Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

♦>€*€♦>( £ <♦€-♦>'I'* .3 

POHTABOAWE ALLTWEN GLEANINGS

POHTABOAWE ALLTWEN GLEANINGS. AIATWEN MARRIAGE. The wedding took place at the Pontardawe Registry Office in Satur- day last, of Mr David Gibbs, of Smkh- field road, Pontardawe, and .Miss E. Lewis, daughter of Mr David ie is, Gbvyn street, Alltwen. The bride as given away. by her father, and he traa attended by Miss Catherine Ann Jones, of AUtwen, as bridesmaid. The bride was attired in a blue tailor-made costume with a rose coloured silk bat to match. Mr Griff. Gibbs, brother of bndesgroom acted as best man, sod the ceremony was performed by Mr Noah L. Davies. GELANCE FOR UNATTESTED. The Bra..R.eh Reorui ting Office for the purpose of attestation under Lord Derby's Scheme has again been opened 8t the Public Hall, Pontardawe, be- tween the hours of 12 to 2 and 7 tp 9 dailyy. This will afford an op- portunity for the unattested to sign en without going to Swansea. Messrs John Kdwards and Albert Bratton are in charge of the office. LOCAL OFFICER*. Sub-Li,out. R. A. Jones, Royal Naral Diviaiom attended the special meeting of the Pont&rdawe Council which was held on Wednesday. Coun- cillor Jones has been in the Chatham Naval Hospital for a few days on ac- count of cartilegea in the knee, other- wise he looks in perfect health. His oousin, Second-Lieut. D. Ivor Erans, of Glaia, left for France last Friday. YNISMEUDEW LADY'S DEATH. We regret to record the death which took place at the Swansea Hospital on Friday last, of Mrs. Elisabeth Jacobs, wife of Mr. Jacobs, who was engaged for many year* as a coachman with Prepend-iry Griffiths, of Pontardawe. Deceased, who was 59 years of age, had been seriously ill for some time. She was held in higheet respect in the district. Much sympathy is felt for Mr. Jacobs and his eight children in their bereavement. There are five oons and three daughters. Two of the sons are in Salonika, another in the Nary, and another at the Barrow Munition Works. The funeral took place at St. Peter's Churchyard, Pont- ardawe, on Tuesday, and was largely Attended. The Revs. Joel Davies, M.A., and D. J. Arter officiated. CWMGORSE ACCIDENT. A serious accident occurred at Cwm- goree, on Saturday night, resulting in tine death of Mr James Davies, a .named man, of Cwmgorse. It ap- pears that he had been to Pontardawe on Saturday afternoon having some •^eeth extracted. and when returning home about 11 o'clock he was knocked down by a motor oar driven by Mr T. Davies, blacksmith, of Owmgorse. It WM a very dark night, and raining heavily when the accident occurred. Deceased was struok on the right leg by one of the front wheels, and was thrown on the mudguard, and then on to the road. He sustained a disloca- tion of the collar bone, and died short- :y afterwards. The inquest was held '>n Tuesday, and the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death. They also added a rider that no blame could be attached to the driver. Mr W. A. Thomas watched the caee for the re- latives of deceased, and Mr Morgan Davies, Pontardawe, for the driver of the car. BROTHER OF LLEW. CYNLAIS I ews has just readied Pontardawe to the effect that Mr Tom Davies a native of Ystradgynlais, and brother of the late Llew. Cynlais, of Pontardawe, had died in December at Idaho, U.S.A. Deceased was about 66 years of age, and emigrated to the far West in 1883 with Joedah Griffiths, of Alltwen. De- ceased paid his first. visit to the Old Country about four years ago, and spent several months with his son, Mr Wm. Davies, bootmaker, Thomas st.. Pontardawe, and friends in the Swan- sea Valley. He returned to the States but came back. to Wales in the early pad of last year. Last September he decided to make another visit to the States on business matters, and while in Idaho in December, he contracted pneumonia, which caused his death. He had taken a keen interest in Free- masonry in tke Western States, amd his remains were interred with the usual Masonic honours. While in Pentadawe he became a very popular figure through his genial disposition. Deceased had been a widower for many years. R.A.O. B AT trebanos. The Edward Bevan Lodge, of the R.A.O.B. was opened at the Pheasant Bush, Trebanos, OR Thursday last, in the presence of a large number of brothers of the Order. The patron of the lodge is Mr Edward Bevan, col- liery proprietor, Trebanos. The cere- mony was performed by Bros. Albert Hinder, P.G.P., assisted by E. G. Shelton, D.P.G.P, Ezekiel Williams, R.O.H, P.G. Secretarv, Joe Williams, K.O.M., P.G.C., and Hy. Newbery, C.P. CLYDACH BOY WOUNDED. Mrs. J. Itees, of the renrheclyn Dairy, Clydach, has received notifica- tion that her son. Private Da.vid Rees, of the 14th Welsh, was slightly wounded in the head bv a shell splinter on January 31st. PONTARDAWE DEATH. The death took place at Smitlifiel-d road, Pontardawe, on Wednesday, of Mrs. Mary Davies, mother of Mrs. Benjamin Davies, Smithfield road. The deceased, who was 75 years of age, was the