Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Ystradgynlais Colliery Fatality

Ystradgynlais Colliery Fatality. Would a Post Have Availed ? Inspector's Cross-examination. Dr. W. R. Jones, the County Coroner, held an enquiry at the Old Police Station, Ystradgynlais, on Tuesday, into the circumstances at- tending the death of Major Solomon Stoyd Clempson, 35, of Brynygroes cottages, who was killed by a fall of roof and side at the Gurnos colliery, on Saturday afternoon. Mr J. Dyer Lewis, H.M.I.M. attended for the Home Office, Mr Randall, solicitor, for the relatives, Air Abiather Lloyd, M.E., for the colliery company, and Mr T. Prosser Jones for the workraesn. Evidence of identification was given by the widow of deceased. Morris Mathews, repairer, who was one of the injured men, said he was engaged as a repairer at the Gumos colliery, and deceased was his assist- ant. On Saturday he was instructed by the fireman of the shift to timber a cavity on the double parting to the Brass Vein. The work was progress- ing favourably, the roof was good, and an adequate supply of good timber, native larch wood, was in the vicinity. At a.bout 5 o'clock a fall of roof oc- curred when about 15 to 20 trams of debris came down without the slightest warning, burying deceased, Wm. Baskerville, and hllffioolf. He had previously examined the side and roof bv tapping, and found nothing wrong. When he was knocked down, he called for assistance, and Peter Mitchell and George Edmunds, two men engaged in the vicinity extricated first him, and then Iiaskerville. After being taken from under the fall, he became uncon- scious. fo answer to Mr Lewis, he said that the distance between, the two arm's, E&c:ll side of the fall was 8 to 9 fee* He had had seven years' experience 

Advertising

LLOYD GEORGE S NEW SECRETARY. Colonel David Danes M.P., who has t?m?Lv returned from Fra?nce, where he ?becn on ?rvice with his b?ttajion. fcIoS A b" private secretary to 1? U£ ovd Geor?. m ?c?i? k)' Si? t fC?h.MtnZ7zzaa. Mon?. a? a?tu?Uy b

IMINERS LAMP GLASS

I MINERS' LAMP GLASS. j FORMULA DISCOVERED FOR I MANUFACTURE IN BRITAIN A statement made recently at King's College, London, by the principal, DT Burrows, who was formerly professor of Greek at the University of Wales at Cardiff, that the formula had been discovered of making the special quality of glass required for miners' lamps, has created keen interest in mining circles. Before the war this glass was wholly imported from Ger- many and Austria, and the formula of its make was unknown in this coun- try. The problem has now been solved by scientists in this country, and it isnw no longer necessary to go to Germany or Austria for the glass. The prob- lem waa to produce a glass having the following properties. It had neces- sarily to be thick in the walls to have the required mechanical strength. But thick glass is well known, as a rale to be prone to break with rapid changes of temperature, so that a glass had to be produced that would withstand such changes of temperature as might, easily occur in the use of a miner's lamp. The discovery of the formula neces- sitated a fairly long research, involv- ing a large number of trial melts on a small scale and experiments on the properties of the glasses produced. Eventually a suitable batch formula for making a good miner's lamp glass was obtained and has been published by the Glass Research Committee of the Institute of Chemistry, the ex- periments having been carried out at King's CoJUege by Professor H. Jack- son and Dr. T. R. Merton, and also at the former's private residence. Miners' lamp glasses standing the most vigor- ous tests have been produced on a manufacturing scale by John Mon- crieff, Ltd., of Perth. Such glass, and practically all the different vairietti-es of glass for chemical laboratory ware, which axe now being made in this country, #er8 previously imported from Germa-ny and Austria.

dM HOME SERVICE MEN

,? dM- HOME SERVICE MEN. The position of men passed for gar- rison duty at home was, made a little clearer when several of their appeals were dealt with by the Law Society AppeaJ Tribunal. Mr A. H. Richard- son, M.P., who presided, quoted Mr. Tennant's recent sitatement-tbat the number of men required for home ser- vice units had nearly been obtained, and that it was intended to cease taking any more home service men as soon as the requirements had been met. Home service men, Mr Richard- son said lie understood, were not being called up.

