Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
26 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
FIGHT FOR THE RIGHT I I

FIGHT FOR THE RIGHT. I I MR ANDREW FISHER'S ADVICE I ON THE WAR. I "I do not blame the Germans for fighting for their country," said Mr Andrew Fisher, High Commissioner for Australia, at a meeting of the "Fight for, Right" movement at the Manision House. "War has been hanging over this country like a pall for five years," he continued, "and if we were not ready we have onlv ourselves to blame. Don t "i,l y let us sen d let us blame Gern^nJ- Let us send men to fight provided with all that they need, and see that their mothers and daughters and sons who- are unfit have those things that we have power to give them. That is fighting for the right. When we get that spirit the Germans will be more afraid of us than they are tcMiav." The Dominions, he added, would make every sacrifice rather than be the slaves of a tyrant. He had hoped of an organised world of nations that would deal with aggressive nation as a policeman dealt with an outlaw. It was more than a dream, it was coming. "I wonder if people realise how- much we have given up," said Mr W. A. Appleton, speaking for the trade unions. "People don't know what it has meant to us to give up things it has taken us a hundred years to build up, and which will take a hundred years to win back unless the standard of honour is as high amongst the upper classes as it is amongst the lower." The Lord Mayor said it helped our fighting men to know that not only politicians and statesmen, but the best men and women of every class attached the highest importance to wha.t we were fighting for, and that they meamt to see them through to a victorious end, no matter how far off that end might be.

ADEN

ADEN Aden, regarding which the Turks have been spreading some fairy tales and where the local Brecknocks experienced such hard times, one of the most im- portant of our links of Empire. A ftourishing seaport centuries before the Christian era, the town continued to thrive under the Roman Empire, and after the rise of Mohammedan power in Asia Minor. The adoption of the Cape of Good Hope Toute to India, however, deprived it of the bulk of its trade, and a century ago Aden had sunk into a squalid, insignificant village. Revival came when the overland route to India was reverted to, and the British Govern merrt, seeing the importance of Aden as o-iiardine the passage to our Eastern Empire, annexed it in 1839. It was the first addition to the Empire in Queen Victoria's reign.

IAUSTRALIANS UNDYING FAME

AUSTRALIANS' UNDYING FAME. The Prime Minister of Australia, Mr Hughes, addressed a number of Austra- lian troops at the military headquarters in Horseferry-road, Westminster. He told the men that they had earned a Came which in the history of the world, "While men lived to speak of these things, Would never die. "In Australia we have watched all your great deeds. We have imagined in eome fashion what dreadful things you Went through. We have seen, we have heard, and we have glorified in your uchievetne,nts. When you have be°n wverwhelmed by the storms of circum- stances we have wept with you, and when you have been victorious we have re- joiced with you, but always we r.1-:o been prouder to call ourselves Austra- lians since you won your name for ua in Gallipoli."

ATTESTED MEN OF 41 NOT TO BE CALLED UP

ATTESTED MEN OF 41 NOT TO BE CALLED UP. Misunderstanding as to the position Under the Group system of men who Were 40 when they attested, and have tince,becawe 41, has been removed, the Wicr Office definitely atatin.g that such tnen will not be oaJIed up. SiTlge men under th- -fiIitary Service Act, who have aL,,K) attained the age of <1 since the Act came into OPerition, are llot liable for service. This aoplies on lv to men who become 41 before being called -u P.

No title

A oollier, named Glyn Rees Griffiths (IFA), living at 100. New road. Skewon, Int-t wit11 a fatal .:wci.dpnt at the No. 4 Pit of the Main Collieries, Skewen. on Saturday morning. Griffiths was Cutting coal when a. hea-vy fall of roof i, .a*"d a lrgeshnü fell upcrs him. He died twenty minutes later.

MARRIED GROUPS 33 41

MARRIED GROUPS 33 41. I REPORTED INTENTION TO CAN- CEL THE CALL. I The following remarkable message was issued by the Exchange Telegraph Company on Tuesday night;- "We Learn on good authority that the second call of married groups 33 to 41 has been or is about to be can- celled, and that the bills will not be posted. The London News Agency under- stands that during the next few days ther.e will be issued a new poster ap- peal for the voluntary attestation under the group system of married men. During the last few weeks attesta- tion has fallen off, it is learned, both in regard to immediate enlistment and under the group system.