widow of Mr Thos. Davies. Ntath road, Llansamlet, and had lived with her daughter in Pontardawe for the past. three years. The funeral takes place on Saturday at 2.30 for Llan- samlet Churchyard. WAITING FOR THE GERMANS. I rnvate Jonn imLNm, oi AUiwen, in a letter to a friend in Alltwen states: "The Pioneers have been in some hot places along the line these last few weeks, and just now we are in the weakest part of the whole front. We don't know what hour the Germans will break through, but we are not afraid. Indeed we would rather see them coming out of earth and give us a chance to show them what we can do, and incidentally strengthen our I own position. Then we could sleep more contented." THE CARETAKER. I The meeting of the protest published in last week's issue in regard to the Pontardawe Hall caretaker created im- mense interest in Pontardawe. The "Llais" was in great demand, and extras had to be secured to cope with the rush. In another column we pub- lish this week a letter from Mr John Edwards, vice-chairman of the Com- mittee, who places the other side of the question before the public. We understand that at a Branch meeting held at Pontardawe last Saturday night, the representative of the j Branch in tiie Hail Committee was j asked to explain the position he had taken. The member placed all the facts before the men, who were con- vinced by the end of the meeting that he was justified in the course adopted, THE NEW CARETAKER. Mr and Mrs. Evan Davies, or is- j talyfera, took over their duties at the Hall on Tuesday last, LETTER FROM THE FRONT. 11 "j re. Bryn towards, B.A., ot tne Jttoyai Futiiiiers, now at the front, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Edwards, Glan- c-amlas, Pontardawe, has sent the fol- hjrr-e, i-tatin;; Hi at he was slightly wounded on February 1st. The I letter is most cheery and interesting. He I states I don't know whether you've already received my letter of yesterday; anyhow I informed you in that that I had been slightly wounded in the head by a Ger- man sniper's bullet-it pierced my cap and grazed the top of my head—no bonta broken at all, so I shall soon be quite all right again. The bullet cut the tlefeh which will soon heal up, and I might tell you I've not felt the least bit of pain since I was hit, on the afternoon of Tuesday {2 p.m.) the 1st last. About fifteen of us were sent up to the trenches as a working party in charge of a ser- geant, so we carried a pile each of sand- bags from the Rescue Trench Stores up to the supports, when we were split up into three parties of five each. I was in t.he act of transferring some soil from my shovel into a bag held by my pal, when I felt a stunning blow on the top of my head, which caused me to fall, of course, and it took me some time to realise what had happened, till it sud- denly occurred to me that I'd been hit by a sniper, then I was all right, because I knew it could not have pierced through my head, or else I'd have been uncon- scious. As it happened I was myself the whole time, Ctnd before many minutes had elapsed a stretcher bearer had my wound dressed up quite nicely and I was able to walk back to headquarters dress- ing station, and from there I was car- ried in an ambulance to the Divisional Field Ambulance Hospital—and remem- ber that I was feeling quite all right the whole time and just as if nothing had happened. I remained at this place for a day, during which time I walked about chatting with the R.A.M.C. people and eating plenty of good food. To-day I came in a motor to the divisional rest station, and after having a nice hot bath, a complete change of underclothing, I wag sent to a very com- fortable ward, where I met quite a large number of friends from our battalion. I hadn't been in the trenches more than half an hour or so before I was out again, and you must not worry at all about it—in fact I wouldn't tell you about it, unless I were afraid lest the War Office should inform you before I would. It will give me a nice and well- earned rest, so keep your peckers up and always remember the old say" ing, "It could have been worst." The accident hasn't affected me in the lea-,t, and I am feeling as strong as a horse, etc. I shall prob .bly be- back with the Battalion in less than a week, because the wound is healmg up nicely. I go out every day just to sec a little of the town—but what I Mre about this life is that one can get enough sle^p, and need never fear any- thing at all. I shan't be happy if I find out that you are worrying about me- there's no need for it. I shall soon be fit again. If anybody asks me what I did in this great war, all I'll have to do is just take off my cap, show them the scar, Quite a souvenir, eh ? When I realised what had happened that I had come off so lightly I could not refrain from laugh- ing, because I first of all thought that somebody had hit me with his shovel- quite a queer sensation I Mm assure you. Hope you are all quite well, heaps ef i love, from your eontented and lucky, BRYN.

