Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
COMPLETE VICTORY COMING

COMPLETE VICTORY COMING 44 Nippers are Gripping." MR. LLOYD GEORGE'S OPTIMISM. Mr. Lloyd George, the War Secretary, was present during the week-end at a concert at Llanyistumdwy Institute, which he presented to the village where he spent his boyhood. He was accom- panied by Mrs. Lloyd CJeorge and his two daughters Mr. Lloyd George said :—"I am satis- field with the way things are going. I feel that for the first. time for two years the nippers are gripping, and we shall not be long before we begin to hear a crack. When we shall be in a position to extract the kernel—well, that is an- other matter. It depends on policy. "I say at once that, having entered on this quarrel, we shall see that there will not be another war in our day. The people of this coiuitry have made great sacrifices—greater sacrifices than any one contemplated as |x>ssible three years ago. According to the measure of our sacrifice must be the rigour of our demand. '•We must be satisfied that. not only in our day, but in the days of our children, of our children's children., there will be no repitition of this crime against human- ity. That is why we must not merely have a victory as will be a warning to any ruler who now sits, or will ever sit, on a throne, and to any ki!ngs or coun- sellors of kings, that they will be called sternly to account by the conscience of civilised nations for every outrage they perpetrate against international right ajid fair dealing. "That is why we must not merely have victory, but unmistakable victory, tlll- challengeable victory, complete victory- a victory that cannot be explained away by German professors to a credulous people. If it is not such a victory the sacrifice will be in vain, and will have to be renewed on a blacker and bloodier scale. Let us have dome with war now and for ever. Tlie Litiik.. in fx*till 4b pci&sut one a grave one. We are still calling on the country to prolong the sacrifice. r- The cause for which we are fighting Will open up a t ew world to us all and a better one; but we must help to make it better. We saw the spirit of unity in the gymanfa at the Welsh Eisteddfod when men of all denominations came to- gether to sing the old hymns of Wales. Let that unity be oomehing which will last, not only for the period of the war, but during the period w hen the damage done by the war is being repaired, and even beyond that, when Britain will be made such a new land that even its own sons and' daughters will not know it—a land of peace, a land of prosperity, a land of hope, a land to love and die for, a. land of which the poorest that dwell in it will be able to say, This is a glorious laind to live in and to work for."

OLDEST WETSKUAS TN THE WORLD

OLDEST WET,SKUAS TN THE WORLD. Our contemporary tJIe "Drych" claims to have discovered the oldest Welshman in the world. He is said to be 122 years of age, and a native of Berriew, Montgomery- shire, where he was born on January 15, 1784, His name is Thomas Morris and he is now living at Westerville, near the town of Anslev, Ouster Cunty, Nebraska. U.S.A. The old blan was recently visited by three Welshmen, who found him in bed, quite blind and nearly quite deaf. Morris is said to be looking well and stout. He has a keen appetite, and is an inveterate smoker, a pipe to- bacco, and matches being constantly kept close to his bedside. Strong coffee, which he drinks night and day -he is unable to distinguish the one from the other is the favourite beverage of this veteran, who is said to be of a happy turn of mind, and has a partiality for the song, "Never push a man when he's going down the hill." An enthusiastic Welshman, he has, nevertheless, lost his know- ledge of tho Cymric language to a large extent. Students of Thomas' work on alleged centenarians will re- gard this story of a 122-year-old with the greatest suspicion.

FOR AGED PENSIONERS

FOR AGED PENSIONERS. PREMIER PROMISES FURTHER ASSISTANCE. Further assistance is to be given to eM age pensioners, who have been very severely hit by the rise in food prices. P M.. t d 1 The Prime Minister ma d e this an- nouncement in the House of Com- mons in reply to a question by Mr Wing. The Government, he said, were satisfied, after careful considera- tion, that there were cases of hard- ship which must be met, and they were now considering the manner in which assistance could best be giTen.

