Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

GRIFFITHS I SONSFI* a" r f 4 l^ I GRIFFITHS & SONS I | Manufacturing'Clothiers, | BXOELtBNCE IN CL0THIN9. ('I 1_. Ka.n ufa.cturing Clothiers, ): i Q «T \4 j j ..)¡¡jl;¡lj¡ i TRADE Iw' MARK .'8(1 e ^'1 .{¡ I 2 EXCELLJ::NCE IN CLOTHI;N 6T. .ij:C.<.<: 8 !f j Public such a grand selection j ||S |||f j J 5 °? stylishly cut and of good M  W J ^jjj^\ wearing M2terial in k" ? BOYS, YOUTHS I | [' • and MEN'S Rugby Suit. J § l•' .i/Wlvi »**■*■■» ?M !?? 1 S: •• ^3 EVERY GARMENT IS PLAINLY MARKED ? ? *♦' Sf" '^j jf' a* a 'cry Keen price. § ? II • lg-3j ?? ???Mr W??o??. ? § I i*»T *2 ??? t ? Q? ? ?? o?4? ? CASTLE ST | ? Henley S? W)AN A g ALSO CARDIFF AND NEWPORT. |§ ? § § The Public is Assured of Getting § g THE VERY BEST VALUE. | o i GGGG@

TRAPPING SUBMARINES

TRAPPING SUBMARINES SCORES CAUGHT BY OUR NAVAL TRAWLERS. Mr Noyes, in the New York "Tri- bune," tells graphically of the splen- did work done bv Britain's naval traw- lers, recording the trapping of scores of German submarines, the safeguard- ing of shipping, the removing of mines, and the rescuing of the crews of tor- pedoed vessels, the crews of the traw- lers often giving their lives that the øea. travellers of all nations may rest unalarmed. Perhaps the most graphio story is that of three men of a trawler who weue taken aboard a submarine, and endured for 80 hours "third degree" torture at the revolver muzzles, but heroically refused to give any informa tion as to the methods of submarine tra-pping. ) Folk at home will hear with infinite ) satisfaction and gratitude that "with- in 25 minutes any submarine reported in moat of the home waters can be on, closed in a steel trap from which there is no escape." Mr Noyes destroys the common belief that it is only in com- paratively narrow areas like the Eng- lish Channel that the traps can be (made operative, declaring that he has himself seen traps 100 miles long that could shift their position and change their shape at a given signal. 40 —————

No title

Mias Slight, who nursed Admiral Jelli- Co) during his childhood, has just com- pleted her 90th year.

Advertising

Be careful not to soak, rub, or scrub the fj clothes when using flM lir SIMPLE SIMON He can show you a better way. Ask your grocer; he knows. » Costs a groat; worth is. I

ISUGAR SUSTITUTE AND HOW TO USE IT

SUGAR SUSTITUTE AND HOW TO USE IT. Plums in plenty are promised all over England, but the Board of Agri- culture utters a word of warning to those who make their own jam. In view of the shortage of sugar, the Board urges those who have been in the habit of making home-made jam to save ordinary sugar and make up the remainder with the sugar known as "gluooee" which is obtainable in considerable quantities. Glucose," says the Board "which is sold under the name of corn syrup, is a preparation made in England, and also imported from America, and is extensively used in the manufacture of confectionery and sweets, espec- ially in acid drops and toffee. Corn syrup can satisfactorily be used in the manufacture of home made jam if the I following precautions are observed:— | Not more. than one part of corn I syrup should be added to two of sugar -that is, the syrup should be 33 per oent. of the preservative, and the weight of the sugar and syrup should be approximately equal to the weight of the fruit used. (The correct pro- portion varies slightly with the kind of fruit used). The jam should be boiled till it gets the right consistency. The usual test for this is to dip a knife into the boiling jam and see if the jam will hang from the edge in a drop. Jam which contains more than 35 per cent. of water will not keep. The jam should be covered with waxed paper, or a thin sheet of paper dipped in some spirit such as whisky to prevent the introduction of mould spore, and then tied down tightly with another sheet of papeqg

2000000 YARDS OF CLOTH I

2,000,000 YARDS OF CLOTH. Ordem for Snore tha ntwo million I yards of cloth for the Russian acny have just been placed in the West Hiding I of Yorkshire, and are required to be delivered befoe next spring. The Scheme of Goverpniment Control will apply to these orders. and to all army requirements of the Allies.