Advertising

If you've got a boiler is your T hornet SIMPLE SIMON ??JM ia the soa £ for tMmm you, I Ask your grocer; he knows. ci [ Costs 3jbd. Worth £ s. c :_6"

ABERCRAVE

ABERCRAVE At the last meeting of the com- mittee of management of the Aber- crave and District Co-operative Societv the following resolution was passed:— "That the members of the Society wish to congratulate Mr Idris Davies, our secretary, on his recent appoint- ment on the committee of inquiry to the National Insurance Act, and that we wish him every success in his work on this important committee, and also in his future career. Not only is this appointment a credit to Abercrave, Mr Davies's native place, and that thev should feel proud of him, but also the Principality. Mr Davies is one of the most highly re- spected residents in the locality; he is always in the forefront when any social question concerning the welfare of the people is being dealt with. He is a man of outstanding ability and per- sonality keen, and fearless in argu- ment. In private life Mr Davies is one of the most unassuming and cheerful of men. One of the chief events in his public life was his first contest for a seat on the Breconshire County Coun- cil, when he secured a brilliant victory over Liberal and Conservative in a three corner fight. The inhabitants of Abercrave and district should look back with pleasure to the day when they first elected him as their repre- sentative. The advantages which the district has derived through his un- tiring efforts are very great, especially in educational matters, in which he takes special interest. Mr Davies is the founder and secretary of the local Co-operative Society, of which he has been, and still is the life and soul. As secret-arv of the Breoonshire As- sociation of Friendly Societies, he has done admirable work not only for the county, but also for the Principality. It may also be stated that Mr Davies ia the local estate agent for Mr Wheatlev Cole, Brecon, and is also rate collector for the Ystradgynlais higher division. All join in wishing him still further success in his new ap- pointment as a member of the Ad- visory Committee. Many residents of Abercrave will re- c-ollect a young Spaniard named Fran- cisco Serrano. who worked at one of the local collieries some years ago, and will regret, to learn that he has lost his life in the service of the adopted country of his parents and lumself. It appears that he joined the Manchester regiment about 18 months ago, and took part in the Dardanelles campaign, where he was severely wounded, and died five days later. Pte. Serrano's home was in Dowlais, and his parents have received official inti- mation from the War Office that their son, Pte. Francisco Serrano had died as the result, of wounds. It ia only fitting and just that grateful tribute should be paid to the young Spanish lad who risked and lost hit- Fro u the I great cavo -of frocJom.

