Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

g mWILH li'IWMgaranWUlWB«gaMWBBBMMaMMWM»^MgaS«aMBBaKiaBKaWgMe8se3aMBMaMPqiM^BgPBMBMBg»gaBaMBBBMB> ? T6ihoM: Dœka 36.  W.W!LL!AMS&CO. Jeu/ellers, &c. 29, CASTLE STREET, SWANSEA. Specialities: Engagement Rings. 22 Carat Gold Wedding Rings. 18 Carat Gold Keepers. English Lever Watches. Good Foreign Watches. English and Foreign mocks. English and Continental Novelties in Cwolcl, Siliver and Electro Plate, suitable for Christening. Birthday and Wedding Presents. Spectacles and Eye-glasses for all Sights. It will pay you to come to us to buy for three reasans-Largest Variety, Best Quality, and Lowest Price. FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE. ftfr S ;t:. ? r r :'=': =". E E IF 11 Lacy 1 nuM Mu] I The Up-to-date I LONDON TAILOR I Who serves you personally and I Cuts All Garments Himself Specialfsts in MOURNING ORDERS. 222, High Street SWANSEA MEggg:T.=:rz 5; :?== =;: ? SPECIAL THIS WEEK- Boys' Cord Trousers for School Wear: 000 to 3, ls-Ilid. 4 to 6, 2s.6d. to 3s.lid. 24 Dozen Ladies' Cambric Aprons 8fd. 12 Dozen Welsh Flannel Shirts just to hand, 5a.11d. and Drawers, 3s.6d. Note the Addrem:- J.T.OWEN THE SQUARE YSTAIVFEBA.