No title

After mourning him as dead for more I than six weeks the mother of a North- umbierSand Fusilier has. received a letter from her eon stating that he iq in a German hospital.

Advertising

W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, I can be consulted &ily at the Victoria I Arcade (nr e Market) Swansea,

I THE NIGHTGALE IN WALES

I THE NIGHTGALE IN WALES Mr. T. Leason Thomas, the active and -Aatchful hon. secretary of the Glamorgan Society in London, writes to the "Daily News" as follows :—"Have you reported Mr. Lloyd George correctly ? Speaking at the Eisteddfod, Aberystwyth, mo nightingales on this (i.e., Welsh) side 4f the Severn.' I have heard the nightingale in Bishops.tone Valley (Swansea) and Llandebie (Carmarthen- shire) and it comes rather as a surprise to me to read that statement. Is the nightingale a very rare visitant to the Prinicpality ? Does it not seem stramge if Air. laoyd George is correct, that a song entitled "The Nightingale" (Eos Lais) should b8 included in the national songs of Wales? I hardl" think that John Thomas (Ieuam Ddu) would have penned those words if the nightingale was a strange in Cymru and her song never heard therein. I believe that the nightin- gale is no stranger in Clyne Valley (Swansea), the Vale of Glamorgan, the Vale of Neath, the Golden Grove { Oarm)."

Advertising

JOHNSTON FOR NEW VEGETABLE AND fLOWER SEEDS AND EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN. Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. 27 OXFORD ST. SWANSEA. TELEPHONE: 567 CENTRAL. QROESAW CALON I'R CYMRY. The "OSBORNE RESTURANT," 7, Union-fittreet, Swansea. M&nager Will Griffiths. Well-Ai^ed Beds, Home Comforts. Parties Cfe-tered for at Moderate Charges. Cymxy pan yn AbertAwe Ewch i'r Ssbooie" í gael bwyd, Ya '7 Unioa-etreet" mae hwnw, Pris rhvxrol iawn a gwtd. Os bydd eisieu lie i fly&gu | Yno cesvoh weiyaii elyd, ffiymry serohQg, nj cherr Owesty GweH na hn drwy'r eang fyd. Chvriflft'i faner gocJi urdd1 Yn roeeaw^ar yn y 'stryd, Ger yr EMPIRE Me yr OSBORrNE, Tuag yno ewch i gyd —(A renydd a fu >.r.o.)