MR LLOYD GEORGE TO PRESIDE AT THE NATIONAL

MR LLOYD GEORGE TO PRE- SIDE AT THE NATIONAL. The executive committee of the National Eisteddfod, which is to be held at Aberystwyth duuing the third week of August, has received the fol- lowing letter from the secretary to Mr Llovd George:— "Mr cloyd George wishes me to say that, circumstances permitting, he will be very pleased to preside at the meet- ing of the Eisteddfod on Thursday, August 17, when the ceremony of ohairing the bard will take place. It has been Mr Lloyd George's pleasure to preside at this meeting for a num- ber of years, and he sincerely hopes to be able to do so this year. Mr Lloyd George wishes me to thank you for the copies of programme* of the Gy- manfia Ganu, but would be much I obliged if you would be good enough to send him some old iiotation, copies of it."

25 PER CENT BONUS T8 SWANSEA DOCKERS

———— ——— 25 PER CENT. BONUS T8 SWANSEA DOCKERS. It was announced on Monday that the employers have agreed to give the Swansea dockloaders and dischargers a further war bonus, making 25 per cent. altogether since the war commenced, with additional increases for night work and douhle ratss for Saturday. Over 1,000 men are

I ASSIZES NEXT WEEK AT SWANSEA

I ASSIZES NEXT WEEK AT SWANSEA. The calendar for next week's As- sizes, which open at Swansea.- is heavier than had been exported. Mean time, there is considerable doubt as to whether the Borough Quarter Sessions wild be over by Monday, the Assize day. ( The S?a-MOM open on Friday, and there are some ei? cases, several i f' whicl1 areexpocted. to be of a pre- > tracted character.

ESCAPED FROM THE BALTC i

? ESCAPED FROM THE BALT!C  i EXCITING ADVENTURES ON I A CARDIFF STEAMER. i How the Cardiff steamer Penmouut escaped from the Baltic is related to the ''Western Mail" in a. letter from one of bhe crew. The ship is now in an Eng- lish port, and the writer says The Pendennis left the day before we did, and got fast in the ice, where &he had to lay for a week. We came out and tried to get down inside the ice, but. found this impossible, so came back again and went down outside quite twenty miles from the land. But we had a diffi- cult job. We buckled in seven plates in the bowa, lost about a foot of the pro- peller, and lost one of our small boats, which got crushed whilst we were trying to clear away the blocks of drift ice from the propeller so as to allow us to go ahead. Well, after this we got along nicely until we came around Sandhammer. Trying to get into Trelleberg that night we had to go round a low point called Sydmjge H uk, which has a shoal off it about two, miles, marked by a stick. It was close on midnight w hen we came close up to it and quite dark. EXCITING AND COMICAL. I All of a sudden we saw about twelve large ships, accompanied by six dark shadows which we could not mistake. They were torpedo-boats. We at once knew it was a German convoy, so instead of trying to round the point we made into the land and dropped anchor as alose in as we could, intending to wait until they passed, knowing it was impossible for them to see us, as we had the lamd at the back of us. But I'm blessed if the whole lot didn't do a similar thing, and came and anchored in the salne place all around, us. Luckily they never w us, or they might have tried some dirty games in the darkness. However, when it came daylight (about 3.0 a.m.) you should have seen the fun They were more afraid of us at first than we were of them, as in the first light they couldn't make out what we were. There was H?na.Hm? and whistles and all sorts, and you imagine their surprise when t?y fomxi -a Ua?k ?M?p Mucn?at ? t-h?n- little flock. When they made out we were only a cargo boat down came j four armed trawlers alongside, about 50ft f away, all with their glasses intently on us. One of our sailors shouted out "Good morning. The situation was so comical that I nearly doubled up with laughter, especiaJily when I saw the look of dis- gust on the faces of those in charge. We were right close to a lighthouse, and there were Swedish fishermen around us so they couldn't do anything, and, after a last, longing look, they went away. About five o'clock the whole lot hove up anchor and disappeared to the east- ward. Then we hove up and continued our journey westward. Outside of Trel- leberg we met the Swedish torpedo-boat Castor, with Prince Wiihelm of Sweden, and, after hailing us and asking us what we were doing in those waters without a convoy, he sent us three torpedo-boats, which kept with us all the way up through the Sound, and luckily for us he did, for no sooner had we got around Falsterbo than up came a big German destroyer and made right foT us, hut the three little Swedes (they didn't seem much bigger than our lifeboats) got in between us, and kept there. GERMANS' CHAGRIN. I I The German, then art. a distance 01 about a hundred yards, ran parallel with us. If only I could describe the expres- sion on that German captain's face. We had to come perilously near the edge of the Swedish water, only a few metres in some places. The nearest I can get to it would be for you to imagine a man in a desert dying of thirst, and somebody. to hold a big pot of cold, frothy beer in front of him and then take it away again. It was a look of longing anguish. I could almost imtaigine I felt the tickling sensation in the palms of his laands as he opened and shut them. With my glass I ocriild see his Tfps ffoing, liD I expect ho wi&s earnestly praying for something; to happen to sand us outside of the limit. Poor chap, I really felt almost sorry for him After a bit he got tired of it, or tilse he didn't like the look of the Swedish torpedo-boats' gtwis, which by this time had been uncovered and got ready for action, so he sheared off, but in a few minutes his place was taken bv a German armed trawler, which appeared even more desirous of making our ac- quain/tances, as he oaane considerably nearer to iis. I didn't like the look of this fellow at all, and told the piiot I thought he was going to try some trick; but the pilot was, really, a splendid man, ø-d. said he was ready for him, and he was, too. I AN AWKWARD MOMENT. I We had to go round a stick which marked a very shallow bank, and, as the stick was only just inside of neuttral waters, we had to keep very, very close to it, almost alanigside, with the result that when rounding it we were only a few yards from the bank. and just when we oame to the stick the German sheared right across our bows, with the intention of either making us so ashore or eke run outside of territorial waters, where, of course, he would have taken us. But the pilot was ready and equal to him. Instead of altering the course he went right on straight for the middle of him, and would, undoubtedly, have run (Continued at bottom of next oeto 1nD)

