Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

i Telephone Docks 35. j W. WILLIAMS & CO. Jewellers, &c. 29, CASTLE STREET, SWANSEA. Specia lities: Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lever Watches. Good Foreign Watches- English and Foreign Clocks. English and Continental Novelties m Gold, Silver and Electro Plate, suitable for Christening. Birthdav and IVedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for all Sights. It will pay you to come to us to buy for three reasons—Largest Variety, Best Quality, and Lowest Price. FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. I. F. W lch Lacy iJ IF. iiciWl {a The Up-to-date LONDON TAILOR Who serves you personally and Cuts All Garments Himself Specialists in MOURNING ORDERS. 222, High Street I { SWANSEA ■ i"- | J

THE BUSINESS GOVERNMENT ILLUSION

THE BUSINESS GOVERN- MENT ILLUSION. "Let us have a Business Govern- ment," is the cry of many people who are impatient with Britain's progress in the war. They put down every dis- appointment of their extravagant hoop-,& to the m. smanagement of the affairs of the country by a Government of lawyers. We have no bias in fav- our:. of lawyers, nor of the present Government, but we think that the faults of Mr Asquitih's Administration would not only be duplicated, but ex- ceeded by any possible alternative Ministry. A Government of business I men, at least, would be impossible. The ideal Government is that in which every section of the community (in- cluding women) is properly repre- sented, and Government by business men would be w'brse than government by lawyers or military officers. A man's ability to pile up a fortune by selling soap or soda or coal is no guarantee of his fitness to conduct public business. Indeed the presump- tive evidence is to the contrary. To 4Succ3ed, a business man has to concen- trat,o his energies in one groove, and ta achieve two main results—the crushing of his competitors, and the selling of his goods at the highest possible price. The ability required of tho statesman is of a rarer and more difficult kind. He dare not take narrow, specialised views. His interests must be many-sided, comprising the whole range of human activities. Has task is not to crush conflicting in- terests, as a business man crushes a rival, but to harmonise them. Tie facts of recent commercial his- fcfry- go to support the a priori grounds foe rejecting the claim of the business anaaX as the fittest possible person to run a country in war .time. We have been at war with German since August 1914, but the business men of this country have been at war with flhEt business men of Germany for many years. How have they fared ? In soinle fields tliev 'held their own, but in many trades they were beaten I  failed in the ignon??ioiislv. If they failed in the commercial fight with Germany, are they likelv to succeed in the war agaifist the German nation, against the military and naval experts who are vastly more efficient than even the Kaiser's business men ? Sensible per- ewqj9""will have no difficulty in supplying ttf^^answer. In this connection it is instructive ta notice how the leading business men of She country reoentlv faced an issue arisnirg out of the war It is so plain, t"1.at it does not need argument, that if we are to withstand German com- petition after the war our working cfojees must be as well educated as the Germain workers. At the recent con- gm.V. of the Associated Chambers of ecmnneroo. Sir Swire Smith of Keigh. lery Tone of the finest centres for tech- nical education in this country), moved the following resolution:—- That this Association re- cwgnftes the immense influence of training as a preparation for work AJ1't! citizenship, and urges that evct" effort be made bv the Govern- eTefrT en ort be ma d e by the Govem- ment &nd all local authorities further tq promote the technical and in- dustrial efficiency cf our people. I The resolution was defeated by an overwhelming majority. And' these are the men who are so clever and far- sighted that, if they had their way, they would have long since established a complete blockade of Germany, and hurled the Kaiser's legions back over t he Rhine! The fatal flaw of the "Government by Expert" theory is seen in the pro- sent muddled condition of recruiting. i Some of the authorities at the War j Office would cheerfully sacrifice every i inteAst of the nation so that they could get more soldiers. Some plain words on this matter were addressed on Tuesdav to Lord Derby by the President of the Board of Agriculture. W hat the Government has to decide is whether a farm labourer meets a more urgent n,4d of the nation by growing food than by being a soldier. It is not an easy question to decide, but the conflicting interests must be harmon- ised. The Board of Agriculture, the Home Office, the Board of Trade, the Ministry of Munitions, represent national interests as vital as the War Now, as always, what the country needs is not men who take the partial and restricted view of the ex- pert, but statesmen who see all the phases of a problem, and provide for all contingencies. ———

