Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Welsh Wedding TragedyI

Welsh Wedding Tragedy. I Judge and Use of Firearms at Weddings. Mr. Justice Ridley, presiding at the Cardiganshire Assizer, held at Lampeter, conderrmd the practice of using fire'arm.s on the occasion of marria,ge festivities. This disapproval was expressed in his review of the only case in the calendar, namely, a, charge of manslaughter against a farm servant, Evan John Jones, aged 16 years, of Blaenanerch, who was charged with fatally shooting a young btide-smaid, Miss Julia Louisa Harries, 27 years, daughter of Capt. Harries, Cwmporthman, on the morning of May 13 th. His Lordship, after reciting the prin- ♦ vP^ fa,ct? in the c&se, said he was told th custom prevailed in the county of W,ing loaded guns on festive cx-ca?ions. e hoped it would be discontinued. It '"? a most dangerous practice. The Lord Lieutenant, as foreman, an- nounced that the grand jury brought in a true bill. He stated that with a view Piling a stop to this pernicious prac- ti,c,e they Wou'd bring the matter before e next Police Committee. l?fr. Vanghan Evans appeajed for the Prosecution, and Mr Griffith Jones (in- &tirud cted by Mr. W. J. Williams) defend- ed. Geo. Harries said his sister was shot 86 she was sitting in the car. Answering Mr. Griffith Jones, witness Skid it was an accident. The boy had been Jill his service since November and bore a good character. P-C. Cbarm-an said the gun was de- fectIve and went off very easily. Aocuood was then called. He said ropes Were placed as usual across the roads, and he and a friend placed one near CiNnIpo-,tiunall, for which they received s- each. After the car had passed he ran 68 hard as he could and saw his father ?h the gun (produced). Witness took old of ?? and loaded it. Captain Jones, ? Neighbour, was near by with a pistol, ut the captain did not fire. When wit- less had his eyes on Captain Jones to. see if he was going to fire, the gun went off. He did not intend to fire at the ^toment, as he had intended doing so after the had passed. He ran after the car, and did not realise that Miss Har- ries had been shot. The occurrence was a Pnre accident. He thought the gun safe. The jury brought in a verdict of "Not guIlty," an d accused was discharged. The 'o-reman stated it was their unanimous opinion that the magistrates of the county shQuld put a stop to the practice com- Plained of.

THE END OF THE WAR I

THE END OF THE WAR. Captain Margrave, at Newcastle Emlyn, said some people were under the impression that the war was prac- tically at an end. He was sorry to tell them that from what he knew of Germany he honestly believed that grass would be growing in the streets of Newcastle Emlyn before the war would come to end. It was a war of extermination—either of the allies or of Germany. They wanted men in every shape or form, and if they could not get them, well thev would have to take them. They ha-d the guns, they had the materials, they had the money It Was the men that were wanted to bring the war to a successful end. A ^7

I SERIOUS MEAT SHORTAGE

I SERIOUS MEAT SHORTAGE da'a £ Ti- day, -?Nir G- Faber (U.) asked the P dent cf the Board of Tndo 1 ?»*I*f«" «.e -?? ?   country, home grown and IMIK,RTED; W^A;RORIRTHRTHanK'Unt ? tS time last year    Pretyman replied that broadly ?kmg the high prices were not due tQ defic.iency ?? t!? source of supply, but + P e very large requirements of the forces in the field. If the hon. member asked whether there is as mu<'h meat available for feho civil Population, the answer is. No. f the Mr Faber: Is the deficiency for the ??1 population serious? Mr Pretyman: That is a question of degree. It is serious enoug h and ?M

No title

At a. meeting of the Swansea Parks Committee a deputation of the Welsh Poultry Club attended and suggested the advisability of the authorities giving practical demonstrations to all interested in the manner and con- ditions under which poultry should be kept. It was decided to adopt the suggestion.

