Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
The Rising Revolt

The Rising Revolt. TRADE UNION ALARM. There is a growing dissatisfaction on the pa.rt of the public at the coiitmucd increase in the price of commodities of all dk-scaiptiol)8. The Cabinet and the majority in the House of Commons are (declares the Lon- don "Evening- News") completely out of touch with public feeling on this matter The public outside has certainly become tired of reading '-reassuring" official state- ments generally based on information supplied from interested quarters. THE TRADE UNION CONGRESS. The chief resolutions to be moved M the Trades Union Congress express "alarm" and "astonishment at the in- difference of the Government, and call for State control of all the meajis of transport. But while the Dock Labourers, who table one motion, ask for steps to 'Secure a revision of prices," the boilermakers de- mand the fixiri" of a maximum. Another motion calls for Government control of wheat and coal. The railway men's contention is that the 58. bonus does not enable them to keep pace with the rise in food, but they are better off in some respects than the transport workers, who only receive a bonus of 2s. "At the time this was granted," said atJ. official of the federation, "it might have been enough to cover the increase in the cost of necessities, but it is certainly not enough now. '-The resolution instructing the execu- tive do press forward with a campaign for Government action was passed un- animously at a general meeting repre- senting thirty Unions. MR. JOHN HODGE'S VIEWS. Mr. John Hodge, M.P., said the cost of freight was greater than the cost of material. "It is up to the Govermimeivt so to control shipping that freights may be reduced," he said. "There is, in consequence of the rise. in iiut. *J.;ofp d ,a)_.cl i) ■' roiw>t, duwatjid --ior highar wages. In my constituency I have had resolutions from 100 Trade Union branches demanding that the Government should take immediate steps to prevent increased food prices. Mr. Asquith appealed to workmen at the Trade Union Conference at Central Hall not to ask for any higher wages, and if he did tha,t he ought to see that the cost of living does not go up. "There is a very uneasy feeling on this question in Manchester and other centres of ind ustry, and unless something is done there wial be a general revolt of the workers." WILL THORNE WANTS ACTION. I Mr. W. Thorne, M.P., who has con- stantly in the House of Commons, called attention of the Government to the rising cost of food, said :The Government ought to commandeer all British ship- ping. Every extra 10s. on the freight for wheat from the Argentine means an ad- dition of one halfpenny to the cost of the 41b. loaf. "The Government should use the Blhips for bringing wheat from South America, Canada, and Australia. They have se- cured control of the railways, but they seem afraid to control the shipping. "There will undoubtedly be a univer- 8a demand for higher wages unless food ??ea ?re brought dQ-wyL Wo?ke?'s find that*k, M? paying 8s. in the £ mwe frvr+L "• ^ving, and they w?l want their wau "?reMed to that extent. "?Nleat a" wheat should be the first mn-odi,ti., ? be brought here in Gov- ??T?? c

THE COALOWXERS HALFCROWN I

THE COALOWXERS- HALF- CROWN. I The following is from the Coal- 

Message to the Workers of Great Britain

Message to the Workers of Great Britain. Lieutenant Weill and Private Cab- annes, who have been addressing meet- ings in this country as representatives of the French Socialist and Labour parties, have returned to London after an extended provincial tour. They have addressed some scores of meetings, and everywhere weie re- ceived with enthusiasm. At Cardiff they were entertained at dinner by the Executive of the South Wales Miners' Federation, and their visit to Wales has been soon much appreciated that Private Gabannes is returning there to address further meetings. Both our visitors have explained how the French Socialists of all shades had been most energetic in supporting the war. Without that effective as- sistnoe. they say, the German attack upon France could not have been met as it has been. Lieutenant Weill and Private Cab- annes have come back impressed and pleased with the immense prepara- tions which this country is making to supply the Allied armies with munitions of war. And tli, cannot understand how any workman can think of anything else but the work of finally beating the German military oase. Every man in France, they say, is bound—and is pleased-to serve the State in some capacity, and they think of nothing but the achievement of victory. They have endeavoured to impress upon the workmen of Great Britain the necessity of their adopt- ing the same attitude, if freedom and civilisation, and all the ideals for which Labour and Socialism stand, are to be saved. Lieut. Weill was the Social Demo- cratic member for Metz at the out- break of the war. Private Cabannes is the travelling secretary of the French Socialist party. Mr Adolphe StwrfcTi J»as acted as interpreter at the meetings. f ri, 'erpr4,er at fh,6