YSTALYFERA NOTES I

YSTALYFERA NOTES. I Customer (on entering shop) You look lew-611 Mr. 0 Mr. 0 Aye, I feel all right, I'm in the V.T.C., you know. Something like a recommendation. It is with regret that we report the death of Private Sid Edwards, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Edwards, Pantteg, who was killed whilst on sentry duty, by being struck in the chest by a bomb from, a German bombing party on August 14th. Private David Jenkins wrote to deceased's brother, and Private Leslie Thomas also sent a letter home regarding the death of the young hero. He was buried behind tlie British lines. Private Edwards, who was only twenty three years of age, had been out for twelve months and was the first man in the Swansea district to join the Guards. He was well liked ia the district, and his death ia mourned by a large circle of friends. A large crowd congregated at the station on Saturday evening for the pur- pose of welcoming Mr. Gwflym Jones, Ystradgynlais, who had won the baritone solo prize at the National eisteddfod. The Ystradgynlais band was in atten- dance, and Ystalyfera people joined with Ystradgyml a is in extending him a hearty welcome. The many friends of Private E. Roberts, will be pleased to learn that b" has sufficiently recovered from his wounds to return to his home at Pwll- bach. He received a. bullet wound through one of his cheekr, the bullet coining out through the opposite cheek, and penetratin.g the shoulder. He was also wounded in the Daivdanelloo during the operations there. Now that the lightii-W restrictims a" isn force, the streets present a deserted Appearance in the latter part of the evening. It ha.s been suggested that the Chamber of Trade could now see to it that the shops were closed at 10 p.m., withcmt waiting for the permission P. M wi of the proper authorities. Mr. J. T. Owen, Compton House, haa received an interesting letter from his late assistant Able-seaman M. B. Thomaa of the R. N. V. R. He has now been re- moved to Gosport, near Portsmouth, and expects to be shortly transferred to his ship. He is in the best of health and epirits. The local Chamber of Trade have now deceived the medals to be given to oua- boys ing from the front instead of the motley as hitherto. Mr. J. T. Owen taa been busy making a distri- bution 01 the medals, and l judging by the -expressions of the boys, the silver medals are preferred to the nwney given up to the present. « Mr. J. D. Williams, of the Old Swan, Ystalyfera, was a successful exhibitor t the Hereford He Show on Saturday winning a prize in the cart cla". Richard, the son of Mv. and Mrs. Jones, Allty^rug- Road, has now been removed to a mnwng home at Neath, where, it is to be hoped, he -will make Af, speedy and oonapiets ewcovsry. k J:=-:lu: L The Rev. Ishmael Lewis, Llanelly, oc- cupied the pulpit at the English Con- gregational Church, Ystalyfera, on Sun- day Last and preached able sermons. The Rev. Rees Griffiths, Llanbradach, was the preacher on the previous Sunday, and the Rev. Enfield Jones, of Pebbles- shire, Scotland, will preach next Sun- day. Mr. Jones is a native of Penycae, Abercrave, and lived at the Penybont farm with his parents. Private D. S. Jones, of the Lancashires late assistant to Mr. D. E. Rees, clothier, who lived at St. David's Road, has been wounded in action. The extent of his wounds is not yet known. Private T. Davies, of the 6th Welsh, who is stationed at Penally, Pembroke- shire, is home on leave, this being his last furlough before proceeding overseas. There is reason to fear that the men eligible for military service employed at the Ystalyfera Tin Works will shortly be called up for service. Some of the men have already been notified to that effect. "W. J." Arrangements have just been com- pleted whereby Mr W. J. Evans, the well-known Aberdare conductor, will officiate at the next Cymanfa Ganu held by the Independents of Ystaly- fera. Mr Evans will be remembered as the conductor who coached the Brynamman Choral Society to attain such splendid successes a few years ago, when the c hoir won, the second prize at Swansea National Eisteddfod in the principal competition, and im- proved upon this by taking the 1st prize at Carmarthen National Eistedd- fod. Music lovers in general, and cy- manfa goers in particular are assured of a musical feast on next Easter Monday. At the next Gymanfa to be held by the Ystalyfera Independents, there will be no programmes in the accepted sense of the word. The "programme" will be selected from the new small, temporary, Welsh Congregational Hymn book, so we shall miss the nimble p u t^ i n-your-pocket programme for one year. Larg(1 numbers of Ystalyfera people seem to have migrated to the Mumbles. Wherever one goes—Lang- land, Caswel, Bracelet, Oystermouth, Pier, Cinema, Chapel, Parade, Pub,— one is almost certain of meeting a little batch of Ystalyfera people. Drummer Ernest Roberts, son of Mr George Roberts, Pwllbach, is home again on leave. Drummer Rooort.s earlier in the war saw some particu- larly active service on the Gallipoli Peninsula. There he was wounded very severely, when he wias conveyed to hospital in Egypt, and afterwards sent home. After completely recover- ing and after the withdrawal of our troops from Gallipoli, he was sent to France, there, after some exciting times he was again wounded-a bullet I through his right cheek, passed through his left creek and buried it- self in his left shoulder. He was brought back to 'Blighty,' and after some excellent treatment in hospital is almost fit again. Messrs. D. Lloyd and Sons, the enter- prising boot factors and ironmongers, of Ystalyfera and Ystradgynlais, have an interesting exhibit in their windows in the form of a. Russian Cossack Jack boot. The boot is of fine construction and has the appeei-anoo of being able to stand much weaw. It will be exhibited at Ys- tnidgynlais next week. "A Welsh Singer," after the novel by Allan Raine, is the star production at the Premier Cinema. this week. This film depicts Florence Turner in the title role, a.nd her acting is all that can be desired. At the and of the week "The Third Generation- will be the chief item of interest, and the Gaumont News Pic- tures, together with a further instalment of "Greed." Gamier Willie Morris, of Gough-road, I has been home for a short furlough. Gun- ner Morris is at present on H.M.S. Am, and. has seen much service. Previous to enlistment he was employed at the Gilwen Colliery.

