Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
5 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

MASTERS OVERCOAT S J Again lead the way for Style, Value and Variety. Whether for Man, Youth or Boy, we can please every taste at prices which will suit every pocket. NOTE THE ADDRESSES- MASTERS & Co. CLOTHIERS Lta, 18 & 19 Castle Street 282 Oxford Street Swansea 3 Green Street, Neath 17 Stepney Street, Llanelly, etc. BØ"+.++.+. oH C?etti))! of Me Cmr, ]| SWANSEA  I I DAVID THOMAS; t (Y Gemydd Cymreig) i I ♦ t Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Silversmith T ♦ t ——— Has RE-OPENED the above —— 1 f I. XVTBW PREiMISSS ?! 1 I WITH A SPLENDID t IsTE-W STOCIEC i NE-W- STOCK; I Gymry, Dewch at y Cymro i i Y Nwyddau Goreu: Y Prisoedd Iselaf. ???-??-<- ?-??-t.????????.????.??  | DISTINGlisHED SERV?Ce { l That !e! I!e rendered and eY!eng. i distinguished service to the health of the people, is proved by I f the ever increasing-sale of that particular medicine. During the f F seventy years they have been in demand, these pills have f 0 secured and held the confidence of the public. It is no 4 # exaggeration to say that millions of men and women have been 1 greatly benefitted by taking this well known family remedy. Sufferers from dyspepsia, liver trouble constipation and the f many common ailments which attack the digestive system r have found a reliable remedy in 4 BEECHAM'S i PILLS. Sold everywhere in boxes. price Is 3d and 3s Od. d -SEE WINDOWS. and ask for Com- 1/ petition Entry Forms. BOYS be builders with MECCANO You can build Towers, Bridges, Aeroplanes, Elevators, and hundreds of other models, 3/9 to 115/ NEW STOCK. C. D. LAKE, Ystradgynlais. i

A NORTH SEA AFFAIR

A NORTH SEA AFFAIR. It ia said that the Government will make an interesting announcement this week about recent events in the North Sea. It is known, of course (re- marks a London correspondent), that there has been a certain liveliness in the North Sea, and the country will be pleased with the news that will he announced.

TRIBUNAL OPENS WITH PRAYER I

TRIBUNAL OPENS WITH PRAYER I I The Kettering Rural District Tri- bunal offeped prayer for Divine guid- ance in their deliberations at the com- menüement of work recently. All ¡ stood Whilst prayer was said by the Rev. T. G. Clarke, rector of Corby; I who is a chaplain to the forces.