ITHE TINPLATE TRADE

I THE TINPLATE TRADE IFinding Employment for Men I Affected by the New Order. In the House of Commons, Capt. Charles liathurst asked the Minister of Munitions if he would state how it was proposed to provide fresh employment or the means of maintenance for the large number of tinplate work ere in South Walts, Monmouthshire, and Gloucester- shire, w ho would be out of employment by his decision to limit the output of all British tint late works to tiliplates re- quired for Government purposes only. Dr. Addison said that in view of the large and unsatisfied demand for labour in connection with the manufacture of munitions it was not anticipated that there would be any difficulty in providing for such number of tinplate workers in South Wales, Monmouthshire and Glou- oestershire as would be thrown out of employment by the decision to limit the output of British tinpJate work s to those required for Government purposes. Any man who might become unemployed as a result of this limitation should report himself to the nearest Labour Exchange, where arrangements were made to have full particulars of vacancies in munition works available. Captain flathamt Is this limitation of output likely to continue for the rest of the war ? Dr. Addison I do not know about the rest of the war, but it is likely to con- tinue for some considerable time. Mr. Chancellor asked did that mean tliat tin box manufacturers and those who supplied biscuit boxes and things of that kind would be unable to obtain any ,material. Dr. Addison Oh, no. It is only a limitation of a certain percentage in the production. Captain Bathrust That is not the ini- pression of manufacturers. Will the hOll. gentlenmi say what the percentage is? Dr. Addison I would rather not give any further detailed information at the moment. REDUCED OUTPUT PREDICTED. "Ith the great demand for steel bars for munition purpose tinplate works bid fan- to be utimiately reduced to one-third of their effective output (says a corres- pondent.) Contrary to a ™ — itha? prevail, works ith steel I" -mbitied will n-ot b'e in aliv more wiavoi?ur5- able Position. The steel control, so far as tinplate works are concerned, follows closely upon the Government control of pig-iron: the various works' capacities are known, and by regulating the supply of pig-iron the output is determined, strict accounts have to be furnished by works, and aJI de- liveries and practically no bar are now obtainable without documentary evidence of the requirements being directly for Government purposes. The question has arisen in South Wales as to whether the district is obtaining its fair share of pig-iron compored with Noithern works, and this was one of the matters that concerned the deputation of South Wales steelmakers that waited upon the Ministery of Munitions last week. South WTales makems were anxious to put their position completely before the Government Department. From what we can gather (continues the coirTespondent) the tinplate trade will be as little affected as possible, though at r present it is only working about 65 to 70 per cent. of its full efficient capaci- tV. It wen-is to be generally understood the tinplate workers' ranka will be con- mente i-ed-uced by recruiting require- men-to. Hitherto this industry 'has been in a semi-reserved occupation li, but this arrangement terminates at the end of the month,

INEW LABOT R WEEKLY

NEW LABOT R WEEKLY. 6 have known for some time that a new Labour weekly under the editor ship of Mr Victor'Fisher, and with the support of the British Workers' rsational League, was in preparation, and it is now announced for next Friday. The project in war time is a b?ld one, but it deserves to suooeed. it has a long list of notable supporters or contributors, including Mabon Messrs. Crooks, Hodge, Stephen Walah, 0 Grady, and Stanton, of the Labour Partv. and Mr Wells, Sir L. C. Money, and others a.mong well- known publicists. The title "British Citizen and Empire Worker" will probably be modified in use but it has been chosen deliberately to indicate the linking of patriotic Labour at home and in the Dominions. Sane patriotism and an absence of class prejudice are to be the keynotes of the paper. -————

I LANDORE WORKS SOLD

LANDORE WORKS SOLD. | It is stated at Swansea that the ■negotiations for the transfer of the: controlling interests iB thfo Mannes- mann Tube Company, Landors to a Scotch company have now beea com- pleted.

No title

I All the banana plants at Jamaica have I • boon dertroyod by ifre.

