Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

0000333MMM 999993993999990990939999999999999993999999■ I SKiFfiTHS & SONS II Q) e § Manufacturing1 clothiers, ffilf |5;i& i § • 8 -aim*. e ? TRADE ?ff? ??? ■ ^mLl Wil g TRADE :,Iff SO.i MARK -} f'. i:l ::<1 § 3 U/' VJ have never in any pre- 8 Z< vious EXCELLNaE IN CLOTBIN.j e § j public such a grand selection | ||f j fJ S stylishly cut and of good iff || [ Q r' f ,fV .

The Little Beggar

The Little Beggar, By A. L. Provost. A boy's part in a miniature ckraAia of the Soudan of to-day. A story with "atmosphere" as well as action. (Continued.) A I The desrt is awesome by day, and ot a terrible immensity by night. The huge silence of it took Mahmoud by the throat as he melted into its shadows, but he pushed ahead mightily. All night he toiled forward, until the oast was a miracle and the desert turned to rose and gold. Along the edge of the sky something moving came into view. Mahmoud dropped flat in a hollow, and squirmed for- ward for a better view. It was a I horseman-very many horsemen. They were a long distance away, but Mah- unoud went flatter. The horsemen wheeled and vanished. Mahmoud took up his journey again warily. The Sun rose higher, and beat down in a shriveling glare from a. brazen sky. Fine sand sifted on hair and skin and clothing, until he was powdered a. uniform gray. His eyes smarted and his tongue was dry. He paused for a moment and took a prec- ious swallow from his water bottle, heroically refrained from more, and Jl,t.um bled ahead. Somewhere about here, if he headed aright, there would be an ancienit tomib iunder which one might hide for a brief space and rest. Mahmoud mounted a aarad hummock and looked anxiously about him, but there was only the mono- tonous swell and dip of the eternal desert. He had missed his way, and he t-urned on his tracks with terror tugging at his heart. Had he not promised to save Payne Pasha and his men ? Half an hour later he came upon it, a strange fragment of massive stone up- thrust through the encroaching sand, and craftily hidden behind it, a hole where 4me could craw 1 into cool darkness. Ma- nxmd put his head in, and jumped ner- vously as a scared lizard scuttled past him. He did not like tombs, although he- knew that this was empty. A camel -driver he had once known had told him "that, long agc,-at least two years—a saint had been buried here at one time, but infidels had come and violated the tomb for gold, and would themselves be ac- cursed. It was quite true—the camel driver's uncle had seen it. Mahmoud wriggled uneasily. The camel driver had beaten him at times, but he had mad* his pilgrimage to Mecca, as his green turban plainly showed, and without doubt was a very w ise and holy man. For some reason Mahmoud, who was on his way to deliver a mahdi into the infidel's hands, did not crawl into the cool darkness and rest. Questions of right and wrong may be very abstruse, even for a brown scrap with fingers that stick to other people's cigarettes. A few hours later a slim reed of a boy, desert bitten, dusted gray, and wrung with fatigue, gave his message In husky whispers as the operator at the hut of a station worked over him to get the words out. Then the instrument of magic on the table clicked smartly, paused, and clicked again, and the opera- tor laughed shortly to himself, which was his way Of eypresoing excitement. For the god of slim chances, by the agency of a loose rail, wrongfully set in its be- ginnings by an Arab' workman who scorned the infidel's worship for the thirty-second part of an inch, had halted none other than the Fortv-ninth and the Sudanese on their belated homeward way, and already orders were going forth to bring them back as rapidly as troop trains could come. Once again Mahmoud saw the khaki river stream out over the sands, but this time great persons, even the fat Colonel Pasha and that other who led the Suda- nese, crowded about him with short, sharp questions, and Major Curtis Pasha, who had once suggested the end of a belt for his education, personally super- intended his transportation. I "There's no use in leav im' the little beggar behind," he urged apologetically, "he'll only trail after us until he finds Payne." Major Curtis Pasha frowned as he spoke. He was wondering—they all were wondering—just what the tale would be when they did find Payne. Time had been lost, and what is wreaked on the infidel traveller invader is done for the glory of Allah. The march through the desert began again, this time under the stars. Mah- moud, far in the rear, shut his eyes and saw a huddled city of a white palace and many mud huts, and Payne Pasha hold- ing back from it the flood of a holy war. The men about him had little to say, and they