Strange Story Revealed at Tribunal

Strange Story Revealed at Tribunal. WOMAN DRESSED AS A MAN BUT I FOUND OUT BY MEDICAL BOARD. A sensation was caused at the North on Trib-unal when it was disclosed that a "foreman," for whom an employer appealed on the ground of indispensahili- ty. w as in reality a woman. The employer had no idea of the real sex of his em- ployee until the Chairman, holding up a document, asked him if he was aware that his "foreman" was a woman. The employer smiled incredulously, and point. ed out that the "irn,a.n" was married and had two children. The Chairman then produced a. certi- ifcaite from the Mill Hill Medical Board placing the sex of the "foreman" beyond dispute. It appeared that the woman had been masquerading as a man and had been living with another woman ostensibly as her husband. She had gone before the Medical Board hi the belief that the examination would only be a cMisery one. It was there discovered, however, that she was a woman. It is understood that the woman had disguised herseiff as a man in order to hide from her husband. On receiving the yellow form she is said to have ex- claimed "Here is a chance of getting where my husband won't find me." The employer told the Tribunal that she had been a splendid worker.

EMPLOYMENT OF SOLDIERI WORKMEN

EMPLOYMENT OF SOLDIER I WORKMEN. The British Steel Smelters have sent a letter to the Prime Minister and the Ministry of Munitions strongly protesting against the insti- tution of industrial conscription by the military authorities placing sold- iers at the disposal of a contractor executing work for a, steel company and calling upon the Prime Minister tQ carry out the arrangement made Unions at the time of tile Military Service Act that no in- dustrial conscription was intended or would be permitted. But in regard to the Llanelly Joase the steel smelters concede 'their local branches took no action in the matter because the soldiers employed on civilian work were not being used on steel work." And everybody agrees that both Mr. Lloyd George at the IVar Office, and Dr. Addison, who is in charge of the Labour Department. at the Ministry of Munitions, are as anxious as anybody that there shall be no industrial con- scription nor anything bearing the slightest resemblance to it.

COMPREHENSIVE PROHIBITION I

COMPREHENSIVE PROHIBITION, Intimation just received prohibits the export of all tinplate, blackplate, and terne plates to all countries. Hitlherto the embargo had applied to the neutral countries of Europe only, shipment being allowed under special circumstances by licences. The pre- sent prohibition extends to all foreign countries. This prohibition, coupled with the reduced supply of pig iron for steel- works manufacturing tinbars, will doubtless mean throwing idle an ad- ditional number of tinplate mills.

DEAR COAL PROTESTI

DEAR COAL PROTEST Mr Will Thorne asked the President of the Board of Trade on Mondav in the House of Commons how many re- solutions he had received from various organisations protesting against the Board of Trade giving power to the South Wales colliery owners to in- crease their price of coal from 4s. to 6s. 6d. over and above the pre-war prices. Mr Harcourt said he had received various resolutions on the subject. He could not follow the fact that a rise of 2e.6d. had produced an increase of 4s. to the consumer. Mr Thorne asked if the Government intended to keep these prices fixed or to reduce them. They could not ex- pect to get the support of the Labour party if they intended to exploit the workers.

A PONY IN COURTI

A PONY IN COURT. The tisual spectacle of magistrates inspecting a pony in the corridor of the court was witnessed at the Shire Hall, Haverfordwest, on Saturday. The bench decided to see the pony, which was the subject, of a crudty charge. They inspected it in the vestibule of the court, and Woolcox, one of the defendants, also trotted i,. tip and down, High street in pouring rain for their benefit. The Bench held that, the pony was lame, and imposed fines of 5s. each.

