Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Telephone 1Jockl 35. I W. WILLIAMS & CO. i Jewellers, &c. 29, CASTLE 1RrET, SWANSEA. Specialities: Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lever Watches. Good Foreign Watches. E-nglish and Foreign Clocks. English and Continental Novelties m Gold, Silver and Electro Plate, suitable for Ch ristening. Birthday and Wedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for all Sights. It will pay you to come to us to buy for three reasons—Largest Variety, Best Quality, and Lowest Price. FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. I IF Welcl Lacy I The Up-to-date I LONDON TAILOR Who serves you personally and Cuts All Garments Himself Specialists in MOURNING ORDERS. ¡ 222, High Street I SWANSEA u L = =

MR LLEWELYN WILLIAMS XP AND ALIEN SHIRKERS

MR LLEWELYN WILLIAMS, X.P. AND ALIEN SHIRKERS Mr Llewelyn Williams, M.P., is de- voting his superfluous energy to the defence of Jewish shirkers. We should have thought that there are other things which might more profit- ably engage his attention, notably the employment of steelworkers at Llan- eily on Army pay. The question of the Jewish shirkers was dealt with by the "Labour Voice" last week, so it is not necessary again to outline the case for and against these people. They have the simple alternative of joining the British Army, or being deported. Under the influence of a sympathy with their woes that is more rhetorical than rational Mr Llewelyn Williams talks of the "most unchecked tyranny this country has experienced since the days of the Star Chamber," and refers to the Jewish shirkers as "these thrifty and well-conducted men." Where is the tyranny of telling a man that if he cannot conform to the conditions of your household you pre- fer his room to his company ? And what sort of one-eyed logic is it that leads an educated man, a leader of ^public opinion, to describe as "thrifty And well-conducted men," persons who try to avail themselves of all the benefits of British liberty without making any return for it ? A man is taken into a househId and given equal privileges with members of the family, then when a day of trouble comes, and the roof-tree is threatened with des- truction, he refuses to lift a finger to- help 'his. benefactor. If that is Mr. Llewelyn Williams' notion of -ood con- druci, it is not ours, nor is it that of the mothers and fathers of the IJan- elly boys now at the Front. It is all very well for Mr Williams to bewail the loss of "the right of asylum, but if everybody was afflicted with his short-sighed views there would be no Britain in which it would be worth while for his Hebrew protecre to take seylum. Will Mr Williams, of his charity, and his store of legal know- ledge, inform us whether there are rights without corresponding duties?

THE DAILY MAIL IS THINKINGIII

THE DAILY MAIL IS THINKING. II Whether its political enemies like the fact or not, there is no doubt that the "Daily Mail" is the most powerful aewspaper m the country. -Tt set us all growing sweet peas, and eatmg standard bread, and before now it has so stirred public opinion on prime is- sues of the day t hat Governments have been compelled to do things that other wise would have been left undone. Co-n- eequ-ently there is more than ordinary interest in the series of articles, editor, ial and otherwise, now appearing in the "Mail" under the heading "Are the Labour Leaders Thinking." Summarised, these articles mean that the "Mail,' is prepared not merely to eupport. but actively to advocate, taationalisatifln of railways, mines, and other essential industries, the payment of a living wage to all workpeople, and the making a permanent feature in our industrial system of the "welfare Work," novv iindl, rtaken by the Ministry of Munitions. Is not this a. remark- able advance from the crude and rabid anti-Socialism of ilie "Ma,il" in the latter pa,rt of 1906? What the conductors of the "Mail," jtmd all other vtttblligent people realise, » :& is that the war has shivered the ojd individualistic system of competitive production to its foundations, and if the nation had not adopted some form of collectivism we should long since have been under the Kaiser's heel. There is not the shadow of a doubt that on economic matters the Socialists had got hold of the right end of the stick, and it is plain as can be that if we are going to make any headway after the war it must be on collectivist lines. The tragic side of the situation is that the I.L.P., infatuated with in- dividualist and pacifist doctrines that are as far from Socialism as the poles are apart, is missing the greatest of all opportunities, the occasion for which the pioneers have toiled and moiled, and gone to early graves for. The tragedy of it! Karl Marx pro- phesied that when Socialism did come in England, it would come more rapidly than anywhere else, and the following homily to employers from Wednesday's "Daily Mail" almost sug- gests that the prophecy is to be realised They (the employers) cannot begin asking themselves too soon how far they were responsible for the un- happy state of things that pre- vailed before the war and how far they should contribute towards find- ing remedy. Did they invariably recognise that in industry, as in all human relationships, it is the spirit that ooaints ? Did they not too often ignore the numberless aspects of the factory system that lie outside the weekly payment. of wages ? Did they study the health and comfort and general welfare of their employees? Could not Labour, when accused of giving too little and asking too much, point in justification to the example of Capital? This. be it emphasised, is from the "Daily Mail" not the "Clarion." We hope the employers, and the South Wales Coalowners in particular, will take note of it. We hope too that local Labour leaders will bethink them- selves of what it means. The golden opportunity of Labour is at hand. Shall we dissipate our energies in propagat- ing the anarchist philosophy of the No- Conscription Fellowship, and the hazy idealism of the Quakers, when we have an opportunity of building out of the ruins of war the foundations of the new society ?