SOUTH WALES NEWS I

SOUTH WALES NEWS I In 1663 there were only fifteen houses in High street, Swansea. Fifty years ago this week the new dock was opened at Briton Ferry. The blind organist of Dock-street Con gregational Church, Newport, died this week. Owing to enlistments thee are many parishes in which church bells a,re rung by the clergy. A protest against casting the town in- to darkness was made at the Merthyr Council meetings. Eleven munition workers were fined £ 2 each at a Welsh court for gaming with cards. The millmen at the Maneftmarui Tube Works, Swansea, are taking a holiday in batches, and have arranged a series of outings. Mr. William Jenkins, of the Queen's Hotel, Caerphilly, having joined the Army, the licence has been transferred to his wife. A drunken woman, Sarah Hicks, has been sent to prison for two months at at Merthyr for neglecting her three children. For using indecent language to ladies and wounded soldier5 in the Victoria Park, Neath, Wrilliam Diamond. Ethel Street was fined 21s. It was his 21st appearance. Our new armies are mostly composed of young soldiers; but, remarks the "Globe," that is no reason for Mr. Lloyd George's patronising remark at Oriccieth that "the nippers are gripping." Fined 40s. for stealing seven shells and two pieces of shell steel, value 2s. 6d., a bricklayer employed at a South WTales munition works pleaded he took them as curios. Redmond Coleman, who was once a noted boxer, and who has just returned from France, made his one hundred and twelfth appearance at Merthy Police- court on Tuesday. Drunkenness was his offence and the fine 10s. The cause of a "bit of a row" investi gated by the Merthyr magistrates on Tuesday was that one woman was an- noyed because had been called to the colours and her neighbour's son was left. .Both were fined 10s. and bound over. Sergeant D. G. James, of the Riile Brigade, who belongs to fekotty, has been promoted to compdnz-sev^i-nt- major and awarded the Military Aletlal for gallant oonduct on July llth. in a letter home he modestly disclaims that he has distinguished hi:iself above his c(mrad,es, since all were ecjuiily actuated by a sense of duty to jrod and countrv A property sale of uitsrost to Welsh- men is to take place at lit: early Jato(' in Montgomeryshire, when Bronygan, Cemaes, will be offered for auction. The house was built by Mynyddog, the famous poet and eisteddfod conductor, and he lived there till his death. It was afterwards occupied by another dis- tinguished Welshman, the late Mr. D. Emlyn Evans, the musician, who married Mynyddog's widow. NEWCASTLE EMLYN CHARGES. A sensatiori was caused at Newcastle Emlyn by the arrest of Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, licensee of the Drovers' Arms, Adpar, and her daughter Margaretta, aged 15 years, who were brought before Mr. Thomas Davies on a charge of utter- ing a forged cheque. The accused were remanded on bail. FOR SLAUGHTERING CALVES. I Samuel Jones, butcher, iy ooch, Itan- arthney, was fined 40s. at Carmarthen for illegalily slaughtering four calves contrary to the Maintenance of Live Stock Order, and John Jones, Felinsych Farm, Llan- arthney, John John Ystrad Nantgaredig, and David Jones, Cwmfargan, Llanarth- ney, were fined Ll each for aiding abet- ting him. Superintendent J. E. Jones de- scribed the Order as a difficult one to enforce. I LLANDILO MART. The Llandjlo and District Auction Mart Co. held their bi-weekly sale on Monday. There was a large supply and a very good cterriand. The following passed through the ri-75 fat cattle 150 sheep, 820 lambs, 20 calves ,8 cows and cal ves, 50 weancrs and 155 porkers. Fat cattle sold from £ 17 10s. to JB32, sheøp 50s. to 63& lambs 32s., to 50s., calves L2 to J38, cows and calves from £ 18 to L22, weaners from 32s. to 3& and porkers from 70s. to 115s. BLIND MAN DRUNK. I A blrnd man named George David Jones, who said he was on his way to Swansea to enter the school there, was summoned at Merthyr for being drunk and disorderly in High-street, and also for assaulting a youth named George Pinks with his stick. Defendant pleaded that he only felt his way along the street. Inspector Phillips said the blind man was very drunk, and struck out with his stick in all direction. The boy's leg was badly bruised. The cases were dismissed on payment of costs, on the defendant promising to leave the town. THOUGHT IT WAS TWELVE. I William Watson, lioensee of the Old- sk,otle Inn, Bridgend, was summoned at Bridgend for selling intoxicating liquor before 12 noon, contrary to the Order of I the Liquor Control Board. Mr. W. M. Thomas, solicitor, who defended, said the !.ear was supplied by a girl without the knowledge of the lamdlord and during him I, temporary absence from the bar. She thought it was 12 o'clock. Defendant wae fined C5. Thomao Kemp, labourer, wall sunuooMd for aiding ajid abetting. He said they told him in the bar that it was 12 o'clock. The case was dismissed. Dekndatit I'll be careful not to listen to what they do tell me again. (Laugh- ter. ) MUMBLES RAILWAY FATALITY. I The last train on the Swansea, and Mumbles Railway returning to the port on Monday night ran over an unknown man on the line between the Cricket Fiefd and the slip. He was dead when picked up. I A FIGHT IN THE MINE. A quarrel in Bryn Colliery, Aber- avon, resulted in Herbert Tudor being fined 40s. for assaulting Thomas Dow- ling. Under the Mines Regulation Act Herbert Tudor was fined 20s., and Dowling and Tudor 40s. for fighting in the mines. VALLEY ROAD ACCIDENT. A hrake accident occurred near St. John's Church, Morriston, involvingi serious injuries to one woman and minor injuries to others, during the week-end. The vehicle, full of women passengers, was returning from Swansea to Clydach a hind wheel fouled the tram-lines and the brake capsized, throwing the occu- pants out. A woman named Mrs. Annie Wavies (52). of Velimire, sustained a broken right forearm. OtfoerB sustained contusions. GLYN NEATH DISPLAY. With the object of securing funds for the entertainment of wounded soldiers at the Neath section of the 3rd Western General Hospital, a floral displa.y was held at the Abernant Fach Park, Glyn Neath. Beautiful wea;their prevailed, and the event waa highly successful. The sale of flowers alone realised over L25. In additions there were various competitions. Prior to the formal opening, a procession paraded the streets, headed by the A bee- per gwm Silver Band, and attended by the members of friendly societies in re- galia, Trade Union members, and boy 6couts. £1 PENSIONS FOR SOLDIERS. Bridgend Board of Guardians have passed a series of resolutions, expressing the opinion that the recent statement by the Flome Secretary regarding enemy aliens was unsatisfactory, that