ESCAPED FRO GERMAN PRISON

ESCAPED FRO. GERMAN PRISON. Corporal J. Costin, of Blackwood, who went out to France with the Monmoutlishire Regiment twelve months last February, was taken prisoner at the battle of Hill 60. His wife has received a telegram from him, stating that he escaped from the German prison and is now in Scotland, and will be home as soon as he possibly can. Corporal Costin attempted some time ago to make his escape, but was caught, and, as a consequence, was j sentenced to imprisonment.

MEN TAKEN FROM MINES I TO FIGHT

MEN TAKEN FROM MINES I TO FIGHT. From a trustworthy source I learn (writes the Rotterdam correspondent of the "Daily Telegraph") of the two new measures suggesting the extent to which Germany is drawing. upon her man-power in order to endeavour to meet the strain imposed by the pre- sent and prospective struggle on all fronts. The first is the calling-Tip of the miners, surfaceworkers, and others connected with the West-phalian col- liery industry. Within certain ages these men had until recently been exempted from military service, so that they might continue in work of vital importance. Now, however, a large proportion, to the number of about 150,000, have been called up, and are already in the depots. Their places have been filled by prisoners of war, disabled soldiers, and women. The other measure, though not of a formal character, is the putting of pressure on youths of 18 to volunteer. These boys belong to the 1918 class which has not vet been embodied Whilst boasting of the latter fact the Government is urging employers and others to induce" the vouths to volunteer at once.

UNSKILLED N 4 NS WAGEI

¡ UNSKILLED N 4 N'S WAGE. I When a rnax in a rolling mill was charged before the Newcastle Munit- ions Tribunal with being absent with- out leave it transpired that he could earn; £ 5 weekly. The Chairman: You mean to say this man was making R5 at unskilled work ? The representative of the firm re- plied, "Yes; I could givo you a job at hktdT^ rate in the momins if you

Interview with Neutral Socialist Leader

Interview with Neutral Socialist Leader. M. Branting's Disclosure of liague Decision. M. Branting, the Swedish Socialist leader, has passed through London on his way back to Stockholm from the conference of neutral Socialists at the Hague, and was interviewed by a "Dailv Chronicle" representative. In the Socialist world M. Branting holds at present a position of eminence that is rivalled oJÙY by M. Vandervelde, the Belgian leader In 1896 he was the only Socialist in the Swedish Par- liament; to-day he commands a solid Socialist phalanx that is the strongest party in the State. Sober students of Swedish politics prophesy the Premier- ship for him at no very distant date. But M. Branting stands above all for neutral Socialism, of which he is the most prominent spokesmen. The Socialists of Sweden and the other neutral countries have never lost touch with their fellow-Socialists in the belligerent countries; they are not inflamed with national animosities and prejudices, though they may have their sympathies—M. Branting, for example, does not disguise his special feeling for the Western democracies—and they consequently constitute a body of opinion that is singularly responsible, impartial and unjust. In so far, then as the neutral conference at The Hague made pro- nouncements on the issues of the war, its decisions must be regarded as pos- sessing an exceptional authority, ap- proaching and perhaps anticipating the verdict. of history. As M. Brant- ing showed, certain of its pronounce- ments were extremely significant. TO AVOID FUTURE WARS. tf "The exiliciertoe, he said, ''passed two resolution,&one political and the other economic. The latter was a re- statement of the case for international Free Trade, both on its merits and also because it is a powerful means of avoiding future wars. But the politic- al resolution was the more important, and it may perhaps be said to mark a turning-point. "It is a long resolution, covering t-he w hole political field from the Socialist point of view, and it had necessarily to be worded carefully. It is a delicate matter for neutral Social- ist, linked up, as they are, with their fellow-Socialists in all the belligerent countries, and responsible in an ex- ceptional degree for the maintenance of the international movement, to pronounce verdicts on the issues of the hour; still more so to pronounce verdicts that would receive the unani- mous aseent of the conference- Yet, in fact, verdicts of the highest im- poranee were pronounced and did re- ceive a unanimous vote." GERMANY THE AGGRESSOR. I "In the first place Germany was definitely put into the position of the aggressor. 'Notwithstanding the pre- sent war-map,' runs one clause, the attack on the countries which were forced to take up arms in defence ap- pears to be a failure.' Here we have not merely a repudiation of German military claims, as put forward by the Chancellor; we have an express state- ment that an attack has been made which had to be resisted. It is im- possible to overrate the significance of this verdict. "Other points in the resolution are, first, a demand 'for the restitution of Belgium aa an independent State. This, it is declared, must be a neces- sary preliminary to any peace negotiat- ions- "What do you gather German in- tentions to be in regard to Belgium?" "Germany means to retain, if she can at least commercial supremacy. Commercially Belgium is to become a sort of vassal State. "Similarly The Huge Cong ress de- mands the 'restitution of Serbia' and the 'creation of an autonomous Poland.' But still more significant (as coinciding with the expressed aims of the Allies) is the expression of a desire by the Congress "that the Ger- man Social Democratic party will be ready to negotiate with the French party about the question of Aslace- Lorraine.' As you are aware, the Socialist majority in Germany refuse to admit even that such a question exists. They are now asked to recog- nise that the problem of Alsaoe-Lor- raine is (L real one and needs solution. SOCIALISM'S TASK. I "What is ?)h? immediate task of  Socialism?'' M. Branting was asked. I "In every country the Socialists I must endeavour to obtain from their statement of the national aims in the war. That matter will probably come up at the Allied Socialist Conference in September. Mr Asquith and Vis- count Grey have already explained their aims. There is little to com- plain of in this respect in regard to England despite the dissatisfaction that seems to be felt by a section of opin- ion. British statesmen seem to us to have formulated their purpose as dis- tinctly as the situation permits. French statesmen are far from being so satisfactory in the opinion of our French comrades, who constantly con- trast the clear and explicit utterances of Mr Asquith and Lord Grey with those of M. Briand and particularly of President Poincare. The German Chancellor, on the other hand, is vague in the extreme, and the only thing that we can deduce with any certainty from his phrases is the in- tention to establish some sort of com- mercial domination over Belgium. This insistence upon a more definite state- ment of peace terms is the more neces- sary in view of the ignorance in which the German people has been kept." Asked by what means Socialism was to exercise its influence upon the peace negotiations, M. Branting said that according to The Hague resolution the peace conference must, not be confined to the diplomatists and Governments, but all the Parliaments. and therefore the Parliamentary parties, including the Socialists, must. be represented. Undoubtedly there should be an inter- national Socialist conference.