did not say that prettily. They were of Payne's own regiment, and they pushed ahead with haste and some grim- ress In the end, with a new day paint- ing the world gloriously, and that mov- ing cloud of hodmen showing on the edge where sky and desert meet, they sent him still farther back, he rebelling fiercely. The khaki ri ver had become a rhyth- mically heaving lake. Then it broke, mathematically precise, i,nto three smal- ler lakes, and all the time the parti- coloured cloud was advancing. Ahead and slightly to the left lay the mis- named city where Pavne and his little force were penned, alive or dead, and in front the cloud of horsemen came on with screams and shouts and gallantly flying horses, until the frantic mass met the solid one and jarred, under the im- pact. Again and again the cloud drew off, broke into groups, circled here and there, and came dashing on again, hurl- ing itself with flashes of dark skin and white bumoose against the khaki lake that had become one again, and by scores and fifths and hundreds the lake closed over them. The Forty-ninth had a score to wipe out. Once more the mahdi's followers drew off, badly shattered, and a khaki wave rolled after them, submerging line after line, so far as lines were there at all, until there was but a disordered flight spreading out into that far distance where the desert melts into the sky. These things were not done quickly. For three hot hours the turmoil lasted, while the brown scrap called Mahmoud slipped away from the remote safety ot the 'luggage, and by dodging here and there behind sand hummocks and into sheltering hollows edged his way along the outer fringe toward the mud-walled city where he had left Payne Pasha. Circling well to the left, he came in time to a point where the whole field lay magnificently before him, the whirl- ing cloud under the green banner on his left. The din and thp shouts and the clatter of rifle fire were in his ears, the jerking rattle of it on his left, the steadier roar on his right. His eyes dilated with excitement, and he crawled to the top of a, sand hillock, and watched the hosts of the mahdi come on. They crume gallantly, shrillilig the holy name of Allah, so close that he caught the hyp-notic flash of their eyes and the whir of their onslaught as they thudded by. It left him with pumping heart and whirling brain. How they fought, like seven thousand devils, throwing them- selves howling on death, with that methodical khaki tide sweeping lemorse- lessly over them. He felt dimly, with- out in the least understanding it, the overwhelming odds between the method and the madness, and he shivered in the glare of the sun. The whirl of their fren- zy was dragging at his feet. Something went very tight in Mahr OToud's throat. They were his people, and he had betrayed them to this. The scorn of his race would be upon him from this day. His Blame would be accursed, and the children of the Faithful would spit upon him. As the scattered horde swervtd and reformed and camo/in again, he struggled to his feet and ran forward, shrilling their battle cry. It was Curtis Pasha., an hour later, who personally carried him to the de- molished courtyard, where Payne Pasha stood, hollow-eyed and grim, with a great bandage around his head. There were unpleasant sights in plenty, by the way, blown men flung deadly quiet ag-aiiist walls, khaki men limping painfully or lying very still, and a few feet away from Payne Pasha, a twisted heap of rags that had caused the bandage. It was the ithrioe-holy beggar who had prayed at the door of the mosque, a.nd his outtlung claw of a hand still clutched i at an old rifle. A rug was dragged forth hastily, and Curtis Pasha- laid Mahmoud down. •'Doiiei fc; poor little beggar," he said jerkily. "Caught between the two fires, (Vod knows how, but he was runnin' right into it Mahmoud opened heavy eyes. I I would see Payne Pasha," he said, and looked up to see the beloved one leaning over him, with the stained band- age on his head and a queer twist to his lips. "What was the trouble, Mahmoud ?" It was an old formula between them. Mahmoud's lids dropped again, and he stirred uneasily. "I betrayed m *v people," he said heav- ily. "It is not well that I should live." Yea,r,s of brotherhood with the desert had taught Payne Pasha some of its mysteries, and a little of its wisdom. He leaned over the slim brown thing and spoke as man to man. "It is something to have saved a friend, Mahmoud." A small paw crept into Payne's big one. Mahmoud looked up again, vague- ly com fronted. "Excellency ? my friend," he said dimly. "Excellency knows that my life Is his." The strong fingers tightened over the slun ones. Curtis Pasha went away hastily, and left them alone. The End.