High Cost of Food I

High Cost of Food I I Strong Government Action. i I NEW REGULATIONS. The Board of Trade's Drastic Powers. Wide public interest has been aroused by the statement that the Board of Trade has been empowered by the Government to inquire whether the amount of goods held by traders is in excess of the normal requirements of the trade, and in cases where that authority is of opinion that the with- holding of goods is prejudicial to the national interests to require the owner "to dispose of the goods in such a manner and within such time as may be specified. Mr Frank Dilnot (editor of the de- funct of the "Daily Citizen") explains in "The London Daily News," the scope and object of the new Govern- ment regulations. SCOPE AND OBJECT OF THE NEW REGULATIONS The official announcement made on Saturday that the Board of Trade has been given powers to set set free for the use of the public stocks of goods which are geinb withheld from sale is the first indication of strong executive action by the Government to cheapen food throughout the country. Organ- ised laoour, which has been so strongly fighting the food pirates, will certain- ly welcome the new step. It will be necessary, however, that the Govern- ment action shall be energetically fol- lowed up, and developments wiU be keenly awaited. During the war there has been prac- tically as much food brought into this ntry as in peace time, and there has never been any shortage of the food supply, but in spite of this fact the retail psice of food has increased enormously, in some cases to as much as double what it used to be. This has been due to a combination of causes, but the dominant cause has been that the increased enormously, in some cases to as much as double what it used to be. This has been due to a combination of causes, but the domin- ant cause has been that the increased demand has given the opportunity for exorbitant profits to those who convey food from afar to the market centres here, and to those who act aa middle- men, securing the control of stocks and releasing them or holding them back as best suits the making of big profits. 111 is against this latter group that the stroke of the Govern- ment is directed. I BOARD OF TRADE POWERS. According to the official announce- ment the Board of Trade is now em- powered to find out whether a firm is holding goods in excess of the normal requirements of the business, and may require the owner to dispose of the goods in such a manner and within such a time as may be specified. If this power is courageously handled it means good-bye to at least some of the food combine of this country, amd pro- bably a damaging blow at some of the foreign combines which are affecting the price of food here. it looks as it the prices or wneat and flour may be first affected. We import enormous quantities of both, and the existence of the huge rings in America which manipulate supplies and pricey is common knowledge. To ima.gine that there are not correspond- ing arrangements in this country would be to strain credulity to the breaking point. In london--and no doubt in other centres alao--numbers of butchers' shops have been closed be- cause meat cannot be obtained from the wholesalers at a price which would enable it to be supplied to people who are not well off. Bland denials of a meat ring will be put to the test when Board of Trade officials enter t.he cold storage warehouses and see what stocks are on hand, and a.t. the SlTle time ex- amine the and see now the business has been carried on. There are probably worried brows in Chicago to-day aa well as at the meat centres here at home. Wh,at of wheat? Combinations in wheat are "wrapped in mystery" for ordinary people, but at any rate we shafll not be far out in assuming that there is a sympathetic understanding between combines abroad and dominant sections of the trade in this country. Again bland denials will be put to the test when British warehouses are ell- terni and bookkeeping records o-on into by impartial officials If the work w done thoroughly—and there is ever, reason to believe it will we shall get at facts which will be supremely valuable Dot only for the preeelk bilt I for the future. So far as immediate practical ends are concerned, it is ob- vious that a Government order to the; effect that great stocks of wheat or flour stored in warehouses in Liver- pool, London, Bristol. Glasgow, or elsewhere shall be quickly offered for sal., will bring down the price of bread with a run. The same remark 3-p- plies, of course, to meat. Action with regard to meat and wheat will naturall. produce a sym- pathetic reduction of prices in other foods. But the Government procedure, it may be assumed, will not be confined to these two commodities only. Direct operations may be conducted in other quarters. What of tea? We were given details in the papers a little while ago of the tremendous fortune made by a London firm who had secured stocks of tea in advance. The hooks of that firm, and its resources in the supplv of tea, will provide a fruitful field-of inquiry. That is but an instance. No doubt in the course of a day or two there will be forthcoming some indication of the proposed scope and intensity of the Government action. Bold and clear explanations will have a heartening effect on all the cora- munitv. They will be particularly op- portune so far as the working classes are concerned because in the week after next the annual Trade Union Congress, representing something like three million workers, will he discuss- ing the question of high prices in all its bearings.

MINERS INCOME TAXI

MINERS' INCOME TAX. I PROBABLE REBATE FOR WORK- I tEN TRAVELLING BY TRAIN. ,Mr. McKenna has promissed. to con- der in all its bearings an important propo&al submitted to him by Mr. T. J. Williams, M. P., by which miners and other workmw who have to travel i. t team to their work shall have an ir xwne tax rebate corresponding to the ail.&Alnt expended on railway fares. A stiong case fo: this concession was put before the Chancellor. It was 61Tlphasised i th.,t miners, for instance, were engaged UJ) work of national important, and t^t where developments were taking plrxe no house accomm-odation could be nr»vided near the mine, and the men had to travel day by day fhom adjacent townships, special trains being ,,in by the railway oom/panies for their borefit. Oftentimes the men pay as much as half-a-crown a week in fa.re, a,m] Mr Williams cited a case where 600 met made daily train journeys of con- siderable distance from Glamorgan town «he colliery at which they were em- ployed. Under the new income tax col- lec ing scheme the tax is deducted by th- employers iu such industries. The rr no An I, which it. of such great interest to all parts of South Wales opens iu some wide oonsidexatiolle for the Ti,-asiiry. There are, however, such pre- cedents as the abatement of tax on MW to M P. s to cover expenses, including ti ^veiling. The difficulty is to discnm- iniiJQ between "workers who from choice live in the suburbs of the large towns and those who are obliged by the neces- sities of the case to make these lonog ioumevs to and from work. Mr. Wil- Kauris thinks the case of big bodies of mtnt travelling together to the same col- lierv stand on a different footing and, th.- Chanoellojr is goin to try and work out the problem.

