Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

S Telephone: Docks M. I  ? ? ????!  ? ?  ?n ?v. W !LL! ? Mb & CO. Jewellers, &c. 29, CASTLE STREET, SWANSEA, .+. Specialities: Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lever Watches. Good Foreign Watches. E-nglish and Foreign Clocks. English and Continental Novelties m Gold, Si'lver and Electro Plate, suitable for Christening. Birthday and Wedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for all Sights. It will pay you to come to us to buy for three reasons-Largest Variety, Best Quality, and Lowest Price. FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. F. Wei Lacyl JS The Up-to-date LONDON TAILOR n Who serves you personally and Cuts All Garments Himself Specialists in MOURNING ORDERS. 222, High Street I SWANSEA If c: ,,°,

A QUESTION TO SIR ALFRED MOND

A QUESTION TO SIR ALFRED MOND. Circumstances have compelled the Government to impose a small, a very small, measure of compulsion on capital. To redress the balance of ex- change against the Allies in America, it is necessary that the Government should have control over American securities, and capitalists have been asked to sell. The response having been very poor (for capitalists will not give their money though working men give their lives to the country), Mr McKenna decided to apply a tiny little dose of compulsion, by putting an extra 2s. income tax on dollar seourities as from July 1st. As a re- sult, there have been queues of capital- ists in the City of London this week unloading their American securities. Some of them do not like the disagree- able innovation, and their spokesmen raised the matter on the floor of the House of Commons. Of coure, Sir Frederick Banbury was among them. He may be counted upon to take the lead in any reactionary movement, for he reserves for animals the love which normal men give to human kind. But what is surprising, and in the most literal sense nauseating, is the Attitude of other capitalists. Mr. Rutherford, M.P. for West Liverpool fulminated about "sheer robbery." Unfair and mean," said Sir George Younger, and Sir Owen Phillips, the Welsh coalowner, whined about "losses of 20 per cent." Sir Alfred Mond had a word to say, and we quote the "Times" report:— Sir Alfred Mond complained that the Government had placed holders in an unfavourable position by al- most compelling them to sell at an unfavourable time. Contrast the peevish note of this utterance with Sir Alfred's recent wholehearted and full-blooded advo- cacy of conscription, hie vociferous de- mand that the Government should take and use the bodies of working- men. In the name of the working- classes of the Swansea district, we ask Sir Alfred, and we insist on a straight- forward reply, whether he thinks that a principle which applies to our bodies does not apply to his money P And if ao, why ?

GERMANYS BIGGEST FAILURE

GERMANY'S BIGGEST FAILURE. Why are the Germans still hammer- ing at Verdun ? The offensive being admittedly more costly in lives than the defensive, these successive and fruitless assauts of the Germans just suit the French book. Joffre could ask for nothing better than their con- tinuance. At a moderate estimate, tllQ Germans have dost 300,000 men eround Verdun in the last three months, an average of 100,000 a month. They will have to keep this up for a long time yet if they want to take Verdun, and if they succeed, which is not altogether impossible, they will have paid a disastrous price. In brief, they will have achieved one vf those victories which a-e more costly tham defeats. Meanwhile the French defenders are covering them- selves with glory. For 250 years the French have justly held the reputa- tion of being the greatest military nation in Europe, their forte being the brilliant and dashing offensive. Now they are showing the world their powers in defence, and their capacity for stubborn endurance and heroic re- sistance has astonished their warmest admirers. It would be an insult to say that no nation is decadent which can produce the defenders of Verdun. The idea. of French decadence in itself is mainly a German slander, which the Boches individually and collectively have been disseminating throughout the world for years. No, France has proved herself among the greatest nations of the earth, and of all time. The French have a divine spark in their souls which the Germans lack. Their care has always been for liberty, the "little wild violet of liberty that grows even under brambles, as M. Romain Rolland said. For that reason there are lovers of France in every country in the world. There is no nation, ourselves included, which does not owe part of its liberty to the fer- tilising influence of French ideas, and there is no small nation "rightly struggling to be free" for whom Frenchmen have not died. How differently is the German regarded! Nowhere is he loved, as the leading German publicists are constantly ad- mitting and deploring, and the small nations most of all dislike the Teuton. There has been striking illustration of this in Switzer l  this in Switzerland this week. Al- though the Swiss are neighbours of the German, aai4 half of them are German- speaking, their sympathies are almost entirely with the Allies. When a few hundred severely-wounded British i prisoners arrived from Germany on Tuesday, for treatment in Switzerland, the Swiss crowded to the railway stations to see the train, and they loaded our striken Tommies with gifts. "Aux defejnseurs du droit et de la liberte'' was the message on one postcard thrown into the train. The very idea of any small nation hailing German soldiers of to-dav as "de- fenders of the right and of liberty" is grotesque. The Germans are spiritually a pariah race. Intellectu- ally and culturally they are the in- feriors of the French and that the French are under equal conditions their masters in land warfare has been proven a hundred times on the blood- soaked fields around Verdun.