10000 DURHAM MINE WORKERS CAN BE SPARED

10,000 DURHAM MINE WORKERS CAN BE SPARED. The Bishop Auckland correspondent of the Central News says:—I have ex- cellent grounds for stating that 10,000, more men will be liberated for the colours from the mining indus- try in the County of Durham. These will be drawn largely, if not solely, from the surface workers, such as screen men, labourers, etc. Very little interference if any, will be I made with the underground workers. —————

WAR ON SPARROWS I

WAR ON SPARROWS. I Farmers are being urged to let the schoolboy do his bit by making war on sparrows. "With wheat at 60s. a quarter, we cannot afford to aHow the sparrow to take his serious toll of corn crops in the coming session," says the "Mark Lane Express," which suggests that schoolboys and Boy Scouts might make raids on sparrows' nests.

CONSCIENCE CORPS I

CONSCIENCE CORPS. I SPECIAL UNITS IN EACH COM- MAND. The Secretary of the War Office forwards the following for publication: A new corns has been formed for conscientious objectors, called the "Non-Combatant Corps." Men accepted for service who hold a, eertificate of exemption from com- batant service, granted by a tribunal, will be appointed to the non-combatant corps. The badges of the corps will be the letters N.C.C. as a cap badge and shoulder title. Companies of the N.C.C. will be formed in each command. The officers and N.C.O.'s will be selected from regular infantry personnel not fit for g,eneral service, but fit for service abroad on lines of ooonmunication. They will be attached to the N.C.C. while serving with a companv of the N.C.C Companies of the Non-Combatant Corps will be trained in squad drill, without arms, and in usexof the var- ious forms of tools used in field en- gineering. The privates will be 4equippcd as in- fantry except that they will not be armed or trained wi th arms of any de- scription.

CARETAKER AS CENSOR I

CARETAKER AS CENSOR. I Discussing the teaching of languages at a teachers' conference on Saturday the Rev. Stewart Headlaim told the story of a caretaker of a school who was instructed to prepare a class-room for a German class. He utterly re- fused to do so, remarking, "Whet's the good of having a German class when in a year's time the Germans will he swept off the face of the earth." —————

I j DEATH OF WELL KNOWN AMMAN I iVALLEY GENTLEMAN I

I DEATH OF WELL KNOWN AMMAN VALLEY GENTLEMAN. I The death took place on Sunday, at his r-s;dence in CommeTcial-placc, Glan- amman, at the age of 72 years, of Mr. Thomas. He was a life-long resident of the district, -and was well known in local bardic circles as "Trumor." He was a Liberal and Non- conformist, and senior deacon at Bethes- da Baptist Chapel. He leaves a son. Dr. IvOr Thomas, H.M. Inspector of Schools f

ABERYSTWYTH NATIONALI

ABERYSTWYTH NATIONAL- I MEDALS FOR WELSH V.Cs. I Professor Edward Edwards presided c\ er a meeting of the Aberystwyth National Eisteddfod Executive Com- mittee. Mr Jenkin James, M.A., presented the report of the Literary Committee, which had had under consideration the proposal to offer a gold torque for the bravest Welsh soldier and sailor in the present war, as was done at Llangollen in the year 1858. The committee felt that as in all probability the war would not be over at the time of the Eisteddfod it would be impossible to decide upon the relative merits of soldiers. As a substitute the com- mittee suggested that a gold medal should be awarded to those soldiers and sailors born in Wales and Mon- mouthshire who in the course of the present war had won the V.C., and that the views of General Sir Francis Lloyd and General Owen Thomas be ascertained. The report was adopted. The question of holding a national gymanfa (singing festival) representa- tive of all parties in WaJes was brought up by Dr. Lloyd Williams. He explained that the suggestion i ?. made to him by Mr Lloyd George a fortnight ago, who expressed a strong wish to hold a cymanfa for the sing- ing of old Welsh tunes in the old style as a supplement to the National Eis- teddfod this year. The suggestion was warmly taken up and it was resolved to appoint a separ- ate committee of a representative character to deal with the matter. The cymanfa. will be held at the close of the eisteddfod, and none but hvmns and tunes of dead composers will be used. ————— —————

