Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
COLONY FOR WALES

COLONY FOR WALES. GLAMORGAN EFFORT FOR SOLDIERS. The Glamorgan Chamber of Agri- culture at a meeting held at Swansea on Saturday afternoon (under the presidency ot Mr W. Emerson) unani- mously adopted a resolution "strongly supporting the Agricultural Council for Wales in their efforts to secure the eata-blishment in Wales of one of the small holdings colonies," Mr Meyler Thomas, in moving the resolution, said a conference was to be held at Shrewsbury on Tuesday next, w hen the Welsh Parliamentary Com- mittee would meet the agricultural council of that body for the purpose of furthering this movement, which was supported by the county councils of South Katies and by the 4South Wales Garden Cities and Town Plan- ning Association. It was of great importance that Welsh soldiers should be accommodated in their own coun- try, but the success of the movement would depend greatly on the character of the land used and its proximity to markets, railways, and centres of population. Landowners would be consulted as to suitable sites. Mr Akers seconded. Mr Morgan Hopkin (Swansea) said he had recently shown Professor Bryner Jones round the commons of Grower, and he found the land there quite suitable. It was easily to be acquired and offered every facility, and they could go to Shrewsbury with this assurance. Mr C. T. Rut hen said their first business was to obtain the colony for Wales, then discuss the location. RESTRICTIONS ON HAY. I Attention was called by several Gower members to the delays in secur- ing permits from Cowbridge for the sate of hay, and Mr Laugharne Mor- gan said that under the present sys- tem, as the Government took the good hay, those farmers who had bad hay got the best prices. Mr F. Parker said local merchants found hay was being held up every- where. The Government did not want small lots, yet they oould not be purchased locally. The Secretary (Mr Hubert Alexan- der) in his report spoke of the pro- posed organisation of each parish for the purpose of securing accurate in- formation as to the amount of the •season's hay available for the Govern- ment, and it was decided that the eba-mbee should co-operate in securing all possible information from mem- bers. "WASTAGE OF MEAT." ( The slaughter of calves formed The subject of a long discussion, in which it was contended by a number of members that the Government Order on the subject was absolutely useless and resulted in a wastage of meat and no increase of stock on farms. Mr William James (Swansea) said that the Order was almost universally evaded. It was a national disgrace to us. But the Order did no good even if it were observed. Calves too young for human food were being sold in large numbers, and the number sold to-day was as large as ever. He had sold by auction a calf three days old. They had started calf marts in several places in South Wales. Mr H. Morris (Gower) moved a re- solution stating that. the Calves Act lmd "absolutely failed to accomplish the object intended, and recommend- ing the Government to alter it so that calves not less than 1601b. alive should not necessarily be sold by auction. Mr L. Morgan seconded, and the resolution was carried unanimously. Mr Meyler Thomas in his report dealt with the question of soldiers' labour on farms. The Chamber of Agriculture had passed a resolution urging the War Office to make early and definite arrangements for putting at the disposal of farmers sufficient labour to enable them to harvest their crops. It was admitted that the danger point of production had been reached in the agriculture of the coun- try. They were now endeavouring to eeoure some basis to go upon which would be useful in lightening their labours in Glamorgan, and there was ftonLe hope that they would get to a better understanding. Some of the local tribunals were doing their best, and the county appeal tribunal, he; thought, had always tried to deal justly and considerately with the mat- ter of labour on farms. Welsh farmers, be showed by figures, had acted most patriotically with regard to extending cultivation where possible. Dealing with the holdings question, he alluded to the recent return as showing the very remarkable fact that Wales was a land of small holdings. The number of farms was 60,716, and the total acre- age 4,7.50,155. In Glamorgan the total holdings were 5,489 and the acreage 514,999, and it was remarkable to note that there were only 34 farms above 300 acres, only 286 above 150 acres and under 300 acres, and only 402 between 100 and 150 acres. The Secretary advised every farmer to give fair consideration to the ques- tion of employing female labour. AN OFFER FROM GOWER. The steward of the Gower Court Leet was instructed to write to the Garden Oities and Town Planning Association stating that the Oystermouth Leet Ooort had no objection to Bishopston Oommon being utilised for the colon- isation of ex-service men.

