stack in the course of erection is nearing com- pletion. Both the Mannesmann Tube Works and the metal extraction works were well employed, and no relaxation was noticed at the iron and brass foundries and engineering and fitting shops. Regular employment was noted at the brickyards and stone quarries.

No title

Fifteen ports have in three months received 314,000 fewer cwts. of fish than in 1914, but worth £ 50,000 more, state the North-Eastern Sea Fisheries Committee. —————. .———

Advertising

I w. A. WILLIAMS, -Phrenologist, can be c-onsulted daily at the Victoria I Arcade (near the Market), Swansea Modern FURNITURE. m d I L  Call and See Our Collection of Artistic and Useful HOME FURNISHINGS == Conveniently Arranged for Inspection in Our New=== ARCADE WINDOWS. F C FDDGRS'H lIT & Ç'UN\ F' t 1 rrMKEES?-W & 1!, House Ftmsim Cabinet Manufactures, Upholsterers, Removal Contractors and Warehousemen. Glass, China and Earthenware Merchants. 19, 20 6c 21, HIGH STREET, SWANSEA.

GWAUNCAEGURWEN

GWAUNCAEGURWEN. DEATH OF fR. WI. DANIEL, M.E. The untimely death of Mr. William Daniel, Brynhawddgir, Gwaunoaegur- wen, brother of Mr. David Daniel, M. E., oolliery manager, Ystalyfera, has cast a gloom over the locality. Although but 24 years of age he had done exceptionally well in the Evening Teelinioal Classes in various subjects, obtaining many scholar- ships at Cardiff and Swansea. He had passed 1st class in advanced surveying, drawing, honours building construction, higher practical mathematics, and many other subjects, and also car-rie-d of first prizes in architecture ai the Summer School, held at Cardiff University. He was ever learning and continuously edu- cating himself and striving to become efficient as a decorator, draughtsman, and artist. Wherever ''Billow" was, the whole surroundings were better and happier, and he seemed to make the world a pleasanter place to live in. Not only was he a hardworking, upright and steady man in his business, but he served his country by striving to become a good man, practising what he knew to be right, and refraining from what he knew to be wrong; by being kind and thought- ful to thuse who need help, by willing ser- vice of every kind at home, in school, and in the world. He did a good turn to somebody everyday. The loss to the loctality is great,. but to his associates and relatives it is ine- parable. The whole district mourns and deeply sympathises with his near relations in their bereavement. MOTOE FATALITY. On Saturday night Mr. James Davies, aged 34, a collier, of Cwmgorse, was pro- ceeding towards his home from Pontar- de in company with another man when he "as knocked down by a motor my belonging to Mr. Tom Davies, Cwmgorse. He reoeived seriens injuries, and died almost immediately. DeceasecJ was a married man with three children. 'DARING DOG THEFT." At Llandilo Police Court Daniel Har- ries and Hopkin Harries, two brothers, residing at Cwmgorse, were charged with what Deputy Chif Constable Evans de- scribed as being "a verv daring theft of a dog." Mr. Daniel Davies, of the Red Lion Inn, Manordeilo. said the men visited his house on December 28th. and one of them onceing the dog remarked that it was a very nice one. Aftfr they left he missed the animal, which he valued at £10. For the defence it was stated that the dog jumped on the defendant's car. The Bench said that if the men found the dog in the car it was their dutv to hand it over to the police. Fines of R2 each, and witnesses expenses, were im- posed.

SWANSEA CAPTAIN

SWANSEA CAPTAIN. LOST ON STEAMER SITXK BY ZEPPELIN. The captain of the steamer Franz Fischer, which was sunk by a Zeppel- in in the North Boo. with the loss of all but three hands, was a wellknown Swansea man. Captain Jack DavieR, of Longoaks-avenue. Deceased was the brother of a still better known Swansea man. Captain Davies, dock- master at the King's Dock, Swansea, and leaves a widow and one child. AN ADVENTUROUS LIFE. Captain J. Davies was 57 years of age. He had had a somewhat ad- venturous life, and had held commands in many kinds of craft. Once, when in command of the Tra- falgar, the oompasses became de- magnetised during a storm, the bunkers blew up by explosion, and there was a mutiny on board. On another occasion he took a traw- ler all the way from Swansea to Vladi- vostok to new ownei-s, returning over- land through Siberia.