MARRIED MEN S PROTESTS

MARRIED MEN S PROTESTS 800,000 SINGLE MEN SAID TO BE BADGED OR STARRED. A mass meeting of attested married men in London unanimously passed the following resolution:— This meeting calls upon the Government to fulfil its pledge that single men who did not attest should be compulsorily attested before at- tested married men under Lord Derby's group system are called up. One speaker declared that there were 100,000 or more single men in starred occupations. If they added to that number the conscientious objec- tors, there were probably a million single men of military age who had been able to shirk the responsibilities that were to be put on the attested married men. There was nothing more deplorable than the spectacle of so many single young men in munition factories. Some of them had been able to save £50 and L60 in a few months, and openly jeered at the married men who had, as they put it, been "foolish enough" to attest. Another man declared that at a certain gun factory in London 400 single young men had been engaged since last June, and the added that undernand methods were adopted to procure jobs for some of these men. Was it fair. asked another speaker, that a married man with six children should have his home broken un while single voung men in munition works, earning P,4 15s. to £5 and £6 a week, were able to laugh at him ? (Cries of "No.") It was almost unthinkable that such a thing should bo allowed in England, which was supposed to stand for loyalty to her pledged word. The National Efficiency. League have arranged for a demonstration of at- tested married men at Hyde Park on Saturday. An effort is in progess to organise an agitation on a national basis. with Manchester as the centre, and ar- rangements are in hnd to hold in the Free Trade Hall a meeting at attested married men representative of the en- tire country.

0 108 EXEMPT OUT OF 111

———— 0- ———— 108 EXEMPT OUT OF 111. Out of 111 claims which came before the South Molton (Devon) Rural Dis- trict Tribunal at the last sitting, 84 exe-mptions were granted-51 absolute, 26 conditional and 17 temporary. Of the other claimants two were conscientious objectors, two were able to produce evidence that they were un- fit, and six had been starred. The net result of the day's pro- ceedings was that.only throo of the 111 men can be called uD.f ————— ————

No title

Henry Snook, who would have reached his 105th birthday on March 22, has died at Ghobham, Surrey. He was a life- long non-smoker.

IPONTARDAWE SOLDIERS I PENSIONI

PONTARDAWE SOLDIER'S I PENSION I 0TJEST0NS IN PARLIAMENT I "RECEIVING PARISH RELIEF 1" I Liberal and Labour members in the House of Commons are inclined to think that the Government is lending a. sym- pathetic. ear to. the plea for pensions for soldiers invalided from. the service. A strong point has been made by Mr. Wardle, the chairman of the Labour party, who brought up the case of a Pontardawe man who was discharged after eight months service suffering from pneumonia. Mr. Wardle said that the man was receiving 14s. 6d. a week parish relief, and that he had drawn 26 weeks sick benefit from the British Steel Smelters Association. It was found that as a. result of the pneumonia he had contracted another disease which affected the heart. OTHER CASES. I Mr. Jowett (Lab. Bradford) called attention to the need of provision be- ing made for soldiers discharged from or dying in the Army as the result of di- seases contracted or developed in the service or of accident, and moved the following amendment "That in the opinion of this House the State should accept the respon- sibility for the payment of pensions and allowances to all soldiers dis- charged from the Army on account of diseases contracted or developed during service with the colours, and in the case of death, pensions and allowances to the dependents, if any." Mr. Hodge (chairman of the Labour Party) in seconding the motion, said that justice would not be done unless any concession made by the War Office was retrospective. Mr. Walter Roch Ill Pembroke) said had been stated tKat out of 35,000 men discharged from the Army more than one-third were discharged without any pension. He asked that attention should be given to the delay there now was in making the payments, month after month elapsing in some cases be- fore the pensions were paid. As an instant, he referred to the case of a man who joined the Armv in September, 1914, was sent to Brecon and put to sleep for five days on the barracks :yard. He contracted a chill in the lungs, which was followed ultimately by tuberculosis. After being in hospi- tal, he waa discharged from the Army in February, 1915, and for many months the War Office refused to recognise his claim to a pension. He was dependent on charity, and public subscriptions were got up for him. In August last he (Mr I Roch) took up the case, but it was not till January that a pension of 19s. 6d. week was granted to the man. Mr. H. W. Forster (Financial Secre- tary to the War Office) pointed out that the. pension policy of the Govern- ment was based upon the recommen- dations of a Select Committee which has been approved by the House. He hoped arrangement would be made for some payment to be made to men between the date of their discharge and the time when the pensions became payable. Mr. Jowett asked leave to withdraw the amendment, but this was objected to and the amendment was negatived without a division.