PONTARDAWE PUBLIC HALL AND INSTITUTE

PONTARDAWE PUBLIC HALL AND INSTITUTE. THE OTHER SIDE OF CARE- TAKER S CONTORVERSY. To the Editor. Sir,—By the perusal of your issue of last week I notice the report of a meet- ing supposed to be held under the aus- j pices of the Pont.ardawe and Dlstrict. Trades and Labour Council to discuss and condemn the action of the management and standing committees of the above institution in connection with the alleged tyrannical treatment of the caretaker. I appeal to your usual courtesy to allow me as brieiiy as possible to submit the whole facts of the case from the com- mittee's point of view, to the public of Pontardawe and district, who after care- fully reading the both sides of the case, will be the competent judges to decide whether the committees on the one hand, or the late caretaker and T. Jeremiah and Co. are the real tyrants and Prussians, after all. The Management Committee is con- stituted of two members from fevery place of worship, and two members from every branch of a Trade Union in the district, and are selected annually. The Stand- ing Committee is appointed by the General Committee from among its mem- only, so it is obvious that the constitu- ¡ tion is thoroughly democratic. The Gener- al Committee is vested with full power to act on all matters pertaining to the institution, and its decision is final. The General Committee meets quarterly, and the Standing Committee weekly. About eight months after declaration of the war, at aji ordinary general meeting, the secretary made a statement of the financial position in which it was stated that the revenue had suffered to the ex- tent of about L80 from the large hall, and decreased membership, bpt chiefly from the large hall, which meant much less work for the caretaker. This com- mittee authorised the Standing Commit- tee immediately to consider ways and means of economising and reducing expen- diture. At this particular time it so happened that the billiard marker was taken ill, so the caretaker was asked to undertake the duties of marker, and he complied, on the condition that he was to receive the marker's full wages, name- ly 28s. a week, in addition to his own wages, of course. We tried several times to get him to accept 14s. with his own wages, but each time he refused. We begged him to consider the loss of revenue, but his abrupt reply was that he didn't care; he didn't want the job. This went on for about seven weeks, at the end of which period the marker re- sumed duties, but only for a fortnight. He became ill again and was ordered to I a sanatorium. I We now engaged a temporary marker at full wage, who kept on for about six weeks, bnt unfortunately, for domestic reasons, he also had to give up the job. We had a general meeting again during this period, At which the appointment of the temporary marker was confirmed, and it was also resolved that the Standing Committee should draft a scheme of economy and reconstruction of staff. We again endeavoured to prevail upon the caretaker ta aet as marker at 14s. week- ly, but met with a erurd refusal. The Standing Committee now set about drafting a scheme, and until their scheme was ready, they insisted upon the care- taker either to accept lis. a week, or 9s. up to 6 p.m., which was temporary, until a new marker, or otherwise, under the new scheme would be appointed. Mr T. Jeremiah refers to this when he stated that we only allowed the caretaker 10 minutes to decide, and he conveniently avoids the 7 weeks and more to accept far better terms. I shall leave the above to the public of Pontardawe to decide where the tyr- anny comes in. I may say the former of the two offers was accepted by the caretaker, namely lis. and not 7s. per week, as per Mr. T. Jeremiah. A sub-committee now very carefully considered the question of reconstruction and whether to make it a one man's job or retain