Advertising

Welsh Flannel and Wool Stores LONGTON HOUSE, Herbert St., Pontardawe. STOCKINGS RE-FOOTED ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. lOd. PER PAIR. POST FREE. Send for patterns and price lists for all kinds of Wool and Flannel. Note Addrem- J. W. MORGAN, Pontardawe & Seven Sisters

Y GOLOFN FARDDOL I

Y GOLOFN FARDDOL. I — I EP. COF I I Am y diweddar Mr Rees D. Powell, Y.H. Mount Pleasant, yr hwn a fu farw Rhag. 16, 1915. wedi cystudd hir a chaled. yu 63 mlwydd oed, ac a gladdwyd y Llun canlynol yn Mynwent Cwmllynfell. C(¡ffw.ria.eth y Cyti.awn sydd Fu.J: gedig." Mor hawdd yw wylo yn y nos ddihedd, Heb kwyrch seren ar ei hron, [gwedd, Amled yw'r dagrau ctreigla dros ein A'r gawod wlith ddisgyna'n .lion; rwl colli gwrtluych anwyl yn y glyn- Un gawsom beunvdd raegis tad; I Ei fywyd llydan m.gis rhosyn gwyn, A'i berarogledd lond y wlad. Siomedig yw ein calon ar ei ol, I Mor anhawdd ydyw credu'r ffaith Na chawn ei wyneb hawddgar eto 'nol I I'n lloni mwyach ar y daith Mor gyniwynasgar bu ar hyd ei ces, I ddeilladd angen yn rnhob man, Ei eiriau mwvu oedd megis balm i'n Iocs, A'i nodded grasol gadd y gwan. Mae'r ffaith fod F'ewyrth Rees yn huno Yn archoll ddofn i lawer un, tnawr Ni chuddid swyn ei bersonoliaeth fawr Ar waetIL-if angeu erch ei hun Mor flin mae'r ardal ar ol eolli'i wen A'i gwmni oedd TllOr lion a'r wawr, Cydwyla'r ieuanc heddyw nghyd a'r hen, Am nad yw yana, ar y llawr. Mi garem ei gwmni'n anwylach o hyd, Rhoedd tegwch y lili yn llanw ei fryd, H ir oes o wasanatth gyflawnodd efe, A dyna dystiolaeth trigolion y lie; Gorweithicdd ei hunaa tra parjdd elnorth Ar fywyd, nid arian, y rhoddai ef werth, I Byw bvwyd crefyddol a da yn y byd Oedd amca.n hyfrydol ein gwrthrych o hyd Rhy gynar colla?om ei gwmni o'r lie, Roedd yma'n tywynu iel haul yn y ne, Mor ffyddlon jyfiawnodd ei swyddi i gyd, I A chadwodd anrhydedd ei enw o hyd; Rrfjedd pawh lfrwy'r gymdogaeth via caru ¡ ei wedd, A tliystini'r dcrf enfaivr ar erchwyn ei fedd, Drwy'r dagrav ollyngent ar geuad ei arch, Fod gv.rthrych ein calon yn uchel ei barch Fel derwen yn her:o y dyrncstl gri', Cadernid cylfelyb nodwetfdai efe, Ni chymrai ei daflu fel eweh ar y lli, Ond safai i fyny'n ddiymffrost o hy'; Bu'n bleidiwr o'i febyd i rinwedd a moes, A blodau ei fywyd oedd gwyn tlodau'r gro-Es I grefvdd bU'll ffyddaon ar bob math o. àin A'i ymga.is yn was tad oedd tToi'l' dwr yn win. 0 flwyddi iiafariodd yn fawr gyJa.'r plant A'i argraff aydd heddyw yn fyw ar eu mant; Mae adgof am dano fel drych ger ein bron Ac hir-eth sy'n llcthu ein mynwes fel ton 0 golli ei gwmni caxedig a da— Cwmpeini dj ini mor fwyned a'r ha', Mor ddigri fviaradaa yn ymyl y tan A'i fyw ymddyddaiiion yn loew a glan. Ar allor gwas&naeth f-e ureuliodd ei rawd, Os gwyllt oedd ei Katur at ambell i frawd Maddeuai y cwbl er gofid a loes I'w galon rol hyny, heb sibrwd gair croes. Rhoi'r goreu i. enill oedd tuedd pi fron, Yn mlilith yr euenetyd Uafuxiodd yn lion; Y n myd y rh: i yma, mor wtrthfa w r oedd ef, Bu'n gymorth i lawer i gvchwyn, i'r nef 1 Roedd delfryd ei fywyd yn uchel a phui, 0 blaid y gwirionedd fe lynai fill dur. Ni wertnai'i egwyddor am ddim is y ne' Ar lwvbr uniondeb y oerdr-lodd efe; Ymguddio ei hunaji o olwg y byd Gan wiuud cjmwynasau a garai o hyd; Pwy ri!a.'r bt-ndithion estynodd ei law, A hyny mor dawel a'r fwyn gawod wlaw ? Chwith yw Egwlys Ebenezer, Ar ol bjaenor gweithgar. lion, Un a garai'i llwydd bob am^er Gyda ciMf. iad lond ei fron Drwy'r blyryddoedd bu yn ffyddlon Fel ffyddljndeb haul i'r dydd, Gan wasgaru llu o roddion Gyda gwen a chalon rydd. IJanwodd h. o swyddi paysig Gjydag urrdas a mwynhad, Riiai ofynent ddyn arbenig I'w cyflawni i foddhad; Rhodd eu eiiau a;'¡ weithrcdoedd Megis un gynghanedd dlos, Drwy ei oes er lies v cyhoedd Bu'n aber:hu ddydd a nos. I'r gwarinwr tlawd ac isel Bu yn novldwr o'r iawji ryw, Ar y *B-wTdd dacbeuai'i-i dawel Am i hwn gael modd i ryw; Ar y Cyngor bu yn brwydro Am weiliantau mwy a mwy, Llawer bendith sydd yn tysiio Am ei lafrr dros y PI", y. Treuliodd lawer iawn o'i oriau Ar hyd llwybrau teg y wlad. Yn unigedd y mynyddau Caffai'r galon wir fwynhad Medrai ganu ei feddyliau Mewn penillion cywrain, mwyn, Mor naturiol a pher nodau Yr ehedydd yn y llyn. Nid oes eisiau careg goffa I amlygu'i fedd yn awr, Beth yw'r b«>ddrod onid gorsaf I gyfeiria.d gwlad y wawr? Onid gwag oedd bedd yr Iesu Wed Ig-,vaivrio'r trydydd dydd ? Felly am y saint yn Ngihymru 1 O'u cadwynau ddont yn rkvdo. Nodded Du" fo dros ei briod A'r pla:it anwyl sydd yn drist, Nes daw ad eg i'w gvfarfod Draw yn ngwynfa lesu Grift; Boed i'r cwmwl du dditlanu, Llifed golev.'r n'.f i lawr, Ar y teulu sy'n galaru Ar ol gwrthrvch serch mcr fav, r. MIN-Y-DLN. *Bwrud C .ng' o" D^slarth Ll:> 11 di o.