ESCAPED FROM THE BALTC i

him down if at the last moment the German had not gone full-speed astern and slaved himself by the skin of his t-eth. The Swedish caine up then and chased him off, and he kept At amore respectful distance, but he still followed us and kept with us for fourteen hours. However, it was no use, and he then turned around and went back—most like. ly thinking of the coal and time he had wasted for nothing. When he disappeared two of our escorting torpedo-beats turned back also, and the other eatrie right on with us to Gothenburg, where we ar- rived without any further adventures.

UNSHAKEN GERMAN CONFI I DENCE

UNSHAKEN GERMAN CONFI- I DENCE. ) ONLY DEFEAT IN THE I FIELD WILL BEAT THEM I IMPRISONMENT OF LEIBKNECHT A I TREMENDOUS STRATEGIC ERROR. "Germany is entering upon the third year of the war with national confidence in ultimate 'victory' still unimpaired. That ie the cardinal fact in the situation which people in Allied countries must take into consideration." The above statement is from a person, age whose sources of information with re- gard to internal developments in Ger- many enable him to speak authoritatively [ and was made to MI. Freak. Wm. Wile, late Berlin correspondent of the Daily Proceeding, this informant states "That this confidence rests upon a foundation of prodigious 'bluff' engineered and sup. ported by every means at the Govern- ment's command, chiefly an iron censor- ship, but confidence continues. That is the main thing. There is only one way of breaking down the structu-re upon which the whole German military pro- gramme rests-the people's hypnotic be- lief in 'victory' and that is military pressure. Pr "Until the Ger-num armies are smashed to an extent which brings the spectre of invasion indubitably before the Germans' eyes, their faith will not be undermined. The moment it begins to crumble the end for the Allies will be m sight. Extra- ordinarily brave as they are in battle and extraordinarily -united as they are -in what seems to be victorious fighting, the Germans are extraordinary cowards when palpably being beaten. They will, in that hOUT, but not until then, collapse like a house of cards. The Allies' work is, therefore, clearly cut out for them. They must defeat Germany decisively in the field and make invasion either an actual or imminent peril. "Such events as are now occurring on the western front are all to the good, but by concealing from the people the facts about their defeat the leaders of the German Army are depriving the Allies of the effective fruits of their vie. torv. There will natureliy come a time defeatel will no longer be conceal- able. Then the moment will have ar- rived when Allied successes in the field will produoe the one result which will hasten p-eace- t-he Germans will see that they are losing, aM the finish will ensue soeedily. Panic unprecedented will break out. Whether it will lead to revo. lution remains to be seen. "STARVATION" NOT DEt^Ai. I ?-I <-These judgments are iounaea o" illY firm conviotioff, that neither attrition of 'man-power' nor lack of food will beat (?a?.. The plain truth about the food S?t?i is that German having m- the past eaten 120 per cent. of what nvunans rieected, are now eating about 80 per cent. They are in a correspondingly grumbling mcoo and inconvenienced state, but they are not starving. I would not go &o far as to say that they can go on uidehnite- ly 071 short commons, but if their present cito fairly comes up to expectations they will be able to go on for a long time yet: certainly over another winter. Their cattle plight ia probably the worst fea- ture. In respect of other commodities, thtnv seems to be some justification for the popular outcry in Germany that 'food troubles, have been due not so much to actual shortage as to inefficiently bureau- cratic organisation of available supplies. "The blocade is pinching Germany much harder, I think, in regard to raw materials for such things as clothing and boots (which are, of course, very essen- tial military requirements). aJtd ingre. dierrts for munitions. I have been re- liably informed that the shrapnel on some fronts is by no means up to the standard used early in the war. "I have not been able to secure any evidence of any material lack of men in Germany. Everybody at all fit has been ssll,ea up, or is being called up, and woman are doing an enormous amount of work formerly fit only for male hands. "Maximilian Harden is probably the man in the country vvho is openly telling the truth. Plenty of others know the tnah-know the utter hopelessness of the German War Party's schemes, know the absurdity of saying that 'France is already bled white,' and is 'ready to make a separate peace,' and the like- but the censorship is now so mercilessly wielded that that there is no 'Stop-tfie- \Vär' er 'Peace' element of any articu- late importance. The ruling clique knows tha,t to keep the country deceived and gagged has become a matter of supreme military necessity. The conviction of the Socialist Liebknecht was a. tremendous strategic error by the German Govern- ment. Nothing in the war thus far has struck such a blow at the county's vaunt- ed 'national unAY."