WAR ON HUN TRADE j i

WAR ON HUN TRADE. MR HUGHES S PT EA TO KEEP THE DOORS CLOSED. ■ A rousing speech was made ati York by Mr Hughes, Prime Minister of Australia, when he received thei free- dom of the city. "You cannot war in a half-hearted, hesitating spirit," he said. "Your acts should be such as to inspire your enemy with fear. Do you imagine we are so many Joshuas to go round and round blowing our trumpets and be- lieving that the walls of this Jericho will fall? There is but one W!Jr Wo must bring our battering ram against this impregnable fortress that they have reared and batter the walls of their citadel down—and them with it. When the clerk handed him the Testament to take the oath as a free- man of that city he saw the phrase beginning "And Saul went out breathing threatenings." He threaten- ed and fumed and was like the leader of our enemies in Germany to-day. who rent the air with his vain and mon- strous threats, thinking to terrify a people like us, and whose threats he I hoped only hardened our steel-like purpose. OUR OWN INTERESTS. "We must look after our own in- terests, Mr Hughes went on. "not provide a market for German roods. Germany sent £20,000,000 worth of sugar to tliis country in 1913. It con- trolled the whole of the R15,000,000 worth of the base metals of Australia. Let us produce that C20,000,000 worth of sugar here or in the Empire. Do not let us buy it from Germany. "Cannot you see what effect the mere notification of our intention, fol- lowed by some outward and visible signs of our earnestness in the matter. will have upon these men who live by producing that sugar and upon those financiers whose millions are bound up in the sugar industry, and upon those grea.t leviathans of finance whose busi- ness interest has depended upon their control of the metal industry, when they know that not one pound of their sugar will ever find its way into these markets and not a ton of Australian metal will go into Germany? "The bubble of confidence which now buoys the Germans up in their privations and consoles them for their millions of dead will be pricked and the nation will lose its confidence in its power to conquer. Close the mar- kets of England against them.- They have shown themselves our enemies." At a reception given later by the Lord Mayor. Mr Hughes said that in Australia they had determined to spend £ 20,000,000 in preparing farms for returned soldiers, and he did not know that England could spend money with the samo object to much better advantage than by preparing to meet the industrial problem after the war.

RUNAWAY TRUCKI

RUNAWAY TRUCK. GIRL'S ESCAPE AT BRYNHYFRYD Another accident occurred to the back of the Brynhyfryd Post Office, Swansea, on Tuesday morning, caused through a runaway coal truck from "V ivian's Colliery, but there was no one injured, though a. good deal of damage was done to the premises. Fortunately the truck was empty. Through some cause it dashed down the steep gradient for nearly three- quarters of a mile, but just before it came to the dangerous bend near the Post Office the rear wheels became de- tached and acted as a brake to the impetus of the truck. This, however, did not stop its journey, for the truck on reaching the bend jumped the metals and in some places almost cut clean through the sleepers, and then dashed into the wall at the back of the Post Office. In the garden there was an eleven-year-old girl named Doris Thomas hanging clothes on the line at the time. She was terribly frightened by the accident, but, luckily, she escaped unhurt. The truck was smashed into splinters. Last October there was a similar acci dent caufced through a runaway coal truck, and on that occasion the truck carded away part of the premises at the back of the Post Office.

TIPPERARYFOR WOUNDED

TIPPERARYFOR WOUNDED Tipperary has been chosen as a home for wounded Irish soldiers, and already some 1,500 have arrived there while 2,000 more are expected shortly Every Irish regiment is represented among the men, who have been dis- charged from hospital and are given instruction in all kinds of work which will be useful to them.

I Police Raid on Brecon I I Club I

Police Raid on Brecon Club. Cases Under New Regulations Dismissed. There was a sequel to a opl lee raid on the North-cote Constitutional Working- men's Club, Brecon, at the local Polic- court, on Monday, when Percy William*, manager of the club, and his son, Wil- liam Williams, were summoned for sell- ing or supplying intoxicating liquor to certain persons during prohibited hours on Monday, the 22nd May. They were also summoned for permitting certain per- sons to consume liquqor during prohibited hours. Mr. Jolly represented the police, Mr. Jones Powell represented the mana- ger and his son, and Mr. Harold Lloyd, Cardiff, represented the soldiers and the two civilians. Mr. Jolly said the charges were under the new regulations in the Welsh area. Superintendent Steven Jones said that at 10 p. m. on the 22nd of May he visited the Northcote Club, and in the bar he found 13 persons—10 soldiers and three civilians. On the counter he saw one pint full of beer recently drawn, also two other pints half full. There were several half-pints, half full, on the counter and two glasses of ginger ale. The manager said all the soldiers were honorary mem- bens, but failed to find. the names of any of the soldiers. The defence was that the manager drew a pint of beer about 9 o'clock for a soldier. The soldier left to go to a fish shop and did not return. The manager himself was not very well, and left his son in charge with instructions that he was not to supply any intoxicating liquor. j The son said he did not supply any intoxicating liquor after 9 o'clock, only ginger ale and hop bitters. Evidence was also given by another defendant, who said all he had after 9 o'clock was hop bitters and ginger ale. What the police saw was hop bitters and not beer. The Bench dismissed the cases.