IIFRIENDLY SOCIETY PROSE I CUTION

FRIENDLY SOCIETY PROSE. I CUTION. i LLANELLY OFFICIAL'S ALLEGED NEGLECT. Mr Wm. David, J.P., LLanelly, High Chief Ruler of the Independent Order of Rechabites, was summoned at Llan- elly, on Wednesday, as secretary of the Third Llanelly 870 Starr Bowkett Building Society and of the Llaneily 561 Bowkett Building Society, for neglecting to send to the Registrar the Societies' accounts made out to October 31st, 1915, and December 31st 1915, respectively. For the prosecution, Mr W. J. Day said complaints had been made for many years, and under the circum- stances he had to press a penalty. Defendant said that it was quite a needless prosecution. In this case the Registrar gave him until May 17th to complete two returns. The first was actually completed and signed bv the auditors on May 17th. If the Regis- trar's office had been in Llaneily and not in London, that return would have been in time. "But I submit," said defendant, "that the Chief Registrar, great per- sonage though he may be, has no right to keep officials in a state of terror as to the exact date for sending in re- turns. Mr Day said he was forced to state that for the past 15 years defendant's returns had been delayed, sometimes as much as ten months. That was why proceedings were taken. Defendant asked the Court to treat the offence as a technical one, and not to impose a penalty, otherwise hund- reds of thousands of members of the I.O.R.—men and women who had loyally looked up to him as their chief -would see that he had been penal- ised. No penalty could be equivalent to what he had already suffered, and lie asked them to mark their &ense of the absurdity and meanness of these proceedings by dismissing the cases. The Bench reserved their decision for a fortnight.

No title

Some bakers in South London have reduced the four-pound loaf to 8d.