ANTHRACITE MINERS MONTHL YWEETING

ANTHRACITE MINERS' MONTHL YWEETING. THE 5 PER CENT. AWARD. A LIVELY DISCUSSION. The monthly meeting of the Anthracite District of Miners was held at Swansea an Saturday. Mr. W. Hughes (Cross Hands) presided, and was supported by Mr. Thos. Davier, (Dillwyn Colliery), Messrs. J. D. Morgan (chief agent), Jno. J Janies (-agent ) Dd. J James (agent), Dd. Morgan (secretary) J D. Morgan (treasurer), and a consider- able number of delegates. Reports were given by Mr. J. D. Morgan dealing with local disputes and other matters. RED CROSS WORK. I Mr. Herbert Lewis, organiser of the movement for providing motor ambulance cars for Red Cross work, attended, and addressed the meeting upon the details of the scheme, but stated that whilst on the one hand they were asked to con- tribute a percentage upon the tonnage of output, the coal owners and Royalty owners were asked to co-operate in special contributions of their own, amd it was proposed that members should give 4s. per man and 2s. per bey. The method would be for the men to decide in the various districts. In some instances it had been raised by contributions of H,d. per member for the week, but that was a matter of detail, for consideration. He urged the district meeting to take the matter into consideration and call on lodges to deal with it. THE O'CONNOR AWARD. I In connection with Judge O'COlmar's award regarding the lost five per cent., there was a lively discussion, which last- ed the whole of the morning. Mr. Jas. Winstone (president of the S.W.M.F.) and Mr. Alfred Onions attended in order to explain the award, but Mr. Thos. Richards, M.P.. who acted as assessor on behalf of the workmen, was unable to be present owing to the serious illness of his son in London. There were 53 delegates present repre- senting nearly 15.000 workmen, and the proceedings were protracted, and, at times, warm. .Nicr. Winstone and Mr. Onions were present on behalf, and at the request of the Central Executive of the miners. to clear up. as far as possible, the posi. tion in face of the general agreement, which states that all standards outside the 1879 standard are to be correspond- ingly adjusted to the 1879 standard, and why the men should accept Judge O'Con- ncr's award that the Anthracite miners should have only 45.78 rver cent.. as com. pared with the 50 per cent. in all other districts added to the standard and form what is known as the 1915 new standard MISUNDERSTANDINGS. I The discussion lasted for hours, and, as Mr. J. D. Morgan admitted, the mis- understandings between the delegates and the- Judge and the assessors were great. For one thing, it was contended that I both Mr. W. P. Nicholas (the Federa- tion solicitor), and Mr. T. Richards, M.P., bad expressed an opinion to the committee that the men would be en- titled to 50 par cent, as the amount to be merged, while Mr. Winstone and Mr. Onions seemed to hold contrary views. And upon this point, it was decided to invite Mr. Rdahards and Mr. Nichofcs to attend a special meeting of the district delegates to be held in three weeks, with the object of clearing up the difficulty. Meanwhile, Judge O'Connor's award was accepted as to the actual amount now payable, but the "merging" question to be left open. As the ordinary business of the month- ly meeting could not be got through it was agreed to hold a special district meeting on Monday. ABSENTEEISM. In the course of the proceedings, Mtr. Winstonle once more referred to the mis. understandings which have arisen in various parts of the coalfield as to the pewers and duties of the new commit- tees appointed to deal with absenteeism. He emphasised t&e point that the com- mittees had no power to fine or other- wise penalise absentee workmen. They oould smuply use moral suasion to trv to get men to work reguiarly, and this was a duty which fell upon the shoulders of the regular workers as well. They would not even post the names of absen- tees on the pit top.