WELL KNOWN SOCIALISTS SUMMONEDI

WELL KNOWN SOCIALISTS SUMMONED. PORT TALBOT SQUARE MEETING. Considerable interest was taken at Port Talbot Police-court in th'3 proceedings against four well-known local Socialists James Price, miner, member of the Aber- avon Town Council; Henry Davies, rate collector, Cwmavon, an ex-member of the County Council; Harry Davies, check- weigher and Tal Mainwaring, tinwork- er, Taibach, two members of the Mar- gam District Council, who were sum- moned for causing obstruction at Beth- any-square, Port Talbot, by holding an anti-conscription meeting on Sunday, May 7th. Superintendent Ben Evans pro- secuted, and Mr. Ewan Gibson Davies defended. Superintendent Ben Evans said he spoke to two of the leaders, Harry Davies and Tal Mainwaring, and told them that if the meeting was held proceedings would be taken. Davies replied, "Well, we will see." He said the chairman spoke for seven minutes, and &aid the meeting was held under the auspices of the National Council against Conscription. At the outset there was a crow d of about 200 people present, and as the meeting progressed the crowd increased. The pro- ceedings disturbed the service at Beth- any Chapel, close by. Inspector W. E. ReeN said when Main- waring was speaking several officials of Bethany Chapel came out and complained about the meeting being held. In reply to Mr. Davies., witneas agreed that re- ligious, recruiting, and other meetings had been held in this square, but they did not cause any obstruction. P. S. Daniel Jones said several people complained to him that it was a shame that such a meeting should be allowed when their sons were fightin.g in the trenches. For the defence Henry Davies said they claimed the right to hold the meet- ing, and questioned the right of the police to assume an obstruction before the meeting was held. There was ample room for people and vehicles to pass. Superintendent Evans What was the object of the meeting ?—It was a politi- cal meeting. It was against conscription as the Prime Minister said we had a perfect right to do. Harry Davies said he did not take part in the meeting in defiance of the police, but to justify their right to hold meetings there. After a hearing lasting over six hours the Bench found the defendants guilty and fined them 40s. and cost p.

No title

Herbert James Thomas, a tin worker of Glanmor Cottages, Briton Ferry who was oharged at Neath with failing to join the Armv, said he was a con- scientious objector. Fined 40s and handed over.

ITHE TINPLATE TRADR i

THE TINPLATE TRADR. i | THIRTY PER CENT. IDLE TO-DAY. There are indications that this week-end will see further stoppages in the tiriplate trade. We learn on the best authority that whilst a fortnight ago there were 75 per ecnt. of the tinplate mills working, today this percentage is estimated at only 70 per cent., and it is calculated that in another fortnight only 55 to 60 per cent. of the mills will be working. It is also state! that if further men are taken (including married men) beyond the 35 years of age limit, some works will have to close altogether. Whilst some works are employed con- siderably below thir full output, others are stated to be working the full number of mills, but this applies chiefly to the I smaller works. j As to tinplate contracts, whilst some makers are booked up to the end of the year, we learn on excellent authority that in other oases contracts have had to be cancelled owing to non-delivery.

IMUJIBLES AND LICENSING I HOURS

MUJIBLES AND LICENSING I HOURS. Efforts are being made to get the 1 old English Sunday licensing hours in- troduced at the Mumbles, a.nd at a meeting of the local trade on Monday Mr Morgan Hopkin was appointed to go to London to interview M.P.'s and explain the position to the Control Board. So far as jVimnbtas 1S concerned it is urged it is a holiday and pleasure locale, and that the needs, more especially of the visitors, call for consideration. It is understood a move on s.imilar lines is being made by other seaside resorts affected. One Mumbles licensed victualler states that his out door trade has in- creased by three times the quantity since the Control Board Order has been introduced. e —————