Elementary education in Carmarthenshire

Elementary education in Carmarthenshire. WORST IN THE COUNTRY." I The Carmarthenshire County Associa- tion of the National Union of Teachers have issued a circular to the workers of Carmarthenshire calling attention to what they desribe as the deplorable conditions of elementary education in the county. The circular declares that out of 495 class teachers in the couinty 419 are uncertifi- cated that the school? in CP-rinarthell- 1&6im &Se the worst staffed in -and Wales; that no fewer thari twelve headmasters and headmistresses in the county are uncertificated that. while on their administration of elementary edcu- ca

J6376468 BREWERY PROFITSI

J6376468 BREWERY PROFITS. The annual report of Bass, Ratcliffe, and Gretton states that the profit for the years is £ 376,468. The directors propose propose to declare a further dividend of 10 per cent. on Ordinary Shares, making 12 per cent cent, for the year.

A GERMAN AT LARGE I

A GERMAN AT LARGE. I MR, STANTON'S QUESTION. x Mr Stanton asked the Home Secre- tary if he would explain why a Ger- mas named Bauer was permitted to hold one-third of the capital of a firm supplying munitions, why this Ger- man was permitted to travel down to Wales when he liked and to live near a reservoir which supplied the whole population with water, and if he would take steps to secure the intern- ment of this alien. Mr Herbert Samuel: Without further particulars I cannot identify the case to which the hon. member re- fers. If he will give me the informa- tion on which his question is based I shall be glad to make inquiries. Mr Stanton. May I say that I have already addressed two letters to the hon. member giving him the proper name, yet the name is not right here? Mr H. Samuel I do not. think thev have been received. I will make in- quiries with regard to the man named. Mr Stanton: I wrote vou two letters giving the right name.

No title

When Daniel Jones (4.5). tinworker of Mornston, was charged at Neath wim stealing apples valued at 3d from the Great Western Railway Mr Edward Powell, who represented him. 8a.id it would be a fitting punishment if accused were compelled to eat them. Jones was bound over.