NOTES AND NOTIONS j I

NOTES AND NOTIONS. j (By SILURIAN.) I The "LIaia" was one of the first news- papers in this country to point out that however much certain people liked the I-Taxiff Reform" part of Mr. Hughes' speeches, they would pull a very wry face when they knew the other part. Mr. Hughes -has been telling them in Bir- mingham (of all places) what he really meaons by Tariff Reform. I find this in my "Birmingham Daily Post" If he thought that Reform, or or- ganised industry, would leave the giveat masses of the people where they were before the war he would not raise his finger. (Applause.) He be- lieved the whole virtue of this w? that it would permeate the whole body politic, so that there was not one cell of the body which was not saturated with its virtues. In his opinion, the basis of this new regime should be a fair and reasonable wage to every man. If they wanted to breed virile men they must create conditions in which virile men could live. When the war was over, what a home-coming to the men who belonged to the working classes if they went down into the gulf from which they came. That must never be. I have not seen an approving leading article about this in the "Times," the "Morning Post," or even the "Western Mail." All the same it is the only sort of Tariff Reform to which the working classes will gives a moment's considera- tion after the war. In a Rhondda. mine a man was-killed through the breaking of a defective shackle. It is an old cause of mining fatalities, and one that can easily be coped with. But there will be no thorough testing of shackles before use until a few colliery directors have been tried and convicted for manslaughter. The cost of materials is increasing in every direction, and no one "feels the pinch" more than the printer. I learn that many kinds of paper, ink, and binding materials are costing from 100 to 300 per cent. more than before the war, and that the increase in wages, manufacturing expenses, and the dimin- ished output have meant an increase in the labour cost of 20 to 30 per cent. Of course Lloyd George is the very man for that Irish job. At the Minis- try of Munitions he has learned how to handle high explosives. Derby Man" writes :—"I went up for my medical examination last week. About a dozen of us were kept waiting in an ante-room before being admitted to the doctor's presence. Entered a middle-aged "knut' who was just in that merry-and-bright mood, which the right quantity of Four X engenders. He amused up all by his jokes, which were fre- quently interlarded by the remark, uttered in a stage whisper, "Hope to God they won't spot me for an -old soldier." The knut and I entered the undressing room together. As soon as we were stripped, the sergeant said to the knut, "Hello, old cock, how long were you in the a.rmy?" [ "It's a d-- lie," said the knut, "I ain't been in the army." "Corporal," shouted the sergeant, "come here!" The corporal came. What about this bloke ?" asked the sergeant, jerking a thumb in the direc- tion of the knut. The corporal glanced at the kunt and said, "He's an old soldier." "I knew the blighters would spot me," remarked the knut ruefully, but he didn't say "blighters." I was in the Midlands the other day, and I foumd that the miners there are earning very good money indeed. One collier to whom I spoke was very solici- tous about the welfare of the Welsh miners. "I suppose you are half 'clemmed' (starved) down there. he ventured. An eminent German doctor named Fuchs has written a frenetic pamphlet part of which is quoted in "Vorwarts" Cultivate hate Cultivate respect for hate Cultivate the love of hate! Or- ganise hate i Down with the childish shyness, away with false shame face to face with brutality and fanaticism! In politics, too, Marinetti's motto must be aited upon more slaps and fewer kisses! We must not hesitate to proclaim blasphemously "Faith, Hope, and Hate, but the greatest of these is hate." The "Vorwarts" mentions that Dr. Fuchs is the chief physician at a pub- lic lunatic asylum in Baden, and adds "Poor lunatics The Smith faiftily had one of those maids of the invariably heavy hand. Not long ago the town experienced a slight shock of earthquake. Pictures were thrown down, furniture and crock- ery rattled about. During the tumult the mistress went to the head of the kitchen stairs and called out in a patient, for- bearing tone "Well, Lizzie, what are you doing now ?" From the American Press I learn that the "world's laziest man" lives in Kent, Minn. A person entered the tired one's shop. "I can't serve youse just now," he drawled, from behind the stove, on which his legs were cocked. "Call 'round sum time when I'm standing up Mir. H. G. Wells has a tart word for the shipowners in his new book What (Continued at bottom of next sohtora)

Advertising

SPESSAL THiS WEEK- I 12 Doz BROWN CLOTH BLANKETS ]?.ll^d, 2s.G|d., and 2s.ll- £ BUY THEM. NO MORE TO BE HAD. 6 Doz. CHILDREN'S SILK HATS. ALL ONE PRICE, ls.llfd. See Windows. OUR OLD LINES JUST TO HAND CUSHIONS, 12 Doz., Only 9fd. ♦ > ♦ Note the Address: — J.T.OWEN J. T I N THE SQUARE YSTALYFERA.