both, on modified and reduced rates, and the latter was decided upon. A new marker was appointed at 25s. a week, inclusive. The scheme provided a printed code of duties, and 10s. a week for the caretaker, and was submitted to a general meeting. The former was con- firmed, but the latter deferred for three months. The Standing Committee asked the caretaker to sign the code of duties, but he emphatically refused. At the fol- lowing general meeting 10s. and 5s. war bonus was recommended and confirmed, but the caretaker again refused to accept it, hence the month's notice and adver- tisement for a new caretaker. Out of 18 applications three were selected to ap- pear before the committee, and the care- taker was asked if he cared to apply, but he refused. I am t'„ccu?ed as a Labour man for re- ducing a man's wages. I have been many years a member of the committee and a daily visilor to the Institute, and should be in a position to know what is the real 1 value of this job. And I maintain that the committee pay in value and money a fair day's wage for a fair day's work. In justification of my action I wish to demonstrate to the public the value of the concessions allowed. The caretaker's premises are divided into two depart- ments, namely a private house, consisting of a large kitchen, three large bedrooms, drawing-room, scullery, pantry, bathroom, and w.c, fitted with hot and cold water ;;nd electric light. The floor department consists of bar and large dining-rooxa, which can accommodate from 40 to. 60 personsk In my opinion the following is a moder- ate estimate of concessions allowed :— Kent of private house 6 r0 I Fires for same 3/- Light for same 1/. 10/6 Bar and dining-room 15/- Fires for same 3/6 Lights for same 376 Gas for urn '3/- Wages 15/ This total may fairly be regarded as actual cash value, but as a matter of fact the potential valae of the position is very much greater. The caretaker enjoyed what is practically a monopoly in cater- ing, etc., the vajue of which was only limited by the ability and tact of the caretaker to exploit it. I feel certain no reasonable person will quanel with this content. Referring to the public meeting held on Thursday night I should like to make a few comments. To give a status to the meeting one would naturally expect the promoters to have a financial interest in the Institution. May I point out that the chairman, secretary, and chief speaker have not been members for years, and yet they unblushingly had the impertinence to advise the committee how to manage the finances of a business concerrn. (I find Mr. T. Jeremiah has now taken a mem- bership card!) Mr. Jeremiah, by a re- markable stretch of imagination considers the caretaker a public servant. I am at a loss to understand how he arrives at such a.conclusion. I always thought that he was a servant to those who paid kim, namely the subscribers. Again Mr. T. Jeremiah refers to a cer- tain complaint by a lady. I could refer him to scores of complaints from various sources, until the committee was sick and tired of them. He also refers to me as not being a Labour man. I should like to ask him why has the branch to which he belongs selected me on various occa- sions to represent them before the em- ployers and on the executive of our Society? He also throws a challenge, which I have no intention of accepting. One cannot take notice of the barking of every puppy. The only comment I would make on the caretaker's speech is his tact and ingenuity in devising an excuse whereby he could demonstrate to the public the excellent qualifications of his family. In conclusion I would say that I have endeavoured to place the true facts before the public, and not a prejudiced perver- sion of truths and deliberate falsehoods as contained in the speeches reported in your last week's issue.—Yours, etc., JOHN EDWARDS, Vice-Chairman of the Committee. Pontardawe.