HIRERS WAGESI

HIRERS' WAGES I APPMCATION FOR AQfTANCE AND REDUCTION. I A meeting of the Coal ConCiliation I Board for South Wales and Monmouth- shire was held at Cardiff 1M) Th am day in ordar to lay before the new inde- pendent chairman, Mr. Justice Pickford, I the applications put forward respectively by the workmen for an increase in the wage rate of 12^ per cent. and by the I ooalowMeirs for a Ted uction of 15 per cent. Jwatioe Pickford rescued hia decis- ion for a few days.

YSTRADGYNLAIS NOTES

YSTRADGYNLAIS NOTES. YSTRAD PROUD OF HIM. Ystradgynlais, especially in the neigh bo uiiiood of the Cr4)ss, was agog with excitement on Saturday evening, when Mr Gwilym Jones, the well- known local baritone, and successful competitor in the baritone &olo at the National Eisteddfod at Aberystwyth, returned home from the festival. Mr Jones arrived by the 10 train to Ys- talyfera, where he was met by the Ystradgynlais Town Band, and es- corted to Ystradgynlais to the strains of "See the Conquering Hero Gomes." In the neighbourhood of the Cross, he was mounted shoulder high and heartily cheered. The procession did not reach Ystradgynlais until 11.30, and owing to the late hour, many would be spectators had turned away. We join in congratulating Mr Jones on his success. Llongyfarchiadau fyrdd I Gwilym rho'f yn awr, Tarawodd uchaf gainc y gerdd Yn Aberystwyth fawr; Gwobrwyon eraill doed i ti, I harddu'th Genedlaethol fri. —Bardd Newydd. FARM LABOUR. A local landlord farmer who has a son in the Army, requested that his son should be spared him to assist in the harvest for about a fortnight. The Military Authorities, however, sent a complete stranger to do the work, de-- spite the fact that the son was well able to do so. Is it not pos- sible to so arrange matters that every effort should be made by the authori- ties to send sons of farmers instead of men who have no knowledge of the district and consequently of local farming customs. TINPLATE TRADE Quite a depressing effect has been the outcome of the announcement of the Ministry of Munitions regarding the tinplate industry. It is fortunate that only a small number of local men are engaged in this industry, but the outlook is none the less serious. It is to be hoped that something will be done with a view to finding employ- ment in the district for the men con- cerned. HOME FOR A HOLIDAY. | Mr D. J. Terry, son of Mr Tom Cynlais Terry, and nephew of Gwilym Cynlais, who is a schoolmaster at Bargoed, visited the district during the week, and was heartily received by his friends. He was at one time en- gaged as a school teacher in the locality. FIREMEN'S EXAMINATION. We are again requested to call the attention of the responsible authori- ties to the fact that a firemen's ex- amination has not been held in the locality for some time. Our corres- pondent informs us that there are many young men in the place who would be given posi tions in the local mines if they only held the necessary certificate. It is to be hoped that an examination will be held shortly. Pte. Gwilym Thomas, of the Pem- brokeshire Yeomanry, son of Mr Thos. Thomas, Miners' Arms, was home during the week on leave. This is probably his last furlough before leaving for France, where many of his friends in the Yemonary battalions are now serving. A "RESTRICTION" ENTHUSIAST. A story is going the rounds this week to the effect that the land- lady of a certain house, the back of which was facing another house, had been warned by the police that no light was to be exposed. The lady of the Latter house, whose husband worked nights at the colliery was so frightened, that when her husband returned next morning, he found that she had placed quilts over the doors and windows, so as to prevent light reaching the outside world. The Rev. J. R. Williams, Aber- kenfig, who is well known in the dis- trict, will occupy the pulpit at Cwm- giedd on Sunday next, whilst the Rev. C. J. Pipe, A.T.S., Abercrave. will officiate at Bethany. The many friends of Mr Jas E. Morris, Bank Buildings and of the Gurnos Post Office, will be pleased to learn that he is recovering from the effects of his recent mishap, when he was badly bitten on the arm by a dog. We join in wishing him a speedy re- covery. Despite the ominous signs to the