BOARD OF TRADE AND COAL PRICES

BOARD OF TRADE AND COAL PRICES. A deputation from the Labour party co listing of Messrs. Wardle, Barnes, B tM-maji, Duncan, ari-d Walsh, has WI ited on the President ot the Board of Trade and conveyed him the protest of the party in -reference to the in- crease of ^s.6d. per ton which had been allowed on the pithead price of coal in South Wales for home con- sumption. They also suggested that in the case of all future applications full public notice of any suggested alterations should be given so that all interests might be heard on the matter and have an opportunity to put their case. Mr Runciman promised to give full consideration to the views placed before him.

iWHAT HAPPENED TO PAUL

WHAT HAPPENED TO PAUL The following little story of the front trenches lig contained in a letter from a British soldier serving in France:— The Saxons used to have a chap "¡th them 'named Paul, who had a Jovely voice and used to sing all the kitest songs. He waa easily heard in our front trenches, and his songs were enjoyed by our fellows as wells M by the Germans. One day, when things were quiet, there were no songs to listen to. and one of our men called out to the Germans: "TeU Paul to sing." Back came the flower, pre- ceded by a &bring of guttural German ourøeliJ: "You obtited Paul y«eteriav."

TRADE UNION CONGRESS

TRADE UNION CONGRESS Resolutions on After-War Problems. Between 600 and 700 delegates will attend the Trade Union Congress in Birmingham, from September 4 to 9. They will be welcomed by the Lord Mayor (Alderman Neville Chamber- lain). In view of the war, the social part of the conference will be curtailed, the only functions arranged being a re- ception by the Lord Mayor on the Tuesday evening and a garden party at the Edgbaston Botanical Gardens on Wednesday afternoon. Congress resolutions deal with the re-establishment of pre-war conditions, the national organisation of industry, provision of employment on demobiliskZ tion. development. of trades vital to national welfare, industral adjust- ments after the war, conscription of wealth, trade union rights, and peace negotiations. Non-war resolutions deal with the cost of living, nationalisation of rail- ways. Government control of wood and coal trades, pensions for widows and orphans, workers' housing accommo- dation, payment for statutory holidays and amendment of the Old Age Pen- sions Act.

INFLUENCE OF THEI CINEMA

INFLUENCE OF THE CINEMA. Speaking at the annual meetings of the Baptist Union of Wales at Pontv- cymmer, the Rev. T. Morgan (Skewen) took as his subject, "The Young Man and His Moral Dangers," said the at- tendance at the cinema estranged people from places of worship, but much of the evil wrought by the pic- ture palace would be mitigated of there were a strict censorship. He deplored the fact that at a time of distress like the present racing and betting news should appear on the same page in newspapers as the casualty lists. He appealed to the young people to develop a purity of character which would enable them 'I \cok into eacl1 other's faces without blushing, and to the young men to treat other's sisters a.s they would have their own treated. One thing which mitigated against the work of Welsh churches was lack of knowledge of the language among the voung people. He suggested that parents should take more trouble to teach their children WTelsh. and. failing that that they should allow the children to attend English places of worship. Mr John Samuel, assistant-principal at the Treforest School of Mine6. spoke on "The Sunday school and the child in its period of awakening." He said the greatest need of the church was to set the Bible in its proper prace. The Bible must be the eon- trolling power of the church, Sunday school, and home.

FOUNDER OF THE PS A I

FOUNDER OF THE P.S A. I Dr. Leach. whose compulsory retire- ment from the House of Commons will be deeply regretted, is generally re- garded as the founder of the Pleasant Sunday Afternoon services, which are now so popular a feature in our work- ing-claas neighbourhoods. At the time when he was a minister in Birmingham he felt the need of some service that would bring men together in a Sun- day afternoon, so inaugurated a series of "talks" on social topics. His genial manner and lucid style soon captured a nuntber of hearts, and his services were crowded Sundav aft-er Sunday. Later DB removed to Cavendish-street Chapel, Manchester, where several divines have risen to fame, of much criticism on acoount of his non-theo- logical subjects. ————— —————

RECORD WEEK FOR WARI SAYINGS

RECORD WEEK FOR WAR I SAYINGS. The weekly return of the National War Savings Committee shows that the number of war savings certificates sold during the six days ending OR Saturday 5th August, was 3.638.446. This was the highest total, reached so far in any sÍngle week. It ex- ceeded the issue for the previous week by 599,083, and increase d the aggre- gate sales to dfate to 21.063.789. The sales in Ireland fell off by 7.5989 but in Scotland there was an increase of 23.457. and in England and Wales an increase of 583,213. During the week there was a slight falling off in the salc of £.5, .620 and £ 50 Post Office Exchequer Bonds. Ap- plication for these bonds numbered 18.000. and the value of the issue was £ 650,000. This brought the Wta4 number of applications since lfrth January ladt, up to 831,000. and ill- creased the total value of the ionie to 1261.500, OOE).