The Caravan of Mystery

The Caravan of Mystery. I By ROY NORTON. Author of "TIre Plunderers," "The Vanishing Fleets, etc. — Follow the fortunes of this pilgrim—an American down on his luck, picked up on a park bench by an employer of infinite surprises—follow him across the Atlantic, through the gipsy camps of Europe, among the Apaches of Paris, hob- nobbing with titled folks and famous musicians, doing unquestionly the bidding of his curious employer, searching for something that ia not revealed till the amazing climax of the story—follow the pilgrim and his unique journey and we have no doubt you will regard this tale as the strangest and most fascinating you have ever read. I (Continued). I CHAPTER XXI "That was a little too much. I told him that my reasons were my own mind; that I wished him to under- stand, finally and irrevocably, that I neither wanted to see nor hear of him again. He had the imprudence to threaten that he would marry me whether I wished it or not, and smiled a.nd bowed his way out of the hotel On the following day he sent flowers us usual arid a card I refused to see him J On the next day following he sent flowers and a letter, praying that I give him a chance to answer any charges against him that had so upset our friendship I returned it with a declination I couldn't go out on the street without seeing him, and always he smiled and bowed. "I slipped away to Berlin, but he came after me, and I remembered, when too late, that I had foolishly given him my plans and addresses for the sum- mer. The man grew to be a nightmare. I loathed, detested, and feared him all at once. And then I happened to re- member that I had a friend down here that I had never mentioned to him, nor to you for that matter, and so, like a fugitive I took pains to get away from Berlin unobserved and came down here to escape him. No one knows where I am save you. The count!" She shrugged her shoulders and threw up her hands with a gesture of con- tempt But I could not dismiss it so easily I raged mentally. But I saw that she was nervous with apprehension, and it was my part to do all I could do assuage her fears Pshaw!" declared I bravely. "I should not even think of him again if I VI ere you. You've done well, per- haps, to slip down here where he could never find you, but you will probably never gee him agam. I'm glad you are rid of him." She shook her head doubtfully, but seemed somewhat encouraged by my words, and I took pains to divert her mind to other topics while she walked with me halfway to Montrichard. She I extracted from me a promise to visit the villa on the morrow, and I had al- ready given assent when I remembered my situation. Now," said I, "suppose, for he sake of romance and open air it-id a gor J walk, that you meet me here where we say good night?" "If you wish," she laughed; "but why ?" "I'll tell you to-moiTOw, I said, and hurried away. I Prosper had given me up as either lost or drunk Experience had taught him it must be one or the other, and experience had taught him that regard- less of what toher people did, it was necessary to eat. He had supper ready when I arrived and stood in an ex- pectant attitude, gauging my mood. It was afte we had sat on the porch some time, and his head had begun to nod that I said, "Bedtime, old chap!" and hustled him into the caravan. He was preparing to curl up on the long when I introduced him to the latest luxury. "To-night, Prosper," said I, "you shall sleep like a gentleman. Take your clothes off It was amazing how his drowsine-ss vanished. With a mad howl of terror he das-hed for the door, swung himself over the brass railing, dropped to the ground, and fled to a safe distance. As- tonished, I followed out to the porch and blinked in the darkness until I dis- covered him standing crouched for further flight if need arose. "Prosper Prosper, boy! What's the matter ? Come here!" I called. Reluctantly he came toward the car- avan, edging in step by step, s if fear- mg a ruae, and then his firsts went up to his eyes. "I ain't done nothing," 1113 waded in argot. J don't want to be licked. I ain't- It was rather shocking to know that in all his life, so far as he could re- member, he had never been asked to doff hfs clothes unices it was to receive a beating. It took me a long time to win him back. For full half hour he cogitated out there on the edge of things. Affection told at last. This to him was a strange situation and he feared he might be cast out of the most gorgeous, ha-ppy home he had ever known. There was a worthy courage 1m him, gathered from Gods knows what ancestor, something rather fine and strong. He made his decision, and came quietly up the steps, passed inside, and disrobed. Hi3 little face was set stoic- I ally, and although he did not whimper, tears chased themselves down his I cheeks. From the corner of my eye I watched him admiringly. He hVtaled just a fraction of a minute when he stood completely nude in the center of t,he caravan and then cillel "I'm ready. You can beat ill" now!" He did not flinch as I approached 1 .9 1 ap p r<),Ic, h d him, and there was no plea -for mercy save in his eyes. He did ?ot break until, to his unbounded astonishment, I I reached over and oaught him up in my arms, and then he clung to my hcck and burst into loud wails. I am con- vinced that had I iashed him till the blood flowed I could have torn no sound from his throat, but the unexpected was too much for him. Patiently I explained to him that most little boys were night suits like the little combinations I slipped over him, and in curiosity he forgot his grief. He wanted to know why. He w,),H'j to know what thy cost, and then whether I was a very righ man. One must be very wealthy to have one suit of clothes for daytime and one for night. It was the first time he had ever had two suits. H,e lifted himself sleepily and said, flushing a little at the expression of such an unheard-of desire "M'sieur, I think, if you wouldn't mind very much, I'd like- I'd like to kiss you!" CHAPTER XXII. What would you do? What can a man -do but surrender completely after a child has voluntarilv kissed him good night for the first time that such a thing has ever happened to him ? This may sound maudlin to you, but if so no child ever kissed you, and probably never will. Before Prosper was up the