NOT A SHIRKER

NOT A SHIRKER. BARGOED COUCILLOR HANDED OVER TO MILITARY. Morgan Jones (31), school teacher, Bargoed, was charged under the Mili- tary Service Act at Caerphilly on Tuesday with being an absentee from H. M. Forces. Considerable interest was taken in the case by virtue of the fact that Councillor Jones is a well- known public man, and one of the most prominent anti-militarists in the country. He is a member of the Gelli- o-aer District Council and other pub- lic bodies. As a conscientious objec- tor, the local tribunal recommended him for non-combatant service, and this decision was upheld by the Glam- organ County Appeal Tribunal. Captain Reed represented the mili- tary authorities, and Mr E. Roberts, Dowlais, defended. The Clerk (Mr R. Y. Evans): Do you admit being an absentee? Mr Roberts replied that so tar as having refused to obey the call was concerned, that was perfectly true, but the position that Mr Jones had taken up had been pursued by him for years. He was onposed to militar sm, and was a conscientious objector to taking up military service. That however did not mean lie was a shirker. Mr Jones resented the term—"shirker —so far as it concerned him. Superintendent Williams asked that prisoner be committed to the Army authorities. Mr Roberts: He claims that the Military Service Act gave him exemp- tion and that the Tribunal refused it. The Chairman: He will be fined 40s. and handed over to ihe military authorities. Mr Jones: I refuse to pay. Mr Jones before leaving the dock expressed his thanks to the police— Superintendent T. Williams, Inspec- tor Hale and othem-for their kind- ness to him while he received their hospitality. ————

MX AS A F9 TL COJII PETITORI

•• MX AS A F,9 TL COJI-I PETITOR. The Admiralty, it is reported, has contracted with a Japanese mine for the supply of 750,000 tons of smoke- less coil for our Fleet in the Pacific. This arrangement (writes a London correspondent) will serve a double purpose, as it will obviate the em- ployment. of a large number of ships for the transport of the fuel from South Wales and prevent the depletion of stocks at home.

No title

Mr George Henry North, Goverra Farm Mamhilad, Monmouthshire, was found dead with a gunshot wound in the heart, on Monday night in a wood near the farm. It is believed that during a rabbit shooting ex- pedition ho met with an accident which pediti,)n I)o m?- t- w* caused his gun to discharge.

Appeal to Miners I LoyaltyI

Appeal to Miners' I Loyalty. I Why it Would be Wise to Curtail Holiday. Responsibility of 66 Un. thinking Societies. I By Mr. T. RICHARDS, M.P. South Wales miners have again to con sider an intimation from the Admiralty that it is of great importance that the supply of coal shall not be unduly in- terfered with by the Whitsun holidavs. The Federation Council are satisfied that even the normal uninterrupted output of coal at the present time is very much below the requirements of ourselves and our allies, who are so dependent upon us, and are unajiimouc in their desire to impress upon the miners of the coalfield the great im- portance of regular attendance to their employment. This in itself ought to appeal to the loyalty of every miner and make him feel that every day on which he refuses his labour is a be- trayal of his fellow-workmen who in their millions, have gone foith to fight this terrible battle in our defence. Now that the Militarv Service Act is coming into operation it is still further incumbent upon us to remem- ber that, while other men will be com- pelled to take their place in the fight- ing lines and other forms of national sesrv ice, the miner is exempt because his ordinary employment is a branch of that service upon which the success of the whole operations so largely de- pends. and that just because there is no "confinement to barracks" or other form of punishment for his neglect of duty his sense of honour and fairplay should be a compelling force to pre- vent the desertion of his post. THE GUILT OF ABSENCE. At the risk of repetition I again call the attention of the miners to the various proposals that are now being .made with a view of securing an im- proved output. Every workmen who contests the recommendation for but one day's holiday, and everv one, if that recommendation is adopted, who is absent from employment on Whit- Tuesday, will be guilty of helping to render inevitable some of these pro- posed strictures which will inflict much greater hardship than that in- volved by the curtailment of holidays for the regular attendance at work. May I also say a word to the un- thinking societies, religious and other- wise, who at these times offer induce- ments for an extension of holidavs ? "To provide for ill-deeds makes ill- deeds done." Hence all those who are making provision for any forms of pleasure at which attendance will in- volve loss of working time are as guilty of the betrayal of the interests of their country as the workman who by his absence has deprived the Navy of the coal he should have produced In the "Western Mail."