contrary, the local collieries were not affected to any marked degree bv the strike of the Swafnsea dock trimmers Sast week. Although the strike en- tailed disorganisation of the traffic at the different collieries, the effect was not sufficiently serious to warrant a stoppage. It was mentioned in our columns test week that Mr Gwilym Jones had taken the prize at the National Eis- teddfod, when the test piece was "Yr Ornest. We are now informed that the solos for rendering were:- "Promo theus" (Hugo Wolffs), and "Can y Gauaf" (Maclean). It is only fair to Mr Jones to gay that "Promo- thus" is reoognised as being the most difficult piece yet sung at the National. We are aJso informed that the I people of Ystradgynlais sontiampl&te showing practical appreciation of Mr Jones' success at an early date. Intimation was received by his parents on Wednesday morning that Pte. Hy. Hazell, of the Swansea Pals, had been killed in action. Pte. Hazell who was well known in the district, was only about nineteen years of age, and much sympathy is felt with the bereaved parents. Pte. J. Pritchard, of Cwmgiedd, who has been in a Manchester hospital for some time suffering from wounds, sus- tained in Mametz Woods, has returned home on furlough. Pte. A. Main- waring, of the 11th Batt., S. W. B.. hM also returned from a home hospital. Pte. Mainwaring was only sixteen years of age when he went out to France. The children at Sardis had their annual tea on Wednesday, when a happy time was spent despite the in- clemency of the weather. The child- ren at Hope Baptist Chapel, Glan- rhyd, also had their annual tea on Thursdav afternoon. Our readers will he pleased to learn tliat Mr Dan Davies, B.A., son of Mr Morgan Davies, Church terrace, who has been a school teacher at Cape Province, South Africa for some years, has been promoted to an important position in a school in Salisbury, Rhodesia. Mr Davies is an old Maesy- dderwen boy, and was a pupil at the old school, where he attended on the day of the opening. His career hitherto can be summed up in the term "brilliant," and his many friends hope that he will climb still higher in his profession. The Ystradgynlais Cham ber of Trade has resolved to take action in regard to the reoent lighting restric- tions with a view to having the street lamps re lighted. It is thought that as the place is illuminated by elec- tricity that the lights could be simul- t-aneously extinguished from the Power Station, provided that a warning could be sent by wire of the approach of Zeppelins. It is also believed that the probability of a raid in this district is remote. The chief attraction at the Cinema this week has been a Lubin master- piece in the film, "The Great Divide." Ths picture shows some of the grand scenery of the great Rocky mountains, and a fine love plot is also interwoven into the story. "To Save her Name," together with a further instalment of "Greed, and other star productions, complete an entertaining programme for this week-end. We are asked to announce that owing to the fact that all the books have not been received, the result of the prize drawing organised by the Ystradgynlais Horticultural Society at their show in aid of the Red Cross will be published in our columns next week. LOYAL YSTRADGYNLAIS FAMILY The wife of Private J. E Garnett, of Glanrhyd road, Ystradgynlais, has been notified that he has been wounded. Pte Garnett, who used to be employed at the Rowton House, belongs to the South Wales Borderers. Mrs. Gar- nett has three sons serving, by her first marriage-two in the Army and one in the Navy. Her first husband was the Late Professor Plumb, swim- ming master at Swansea Baths. Whilst following his employment at the Diamond Colliery as a. repairer. Mr. Ben Morgan, of 7, Gough-buildings, received injuries to his back whilst pushing a train in 'tlie main district of the mine. The unfoaunate man, who sustained in- juries to his back, was conveyed home in a trap and subsequently attended to by Dr. Walsh. (Mir. Morgan is confined to his bed. "The Labour Voice" has evidently some influence in high circles. We drew at- tention in our columns last week to the fact that the roads had not yet been tarred, with the result that the neoessary paraphanelia has now made its appear- ance. ■ww uu