HOCH ENGLAND I

HOCH ENGLAND?' I SCENE AT AUSTRIAN "DERBY." Mr Gwilym Davies, M.A., of New- port, on a postcard from Raab (Hung- ary) to his mother writes:—The feel- ings of the Austrians towards us are changing. A story by way of illus- tration which came to us direct from the chief character in it:—The Aus- trian "Derby" was run last week in Vienna and won by Baron Alphonse Rothschild's Sanserit. As the Baa-on was not present, the Baroness, who is an Englishwoman, and has done many good turns for her luckless country- men in these days, went and led in the winner. The crowd rose to this and cheered "Hooh, En$land" -only a joke of course, and cominig from the sport- ing and blood section of the public, which has never been really hostile to us. But stiJl-" Mr Davies, who is a nephew of Councillor Idris Davies, Abercrave, was at one time a lecturer at the Univer- sity College, Cardiff, and later a Jec- turer in Romafn History at Aberdeen University. He was travelling in Austria when war broke out and was not allowed to leave the country. The fact that his message was allowed to pass the Austrian censor on an open postcard is significant.

r I SOUTH WALES MINING SCHOOLI

r. SOUTH WALES MINING SCHOOL The South Wales Coalfield Twelfth Annual Summer Mining and Engineering School, organised by the Glamorgan Education Committee, was opened on Monday last at the Tech- nical College, Swtansea. In spite of the war there are 44 young people in attendance, and the school promises to he one of the most successful held. Thirty of the students have received Glamorgan scholarships, six Mon- mouthshire scholarships and eight are fee-paying pupils. The pupils are divided into two groups. One group is taking mining engineering, and the other group technical, mechanical, and electricaJ engineering.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, en-n he t'(JnAHJJ dafi a* V'xVtr;' t!¡¡; SPECIAL THIS WEEK. ALL REMAINING VOILES TO CLEAR AT HALF PRICE. SEE WINDOWS. MUSLINS FOR SEASIDE DRESSES 21d., 3id. and 4fd. JUST TO HAND- 6 Doz. BOYS' MOLESKIN TROURERS ALL SIZES &s.6d. EACH SEE THE SHOW7- OF SMART FELT HATS at 3s. lid. ♦ ♦ ♦ Note the Address:— J.T.OWEN THE SQUARE YSTALYFERA.