I NARROW INTOLERANCE

I NARROW INTOLERANCE M.P. REBUKES I.L.P. HOTHEADS. Mr W. C. Anderson, M.P., has ad- ministered a stinging rebuke to some of the extreme pacifists in the I.L.P. A movement is on foot to hound Mr J. R. Olynes, M.P., and Mr James Parker, M.P., out of the party because they have asked men to come forward as soldiers to defend the country. Mr Anderson, writing in the "Lab- our Leader," strongly condemns this heresy hunt, and tells the bellicose pacifists that if they are not careful the I.L.P. will be fatally wounded in the house of its friends. He vigorously condemns the policy that would "try to force an issue which would compel those who have differed about the war, and its origins or about the immediate duty to the country, and to the future of our cause to turn their swords for all time to come against each other. "Such policy, worthy only of em- bittered sectarians, might gratify pharisaism, but it would defeat our wider purpose, and play the game of reaction with a ven geans.

YSTRADGYNLAIS TRIBUNAL

YSTRADGYNLAIS TRIBUNAL I FORTYNINE APPEALS. FORTY-NINE APPEALS. The Ystradgynlais Tribunal met on Tuesday under the presidency of the Rev. Lewis Jones (Tynycoed). There were 49 appeals down for hearing. Thirty-four of these were attested men, and fifteen unattested. In the Latter there were two conscientious objecCoie. The latter failed to convince the tribunal that their reasons were strong enough and exemp- tions were refused in both cases. In other cases good reasons were put forward by farmers tradesmen and others. Exemptions were granted to some, while so employed, whilst short periods rang- ing from a month to six months were al- lowed to others. Apart from conscientious objectors there was only one refusal.

PHILIP SNOWDEN AND COL PEARSON

PHILIP SNOWDEN AND COL PEARSON Mr. Philip Snowden (Lab. Blackburn) in the House of Commons, asked the Under-Secretary for War if instructions «i.uuin, nis duties as a military represen- tative on a local tribunal had been sent to Colonel Pearson, of the Swansea district, and, if so, would he send a further instruction to Col. Pearson in- forming him that it was not the fact that conscientious objections only held good as far as non-combatant units wert-, concerned, as his remarks at the Llan- samlet Tribunal on March 2 showed that he was misinformed on the point. Mr. Tennant: I am communicating with Colonel Pea.rson on the subject of my hon. friend's question, and inquir- ing into the oircumstances. —————- —————

No title

The recent snowstorm in North Wales is said to he the heaviest ex- perienced for the past 20 years. In the Llanberis district hundreds of quarrymon were idle in consequence of the heavy drifts.

IOUR LONDON LETTERI

OUR LONDON LETTER. LABOUR AND PROTECTION. Ten years ago the Free Trade news- papers were positively asserting that Protection was not only de

REDUCED OUTPUT OF COAL

REDUCED OUTPUT OF COAL EFFECT OF THE WAR IN SOUTH WALES. Last year there was a great decrease in the output of coal in the Welsh coalfield. When the report for the year 1915 was submitted at the annual meet- ing o fthe Monmouthshire and South Wales Coalowners' Association, which was held at Cardiff on Tuesday, it was shown that the decrease at the associated collieries amounted. to upwards of 2,700,000 tons. Except on occasions of prolonged i strikes this is probably the first occas- ion on which a decrease of output had to be reported to the Welsh Coalowners Association. COLLIERS' ENLISTMENT. The reason for last year's decrease L. s obvious. It is one of the results of the war. So many thousands of miners have responded to their country's call that there is a great shortage of labour. It is stated that there has been a considerable influx of new men to the collieries. These have been attracted to the pits by the increased wage, and it is suggested that many have sought a re- fuge in this reserved occupation so as to avoid military service. But this in- flux has been by no means commensurate with the loss of men sustained through enlistments. The total output of the associated collieries for the year ended Decem ber 31, 1915, was 42,036,749 tons. This showed a decrease in output as compared with the y ar ended December 31, -1914, of 2,736,236 tons.