AMMANFORD

AMMANFORD- There has been missing from his home, Pantamman Houses, Amman- ford, since Ja.nua.ry 17th, a man named Alfred Garlan, aged 65, a painter by trade. He was dressed in a bkick jacket and vest brown cloth trousers, dark overcoat and cap, with so rf around his neck, and wore a pair of black laced boots. H4& had been ill lately, and up to the present police in. quiries as to his whereabouts have been futile.

No title

Lodging-hooise keepers, who have been almost ruiaed by the exclusion of foreign visitors from the Isle of Wight, have been awarded a grant ef £ 1,500- I

CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE II LOCAL RECRUITING CONCERTS II AND THE RECEIPTS. To the Editor. I Sir-The balance sheet. of the recruiting concerts which appeared in your last issue has caused a great deal of curiosity in this neighbourhood. Many persons have ques- tioned me about it, as the person respon- sible for the Girl Guides' movement in Ystalyfera. I should be obliged if you would allow me space in your valuable paper to make some observations upon this balance sheet. (1) I was asked by the recruiting authorities to get up a series of concerts, and as I had excellent material to hand in the Girl Guides, I willingly consented. I was then given to understand that I was entirely responsible for these con- certs. (2) This "balance sheet" as a whole is entirely unauthorised, and represents Trooper Albert J. Woodman's statement of affairs unchecked and uncorrected. (3) The accounts of these concerts were submitted as far back as July, 1915, to a committee expressly called for that purpose, but this statement in your last issue, as it stands, has never been author- ised. Two separate balance sheets were then drawn up—one of Trooper Wood- man's accounts, and another of mine. To this meeting I brought every item of my accounts Trooper Woodman brought "some" of his, and it was then decided to hold another meeting for him to bring the remaining accounts. (4) This balance sheet does not show the object for which the concerts were held, nor how much was obtained and given for that object. Perhaps, therefore, it will be well to state that the concerts were held to provide funds for teas in each district for the wives and children of men serving with the colours. Yet this precious statement would convey the impression that not a halfpenny was made for these teas, where- as treats were provided for out of the pro- ceeds of each centre. The balance sheet should show- (a) How much was taken at each place; (b) what portion of the expendi- ture was borne locally; and (c) how much money was spent on teas at the various centres, Would anyone from reading this balance sheet have any idea that tea had been given to nearly 500 people? Yet, at Y"tad- yfera alone ?18 was spent on teas. Why does the balance sheet not show what money was received for the VERY OBJECTS for which the concerts were held? Further, I conterxl that the statement of expenses incurred by me on behalf j of the Girl Guides is incorrect and gross- ly misleading; that items for which I was in no degree responsible have been put down against the Guides, and that the balance sheet omits to state tke fact that a considerable sum waa taken by the concerts. I submit a. full' and AUTHORISED statement of my expen- s.es, and shall expect that in justice to myself, as one asked by the recruiting authorities too produce these concerts, a full statement will be given showing— (a) What was received at each con- cert (b) What was spent upon the teas to the wives and children of men serving with the colours. Yours faithfully, JESSIE E. WILLIAMS, Wern House, Ystalyfera. P.S.—May I state that the phroographe referred to at the foot of the statement have not yet been delivered to the Girl. Guides, and according to the statement have net yet been paid for. Girl Guides' Expenses. Making fairy dresses and Girl Guide blouses 2 16 0 Material for above 1 13 111 Lunch and tea. for Girl Guides 0 2 0 Music 012 6 H. and M. Ilayne for hire of costume 0 16 0 Stationery 0 3 6 Tuning piano 0 4 6 Biscuits 0 2 3 Postage stamps 0 2 3 Grease paints and powder 0 3 9 Two copies of Sketch 0 1 0 Train fares to Brynajnman (49 persons) 2 9 0 Ditto Cwmllynfell (53 persons) 1 15 4 Bus fares for 4 children for a fortnight from Ystalyfera to Godre'rgpraig 0 7 6 £ 11 18 2i (Signed) JESSIE E. WILLIAMS. June, 1915. —————

BRAVEST DEED OF THE YEAR

BRAVEST DEED OF THE YEAR. SHIP'S APPRENTICE GAINS THE STANHOPE MEDAL. The Stanhope gold medal for the brav- est deed of the year awarded by the Royal Humane Society has been received by Cecil Hetherington, a ship's appren- tice, of Allendale Town,. Northumb. rland. His action was officially described aa follows :— At 11.35 p.m. on August 12, 1915, the steamship Jacona, on a voyage from Middlesbrough to Montreal,, was either torpedoed or struck a mine and sank in two minutes. There was no time for launching boiits, all hands going down with the ship. The captain and nins others came to the surface clinging te some wreckage. Some ten minutes later what was thought to be a b%t was seen some 75 yards away. As the men were exhausted Hethering- ton volunteered to swim to. the object, which he did, and, finding a boat, auc- ceeded in climbing into her and bringing her back to the wreckage, and in this way was the means of saving 13 lives, the- remaindeT at the crew, 25 in number,, being lost. After five hours in the boat they were picked up and laaaded. Hetherington, who is still in hia te-ns, is 6ft. 3in. in height, his robust buiid being of great service to him during the trying ordeal.