the in- ternment of aliens had been carried out in a very lax manner, and strongly urg- ing the Government to intern enemy aliens without exception. Other resolu- tions were passed stigmatising as inade- quate the present pensions for soldiers and sailors aind soldiers' and sailors' widows and children, and urging that these should be not less than JB1 per week, and disapproving of the Board of Trade allowing coalowners to advance the price of inland coal by 2s. 6d. per ton. "MANUFACTURED AGITATION" The following is of particular interest following the complaint made at the Swansea district tribunal that medical boards were passing for service men abso- lutely unfit and leaving at home men fat more fit. "A manufactured agitation," was the phrase ust-d by a high official at the War Office to describe the criticism at present being directed against decisions of the Army Medical Boards in various parts of the country. Every specific instance in which an unfit man had been passed into the Army, he said, had been investigated by the bast sp-eclalists in the land, and j immediate steps had been taken to recti- fy mistakes. DROWNED AT TAIBACH. -n inquest was held at Taibach touching the death of William Rees (8) of Bromb il-road Taibach, who was drowned the previous day. Louisa. Rees, the mother of the boy, stated that she took her children down to the Moria., Beach, -and went into tho water to bathe. Scon after she 52.W the little boy in difficulties. She tried to Teach him, but failed. Witness complained that a man was sitting on the beach a little distance away, but he made no attempt to rescue the boy, nor did he move from where he was. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally drowned," and added a. rider censuring the conduct of the man complained of fdr not going to the child's assistance. ABERAVON GIRL'S TRAGIC I DEATH. "Deatih ,from miisadvienitnire" was I the verdict at an inquest into the death of Mary Jane Norkey (16), of Aberavon, who died from the effects of carbolic acid. Deceased's mother, a widow, said her daughter, who was a cheerful girl, was employed at the Luoania Billiard Saloon. She went to have a bath on Saturday, and a few minutes later deceased called "Mamma." When witness went up she saw the girl's mouth lined with white. She thought it was cold cream but Mary Jane said "This stuff," pointing to some carbolic acid, and collapsed. Witness had kept the acid iR a cupboard in her bedroom which was dark. DISPUTE OVER WELSH TIN- I PLATES. In a case heard at Swansea County Court on Monday it was explained that tborm were three kinds of waste sheets in tinplate manufacture, and they were called primes, waste-waste, and buckled waste. In the claim in question brought by Messrs. Goldberg and Sons, Birmingham, against the Morriston Tinplate Company for an alleged breach of contract it was stated that the waste-waste contract- ed for waB required for munition works, but that somie of the boxes contained 20 per cent. of buckled waste, which was inferior stuff, but the defence was that waste-waste meant a mixture of spoilt sheets. In the case of a disputed contract resumed at Swansea County Court on Tuesday, brought by J. A. Goldberg and Sons. Birmingham, against the Midland Tinplate Company, Morriston over a question of "waste waste" tin- plates, his Honour held that the goods in question were lupplied by defend- ants without any guarantee, and he, therefore, found for the defendant company, with coete. SOLDIERS FOR THE HARVET. ..J Arrangements recently annoumeu iv« the drafting of 900 soldiers to Carmar- then for distribution among the South Wades counties to assist in the corn harvest have been cancelled. Application from individual farmers for the assis- tance of soldiers will, however, still be dealt with, the same as during the hay harvest. SWANSEA EXECUTION TO TAKE ITS COURSE. Sullivan, the Dowlais murderer, who lies under sentence of cleath at Swan- sea Prison for the murder of his wife, under circumstances of exceptional brutality has been refused leave of appeal against his conviction, and the ft execution will take place in due course. INCREASE OF SIXPENCE. The award of Mr Charles Doughty, in the recent arbitration in respect of the claims of speltermen in the t-hroo chief spelter works at Swansea, gives an increase of 6d. per shift to all furnacemen, produoermen, calciners, potterymen, and labourers. Time- and-a-half is to be paid for Sunday labour to all men working six shifts in the seven days of the week. MOTOR CYCLE CRASH. 1 1 Two motor cycles, nauen Dy George- Kettle, colliery pumpsman, Penyfaie, and John Henry Loveday, Bryncoch, collid- ed near Bridgend on Monday. Kettle was rendered unconscious, and was at- tended by Dr. Edmund Thomas and re- moved to the Cottage Hospital. Loveda.y escaped with a shaking. and so did Isaac Tame, of Tvnygarn, who was riding on the carrier of Kettle's bicycle. A motor car driven by Mr. George Dobbin, to- bacconist, Bridgend, was turned into the- hedge by its driver to av^id running into the overturned bicycles and waa; severely damaged CHARGE AGAINST A SWANSEA P.C. DISMISSED. A member of the local force, Pohce- constable Evans, was summoned at Swan- sea by Thomas Evaois for assault. It was alleged by complainant that he was struck and pushed against a will. Far the defence it was stated that defendailt met complainant, who lived in the same- street., and asked rtirn to request his wife to keep quiet, as he could not get any rest or sleep. Complainant then assumed a fighting attitude, and all defendant did was to put his hand on complainant's shoulder and advise him to go into the house. A Mrs. John, called for the de- fence, said it was she who hit defendant. in the mouth later in the day because he had hit a Mrs. Davies and that complain- ant then kicked her three time. The summons was dismissed. NEATH ROW OVER BEAUTY COM- I PETITION. More rows and further police-court proceedings have arisen out of the recent beauty corn petition at Neath. At the police-court on Monday Catherine Roach, Ethel street, sum- moned a. trio of neighbours ior oM- sawlfcs. Telling her story, she ad- mitted calling Mrs. Jafford's daughter a "beautiful doll," because she won a prize at ft beauty show. Then Mrs. Jafford challenged her to fight a-nd said she would turn her into minoe- meat. Mrs. Jafford: It's all lies. gentio- men. She was drunk. pulled up her ski rife, showed her stockings and sang and danced "The Beautiful' Doll" on the pavement. She's a pest to the nei gh bou rheod. The bench dismissed the summoasee, the Chairman advisins; Mrs. Roach" t. look for another house. Printed and Published by "Llain Llalur" Co.. Ltd., Ystalyfera, in, am County of Glamorgan, Aug. 26, 1016 •