PRESERVE YOUR FRUITI

PRESERVE YOUR FRUIT. I DIRECTIONS FOR JAM-MAKING, I BOTTLING AND DRYING. In view of the appeals that are being made to economise in food sup- pli,es obtained from abroad, every- thing possible should be done, the Board of Agriculture say, to conserve the supplies grown at home. One of the most .important methods is the i> reservation of ruit, and small growers and householders are urged to take the greatest pains to ensure that the whole of their produce is made use of. The other day we drew attention in these columns to an experiment for saving sugar in jam-making by adding salt. The Board of Agriculture are recommending the use of corn syrup, which contains the sugar known as glucose. Good results, they say. may be obtained by using one part of syrup to two of sugar. To preserve fruit without the use of sugar, glucose, or any other added preservati ve, the best method is to sterilise it in bottles. Plums, in- cluding damsons, are mentioned amongst the best fruits for bottling. Another method of preserving plums is known as prune-making. By this process the sugar in the plums is used in preserving the fruit, and there is less risk of subsequent decay if the fruit gets damp. Full information about this and other methods of pre- servation is given in a pamphlet which is being issued entitled "Fruit-pre- serving for small market growers and housewives," which may be obtained free of charge and post-free on ap- plication to the Secretary of the Board of A griculture, Whitehall place, S.W.

Advertising

BRADFORD and MANCHESTER WAREHOUSE COMPANY. 12 GOWER STREET SWANSEA (Opposite Mount Pleasant Chapel) The Bargain Warehouse of South Wales. GOOD SELECTION OF SERGES FROM ls.9d. to 7s.9d. per yd. TAILORS AND DRESSMAKERS, LININGS AND TRIMMINGS A SPECIALITY AT WHOLESALE PRICES. BOYS' SUITS OR ANYTHING FOR HARD WEAR 64in. WIDE, 2a.9d. per yard. ORDERS BY POST RECEIVE SPECIAL AND PROMPT. PIANOFORTE AND ORGÅ" TUNING. REPAIRS of EVERY DESCRIPTION First Class Work, Moderate Charges PIANOS TUNED FROM 8s.6d. JAMES TARR, Compton House, Ystalyfera JOHNSTON FOR NEW VEGETABLE AND FLOWER SEEDS AND EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN. Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. 27 OXFORD ST. SWANSEA. TELEPHONE: 567 CENTRAL.

No title

Nottingham war orphans, of whom there aire over 500 to date are each to be given a- war savings account at the local post office.