Advertising

? ?? —— m ?m )? M t?? m ? _ji )?M   _

WHITSUN WAR WORK

WHITSUN WAR WORK. HOLIDAYS POSTPONED FOR TWO MONTHS. Mr Lloyd George has succeeded in his appeal to the munition workers to defer their Whitsuntide holiday in order to maintain fully their out out- put of munitions. He told the conference of workers' delegates, held at the Ministry of Munitions on Monday, that a post- ponement of the holidays for two months would save thousands of lives, and after his earnest appeal to them the delegates unanimously resolved to recommend that the holidays be post- poned for two months. In the mean- time local conferences are to be held to make the necessary arrangements. Mr Lloyd George opened the con- ference. He was accompanied by Mr Arthur Henderson, M.P., Dr. Addi- son, Dr. Macnamara, and members of the National Labour Advisory Com- mittee on War Output. There were between 50 and 60 dole-, gates, representing various branches of the munitions industry and also other important organisations, such as the transport workers and the railway- men, represented respectively by Mr R Williams and Mr J. E. Williams. Mr Henderson assurred the dele- gates that wherever it was proved that any hardship or pecuniary sacrifice had been caused through large bodies of men having made arrangements to take a holiday in the ordinary course every safeguard would be taken to see that they would be freed from any obligations into which they had en- tered. It is possible that legislation may have to be passed in regard to the de- cision of the conference, and it is understood that the Government, through the Ministry of Munitions, will agree to a longer holiday at the beginning of August should the con- ditions of supply to the Army at that time so permit. MAY APPLY TO ALL? It is considerel probable that not only will munition workers be asked to postpone their Whitsun holidays to a more convenient season, but that a general appeal will be made to all to carry on business as usual, and that this will apply not only to works, but to schools and shops as wel.

No title

A Pembroke grocer H. J. Phillips, who had liabilities £ 1,125 and a de- ficiency of £ 540, told the official re- ceiver that Pembroke tradesmen were doing badly since the Co-operati vo Stores opened in the dockyard.

INO EXEMPTION FOR I JOCKEYS

NO EXEMPTION FOR I JOCKEYS. Lancaster, the middle-weight jockey has failed to secure exemption in what was accepted as a test case for all jockeys. He is a married man with a family, and it was urged that Army service would so increase his weight as to ruin his career in the saddle. The great majority of flat-race jockeys are too small or too light for military service. Of the eligible minority a number have joined up, in- cluding Herbert Jones, the King's jockey. William "Griggs was a lead- ing member in the daring motor-car rescue of the survivors of the Tara in Egypt recently.

NEW LIBERAL PAPER I

NEW LIBERAL PAPER. I The "Pall Mall Gazette" under- stands that during the last few weeks » active steps have been in progress with a view to the publication of a new Liberal morning daily newspaper which will be more particularly identi- fied with what are supposed to be the war views of Mr Lloyd George. It is understood that a luncheon which waa held a few days ago in a private room of a well-known Strand restaurant produced guarantees for the new venture amounting to £85,000 andplenty more is said to be forth- coming. The main obstacle is the question of the supply of paper.

Advertising

PIANOFORTE AND 0RGAF TUNING. REPAIRS of EVERY DESCRIPTION First Class Work, Moderate Chargea PIANOS TUNED FROM 3s.6d. JAMES TARR, Compton Terrace. Y stalyfera 1 e JOHNSTON! FOR NEW VEGETABLE and FLOWER SEEDS AND EVERYTHING FOR t THE GARDEN. Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. 27 OXFORD ST. SWANSEA TELEPHONE: 567 CENTRAL.

FOOD GAMBLING

FOOD GAMBLING. GOVERNMENT AND REGULATION OF SUPPLY AND PRICE. In the House of Commons on Mon- day Sir Walter Essex (R., Stafford) asked the President of the Board of Trade whether his attention had been drawn to the increase of prices by the gambling of certain persons operating in the London tea market. Mr Runciman said that he had been making inquiries with a view to deter- mining what action might be appro- priate in the circumstances, and he hoped to complete those inquiries very shortly. If there was any withholding of foodstuffs the Government would exercise the powers they possessed. (Cheers). Sir Joseph Walton (R., Barnsley), asked the Prime Minister whether, in view of the rise in the price of meat, the Government would consider the advisability of arresting the increase by limiting the sale per head of the population. Mr Runciman: The whole situation as regards meat supply and consump- tion is under review by the Govern- ment. The consumption per head of the population has continuously gone down. Mr Hogge (R., Edinburgh, E.) asked the Prime Minister whether the Government had re-considered the original amount of separation allow- ances in view of the rise in prices. Mr Bonar Law replied: The Govern- ment do not consider it necessary to increase the amount of the ordinary separation allowances in view of the provisions they have made for excep- tional cases to be dealt with under the new scheme.