Advertising

Peqlmlc's  ??e/7S/0/) WIR m t))* ?Mt ALE —— PREVIOUS TO EXTENSIVE AL- TERATIONS to meet tke demand of our COSTUME AND MANTLE DE- PARTMENT, to effect Speedy Clear aiicc, during the next 14 days we offer the following 300 YOUTHS' and Men's Plain Grey Flannel Trousers; to-day's vaJue. 66 lid. SALE PRICE, 6s. lid. About 50 StIiped Flaainel Trousers, TO CLEAR 3s lid. EACH 50 YOUTHS' Tweed LOMK Trouser Suits to-day's value, 25s. 6d. SALE PRICE, 16s. lid; 40 Boys' School Norfolks: to-day's value 8s. lid. SALE PRICE, 6s. lid. 50 Boys' Three Gar- ment Suits; to-day's value, 10s. lid.; SALE PRICE, 8s. lid. 80 RAINCOATS, Fawn and Tan worn- by ladies or Events; to-chy's value, 30s; SALE PRICE 20s.; 25 finer quali. ty, to-day's value 42s. SALE PRICE, 31s. 6d. 60 YOUTHS' and Boys' Wat-erproofs,. for school; to-day's value, 18s. lid. SALE PRICE 10s. lid. Get the boy protected from colds—cheaper than doc- tor's bills. IINDERWEAR—250 Pants and Vests; t-day 8 value, Is. ll^d. SALE PRICE, Is. 4^d. 300 Summer SOCKS to-dav's value, Is. 6d. SALE PRICE, Is. 3d. 144 pair TO CLEAR AT &id.- Penhale's, 232 High-st, Swansea *— Orders by post promptly attended to.