Advertising

I The London City and Midland Bank LIMI TED. I ESTABLISHED 1836. Subscribed Capital, 922,947,804 0 0 Paid-up Capital, £ 4,780r7B2 10 0 I Reserve Fund, £ 4,000,000 0 0 DIRECTORS: 1 Sir EDWARD H. HOLDEN, Bart., Chairman aaid Managing Director. WILLIAM GRAHAM BRADSHAW, Esq., London, Deputv-Chairman. The Right Hon. LORD AIREDALE, Leeds. Sir PERCY ELLY BATES. Bart., Liverpool. 1 3 Bart., Li ver p ool.. ROBERT CLOVER BEAZLEY, Esq., Liverpool. DAVID DAVIES, Esq., M.P., Llandinam. FRANK DUDLEY DOCKER, Esq., C.B., Birmingham. FREDERICK HYNDE FOX. Esq., Liverpool. Sir GEORGE FRANKLIN, Sheffield. H. SIMPSON GEE. Esq., Leicester. JOHN GLASBROOK, Esq., Swansea. ARTHUR T. KEEN, Esq., Birmingham. FREDERICK AVILLIAM NASH, Esq. Birmingham Tlio Right Hon. LORD PIRRIE K.P., London Tho Right Hon. LORD ROTHERHAM, Manchester THOMAS ROYAEN, Esq., Liverl. Sir J(koL?PIT AVESTON-STEVErS.I'Bnsto4. The Right" Ron, Sir GUY FLEETWOOD WILSON, K.C.B., K.C.M.G. G.C.I.E., London. WILLIAM FITZTHOMAS WYLEY, Eibq-, Coventry. HEAD OFFICE: 5, THREADNEEDLE STREET, LONDON, E.C. Joint General Managers J. M. MADDERS, S. B. MURRAY,, F. HYDE, K. W. WOOLLEY. Secr: E. J. MORRIS Welsh District Manager: JOSIAH' E. JONES. Welsh District Assistant Manager: W. R. OWEN. LIABILITIES AND ASSETSv 31 DECEMBER 1915. £ 8 tl To Capital Paid up, viz.:— JE2 10s 9d. per Share on 1,912,317, Shares of £ 12 each 4,780,792 10! 0 Reserve Fund 4,000,000 Q* 0 Dividend payable on 1st Feb. unü: 360,352 4 8 Balance of Profit and Loss Account. 113,597 15 2 9,254,742. 9 10 Current, Deposit and other Acootants 147,750,702 0 6 Acceptances on account of Customers 9,157,6,61, 11 9 £ 166,103,046 2 1 [ £ a By Cash lit, hand (including Gofcli Coin R7,000,M)- and Cash at Bank ofi Eiigliand 30,881,200 14 < Money at Call and at Short Notice allKl Stock Exchange Loana 8,651,257 17' 9 Investments:— War Loans at cost (of which £ 1,490,000 is lodged for Public and other Accounts) and other British Government Socusities 33,946,384 8 2 Stocks Guaranteed by the British Government, India Stocks, Indian ltailway Guaranteed Stocks and Debentures 481,) 5 8. British Railway Debenture and Pre- ference Stocks, British Corporation Stocks 2,400^296 19 » Colonial and Foreign Government Stocks and Bonds 962,062 7 & Sundry Investments 1,039,650 15 7 Bills of Exchange 9,961,545 13 » W323,438 2 B- Auv vance.i on Current Account, Loans 88^323,438 2 & Security and other Accounts S3,921,541 11 9 Liabilities of Customers for Acoept- anoes as per contra 9.157,601 11 Uank 1 remises at Head Office ajKi Branch es I'll 2,760,464 1$ij £ 166,163.046 2 1 EDWARD H. HOLDEN, Chairman and Managing Director. F. D. DOCKER, W. G. BRADSHAW, Deputy-Chairman. GUY FLEETWOOD WILSON, Directors. REPORT OF THE AUDITORS TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE LONDON CITY AND MIDLAND BANK, LTD. In accordance with the provisions of Sub-section 2 of Section 113 of the Companies (Consolidation) Act, 1908, we report as follows:— We h ave examined the above Balance Sheet in detail with the Books at Head Office and with the certified Returns from the Branches. We have satisfied ourselves as to the correctness of the Cash Balances and the Bills of Exchange and have verified the correctness of the Money at Call and Short Notice. We have also verified the Securities representing the Investments of the Bank, and having obtained all the information and explanations "e have required we are of opinion that such Balance Sheet is properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and OOfroot view of the state of th^wCompany's affairs according to the best of our information a.1d the explanations given to us and as shown by the boosa of the Company, WHINNEY, SMITH AND WHJNNEY, Chartered Accountants L'fv.don. 10th January, 1916, Auditors,