next morning I had surprised an early shopkeeper and bought a suit of cor- duroys. I bought no cap. It would have been a sin to imprison those riot- our curls. We ha.d quite a fete of our own, Prosper and I, that forenoon, and I climbed the hill in the early afternoon with a fine sense of happiness. I had not long to wait before made- moiselle appeared, radiant, and striding toward me with the grace of beautiful youth. "I've been wondering," she greeted me, "why you didn't want to call for me." There is was aaln-the reminder! "Because," said I, "it will scarcely enhance your reputation to be seen too openly, or at all, with a tight-rope walker from a caravan. Your friends might not admire your taste." "Then," & he said, with brave enele- gance, "my friends can go hang I liked her for it, but we fought it out there on the hillside that afternoon, and I won. Fancy me, the vagabond, become a defender of conventions I could scarcely believe it myself, yet such was the change she had wrought in me and my attitude toward life. That afternoon passed as if in a dream. And so did the day following when, by her express wish, I employed a watchman to protect the caravans and took Prosper up on the hill. We had a wonderful excursion, we three, and she wo nthe boy's heart as she had mine. We were three as careless and happy wanderers as ever rambled through the woods. Prosper confided to me that night, after his prayers were finished, that he intended to marry her as soon as he became fourteen years of age, and after I was half asleep awoke me to ask if, in my opinion, twelve yeairs would be enough but alas! it was Prosper, unwitting and loyal, who came near bringing every- thing to a sad climax. The next evening, after another glo- rious afternoon spent with Marie, I returned to find Laurent swaggering about the encampment. It was Satur- day, and the Montricharrl fete, would open on the following Monday. H e explained that he had been to Blois, but had not been near the professor, who was enjoying himself and making fr i -e,li d s, as u' friends, as usual, with the caravaners. He said that he had returned be- he had an opportunity to travel with a toy dealer, and pointed to another caravan that had arrived in my ab- senee. Prosper was fraternizing with the tcy vender's children, who appeared to be old friends I fear he waa a little boa-stiil.g inasmuch as he was exhibiting his new corduroy suit, and from that went on to expose his under- wear. A few minutes later there was an unholy row in the group, and I rushed across th intervening spaoe to find th angel-faced Prosper gallantly inflicting and bravely receiving punishment, the other combatant being the toy vender's oldest son, who stood about two heads taller than Prosper but was not, nearly so nimble. I also regret to remark that Prosper's language, despite my admonitions and example, was not all that it should b\ He had reverted, and his vocabulary of epitrets was hai--rais'n?, bl odcu.'dHng, exteremely awuful. He W-fI 1113iig fi t-i. hands, and teeth sirnvitmeoudv, and bellowed am oeug-ry protast when I dragged him away. I got him in the caravan, and by dint of much water cleansed his seraphic face of blood, then made him go to b^ to do penance for his oaths. And all the time the toy vender and his wife never ceased working on their wares, repairing boken jumping jacks and mending springs. All through the night the wheels rumbled over the cobblestones of old Montrichard, and when morning dawned where had been an almost empty square was now a bivouac. Aris- tocrats of the oaravan world were these, proud of lineage and far different from those i had seen on the grande route. Three of them had automobiles, huge structures the size of moving vans, whose roof3 supported floors for the fronts of their moving shops, and all sorts of compact folding contrivances for their beau tifi cat ion. I was told that some of them, owned shops in villages more or less remote, but that the call of the blood would not be stilled, and though they became rich, they must obey the lure of the highway for a por- tion of the year at least and drift along its never-ending reaches. I had a telegram from the professor asking me to arrange that Parfait's lo- cation be next our own. It had been taken by a late arrival, and here was an evidence of courtesy, for w hen I explained my desire, the man volun- teered to move elsewhere. "Parfait, the tinker, wants thfs posi- tion ? Ah, the gentle Parfait! He shall have it. By my faith, m'.sieurl It's no trouble at all. We gentlemen of the road live to oblige and assist one an- other." And cheerfully he sang and cheer- fully he accepted a much less desirable spot. The Potan caravan arrived in the afternoon, and the professor and the tinker were both in high good spirits. They came as an advance guard, a full hour before the wagon arrived, having taken some short cut through the foests with which Parfait was familiar, and after greeting me, they threw themselves down like a pair of hunting dogs home from the chase. Wakometkla, I learned, had lost his purse en route, and had been cheerfully living off the charity of his friend, the tinker. Also he had found a trace of one for whom he searched. This he imparted with a mysterious air. All it required wa patience. I nodded my head sagely to all his hoken sentences, but asked no ques- tions. "How is my pet horse ?" "Entirely recovered and will have neither sear nor blemish." "Visiting over on the other side of the square." "Um-m-mb Give much troublt- ?" He sat up. and scowled at me with vastly aggrieved air. "Sainte Vierge de Misericorde he exclaimed petulantly. "I wanted to do that, but had not time. Now you've spoiled mv charity. What kind of a suit was it?" "Corduroy." "Corduroy, eh? Well, I'll be jig- gered Good! I'ti buy him one of blue velvet. And he shall have silk 1 stockings and patent-leather shoes and a ring and a watch with a chain. H got up presently and wandered off through the miaze of caravans that had not formed themselves into streets, and I surmissed that he had gone to seek his protege. He returned with him after a while, holding the youngster's hand and grinning from ear to ear. I never saw a man with such an appearance of pride. He stopped now and then to explain to some of the friends he had made in Blois that