YSTALYFERA MOTES I

YSTALYFERA MOTES. I The prize for the soprano solo at the Aberavon eisteddfod on Monday was carried off by Miss Esther N. Joshua, Goclro'rgraig. An interesting letter has been re- ceived from Bombardier Ieuan B. Clee, who is taking part in the "Big Push." During a particularly (heavy "strafe," ,his shirt was torn by shrapnel, his wrist-watch was smashed, his right boot was cut, but, marvellous to re- late, he still -possesses a whole skin. His cousin, Pte. Elwyn Clee, of the Welsh Guards, is in the London General Hospital recovering from shell wounds, while another cousin, Trooper Cledwyn Clee, of Ystradgynlais, has just arrived in France to do his bit against the Hums. There are Ystalyfera boys in every force on the fighting fronts. Lieut. Emlyn Hopkin, B.A., serving with the R.F.A. with the Salonica Expedit.ion- ary Force, writes to say that it is terribly hot there. It is often 100 degrees in the Shade, making fighting and working impossible for the greater part of the day. Our men there are looking forward to cooler weather, when they can make it hotter for the Bulgars and Turks. A cor respondent writes us as fol- lows:- Monday and Tuesday were given up to holiday-making by the tradesmen of Ystalyfera. Some members of t!he Government appealed" to all tradesmen to "carry on," rather than create a holiday atmosphere. Some members of the Chamber of Trade would be in a better position to criticise the colliers for their first decision, if they had imfitat.ed the colliers in re-deciding to "carry on." An excellent programme has been arranged for Saturday next, when a concert will be held at the Central vl! (the Playhouse) for the purpose of establishing a fund for the neliev of the local dependents of soldiers killed in action, also for presenting soldiers re- turning from the front with small gifts. The following well-known ar- tistes will take part: Soprano, Miss M Davies, Brynamman; contralto, Miss Bessie Clee. Ystalyfera; bo, soprano, Master Philip Davies, Godrolrgraig; baritone, Mr W. Thomas Davies; euphonium, Mr Evan Lewis Williams; instrumental quartetee, Mr David Morgan aind Co., Ystalyfera; elocution- ists, Mr Gunstone Jones, and Miss M. Evans, Abercrave; accompanist, Mr D R Williams, Ystalyfera. The chair will be taken by D. R. Williams, f Esq., M. E., Tirbach Colliery, Ystalyfera. It is unfortutnate that the public have not been fully informed concern- ing the promotion of this concert. The avowed object is undoubtedly a most worthy one, while the names of "-1h.e artistes who will take part are a sufficient guarantee of a good pro- gram. The promoters may be, and doubtless are, men of integrity; but now that so much light is being thrown on the scandals of charitable funds through the action of the Government, it would have been desirable to know who are the responsible parties who will manage the funds. The public are entitled to know this, for both artistes and public will give services and money under the most generous impulse of patriotic feeling, and anything savour- ing of hole-and-corner methods should be avoided. The Sunday School children, together with their mothers, of the Tai'rgwaAth Church, Gwauncaegurwen, spent a very enjoyable afternoon last Thurs- day, wihen they were entertained to tea and games by Mrs. Howell Mor- gan at Maesycoed, Ystalyfera. The children did ample justice to the piles of .good things prepared for them, afterwards playing games with a zest only granted to the voune. Races were held on the lawn. the winners of which obtained prizes kindly given by Mrs. Morgan. Before leaving the grounds for the train, Mr Stanton, Tai'rgwaith, pro- posed a hearty vote of thanks to Mrs. Morgan and her helpers, and to the absent Lieut. H. A. Moilgan (who is in India), for a moat delightful afternoon. In a neat little speech Mrs. Moore seconded the proposition which was carried accompanied by cheers for Lieut. &nd Mrs. Morgan. Rev. D. S. WilHiams, brother of Mrs. Morgan. and curate at Tai'Tgwaith. superintended the proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Mor- gan. At the recent examination held in Cardiff. Mr Benjamin James Lvddon, son of Mir G. W. Lyddon, Ystalyfera, succeeded in fully qualifying as a sur- veyor. Mr Lyddon is only 20 years of age, and is engaged at Tarreni Col- liery, Godre'rgraig. Gunner Richard Daniels, of the R.F.A. was Tiome during the week- end on his first leave. Mr Daniels, who is well known as a vocalist, is in great request at entertainments for "Tommies," and at charity concerts at Gosfort, Isle of Wight (his station). Recently he took part in the same programme as the famous Miss Ada Reeve. Gunmer Daniels looked very "tanned," and hopes to take part in giving the Germans a "tanning." Mr Joseph D. Williams of the Old Swan Hotel, was a successful exhibit- or at the Ystradgynlais Agricultural Society's Annual Show. His champion mare took first prize in her class. Mr Abraham Morgan, of the Mill, was also a successful exhibitor. In the turn- out competition he divided the first and second prizes with Mr W Williams Trebanos. Mr Thomas Davies, Tvgwyn Dairy, was successful in taking first prize for best milking cow. Mr John Davies, Ynysgynon Colliery, took first prize for best collier pony, while Col. Goiugh took a first prize and a seoond prize in the cows' competition. Mr D. M. Evans, of the New Swan Hotel, ,was starter at the show. Lovers of the music hall from Ystaly- fera, who