IA YEARS OUTPUT IN FOUR DA YS

I A YEAR'S OUTPUT IN FOUR DA YS. I HOW MUNITIONS MINISTRY I HAS SPEEDED T P Z *? 1: I PRODUCTION" I I ASTOUNDING FIGURES. Our astonishing out-put of -nurutio.M ,A& the subject of -Nir. Montagu s speeci in the House of Commons on the vote for his department. He said that to take percentage# based on our output before the war woulod give a fantastic result. In the case of empty 18-poundoc shells we were turmn« out now 170 times the num ber which were being made before the NNar. and in the case of heavy shells 2,650 times. As regards 18-pounder shell?, the rate of production in June, 1915 was times what it was in the previous yeaa at July 1915 it was 17-1 times. In heavy howitzer shells the production at the date given was 8 times and 27 times respectively. In medium ammuni- tion the figures were 71 times and 34 times respectively. GROWTH OF SHELL-MAKING The greatest increase had been heavy shells. The average weekly* pIn- duction of heavy shells was now 9ct times as great as in 1914. The putp m which in 1914-15 took 12 months to. pro- duce, could now be obtained from home sources, 18-pounder shells in 3 Greeks, field howitzers in 2 weeks, medium:size shells in 11 days, and heavy shells in 4 days. We were now manufacturing eve: y wook about as much ammunition as the whüle 6toek of munitions before the war. As regards guns, we were now turning out in a month nearly twice é14I. mar.y heavy guns as were in existence wheaf the Ministry of Munitions was instituted. The present rate of output would soon be very nearly doubted. < MACHINE GUNS. The output ot macmne-iguns had in- creased since the Ministry of Munitions was founded 1 4times. The total stock existing when the Ministry was formtd oould be replaced in from thiee to fo;4. weeks. I As regards rifles, all that he would say"- was that our overseas armies had been entirely equipped from our own out- put. The output of high explosives waa a-bout 60 times aG high as it was in the beginning of 1915. and the amount' now required was 11,000 or 12.000 tirum the amount required at the beginning of the war. QUALITY I-AIPROVED. 0; Mr. Montagu declared that the quality of afll their productions had constantly mproved; but against such an enemv Germany they could never stand stilL There had to be continual progress. We were supplying our Allies with the consntituente of explosives, large quan- tities of machines, tools, etc., and munition woTkei-E of this country cou Id flatter themselves that they had takea some part iu the glorious victories of Russia, Italy. and France. The provision that was to be made for replacing the field or at home w a source of anxiety. During the presejjt'" j offensive the difficulties had been satis- factorily surmounted, and there every reason to express confidence that v the means would prove adequate for their > great task. Conditions of modern warfare continued L to emphasise the value of lo-ra.ne '< guns, and the demand was still far in- creased range. ADVANTAGES OF UNPREPARED NESS. • Our unpreparedruess for war had had this advantage that all our weapor* 4; were of modern type. f The question of ammunition, itsichar- acter and production had also to be carefully considered. A whole series of ( problems had to be solved. They had been solved and reports received from, the front showed a steady improvement in the quality of our ammunition. It was a great satisfaction to be able to say that week by week the output of amamrnition oovered the expenditure, and if workers and employers continued to play their part as nobly as they were doing, there need be no fear the pre- sent offensive would be brought to a premature conclusion by a shortage cf ammunition. (Hear hear). INCREASE OF FACTORIES. Before the war there were three nation al factori es for the land cel-vi ce. The:e were now 95. Of these 18 wee for fill- J ing gn and trench mortar ammunition, all j of which had been ordered, plannoo., and built i the last twelve months. There were 12 national shell factories which as vet had developed barelv ha'f their total capacity 22 factories con- cerned with the manufacture of ex- plosives, six for cartridge cases, one hr gauges, and one for machine tools

No title

A Rifica woman journeying from Porthcawl gave birth to a child in" the waiting-room of Cardiff Railway Station. Dr. O'Donovan attended her and she and the babe were taken temporarily to the workhon&e.