No title

"Work, work, work! It's nothing but work all day long!" a loafer outside a Swansea. public-house. ""ny. Bill," said his mate, "since when have you started ?" "I'm start- ing to-morrow," was the answer.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, ('an be consulted daily at the Victoria Arcade (rwar thu MaH

YSTALYFERA NOTES

YSTALYFERA NOTES. The Zoar Young People's Society held their last meeting of the session on Tuesday evening, Mr Frederick Rees presiding. Two papers were read, one by Councillor J. D. Rees on "The Greatest. Inventor of the 19th Century, Richard Roberts, of Mont- gomery," and the other by Mr Phillip M. Jones, on "William Wroth, the founder of Congregationalism." Both papers were of excellent character, and wore much enjoyed. At the close of the meeting the members proceeded to elect officers for the next session. Mr F. Rees, who has occupied the presidential chair since the Society was formed eleven years ago, is now retiring from office, and it has been decided that the chair shall be filled by the young people in turn. We are glad to hoar that Mr Ben Jones, M.A., is progressing, if but slowly, towards recovery from the breakdown that overcame him some weeks ago. He is now a.ble to leave his bed, though not the room, for a couple of hours daily. Next Tuesday evening there will be a social in connection with the Zoar Young People's Society. Mrs. Fredk. Rees has very generously offered to furnish all the provisions necessary for the tea. A small charge will be made, and the pro- ceeds will be entirely devoted to provid- ing comforts for the soldiers belonging to the chapel. About 20 boys from this chapel are now serving with the colours, and it is hoped that the friends will come forward and support Mrs. Rees in her efforts on their behalf. We regret to announce the death on Friday last of Mr. Terwyn Mitchell, the second son of the late Mr. John Mitchell and Mrs. Mitchell, of Commercial-street. Deceased, who was 31 years of age, had been for a number of years, suffering from consumption, and for several months previous to his death was con- fined to bed. The funeral took place on Mc-nday afternoon at Holy Trinity churchyard. We learn that Sergt. Gould, of the Ystalyfera Hotel, has been acquainted this week of the death of his mother. The sergeant journeyed to Plymouth on Wednesday to attend the funeral, which took place on Thursday. On Tuesday morning the death oc- curred of Mrs. Magdalene Evans, of Wem-road, widow of the late Mr. John Evans. The deceased, who was an old and respected inhabitant of Ystalyfera, resided for a great number of years at Gurnos, in a little cottage on the site of which the Station Inn now stands, where sh e will be best remembered by most ot tho old natives of the place. Jlrs Evans was in her usual health up to Thursday last, when she was prostrated from the effects of a seizure. She never regained consciousness, and passed away in the early hours of Tuesday morning. She leaves five grown-up sons and one daughter to mourn her loss. The funeral will take place on Saturday at Ystrad- gynlais churchyard. We are now in a position to state more clearly the duties connected with the new appointment recently aoccapted by the Rev. R. G. James, pastor of the English Congregational Church. The British and Foreign Sailors' Society were in need of an organiser for their South Wales area, which has been much ne- glected for a considerable time. This area includes the ports of Briton Ferry, Port Talbot, Neath, Swansea, Llanelly, and Burry Port, and Mr. James has been appointed the Society's re presentative to take absolute charge of these ports to organise srdlors' rests, sailors' mission, and in fact, anything he can organise for the comfort and benefit of the sailors when in port. In addition to this Mr. James will occupy the pulpit in the Swansea Sailors' Chapel each Sunday. We feel confident that in Mr. James the Society will hive a most competent and energetic worker. The rev. gentleman contemplates taking up his new duties early in May. On Sunday last Mr and Mrs. John Thomas, near Worn Fawr, received the arlnewg that their son, Pt-e. Daniel Thomas, of the 