Death ef WellKnown Seven Sisters Man

Death ef Well-Known Seven Sisters Man. We regret to announce the death of Mr. Henry Harries, of Seven Sisters, which took place on Wednesday morning under sudden circumstances. Deceased previous to his death, was seemingly in good health, and was out the previous day. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Harries, of the Seven Sisters Hotel, and was held in high esteem in the locali- ty Deceased brothers are Messrs. Dd. Harries, who now occupies the hotel; Mr. John Harries, chernisrt, Ystcradgyndais and Mr. Thos. Harries, chemist, Seven Sisters. Much sympathy m expressed with the family. ————— —————

Chinese in France

Chinese in France. WAR WORKERS FROM FAR EAST .AND FROM PORTUGAL. Ten thousand Portugese workmen are being aent to work in French fac- tories. They will be above 32 years of age. Others below this age are being mobilised and are destined to operate on the French front. One thousand seven hundred Chinese workmen are arriving in Mar- seilles to strengthen the staffs work- ing in the factories. They include experts in the manufacture of war Inarial. If the trial ie successful others will fellow.

No title

Music draws iii: crowd in Wales, but Mr. Lloyd George oomniands a multitude mya ti* "Daily Mail."

Advertising

@ .(.(;G.).G. G .@+> I O. M. Lewis I Co., i U. 7 I LTD. e & ARE NOW SHOWING | ? 1 Men's, Youths' and Boys' Suits | V + t W'hich are offered much below the present market §• +.. prices. Newest Styles and Materials. "8 P (. @ 0 A Large Stock of Boys' Washing Suits, Blouses, Blazers, Flannel Coats and Knickers, etc.. at the & Very Lowest Prices. o> m ❖ —<$►— c.. Q Shirts, Pants, Vests, Socks, etc. The Best Value ♦> Q in the town. 9 —— — J OXFORD STREET, SW AN SEA. .:(.(.(). cj @ .&

Tumble Colliers andI Ambulance

Tumble Colliers and Ambulance. Enthusiastic Meeting at Pit Head. Despite the fact that there was a heavy downpour of rain, there was a large attendance of miners at the Great Mountain Colliery, Tumble, on Wednes- dey, when Lieut.-Colonel H. D. Lewis, as reported in another column, appealed for support for the St. John's Ambu- lanœ Association. It was decided, with- out a sun?s dissentient to give a mandate to the pit delegate to vote in favour of the sch eme at next Saturday's district meeting. Mr. J. D. Morgan, treasurer of the Anthracite District, was also present at the meeting. Lieut. -Col. Lewis thanked the men for the ready support and the enthusiasm shown in fa-vour of the scheme.

I GREAT EVENTS SOON I

I GREAT EVENTS SOON. I I am justified im saying (writes the "Westminster Gazette" diarist) that members are leaving Westminster in a more cheerful mood than at the time of the summer recess last year. It is whispered that great events may hap- POOl in the next few weeks, and every- one looks forward to a marked stride being made towards victory before the House meets again. So great is the general optimism that a Minister was heard to remark a few days ago that he was almost sorry to find no pessimists left, for the official belief in the war lasting the better part of another year has not been shaken, and predictions of a speedier close may only end in dis- appointment. It is better for the Government, which requires a cahn atmosphere- to work in, that neither the House nor the country should indulge in vain expectations. ——————————— ————

ISwansea Hairdressers DividedI

Swansea Hairdressers Divided. A split seems to have occurred amongst the members of the Swansea. Hairdressers' Union on the subject of the employment of women. The National Federation of Hairdressers has declared in favour of the employ- ment of women during the war, but the local branch has twice thrown out a similar proposal, and as a result the secretary has tendered his resignation, for, he points out, in Swansea. and district alone some 12 to 14 Union saloonsn: have had to close their doors owing to principals and assistants having been called to the colours. Al- together, 60 assistants have gone, and the question is asked what is to be- come of the wives and children of the owners who have had to close in con- sequence.