happen to be in Swansea this week, will have an opportunity of seeing a "turn" by an Ystalyfera boy ■—Gitto"—the double-voiced vocalist. Gitto (Mr Griff. Williams, of Godre'r- graig), possesses a very fine baritone voice, in addition to a very rich soprano voice, and Valleyites will be well pleased to hear a very novel vocal turn at the Swansea Empire performed by one of their townsmen. Pte. G. Williams, of the 1st Breek- nocks, son of Mr Thomas Williams, MiJJlhorough road. Ystalyfera, is home on leave from a Manchester Convales- cent home after recovering from a severe illness resultant from the great lieat experienced at Aden. He came home on the 23rd July, 1915, from Aden. He expects to be sent back to his unit soon, as he now feels fit and wen. A correspondent writes:— Have you noticed how our local Council are economising this year over the tar-spraying of the roads ? Ap- parently their omcials find the middle of the road, then tar-spraying about, a yard (more or less) each side of it, leaving about half of the whole width of the road um-tarred; the result is that the roads are almost as dusty as ever. Gentlemen of the Council,—it is false economy (viewed from the point of public health) to allow any portion of the public highway to be dusty— therefore a disease germ carrying medium. I Mr J. Walter Jones, B.A., is doing "his bit," by serving behind the counter at a Y.M.C.A hut at SHn. Salisbury Plain If there are any gentlemen, who have time to spare (say a week or a fortnight), they could not do better than serve in one these huts, for the benefit of our boys, and also for the furtherance of truly prac- tical Christianity. The death took place last week of Mr David Moses, Brynalluman road, Bryn- amman, at hte age of 60 years. He was a native of Ystlyfera, but had re- sided at Brynammain for the last 28 years. He was the father of Mr Arthur Moses, A.L.C.M., schoolmaster, Bettws Ammanford, and conductor of the successful Bettws Juvenile Choir. Mrs. Morgan, wife of Mr Isaac Morgan, M.E., and Mrs. T Jones are daughters. He was a prominent member of Siloam Church, Brynamman, and a faithful Sunday School worker. Half-yearly anniversary services will be held at Gurnos Chapel next Sun- day and Monday next, when the Rev. J. Caradog Owen, A.T.S., of Libanus, Ebbw Vale, is expected to preach. Our Gurnos friends expect a large number of visitors anxious to hear this well-known preacher. The ser- vices will be held at 10.30, 2, and 6 on Sunday, and 7 o'clock on Monday. Little Willie Jones, son of Mr and Mrs. William Jones, of Burchell row, passed away after a long illness, patiently borne, on Sundav last. Willie was 11 years of age, and had not left his bed since Easter. Much sympathy is felt for his sorrowing parents. A large number of relatives and friend followed the mortal remains of Mrs. Rees Lewis, of Clee's lane, to Paniteg Churchyard, on Wednesday. Mrs. Lewis had been a faithful mem- ber at Pamtteg Chapel. The Rev. Ben Davies officiated at the funeral. Pte. Edward Puntan, of the South Wales Borderers, is home on sick leave. He was wounded in the shoulder and arm by shrapnel Some- where in France. He was brought home to Northumberland War Hos- pital, and was afterwards sent to Airdwick Convalescent Home. He is on 10 days' leave before rejoining his regiment. Pte. David John Thomas. Pwllbach, of the Welsh Pioneers, is home for 48 hours,-last leave-before prooeed- ing to an unknown destination. All he knows is that he will be "sailing." He leaves with the best wishes of i ? numerous friends. I Seaman Jenkins, of Gilfach -T r- Haidd Farm, is home on leave from Devonport. He looks very fit. The Balance Sheet of Accounts of the Fete held recently on "Gurnos L Fawr" will soon be published. It is to be hoped that other committees in charge of works of cliarity, will emulate Mrs. Gough in issuing a statement of account to the public, which so ungrudgingly supports all these works for good. Owing to lack of work the local Tribunal is taking a short holiday. When is the Midland Railway Co. going to learn the slightest little thing about dealing with passengers? The way in which passengers on Mon- day evening were released from the platform was a positive scandal. While there are two exits from the platform, onily one was used, and that only to half its possibilties. This exit has two doors, but one was bolted up and down. A large crowd on the platform had to suffer a long wait, packed like sardines, while some of the rougher element barged their way through. The mortal remains of Mrs. Mor- gans, sister of Councillor David Griffiths, Cwrabwrla (the Swansea Town Councillor), were laid to rest in Zoar Chapel Churchyard, on Wednes- day, at 5 o'clock. Her husband was the eldest son of the late Mr Henry Morgan, Canal terrace. Ystalyfera. There were present at the funeral a large number of relatives and friends. The Rev. W. Joites, Zoar; Rev. D. Lewis, Caersalem; and Rev. -Price, Bethesda, Swansea (late of Beulah Owimtwrch), officiated at the funeral. Gunner Edwyn Price, the R.F.A. is home, spending a fairly long holi- day before returning to "Somewhere" on the fighting fronts. We are pleased to: note that Mr. Frank Bamford, eacetaker of St. David's Church, is progressing favourably, from the effects ot his accident a few days- ago. It will be recalled that at, the school treat in connection with the above chmch, a boiler of water overturned scalding him severely on arms and legs.