CONSCIENTIOUS ADYISER

CONSCIENTIOUS ADYISER. For circularising a statement likely to cause disaffection a,nd to prejudice recruiting and discipline, Frederick Will iam Halfpenny, twenty-two, a clerk, of 18, Brisbane road, Uford, was fined E50, or ninety days' imprison- ment. at Stratford. Halfpenny, it was stated, was the secretary of the Forest Gate branch of the No-Conscription Fellowship. The circular was said to be advice to conscientious objectors. ———— —————-

No title

£ 50 damage by fire was caused by a little boy at Tycroes.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be consulted daily at the Victoria Arcade (near the Market), Swan-vea.

I MPS 18 DAYS HOLIDAY I

I M.P.'S 18 DAYS HOLIDAY. I I It is understood, says the Pr&es Asso- 1 ciation th;?t both Houses of Parliament will adjourn on Thursday until Tuesday 1 1June 20. i THE SUPPLY OF STEEL HELMETS. I Mr. Tennant stated in the House of Commons that the supply of steel helmets had very nearly reached the number asked for up to the present. It was believed sufficient had been issued for the needs of all British troops who live in the zone of shell-fire in France. I WOMEN TAR SPRAYERS. An aplication by the Birmingham City Council that women should assist in the tar-spraying of public roads, brought a big queue of applicants to the Council House, although only 40 were wanted. Evidently there is plenty of female labour yet untapped. The women will be paid at the same rate as the men. I LAMPETER SOLICITOR'S DEATH. I A painful incident occurred at Cardi- ganshire Assizes at Lampeter, on Monday morning. Mr. R. Gedles Smith, solicitor, Aberystwyth, head of the firm of Smith, Davies and Evans, solicitors, and a mem- ber of the Town Council, Aberstwyth, expired in court. The incident caused a painful sensation.  ROAD FATALITY AT LLANSAMLET. I A man named John Evans, lodging at II Peniel Green, Llansamlet, was run over by a motor 'bus on Monday night at 11.30 as he was crossing the road, and I' was killed outright. Deceased, who is elderly, is a well-known figure at Llan- samlet. He was knocked down by a I motor car about three" months ago. I PUBLICAN FINED J3152. I Fines amounting to £ 130 and jS22 were imposed at Newcastle on GeoTge Patter- son and William Stephenson, licence- holder and manager respectively of the Hawthorn Inn, Forth Banks. It was said that on May 20 and 22 crowds of workmen were drinking rum and whisky on the premises at 6 o'clock in the morning. NEW ZEALAND COALOWNERS AND CONSCRIPTION I Replying to the coalowners' intima- tion that they would oppose to the utmost any attempt to enforce con- scription, Mr Massey, the Premier, de- clared that the man who in the hour of national peril declined to "recognise the discharge of his obligations con- clusively demonstrated his unfitness for citizenship. THE CHURCH TOO "STARCHY." The Church, according to the Bishop of London, is out of touch with the 1\ world of labour. "How is it." he asked, that the Church of the Carpenter of Nazareth had not the confidence of the carpenter of the present age 7" He thought they were too "starchy" in the Church to-day. It was a mon- strous thing that the people should not find satisfaction for their souls in the Church, which ought to be the life of the people. I BARCTNET AS WAR WAITER. The Rev. A. T. Guttery, the president- elect of the Primitive Methodist Con- ference, lecturing at Yarmouth on his recent visit to France, paid a high tri- L'nte to the work of the Y.M.C.A. among our soldiers at the front. He found, he said, ladies and gentlemen of leisure, wealth, and even title serving the soldiers. In one hut into which he went he found a man in his shirt sleeves i serving tea, coffee, and cocoa. His guide told him he was a millionaire and an English baronet. He had been re- jected for military service as physically unfit, and built the hut and stocked it, and ha,d built other huts, but he would not allow the Y.M.C.A. to mention it in their reports. SWANSEA MAN'S RECORD. I When I was at the Royal Review of the Welsh Bantams (writes a corespon- j dent) an officer of one of the battalions introduced to me a young Welshman who had made eight futile efforts to get into the Army before he was even- tually selected as a Bantam. But Mr. T. C. Wignall, a Welsh journalist, easily establishes a record for persistency in getting into the service. He has just been made sergeant of works on his twenty-third attempt to become a soldier, having been rejected twenty-two times on account of defective eyesight. The son of M'r. James Wignall, a well-kno\»n Trade Union Leader at Swansea, he served through the South African war, tltlioi-igh incapacitated from personal service in this war until now, he has during the present campaign trained a company of men at the Inns of Court. Mr. Wignall is popular in sporting jour- nali..tio circles in London, and rather a, prolific writer of short stories. I COLLIERS PAY E140 DAMAGES I At Aberavon Uountv Police Court on Monday, the adjourned summones against 30 of the workmen employed at the Oak- wood Colliery, Pontrhydyfen, for breach of contract, were again mentioned. It will be remembered that at the prevous court the summonses were adjourned with a view to a. settlement. Mr. W. H. Towl. son (Messrs Kenshole and Kenshole, Aberdare now announced that the cases had been settled, the terms of settlement being that the men should pay E140 damages, inclusive of costs, to be I divided amongst all the workmen re- sponsible for the stoppage and to be deducted by weekly instalments from their wages. The workmen also under- took to carry out the terms of the conciliation agreement in the future. Air. Lewis M. Thomas, for the men, said he concurred in the decision and gave the nece?mry undertaking.—The cases were then withdrawn.