YSTALYFERA NOTESI

YSTALYFERA NOTES. I On Tuesday evening a united prayer meeting was held at Jerusalem Vestry. There was a good attendance, mem- bers of all the different denominations being present. The Rev. D W. Stephens presided, and emphasised the desirability of the churches being united during the present crisis. On Monday afternoon, as the work- men were leaving Tirbach colliery, a serious accident befell Mr Taliesin Thomas, of Owen's road, son of Mr. and Mrs. Evan Thomas, of the Wern. As the men were passing a number of horses, one of the latter reared and kicked Mir Thomas on the side of the head, as a result of which He lies in a very critical condition. A sad feature of the case is that his mother (Mrs. Evan Thomas) is also seriously ill. and unable to visit her son. On Saturday last the marriage was solemnised at Clydach, of Miss Eleanor A. Thomas, eldest daughter of Mr John Thomas, and Mr Edwin Main- waring, both of Swan Field. The honeymoon is being spent at the Mumbles. We learn that Pte. T. Laing has been brought to England, and now lies in a hospital in Carlisle, suffering from nervous debility, and strain £ o his back, from the falling of some sandbags, an account of which acci- dent appeared in these columns a short time ago. There were good attendances at Wern Chapel, on Sunday last, when special services were conducted bv the Rev. J. Oldfield Davies, of Ton, Pentre. The pulpit will bo occupied next Sunday, by the Rev. H. P. Jenkins. of Saron, Aberdare, who was for many years minister at Wern Chapel. A letter has been received this week from Mr A. V. Lloyd, formerly on the staff of this paper, in which he states that he has been promoted, and is now a lance-corporal. He has been for some time at Gramtham, being trained on the machine guns, and is now a No. 1 man on the gun. He expects shortly to be drafted to France, as "new boots and gas helmets have been served out." Blind Mark's visit to the Ystalyfera Corps of the Salvation Army has been a great success, and Commanding Officers Ensign Piggott and Captain Pearce made a happy selection when they asked that Blind Mark should visit Ystalyfera Corps. On Monday evening a musical festival was held at Jerusalem Vestry, at which Mr H. J. Powell, J.P., pre- sided. The chairman in his opening remarks expressed his pleasure at being present, and said that the Army de- served all the support that would be given them. A fine musical pro- gramme was gone through, and at the close Ensign Piggott proposed a vote of thanks to Mr Powell for presiding, also to the members of the chapel for the use of the vestry. Captain Annie Green, late Com- manding Officer of the Ystalyfera Corps of the Salvation Army visited Ystalyfera on Monday. Captain

No title

(Continuing from preceding column). Is Coming?" "We cannot count on amy limit to their selfishness and treason." He declares that British ships "would carry munitions to Germany if their owners thought they had a sporting chance of not getting caught at it." New question a, ddressed by the younger generation to shipowners, coalowners, tea speculators, beef monopolists and others "WHOM did YOU do in the great war, Daddy ?" In "My Struggle for Life," Mr. Joseph Keating describes his elation on his first day in the pit. He was particularly proud of himself in the evening on his way home. "I was seen by most of my friends, in my black clothes, with my face black, my hands black, and my pit lamp and my 'box-an-jack' black, as I oame home. My mother smiled at my comical appearance as I went into the house. But there was a sigh in the smile. 'God help us! she said laughing, as she looked at me. 'He's as proud as a dog with two tails. Doc. Woodrow Wilson, President of the Yew-nited States, is out for the Presi- dential tussle, and as that Roosevelt guy is chucking his hat into the ring, Doc. is dealing out the soft stuff to the hyphenated fit to beat the band. Ther. fore, I opine, its up to us to kybosh all the sawder about freedom of the seas, and get on with the war. Doc. will hand the plain stuff after he's carried his grip into tlie White House fcr another three years' sojourn. Yep Y'wise? Green has been stationed at Gilfach Goch and Carmarthen since leaving Ystalyfera, and on Friday last she received instructions to take I charge of the Corps at Fakenham. Nor- folk, to which place she proceeded on Wednesday. She was the first officer to take command of the Ystalyfera. Corps when it was started, and as she had made numerous friends in Ystaly- fera, she came to bid them farewell. She was warmly received by all her friends- She had done splendid work when here, and her services have been greatly appreciated, especially by the members of the Corps. Mr and Mrs. Phillip Williams, Allty- grug road, have heard from their son Pte. Willie WiUiams, who has been with the Swansea Battalion almost since its formation, that he has been appointed orderly to one of General I vor Phillips' aides-de-camp, and that henceforth he will be stationed at the divisional headquarters. He is in good health, and happy. Dr. T. H. Morris, of Tylorstown, chairman of the GL-Lmorgan Eduettion Committee, was married at Cardiff on Thursday. Dr. Morris was for several years at Ystalyfera, assisting the late Dr. Thomas, and his first wife was a daughter of the late Mr Thomas Griffiths, one-time manager of Gurnos tinplate works. Seaman J. J. Gape, of H.M.S. "Tiger" is home on leave, and speaks enthusiastically of the readiness and the eagerness with which the fleet looks forward to meeting the Germans. We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Phillip R. Evans, Lucknow Shop, who passed away on Wednesday morn ing, at the age of 67 years, after a severe attack of pneumonia. The deceased had resided at Lucknow Shop for the last 22 years, previous to which she and her late husband, who pre-deceased her 14 years ago ,had lived at Church-road, P-antteg, for 25 years. She was conse- quently very well-known in the locality. She was a faithful member of Pantteg Chapel, and her outstanding characteris- tic was a generous and sympathetic nature, ever ready to assist and succour the need v. The funeral for men only, will take place on Saturday at 4.30, for Holy Trinity Church. The death occurred on Sunday last of Miss Jane Lewis, Graig-road, for many yeatra caretaker of Holy Trinity Church. This wark was formerly performed by deceased's parents, and since her girl- hood she had assisted. The funeral took place on Wednesday, when the choir at- tended and special hymns were rendered. The Rev. J. Secundus Jones, vicar, and Rev. Oliver Davies, curate, officiated.