The Drummers I

The Drummers. I By Fred Wright. I "Them drummers have hooked it," said William, with a sigh, and looked at me. I was sitting on the fence watching the man industriously excavating the soil near the hedge with a trowel. He pulled out a handful of matted rabbit fur from the hole he had made. "Seem strange," he contilnued. "I don't often make mistakes like that. Them drummers was older than I thought." I was puzzled. "What drummers are you referring to ?" I inquired. "1 haven't noticed a band in the neighbourhood." Don't you be funny," he retorted. "Drummers is young rabbits, and young rabbits means rabbit pie. see?" "Yes," I assented, "I see." "Well, they've hooked it, and now there's no rabbit pie, and Bob was dead nuts on rabbit pie. He looked up, and brushed his soiled knees with his hand. "Bob's in London somewhere," he said sadly, "in hospital. I had a postcard from somebody saying he had been wounded." I'm very sorry," I said sympatheti- cally. "The missus was that glad to hear he was back again away from the fighting, that she cried, 'Fancy Bob being back home again,' she said. RABBBIT PIE. I "Then I told her about this nest f drummers, and how Bob liked rabbit pie and she was delighted to thing we could send him a pit to-morrow, and now they've hooked it.' "Wouldn't a grown rabbit do ?" I asked. "No, there ain't the jelly in the cold pie of the old 'un like there is in drum- mers. "There ought to be more young ones round about," I suggested, "the place is a network of burrows. Aye, maybe you're right," he replied. fetch the dog. Will 'ee wait a bit?" I nodded, and watched him as he climbed the fence and strode heavfly down the road. A rustling in the hedge attracted my attention, and I quietly quitted my seat and peered through the undergrowth. In the shaded light I could see several dis- tinct movements., and the little white scuta convihced me that they were young rabbits. Very quietly I watched as they dart- ed hither and thither amongst the dry leaves of the ditch, until, without appar- ent reason, they suddenly disappeared. But where? It was surely behind those brambles. For some minutes I waited patiently without result, and then decided to re- connoitre. Creeping stealthily along the the ditch, I inspected the position, and was rewarded by the si.ght of a. suspicious rabbit sniffing the air at the entrance to a. hole. THE NEST I I was in doubt as to what I sluould do next, so I stretched myself on the baaik and watched. Overhead was a canopy of bramble, and at my feet a thick carpet of brown leaves. A field mouse played hide and seek near my boot with a solemn-look- ing tJoad for an audience. "He's hooked it, too," gumtmibled a voice so close that I was startled, and jumped up, becoming entangled in the brambles as I did go. "Oh, there you are," said William, as I detached the clinging bushes from my clothes. "Well. I can't find the dog, so it's no go." "Comie here," I whispered, ''there's a nest of young rabbits." He somn-lbled- down besiidle me and I indicated the place where the young rab- bits had disappeared. You should 'ave stuffed up the 'ole,' he said. He picked up a big stone, and wrapping a discoloured handkerchief round it, he thrust it into the opening. "Now," he said, "it's simple. The 'ole goes that way. and the nefit is never far underground. He pulled the trowel from his pocket and began removing the satndy soil from the surface. "Here they be," he said, gleeifully. "Put 'em in your hat as I give 'em to 'ee." NOT WANTED. He pushed his hand into the loose soil and pulled out a struggling little rabbit. "Mind he don't run," he said. I put it into the soft felt hat and rolled it up. "Be careful," he warned me. as ho handed me .mother, they be pretty lively." Five little rabbits were safely trans- ferred from the ihole to the hat. "There's another one, but I oan't reach em," he said. "Anyway, five's enough foi Bob's pie. Come along." He kicked the soil together which he had disturbed and looked around. "Why there's the M'iissrus a-comin' he said. "I 'ope she's brought a big basket." I got up from my knees, holding the hat very tightly in mv right hand, but the slippery grass of the bank proved a bad foothold. I slipped, and the hat and the rabbits rolled into the ditch. Quick as thought I fell on the hat. but the rabbits were quicker, and scuttled in all directions. William had marched off to meet his wife, so I picked up my hat and meekly foUowed. They stood whisperin for a moment, and tdien \\iLliam turned to me with blur- ry eyes. In his right hand a crumpled te egram Wlag being twisted nervously. "Bob won't want that rabbit-pie," he said 1ft a broken voice. "Y ou can let them drummers go.From the London Star" db.-

No title

No fewer than 15,00 children took part in the annual demonstration held at, Treorcky on Monday in connection with the Sunday school of the various denominations. These children, after parading the main streets of the town, partook of tea at their various chapels. 9UUS9aR9BfP