I GERMANYS fRON SUPPLY

I GERMANY'S fRON SUPPLY IWh) Lorraine Must be Taken r From the Hans. "There will be no industrial peace for the British Empire until Lorraine has returned to its legitimate p<^set(- sor," says M. Philippe Millet in a Paris message to the "Observer." Lorraine contains the real Rhine- gold. the deposits of iron which have Iveen the kev to Germany's industrial development. "Every Englishman. says M. Millet "ought to know the following figures: --Out of 28,600.000 tons of iron ore which Germany extracted from hea soil in 1913. 21.000.000 came from ";oi l 11 1913, Lorraine. Out of 2.800.000 tons. re- presenting the iron deposits of Ger- many, the German engineers admitted that v Lorraine alone contained 2,100.000. "What does this mean? It means that the Lorraine treasure has, for the last forty-five years, been the main source from which German metallurgT is not only the most irr- portant of all German industries: it is the very key to the whole of Ger- man industrial development, for itwals by using their supremacy in steel that the Germans tried and began to dom- inate the markets of the world. "Moreover. Germany owes it to Lorraine that she has been able to supply her armies with an enormous amount of shells in spite of the block- ade. The Germans have said so them- selves. 'If the output of the minette f (iron ore) of Lorraine were to be dis- turbed.' said a manifesto issued in September 1915, by some of their in- f dustrial associations, ;thp war would he as good as lost.1 Indeed, if Prussia had not possessed Lorraine she would very likely not have dared to go to war at all."

tt DENOMINATION VL BIG DRUM

tt DENOMINATION VL BIG DRUM. PLEA FOR CLOSER CO-OPERATION OF THE CHURCHES. Pr,,Qe,hiaig at Bw loh\groes. near Llan dyssul, the Rev. T. Phillips, oi Middleton. Manchester, and author of. V "Cofktnt Phillips, Horeb," pleaded to; a closer co-openaticin in the Christian and social work between the Welsh Free Chul-clie-, and the Anglicaji Church. He said that all right-thinking Chris- tians, of all sects, were weary of the denominationiai big drum. The demand of modern life was not for the cease less advertisement of the Congregational mind, or of the Baptist mind, or of the Methodist mind, or of the Church of England mind. On the oontrarv. thc-r* was agrowin.g persistency in the request for a modern interpretation of the "mind of Christ." He had heard it asked, what. was to be the knot to hold together the Fiiee Churches of Wales for common work now that Disestablishment had been secured. He thought it mos*t de plorajble that such. a question was • i being asked at all. The gceat need was for the Free Churches 1md th* Mother Church to join hands aad make one united force to fight the eommoai danger of materialism. „

I 7INC

I 7INC. Zince, styled "spelter'' in com- meroe of which the Allies have just secured the Australian supply prev- » iously "cornered" by a German syndi- cate, may be considered a parvenu among metals, for its separat-e exist- ence was not recognised until two centuries ago. It was. however, pro- duced in very ancient times, but only diic,ed in ve r by accident during the smelting of copper. Zince bracelets have been found among the ruins of Gameroe, destroyed about 500 B.C.. and coins of brass, a zinc alloy, were known to the Romans. The metal nowhere oc- curs pure, except in Australia, but combined with blende or calamine ores is widely distributed. The world's greatest production of "spelterl" is, or was, at luckless Liege, now held by the Germans, who had previously pos- sessed in Silesia the second largest zinc industry. ————

NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD SUE PLUS

NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD SUE. PLUS. The financial results of the 'el&h National Eisteddfod at Aberystwyt}. are quite satisfactory. The threr evening concertST^rought in £ 285 3s 6d two Eisteddfod meetings £ 774 16s. 6d„ Cymanfa £ 310 2«., making a total of £ 1.370 2s. To this figure must added the collection made a.t tke meeting of Sunday schools held in the marquee on Sunday, the oopyrirlit of the Eisteddfod programme, and thfe sale of the tune book. probably a sum of £ 250. The subscriptions and priedi reached a total of £ 718 18s. 6d. To sum up, there will be a surplus of over £ 1.000 for the Soldiers' and Sailor*' Finds.