Advertising

3 -M M ?.?.?J.s? t-ri c? V{ 1 14 „1 '?   ? M < ?- ? '? ?b rJJ LAJ cii rll en o G  PENHALE'S 232 High Street, Swansea

WHEN RAILWAYS ARE BOMBED

WHEN RAILWAYS ARE BOMBED. Railway companies and the Board of Trade, said Mr J. H. Thomas at Hull, had come to an agreement that a railwayman killed or injured when on duty through an air raid or bom- bardment would not be denied any of the provisions of the Workmen's Com- pensation Act, thus restoring the position to what it was before the re- cent judgment.

NEWSPAPERS AND THE WAR

NEWSPAPERS AND THE WAR. The military representative at East- bourne tribunal. Mr H. M. Beattie, stated that there are 1110,000 news- papers in Great Britain, and that these must be holding up a very large- number of men who ought to be in the Army." Mr Arthur Beckett, managing direc- tor of the "Sussex County Herald" and the '"Eastbourne Gazette," in a letter to Mr Beattio, points out that there are only 2.413 newspapers in the kingdom, and that had it not been for the newspapers the Government would not have secured the armies it haa demanded. "Although it is perhaps too much for the Press to expect gratitude or even acknowledgment of its efforts on behalf of the Army from all who have reaped the benefit of them, I most em- phatically deprecate any statement that tends to misinform the local tri- bunal as to the real value of tho Press. —————

DEVILRY IN GERMAN MUSIC

DEVILRY IN GERMAN MUSIC. "We have been ridden too long irt this country by Germans—influenced by the idea that the German people are the only musicians we can learn from," said Sir Frederick Bridge, or- ganist of Westminster Abbey, at Plymouth. We had given them some of our biggest posts, paid salaries- English people would never aspire to, and they rewarded us hy turning out the biggest set of blackguards any country ever had to fight. "I hope," continued Sir Frederick, "1 shall not have again to take part in anything with which a German has to do in music; I walk out when he walks in. Our teachers can teach as well as the Germans—and they e-it with more politeness. (Laughter). Our younger musicians can compose music which sounds like music and not like the devilry in modern Germans' music, which shows them in their real character."

PRIMATE AT THE FRONT

PRIMATE AT THE FRONT, CONDUCTS MEETINGS AMIDST FALLING OF SHELLS. Speaking at the opening of a Church convention at Ramsgate on Monday, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who has just returned from a visit to the front, said he had had the unwonted experience of conducting day after day meetings of men amidst many and great dangers. At any moment, he said, the gatherings might have been dispersed by the bursting of one of the shells which were falling around. Amongst the soldiers he found a real spirit of prayer growing up.

No title

———— 0 ———— The Rev. J. DyfnaUt Owen, Car- marthen, has left to minister to the troops near the fighting line. Printed and Published by "Llais IJafur" Co. Ltd., Ystalyfera, in the County of Glamorgan, June 3, 1916.