Advertising

IMPORTANT NOTICE re INCOME TAX. The attention of our MEMBERS is particularly called to a Form (Ql) just issued by the BOARD OF INLAND REVENUE, through the LOCAL SURVEYORS OF INCOME TAX, which requires CO OPERATORS to declare their- "Income from any Dividends and Interest you receive, including Share Interest or Deposit Interest from Co-operative Societies." All our goods are sold at current local market prices. These, prices give us a considerably hgher margin than we require to cover the ex- penses of running the business. Therefore, we return the surplus to members in the form of dividend. THIS DIVIDEND DOES NOT FORM PART OF A MEMBER'S INCOME FOR TAX PURPOSES. Extract from letter from the Board of Inland Revenue :— "SOMERSET HOUSE, i"-17th July, 1916. Dividends on purchases made by members of Co-operative Societies are not income assessable to Income Tax, and it is not intended that they should be included in the Statement of Income." THEREFORE BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE YOUR DIVIDEND ON PURCHASES. If any Co-operator has already filled in his Form and included "Dividends on Purchases," he should at once apply to the Local Surveyor for the return of that amount. N.B.-I-n all cases of doubt apply at once to the SECRETARY OF YOUR SOCIETY for advice— AlUwen & Pontardawe Cooperative Society* Alltwen, Pontardawe, Rhos, Ystalyfera & Ystradgynlais.