IDEARER TEAI DEARERTEAI

DEARER TEA. I DEARER TEA. I There is apparently a belief that the coming Budget will add to the duty on tea, and the public are now buying I more. Meanwhile the wholesale price of the cheaper tea has risen ld. a lb. this week and the rise will affect the re- tail price in due course., A restriction of tea imports, it is sug- gested may be pending. ————

I IMPORT OF FOREIGN TYRESI

I IMPORT OF FOREIGN TYRES. Recognising that after the war the security of their employment and of fellow-workers now with the colours will be threatened if foreign tyres are still allowed to come into the country free, the employees at both works of the Dun- lop Rubber Company have signed a petition to the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer asking that a duty be imposed. All the other British tyre manufac- turers are being asked to join, and their work-people are supporting the move- I ment for a tariff. I ——

No title

I For treating his wife to a glass of j I wine a Southampton man has beei fined £ 1. his wife j51 for consuming, ard a barmaid J35 for selling the drink con- ti-ary to the regulations of the Liquer ( Control Board.

ATTITUDE OF MINERS I

ATTITUDE OF MINERS. I I MR FRANK HODGES AND THE IN- DEPENDENT CHAIRMAN. Mr Frank Hodges (the, miners' agent), addressing themonthly meeting of the Garw District of Miners, re- ferred to the award of Lord Muir- Mackenzie, and said that, whilst the award was against both the workmen's a-nd owners' proposals, it would be- come just as necessary at the next quarterly audit of pri ces for the work- men to re-state their case for the equivalent selling price to thegmini- mum. with a view to inducing his lord- ship to accept the workmen's equiva- lent, in order that the workmen under the present agreement should not be relatively worse off than they were under the agreement of 1910. Even in the face of a further reduction in the selling price of coal, thd work- men would be justified in resisting any application on the part of the owners for any reduction in the wag e- rate. A resolution was passed endorsing the attitude of the Scottish miners, that unskilled workmen in fhe mines should be refused employment in the mines if their presence meant the un- employment of those of the workmen who had been discharged from the Army. A resolution was passed calling up- on the Government to provide the same privileges to discharged soldiers and sailors, through illness, as were ac- corded to those who were wounded, and that the dependents of those who died from sickness should be similarly dealt with as the dependents of those who had been killed. ————— -ilb. ————— 1

ALIEN IN HIS OWN COUNI TRY

ALIEN IN HIS OWN COUN- I TRY. "WELSHMAN FINED FOR SAYING HE WAS BRITISH. Two young people, named John F. Morris and Grace Morris, at present living at Glyncorrwg, appeared on re- mand at Aberavon on Monday charged under the Alien Restriction Act, with failing to register themselves. Superin- tendent Ben Evans said that the case was adjourned a fortnight before for inquiries to be made. He now wished to alter the charge to one of making false statements to the authorities at Liverpool, where they arrived on Dec. 26th last year from America. The male defendant made a statement that they were both both British subjects. He was a native of Festiniog, North Wales, and eight years ago was naturalised as an American citizen. The woman was an American-born citizen. Colonel Arii.llt Jones (chairman): The woman simply did as she was told by the man, I suppose? Superinten- by the men, I suppose ? Superintend-ent Ben Evans: I expect so. They generally do. (Laughter). The male defendant was fined 10s.. and the woman discharged.

SPRING AS USUAL I

SPRING AS USUAL. I Once more the spring that promised to be early will probably be no earliar than usual. Though th?re was practical- ly no frost in December and January, the raw r.ess and the snows of the past few weeks have so checked growth that the season is very little further forward than it was in the first half of February. The swollen buds arc no nearer open- ing than they were a month ago, and the seeds put in somewhat adventurously early owing to the openness of the New Year are not yet showing above the soil. If the present weather holds (says a corTespon dent) this year may be like that of 1908. Then, aitrT a long set-back through late frost and snows, growth suddenly rushed forward at an almost furious speed, and all in one wonderful week the world sprang from winter into early summer.