jSILLY 0rESTI0vS

SILLY 0rESTI0:vS. MINERS' LEADER S RETORT AT PORTH MEETING. In connection with the munitions campaign a meeting wa& held at the English Congregation Church, Forth, on Saturday, Councillor W. Er ana- presiding. Mr Ben Divieti, J.P., miners' agent, said that if Great BritviLu did not have.- I conscription in order to nave herself, then in the case of a German victory- Great Britain would have to submit to it. A man in the audience asked: Is it a fact that the motor ambulances ncvr at the front are sufficient for the need* of the Army at the present time ? Mr Davies: No. The Questioner: According t-o Lieu- tenant Bailey at last Monday's con- ferenc-e they have enough, thanks to the efforts of the Red Cross Society. You cannot deny that. Mr Davies: That is due to the charity of other people. They may at the moment have a sufficient number, but if a big forward movement is mad^ they have not enough. The meeting was then addressed by Mr J. W. Pratt, M.P.. who &a:d that the Minister of Munitions might not be popular in soma places, but the speaker said he could assure them that he was popular in the trenches. (Ap- plause). In appealing to the workers to put forth ever,, effort into their labours, Mr Pratt said that they da-red not barter away the liberties which they had not purchased, but which had been purchased by them by the lalvours and blood of past generations. Mr Henry Herbert, organising secre- tary of the Parliamentary Munitions Campaign, who was the next speaker, was asked by another interrupter to state what was his purpose in address- ing the meeting. Air Herbert replied: Mv endeavour is to s how that during the present crisis it is the duty of every man, whatever his work, and notwithstand- ing the amount he has been accustomed to do in ordinary times, to put forth every ounce of strength to as'-i.-t the, nation in the present struggle. (Ap- plause). In proposing a vote of thinks to the- speakers, Mr Ben Davies, J.P., refer- ring to the interruptions, sai

LLYFRAU AR WERTH AM LAI NA HANER EU PR S

LLYFRAU AR WERTH AM LAI NA HANER EU PR] S. Y Gwvddoniadux CymreiK'" 10 cyf. Geiriadur Charles 1 Esboniad Cyriawn at yr Hen Deeta- ment a'r Newydd 5 Testament yr Ysgol Sabbothol 2 Credoa.u y Byd 2 Hanes y Merthyron 2 Chambers' Information for the People 2 „ Mynegair Ysgrythvrol 1 Gwaith Flavius Josephus 1 „ Diwygwyr Cymru 1 „ "Y Byd a Ddaw," gan Dr. Watts 1., Gladstone a'i Amserau 1 Ac ugemiau o lyfrau eraul rhvddiaeth & barddoniacth. Gellir eu gweld unryw adeg. Mae'r oll o'r llyfrau uchod ddim gwaeth na newydd. Mae anrryw gyfrolau o'r KJeninen" ar gael. Am fanylion pellach ymofyner 9. JOSEPH WILLIAMS. Llyfr Werthvdd, CwmtWTch. 1

Advertising

HERBERT ROGERS, PRACTICAL 8ANTTAaff PLUMBER, GAS AND HOT WATER FITTER, GLAN R HYD ROAD. YSTRADGYNLAIS All orders promptly attend to.