Advertising

.o.+. DEFFRO! i" A N ID E:) V E:) ID i You Buy your Food and Clothing FROM A SMALL TRADER Who buys from A SMALL WHOLESALER Who buys from A COMMISSION AGENT Who buys from A LARGE WHOLESALE MERCHANT Who buys from THE MANUFACTURER AND PRODUCER! AND YOU GRUMBLE You blame merchant and tradesmen and millers and manufacturers, and shippers! You blame the Government for not rescuing you from the hands of monopolists and profiteers Rub your eyes, man, and save vourself.' The Co-operative Societies of this country among themselves have the largest wholesale house in the land. We own also some of the largest factories in the country. Why! We have eight flour mills of the most modern type which turned out in 1915, 2,727,950 2801b. sacks of pure, unadulterated,, unbleached wholesome flour under the best labour conditions in the trade- We retail this flour—the best that money can buy—for 28s.6d. per half- sack. Our present dividend reduces this price to 2os.8d. AWAKE, MAN, 'TIS DAY! and join The Ailtwen and Pontardawe Co=operative Society. Rhos, Pont a rd awe, Ystalyfera & Ystradgyrilais +.+.+.

THE BRECKNOCKS DRAFT TO INDIA i

THE BRECKNOCKS DRAFT TO INDIA. Letters have been received from Mhow India, under date of May 6, stating that the draft which left this country (con- taining a large number of local soldiers) arrived safely, and were warmly wel- comed. A tea and entertainment, over which the Bishop of Swansea presided, was arranged in their honour, and alto- gether the new arri vals were treated as something precious from the old coun- try.

Y s t it I y fer a Headteachers Dismissed

Y s t it I y fer a Head- teachers Dismissed. The Staffs Give Notice. Following the result of the appeal for an injunction against the Glam- organ Education Committee in the matter of the place of abode, by the headmaster of the Wern Boys' School, Ystalyfera, the headmaster of Col- bren School, and the headmistress of the Wern Infants' School, Ystalyfera, these three have now been notified* by the Education Committee that their services would not be required after the 31st May, in accordance with the i notices already tendered to them. The sequel to this is that the staffs of the two Wern Schools have sent in their notices to the Education Com- mittee, and a month hence there will be a unique strike at the Worn- Schools, unless———■——

Advertising

Mr. J. T. DAVIES A.R.C.O., (Organist Congregational Chapel, Pontardawe), (Accompanist Pontardawe Male Voice Party), LESSONS ON THE PIANOFORTE, ORGAN AND THEORY. YSTRADGYNLAIS AND DISTRICT VISITED WEEKLY. • Address— 18 GROVE ROAD, PONTARDAWE. 4Ml3J3 Welsh Flannel and Wool Stores LONGTON HOUSE, Herbert St., Pontardawe- STOCKINGS RE FOOTED ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. lOd. PER PAIR. POST FREE. Send for patterns and price Lists for aU kindfl of Wool and Flannel. Note Address— J. W. MORGAN, Pontardawe & Seven Sisters Twenty centres to train women to take the place of men in agriculture are to be established in Nottingham- shire.