this was his son Prosper, and boasted of the lad's ability just as if he had known him /since the day of birth. He was stretched at full length on belly and elbows, with that incredible hat on the back of his head and talking to Prosper when I slipped away from the mar- ket place to meet mademoiselle at our tryst. I was heavy-hearted, for it seemed that this might be our last day. True I would be able to see her for a few minutes each evening, but I must be at the professor's beck and call now that it was time for him to resume that crazy occupation of his. I ha.d one satisfaction from the visit, which was that she frankly told me that she would be lonesome, and had come to look for- ward to our meetings. It was danger our ground, and I fought the old fight over again. I did extract from her a promise that she would not come near the fete. I admitted that I should feel ashamed to look down upon her from a tight rope, while beneath me that fool Laurent spouted his harangue of my exploits, and Wakometkla the saga's divine gift of prophecy. When I got Lack to the camp the little fires glowed here and there, and the professor was asking Parfait more of the never-finished questions regard- ing tho Kettle Drum, the man who had been driven from the camps, while Lau- rent sat moodily by, appearing to hear nothing, but I suspected, drinking in every word. I was angry with myself for not having immediately told my employer of that message, a copv of which I had in my pocket, but I dared not risk saying anything than save to scrawl a note and slip it into mv em- plover's hand, for there was the ?hince ¡ of Laurent's being still on guard. This was my note I "I have something important to tell you and dare not talk here." For but nn instant he appeared puz- zled when I slipped the card into his hand, and he looked at the sleeping Prosper as if wondering if I suspected the boy of eavesdropping, then back at me with an amused, peering g lance. He scrawled a reply on tho other side of the cardboard whn he divined, that I was quite Meet me on the bridge." This was the message he handed to me as he brushed past and out to the porch. I shut the door for an instant, turned j out the light and softly reopened it. Th professor was not there. Over in Laurent's caravan the light was still bnring, and I could see him moving around inside. I lost no time in turning down the street that led to the river. But few villagers were abroad, and the night was so still that my feet echoed loudly over the cobbles in the narrow way. At the foot of the street the wash- houses and boats moored to the, quay loomed ghastly white, and under th dim Jight of the skies the river ap- peared of magnificent width. Toward the bridge was an avenue of trees, and once in their shade I paused to look back. No one was in sight. Out in the middle of the big stone span the professor waited and looked down at, the water kelow as if fascinated by ita rush. "Well," he said quietly w hen he rec- ognized me, Here we are. Quite like- conspirators of old. What are we to do ? Murder somebody or keep some- body from murdering us." "And to neither can I make answer, I Teplied "but what I do know is that one or other of us is being constantly watched and reported on." I saw him start a.nd ru b his hands, as if rather pleased with the idea. "Are you sure?" he asked, in that mellow voice of his, but quite eagerly. "Yes, quite sure. By Laurent." "No! By Laurent? That seems in- credible "Well, it is not," I retorted stoutly. I knew that one of his fads was a little pocket batterry lamp that he was; never without, for when restless in the- night-time he would flash it at his watch and when entering the wagon in the dark it proved convenient "Read this," I said. and passed him the copy of the message. His face shone very plain in the light that re- flected back from the paper, and looked almost as strong as the red Indian's whose characteristics he had assumedL Indeed, they were quite the same. I could see his scrawl of amazed perplex- ity, and then his lips moved as he mum- bled it aloud. How did you get. this, Carter?" he- asked as if feeling his way. I explained to him how I had rroclc, the copy. "Then," said he, "you speak French ?" "Yes," I replied. For another moment he paused be- fore asking why I had kept the knowl- edge from him. I had no good excuse,- I told him so, and surmised that he- was hurt. "No." I said, hastening to make my- self clear, "I didn't distrust you. I have no reason to, but it began there on the "Menduto" when I deemed it best to pretend ignoranoo that I might have a better chance to leain who threw me overboard. I kept the pretense after for no exact reason that I can state. save perhaps that I thought pretended' ignorance might p-,ove a convenient cloak. '^Remarkable R markable man he declared. "And now your gift of silence has served me admirably. Carter, I like you." He turned squarely toward me, and' peered up at my face. 'I'm going to prove it by giving you my full confidence* in regard to what may appear to one of your hard sense like a madman's eccentricities, but I can't do it to-night. I am tired. Moreover, when I do t-ll you, there isr, the chance that you will still regard it. as a childish quest. You have proved your fidelity. Prove it pome more by keeping a watch on Laurent. I h a(f not suspected him in any way any more than I had Perard. I don't un- derstand the significance of this mes- sage now, but by pattern* we shall know before long. To w hichever of na it refers we are at least" forewarned." (To be Continued.)

Advertising

People's 232, High St., Swansea WATCH OUR WINDOWS, Our goods do nut stay long as customers- Buy Our Bargains El -TillS WEEK ONLY- 3,000 Soldiers All Wool Body Belts 1/3, worth 2/6; special price to Local Committees. 500 Real Welsh Llandysuf Shirts, cream, fawn and grey 5/- each. These goods ars to-day worth 6 11, Boys' Suits (Norfolk) 6/11, Boys' New Style (Norfolk) Suits 8/11. Men's Smart Tweed Suits, 25/11. The Last Lot 50 Raincoats New fan Shade, suitable for Ladies and Gents 20/ -8.- PENHALE'S 232 High Street, Swansea W. A. ^TLLIAM.S. Phrenologist, can be eonsulfed daily at the Victoria A rondo (nen-r rhp Marl pt\, Swansea Printed and Published bv "Llais T.iafur" Co. Ltd., Ysrtalvfera. in the County of Glamorgan, Mar. 18, 191G