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, I can be consulted daily at tb« Victoria Arcade fceer the Market), S rarsaa, Pinhole's gtk Extension SALE -0 PREVIOUS TO EXTENSIVE AL- TERATIONS to meet the demand of cur COSTUME AND MANTLE DE- PARTMENT, to effect Speedy Clear P.r.ce, during the next 14 days we offer the fol1(ming;- 300 YOUTHS' and Men's Plain Grey Flannel Trousers; t/0-day's value. 8s lid. SALE PRICE, 6s. lid. About 50 Striped Flannel Trousers, TO CLEAR 3s lid. EACH 50 YOUTHS' Tweed Long Trouser Suits to-day's value, 25s. 6d. r SALE PRICE, 16s. lid; 40 Boys' School Norfolks; to-day's value 8s. lid. SALE PRICE, 6s. lid. 50 Boys' Three Gar- ment Suits; to-dav's vaiue, 10s. lid.; SALE- PRICE, as." lid. 80 RAINCOATS, Fawn and Tan worn by ladies or gents; to-day's value, 30s; SALE PRICE 20s.; 25 finer quaJi. ty, to-day's value 42s. SALE PRICE, 31s. 6d. 60 YOUTHS' and Boys' Waterproofs. for school; to-day's value, 18s. lid. SALE PRICE 108. lid. Get the boy protected from col(L-cheaoer than doc- tor's bills. IINDERWEAR.—250 Pants and Vests to-day's value. Is. llld. SALE PRICE, Is. 4id. 300 Summer Socks; to-day's value. Is 6d. SALE PRICE. Is. 3d. 144 pair TO CLEAR AT 6id.— Penhale's, 232 High-st, Swansea Orders by post promptly attended to.

PRISON CAMP LIFE IN BRITAIN

PRISON CAMP LIFE IN BRITAIN. GERMAN PARENT S THANKS FOR KIND TREATMENT. A young German was recently re- leased from the Isle of Man camp at Knockaloe, on the advice of the medic- al authorities, who feared that his de- tention might have a permanent ill- effect on his health. He has now reached his parents, and the camp commandant has received a letter thanking him for his kind treatment of the prisoner. "I have not failed to inform our authorities" says the writer, "of the treatment acw?ded to your prisionem at I?oup?as. wih a Vifw of makin your camp exemplary to all." The letter is dated from Berlin, June 25r 1916, and records how- "It is just a fortnight to-day that we had the extreme .10" of meeting our illl son in Flushing. Thanks to the good protection of Mr who accompanied him, and who. as we learned later on, you had so kndly in- structed to take special further hap- pening to him on the lontg journey, he arrived in perfect safety at Flushing; here we ourselves had the pleasure of taking further charge of him. "From our .son's report, as well a& from letters received from prisoners interned at Douglas. I was extremely pleased to infer that a most kind and considerate treatment is accorded all prisoners under your charge. I ani most desirous, therefore, of letting you know how highly we, over here appreciate your kind sympathy with the feelings of the interiled prisoners.

I A NAME FOR A CHAIRMAN

A NAME FOR A CHAIRMAN. The Urban District Councils' As- sociation has (through its secretary)- been discussing with the Local Govern- ment Board the question of a suitable title for the Chairman of an U rban District Council. The Chairman of a municipal corporation is described in one word as Mayor, and a similarly convenient and dignified title is want- ed for the chairman of an Urban Dis- trict Council. More than that the Rural District Council needs to be catered for too, and now that the question is taken up the Rural District- Councils' Association has gone so far as to appoint a su b-committee of six. to explore the dictionaries for an ac- ceptable title. The submission that such a title would add. dignity to the office is not to be despised, and on the grounds of convenience alone a single-word synonym for a Chairman of the Urban District Council would be something to be thankful for. Some reader of this paragraph may be able to contribute a (serious) suggestion. A good beginning would be to give the Chairman of a County Council what is undoubtedly his due, the style of shire-reeve, or sheriff.

No title

About £ 52,300 was taken on the L.C.C. trams last week—a record Mr Duke, the new Chief Secretary for Ireland, was re-elected without op- position for Exeter. Sheffield police are to do nine hours' duty instead of eight a day. The- extra, time will be paid for. v iii Printed and Published by "Llais Llafur" Co., Ltd., Ystalyfera, in the County of Glamorgan, Aug. 12, 1916