FOR SUPPLYING A SOLDIER

-———- FOR SUPPLYING A SOLDIER. At the Roose Sessions, Haverfordwest, John Charles Spicer, licensee, of the Commercial Inn, Neyland. was fined I 40s. for supplying a soldfer with beer to be consumed off the premises, the chair- man obserrving that the result of supply- ing beer to soldiers at night was that they were too drunk to do their duty next morning. I' Private Tom Williams, FoTt Scoveston, was fined 10s. for taking away the beer.

No title

There are 124,646 special constables in England and Wales..

MR RAMSAY MACDONALD AT SWANSEA

MR RAMSAY MACDONALD AT SWANSEA. NOT A PEACE AT ANY j PRICE MlAN. Mr Ramsay Macdonald M.P., ad- dressing a meeting at the .Elysium, Swansea, on the subject "Why We Should Have no Patched-up Peace," said in the ("irse of his addrese tht the Independent Labour Party h t never disputed the decision that the war should not cease till Belgium had been restored. But there were wavs of doing that other than those proposed, and if Belgium could be freed other than by the sword it would be for the benefit' of Belgium. The I. L. P. agreed that one of the con- ditions of peace should be the clear- ance of Belgium and th4 establishment of Belgium's right of sovereignty, and he ventured to say that the majority of the German people were opposed to all kinds of annexation. and- they would refuse tc-motrow if the ques- tion of Belgium was the only question, to grant any more supplies to the front in order to annex Belgium to German sovereignty. If we could only narrow down these things and make them definite we should find not only a great movement in Great Britain, but a corresponding movement in Ger- manv and Austria, which would enable the democracies- in both countries to unite in a peace which would be a permanent peace amd not the patched- up peace our diplomatists would im- pose. Thev would not, he went on, crush • militarism by war. He was the last person to sav a soldier might be un- necessary. lie was not what might be described as a peace at amy price man, but he was c ertainly not one df those who were peace at no price people. One could not crush and humiliate a people and then make a peace. It would only be a truce. As to how a permanent peace might be secured let them say to Germany, "We are going in for reconciliation: we are going in for internationalism we are going to stand by our old position that which vou have in common with us is more precious than that which you have not in common, and until you have dis- covered your common platform mib- • tarists and diplomatists will always be exploiting and driving you- into wai and cutting you in twaÜ," Then we. must declare for 'an ternationa.1 council to which all disputed points must be referred—an international court to which could 'be referred all questions in dispute &o as to secure a judieial and satisfactory settlement. And when we said to the Germans the. should have no more a-rmy and no mare fleet let us say that we would also disarm, for we could not abolish war by keeping armed ourselves, and therefore anything we did to Germain v. we must turn round and apply to our- sel ves. ELECTRIC SUPPLY CUT OFF. With a view of trying .to prevent » meeting at Briton Ferry, which was ad- dressed by Mr. Ramsay Macdonald at the Public Hall, some persons, interfe ed duriDg the day with the machinery which supplies the hall with electric light, and consequently the power was cut off. Thev had, however, overlooked the gas supply, but although this was requisi- tioned the meeting was held in semi- darkness. Admission to the hall was by ticket, and each card was keenly acrutinised M the persons entered. A huge crowd ww kept outside, and several attempthwate made to rush the doors, but a strong force was able to resist these attempts. Mr. Macdonald addressed the meeting at some length, and at the close as asked by Captain Godfrey, of N?"th, whether he was pleaeed to see so m ny voung men of military age p: nt Tne reply of Mr. Macdonald was that he was glad to see anyone present.

LONG LIYED JVELSHWPy f4

LONG LIYED JVELSHWPy f'"4 DOCTOR'S REPORT TO CARMAR- THEN RURAL COUNCIL. Dr. L. M. Bowen Jonee states iJjG his report to the C ■armarthen Rural District Council thai, out. oi 343 dc: hs for 1915, 24 were of persons of I yeare of ago -nd "I and -of Ci eiw nine lived to the ;tge (,f 90 and nr. wards, the oM?t bonp a woman of 3?. Another woman reached the age 08 96. Regarding infantile 'morto]:tv. Bowen Jone. said 1.e had ly drawn attention vo the fact that it was principallv due to the want of knowledge possessed by young mot ors and in a lesser degree to the fat,,) -IT a and consequent lack of care Lien I during the prevalence of epidemic <"?i**— care, notably rr,er ars-1 w:1{)"P:1! cough.