3/lst Broeknocks, stationed at Bedford had died suddenly in hospital. It transpired later that the deceased had taken part in a. route march of about 15 miles on the pre- ceding day. and it can only be sur- mised that the fatigue.of this march found an unexpected weak spot in his constitution. Deceased, who was 33 years of age. was eng-ag-ed as a haulier at Tirbach colliery, previous to joining the Army 16 months ati(i expected to leave for foreign service at an early date. From the hospital to the station at Bedford, the remains were accorded full military honours, the body being conveyed on a gun carriage, and two beautiful wreaths were sent, one by the officers, and one by the men. The body arrived at Ystalyfera on Wed- nesday noon, and the interment took place at Beulah Cemetery, Cwmtwrch, on Thursday. The funeral was a very large and im- pressive one, and was headed by a firing party from the 6th Welsh stationed at Sketty, who marched with rifles re- versed. Following came members of the Ystalyfera Bands, who played the "Dead! March" along the route to the graveside. The funeral services were conducted at. the house by the Rev: W. Jones, Zoar, at the graveside by the Revs. W. T. Hughes and D. Lewis, Caersalem. Other ministers present were Revs. R. G. James, D. W. Stephens, and J. Secun- dus Jones. The coffin was covered by the Union Jack, and a number of beau- tiful wreaths, two of which, as stated, were sent by the officers and men of the deceased's aegiment. On Wednesday of last week the mem- bers of the Wern Mutual Improvement Society held a musical evening in which the following took part Mr. W. D. Clee (solos on the organ), Misses K. M. Bnazell, Annetta Davies, Annie Cleo, Bessie Clee, Jenny Griffiths; Mr. W. T. Davies and Master Phillip Davies contri- buted vocal solos. The arrangements were in the hands of Mr. W. D. Clee, A.R.C.O., and he was highly compliment- ed for the manner in which he had car- ried out the arrangements. The meeting. was presided over by Mr. T. G. Wil- liams, and was concluded by singing of "Hen Wlad fy Nhadau." Tant Priodasol I Gunner Brinley Thomas, B.A., a Miss Carrie Jones, A.L.C.M., Godre'rgraig. Fe gipiwyd calon Brinley Gan welnau Carrie lan, Roedd llon-der ei gweniadau hi Yn rhoi ei serch ar dan. 0 Dduw rho'n helaeth iddynt O'th etifeddiaeth fawr; A gwylia lwybrau Brinley ddewr Ar fus y gad bob awr. —"Toriad y Dydd." During last week-end, Ensign Phillips, Captain Morgan (Swansea), Assistant- Superintendent Davies (Neath), and Agent Phillips (Skewen) all of the Sal- vation Army Assurance Staff, conducted the meetings at the Salvation Army Halt and a very good time was spent. The Home League w-as held on Tuesday, when a goodly number turned up. On Tuesday next March 21st, Mrs. Brigadier Rogers and her daughter, of Swansea (Mrs- Rogers inaugurated the league) will pay a special visit, and speak at the Home League. She will also conduct a special meeting in the evening at 7.30 p.m., in the Army Hall. A hearty invitation is extended to all. The Rev. Oliver Davies, B.A., curate of Glanamma.n, has been appointed to; I the curacy of Y stalyfera., and will take up duties in his new field of labour im May. Mr. Rhys Nicholas, headmaster of the Cwmavon Council School (fcrmeTly of the Wern Fawr, Ystalyfera), has re- ceived notification that his son, Lieut. Archie E. Nicholas, of the Manchester Regiment, has been wounded in the Mesopotamia operations. A brother of Lieut. Nicholas is serving in Egypt.

No title

"Government by politicians has den

No title

The annual report of the medical officer to Carmarthen Rural District C-ouncil discloses the rather interest- ing fact that of the 343 deaths during the year, 24 were those of persons of 85 vears and upwards, and of these nine lived to the age of 90 and up- wards, the oldest being a female who reached the age of 99. while another female reached the age of 96.

Advertising

Neath Socialist Society 1 A MEETING Will be held at the GWYN HALL, NEATH, on SATURDAY, MTR-C If 18th, 1916 Speaker W. C. ANDERSON M P. Subject: 14 LABOUR AFTEP THE WAR." Doors open at 7.15 p.m. Chair to be taken at 7.45 by Coun. G. H. COLWIL, Swansea. Admission 6d. j