MAY FLY SEASONI

MAY FLY SEASON. I Only one fly is in the thoughts of an glers to-day. and that is the May- fly. Last week and even earlier watchful and observant anglers re- ported the presence of scouts belong- ing to the great May-fly army. The invasion of the trout haunts cannot be long delayed. During the past few da,y U¡e fly Duringthe pa?t few da.Ts thf fiv has been noticed in increasing num- b?-e. and though the May-fly 8eon proper .sgener?Iy in the first two ^S miUne' ?? be earlier ?? yeai K of the summerlike  the ?- temperature of the wIL?!1 h, 'g ,er of On a warm, sultry May or June day it is a thrilling moment for the angler I when he sees the first May-flies appear at the surface, followed by the boils and bubbles of trout eager for what to them must be a savoury tit-bit. At this season of the year, too the largest trout are often killed by flv- fishers. The time to catch the fish is y. hen the fly comes on in nice little schools," and the trout can single the flv out. —————

I j HOME PEACEMAKER

j HOME PEACEMAKER. | A youn man asked for exemption at the Wiltshire Appeal TribunaJ on domestic grounds. He said his mother i and aunt. would be left in the house together, and he åÏd not know whether they would agree. His application was refused, and he was told he would not be there to see the end

No title

The hot weather ha.s alreadv so af- fected tinplate millmen that the pro- duction per mill is falling.

HUNTING SUBMARINES

HUNTING SUBMARINES- OUR FLEET OF 2.400 SMALL CRAFT. The Press Association special corres- pondent. who, with other Pressmen, has been. allowed to visit the Fleet, writes:— The party of new spaper men was re- ceived by aji admiral w hose special work is coastal defence, and he was able to give them a number of illus- trations of the magnitude of the work. The system of coast patrol which has been called into being to meet- the submarine menace has been developed to a remarkable degree. Every variety of small craft has been requisitioned to hunt submarines, and includes no fewer than 100 armed yachts. 1.000 armed trawlers, 1,000 armed fishing boats, and about 300 armed motor boats. All of those ships have befen fitted out. and armed since the begin- ning of the war. In the majority of cases they are manned by fishermen who have received some training in the handling of a gun. These men were wholly unused to service discipline at first but in the opinion of their admiral they have done gal- l nt,lv FINE ACHIEVEMENT BY A DRIFTER. One particularly fine achievement related by the admiral was that ao complislied by an unarmed drifter who went for an enemy submarine "with his fietfi." The boat a-rrived on the scene when the submarine was en- gaging a merchant ship. The sub- marine was armed with two 14- pounders. The little fishing boat had none, but she sailed in nevertheless, hoisting the white ensign. "The Ger- man thought there must be something else under that white ensign, said the admiral, "and he went back to Gennany. That feat was accomplished by an old retired officer. The officers for these craft are largely drawn from the Roval Naval Reserve and R.N.V.R.. and very splendidly have they and their men stuck to their duties. ON H.M.S. LION Describing a visit to H.M.S. Lion. the famous battle cruiser flagship of Admiral Beatty, the correspondent states:—A tour of the ship is entered upon under the guidance of the cap- tain and the flagship officers, for it is the Lion, no less, who has submitted to this peaceable invasion of his do- main. Presently one is ushered into the admiral's quarters, and is Greeted by Admiral Beatty himself. One's first impression is that of a young man. for he advances with lissome stride, swinging a pa.ir of powerful shoulders, above which a pair of pierc- ing dark eyes are set in a mobile face. The admiral, who has led the great "cat" squadron since its birth, has an air of insurgent vitality; instant decision and action, one concludes, are some of the most telling attributes in, his character. After lunch he bids farewell to his visitors and returns to his work, and one spends an hour or two wandering about the enchanted decks of the great flagship. The oonning tower of the ship is visited, and one stands amazed at the formidable collection of indicators. voice tubes, telephones. and switches which enable every moment of the great fighting machine to be controlled from this nerve centre when in action. The bust of Nelson which vis-a-vis to a portrait of Lady Hamilton mounts the desk in the Admiral's cabin prompts the reflection that no com- pany of men are so fitted to revive the spirit of the hero of Trafalgar in the changed conditons of modern warfare as those who have led and will lead again into action the massive ships of the battle-cruiser squadron. a

MINERSONLY ONE DAY

MINERS-ONLY ONE DAY. A joint meeting of Cannock colliery owners and miners' representatives has decided to take only one day's holiday at hitsun. Coal supplies are so deficient that any stoppage must inevitably involve a number of works. At a meeting of the executive coun- cil of the South Wales Miners' Federation at Cardiff on Saturday a communication was received from the Admiralty, and the council resolved to issue a circular recommending the workmen to take only one day's Whit- sun holiday.

No title

Mr. Arthur HerAwson, president of the Board of Educat"o'n, has promised a depu- j tation to consider tnnj making of the teaching of general principles of sea power and the main outlines of naval I history an essential paut of national edu- cation.