I VOTES FOR SOLDIERSI

I VOTES FOR SOLDIERS. I BRITISH COLUMBIANS TO VOTE I IN THIS COUNTRY. Residents of British Columbia- are not to be disfranchised because thev are away on war service. An official notice states that male British sub- jects eerving in the naval and military forces of Canada, or in any other of his Majesty's naval or military forces, or who have served in such forces in the present war, and who have ful- filled certain conditions as to living in British Columbia set out in the Military Forces Voting Act, 1916, can vote in ths general election of mem- bers to the Legislative Assembly of I British Columbia.. From IVednesday. Aug. 9, to Wed- nesday, August 16, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (Sunday excepted), polling stations will be open' at the offices of Messrs. Atkinson and Staaner, Solicits ors, at Radnor-chambers, Cheriton, place, Folkestone, an(l Bank-chambers 62 High street Hythe, and further I facilities for voting will be announced later. In addition to th"election of the Ilegislative Assemb!y,-?e electors will be asked to state whether or no they are in favour of the British Columbia Prohibition Act being put into opera- tion, and whether thcly,.w in favour of the extension of the electoral fran- chise to women.

DIED WHILST MILKING

DIED WHILST MILKING. Whilst engaged with her sister in milk- ing the cows, Miss Margaret Thomas (51), Pantgwyn Farm, Llangeler, near Newcastle Emlyn, exclaimed, "Oh, dear." and fell to the ground. On going to her assistance her sister discovered she was dead.

Advertising

I W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be oonsulted daily at the Victoria I Arcade (near the Market), "wanqea.

BRYNAMMAN

BRYNAMMAN On Sunday last special services were held at St. Catherine's Church, Upper Brynamman, the occasion being the re-opening of the edifice aft-er under- going renovation, which necessitated the worshippers meet.ing in the vestry haH. The Bishop of St. David'& officiated in the evening, and delivered a sermon on the war, its effects, teach- ings, le&sons, and a.s a medium which has drawn the best out of the individu- al and the nation in the way of love and self-denial. Referring to the miners givinig up the proposed holidays which they fully deserved, he used it as an illustration to prove that the nation was prepared to sacrifice itself for the Empire. One victor only was possible, and that based on righteous- ness and freedom. People were asking questions as to why God suffered this war to go on for two years. We must not make gods of our experiences, but lift up-our eyes to the real God for an answer. Parents were giving their sottto to fight for freedom yes, and God gave -His only begotten Son to van- quash sin. Why not. keep this spirit, wonderful and general, of self-denial aliw,&after the -ware Thf,; text WM" based on the Scriptural extract, "And He: took compassion on the multi- tudes." There was a large oongrega- tion, and a collection was made to- wards the Church Renovation Fund. BRYNAMMAN "SEAFORTH" DIES Mrs. Margaret Griffiths, Glyn road, Lawer Brynamman, received the fol- lowing mews during the week-end: "It is my painful duty to inform you that a report has this day been received from the War Office notifying the death of Wm. Rufus Griffiths, Seaforth Highlanders, which occurred in the Persian Gulf on July 17 th." The cause of death is defined as "disease." Of the four Brynamman Highlanders this is the second death, while an- other has been wounded. BROTHERS WOUNDED. Mr Samuel Booth, Brynamman road, Lower Brynamman, has been notified that his son Pte. Luther Booth, of tthe Welsh Regt., has been wounded in the shoulder, face and leg, and is being treated at Sandgate Hospital. Also his son-in-law, Pte. T Davies R.W.F. has been wounded in the leg, and lie& at -Hiidderrfield. Both the warriors were engaged as miners at the Gwaum- caegnrwen Pit prior to enlistment, fte Tom Davies is a native of Cwm- l^inman, where his wife resides. They joined the colours some two years ago- The remains of the late Pte. Lewis J- Moses arrived in Brynamman with a late train on Saturday evening. Deceased was seriously wounded while in France, a& already reported, and after a period of treatment was brought over to Southamp- ton, where he died on Friday. He was 29 ')ears of age, and was 16 months in action. On Tuesday a very laJrge con- coarse of friends and sympathisers gathered to pay their last tribute of re- spect to one who had died for his coun- try.

Advertising

Simply boil the G l 0 the s for ^^Jpi thirty min- utea, no rub, no scrub, no soak. S j|/ The SIMPLE SIMON way. Ask your grocer; he knows. Costs a groat; worth £ s. 2 ■