lqqqpTEE BRITISH WAY I

lqqqp- TEE BRITISH WAY. I A Munach newspaper learns from the Western Theatre of War that on June 30 a Bntish airman dropped a wreath of fresh flowers, covered with a mourn- ing veil, for Lieutenant Immelmann, the Germ-an airman. The wreath was enclosed in a tin box, which also con- tained the following letter:- "Dropped over Chateau, June 30-— For Flret-lieut-enant Inamelmann, who died in b&tt? on June 18. In memory OT i a brave and chivaJroT? opponent, righting Squadron."

No title

Charged with the mur der of his mother by putting arsenic in a rioe pudding. Henry Biggott waø -found not guilty at, Staffordshire AadzsB.

I Five Millions for War I Relief

I Five Millions for War I Relief. I i NATIONAL FUND MAKES GRANTS TO 13.104 WIDOWS. Interesting information is rontainedi in the report issued as a White Paper on Saturday of the administration ef the National Relief Fund. Up to March 31 last the total sub- scriptions amounted to L5. W, U6 and the total issues for naval and mili- tarv relief amounted to t2,624,249, and for civil relief £ 426,518. It is pointed out that the Royal Patriotic Fund Corporation will take over the responsibility for the relief of naval and military distress after June 30. Acting through the Royal Patriotic Fund Corporation, the committee has made grants to 13,104 widows, 29,543 children, and 8,056 other -dependento during the half-year, while in addition the committee has made & .grant of £ 20.000 to the Officers' Families' Fund. As regards civil relief, it is pointed out that the present prosperity ie largely artificial, and it is expected there will inevita-bly be very heavy demands upon the fund after the war for the relief of civilian distress.

I OALOWNEBS CHAIRMAN

I OALOWNEBS CHAIRMAN. Mr F. L. Davis has resigned hi6 position as permanent chairman of the coalowners' side of the South Walee Conciliation Board. The resignation is an expeeW sequel to the acquisition of the collieries of Messrs. D. Davis amd Bone by the Cambrian Combine. Mr F. L. Davis has held the chairmanship since May.. 1904.

TERITORIALS HEATI DEATHS I

TERITORIALS' HEAT I DEATHS. I INDIAN PAPER'S ALLEGATION. The "Oivil and Military CrMette," of Lahore, in ite Issue of June 11 published the folio-Alng Karachi, June 9. "A Sukkur correspondent of the Daily Gazette' writes The other day a speciaJ tra;n containing Territorial soldiers halt ed at Rohri Station (Sind, North-West Frontier) at 3 p.m., an the way to a fur- ther destination. The party appear to have suffered very much from the exces- sive heat. Sevea men were found dead in the train, and their bodies were sent here to be buried. Thirty-two more, of whom about eight were seriously ill, were sent to the Civil Hospital for treatment. 'The civil surgeon. Mr. Hingorani, and Mr. Hales, district traffic superintendent, took prompt measures to give relief. Of the 32, two died- shortly after arrivfJ, and these were buried here. Three more died later. One is lying in a precarious condition, while the rest have partially recovered. (It is understood that there were further fatalities at a later stage of the journey. )"

tSTEELWORKERS WAGES

STEELWORKERS' WAGES. At the adjourned meeting of the vrig-t* board in connection with the South Wales and Monmouthshire Iron and Steel Workers' Association (Sliding-scale), held at Abergavenny, the employers' re- presentative made an offer of a 10 per cant. advance., to take effect from July 1, but this was refused by the wwkmen, 0 who asked for 24i per cent. Finally it was decided t* commnnicale with the Board of Trade with a view of the de- pute being referred for arbitration.

No title

Collier boys at Pontypridd earning 3fis. a week wepe finecf 20s. far gaming with cards. Chepstow Guardians have decided to use Demaarra sugar instead of gra»ulat. ed sugar for the pampers' tea. Ca hill Co-il k" passed a. re" n- t. f .2.t.  diMf,leè so.ldwn tion of p