ITHE WORST IN CARDIGAN FORj CONSUMPTION

I THE WORST IN CARDIGAN FOR CONSUMPTION. I Alderman D. J. Williams pointed out at the Tsegaron Council that tuberculosis WM more prevaJent m that union than in any other in the county. The Clerk stated thqt, according to the lieta, mora people were being killed by this disease than by the war. Dr. Morgan said there was no doubt that tha notification was done more thoroughly in some districts than in othera. People seemed to prefer to have one or two deaths in a. family rather than pull the paper off the walls. M,r. D. D. Evans, J.P., drew attention to the delay in opening the Tregaron Sanatorium. He considered there w as great skwjkneee. Ald. Williaino agreed, and said the local conimitte-e know nothing about it. It wim reeolved to draw the attention of the Memorial Association to the nutb- i ter.

Soldier Harvesters

Soldier= Harvesters. Nearly 17,000 Released by Military Authorities. The Board of Trade wish to call the attention of farmers to the fact that (despite statements which have appeared in the Press to the contrary) applications for the temporary release of soldiers for harvest work should continue to be made through the Labour Exchanges. During the period June 3 to August 4, over 1,900 farmers have applied for the temporary release of 37,332 soldiers for agricultural work, and 16,870 soldiers have been supplied by the military authorities. Provided that farmers will accept any soldiers. whom the military authorities may be able to spare, it is anticipated that practically every appli- cation for soldiers for harvest work will be met. in full. No guarantee can, how- ever, be given to release individual men w ho may be wanted by farmers. A TOLLY LOT. S I have spent a day with soldiers in the harvest Add. and a. jollier lot of 'ii harvesters I could not wish, to see (writes a correspondent) To the regular agricultural hand who works in solitude during most of the year harvest time is a diversion. The ad- vent of the soldier has changed all this. He has created a new atmosphere, for he not only works, but taJks, sings, and whistles whilst he is about it.

WAGE EARNERS WHO PAY INCOME TAX

WAGE EARNERS WHO PAY INCOME TAX. 1,150,000 Workers with E2 10& a Week or More. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, in a written answer to Sir J. Harmood Ban- ner, said I promised my hon. friend, in reply to his question of June 26 last, to obtain the number of weekly wage-earners whor during the quarter concluded JvJy 5, 1916, were in receipt of wages exceeding £ 2 10s. a week. 'The Commissioners of Inland Revenue have summarised the statistics available in the various tax districts throughout. the country, and these indicate an ap- proximate figure of 1,150,000 such wage- earnerrs in receipt of £ 48,000,000 for the Quarter, or an average per head of three guineas a. week. It is, of course, too early to state the amount of income tax which will be found to be due for the qua/rter or the number of wage-earners who will be liable. My hon. friend will not forget that, in common with other tax-payersf the weekly wage-earners are entitled to claim abatement, children's allowance, in-- surance, etc."

LLANDOVERY INCIDENT

LLANDOVERY INCIDENT A curious spectacle wag recently wit- nomed in the Llandovery district. Riding slowly in a motor car, and driving before him to the Llangadock Mart a flock of 40 geese, was to be seen a Llandovery towtisman. The oc- casion recalled the times when it was a common sight to see farmers and others driving geese on foot to the fairs, but the motor car was an in- congruous item in the scene.

IDROWNED IN A BATH

DROWNED IN A BATH. At Llanelly on Tuesday the youtng son of James Warner, 7, Great Wes- tern crescent was accidentally drowned during the absence of his grandmother who had gone shopping. The boy, who was three years old, had been left in charge of the grandmother by the mother, who is employed at munition works. While the grandmother welat to make some purchases she left her 13-year-old granddaugli-ter in ch.a.rge acda ske in turn appears to have left the child with a boy eight years of age. The child went to the bathroom, and fell from a chair into the bath.