Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Mr Will Crooks on I Food I

Mr. Will Crooks on I Food. I I t No Scarcity, But a Bad Distri- butive System. WANTED—A MAN. I "I think the report of the Com- mittee on Food Prices will stir up the best sort of public opinion a.nd com- pel action to be taken," said Mr Will Crooks, M.P., to a newspaper represen. iative. "In view of the differing types of men who form the Committee, I think they have done very well to report as they have done. The Committee, with the facts before them, saw the difficulties of the situation, and that they were able to agree at all on any- thing came rather as a surprise to me. There is great need, and every mem- ber of the Committee must have felt it, to satisfy the public mind that the Government are fully alive to the shortcomings, if one may use so mild a term of the exploiters not only in the matter of food prices, but in necessaries and commodities in general. "It seems to me that the twin difficulties we have got to face are those of supply in bulk and the proper distribution in detail. The Govern- ment, by entering into enormous con- tracts, can settle the question of sup- ply, for a big demand will ensure a big supply. Then comes the question of distribution, and here I am con- cerned chiefly with the needs of the poorer districts, in many of which re- tail shops have had to close owing to inability to buy goods except at prices which are prohibitive to their cus- tomers. "A MAN OF HIS WORD." "Á6 I have observed in another con- nection," continued Mr Crooks, em- phatically, "what we need is some etrong man, or some strong authority, w ho will fearlessly repeat the observa- tion made bv Sir John Moore on a famous occasion during the Peninsular wars. The head of the commissariat department, it will be remembered, went to Sir John, and, in tears, said: 'Sir Arthur Wellesley demands beef for his soldiers to-morrow morning, and threateng to hang me if he does not get it.' Sir John replied: 'Sir Arthur is a man of his word.' "If you have a person in authority who say, 'We must have it,' we shall get what we need. Everything goes to show thati there has never been a scarcity of food, though allegations of a scarcity have been made from time to time as excuses for raising the prices. A further excuse was that bv raising prices you lessened the consumption. But who to? Not to the people who could afford to pay for it; and surely the last people in the world whose consumption should be lessened are the people who really need food and cansot get it! MINISTRY OF FOOD SUPPLY. "My feeling is that if the Govern- ment are going to do anything they might set up a committee of the Board of Trade to decide upon the distribu- tion of food. Or, better still, they could appoint a Minister of Munitions, and a Minister of Food Supply is equally as important and necessary. The committee or the Minister, which ever was appointed, could easily settle the details of distribution.—how much should go to Mayfair and how much to Poplar; in fact, to every place accord- ing to its needs and at prices within its capacity to pay. "Shops could be set up or existing shops taken over as controlled estab- lishments, as in the case of the muni- tion factories, for the retailing of the food. The shops, on the other hand, could be municipally-controlled, if this method were found satisfactory. "I can well imagine the Co-opera- tive Wholesale Society, with its many retail distributive branches, under- taking a job of this character very BUccessfullv. The task could be done at present it is a question of no in- clination to do it. I know the people are exceedingly loyal and patient, but the wonder to me is that they have shown such patience in view of the prices they are charged. "Notwithstanding high freightage and an alleged shortage. I still think prices could he hrüught down con- siderably, and still leave a working margin of profit. The nation cannot afford to let its poorest and neediest go short. "BOTH ENDS MEAT." "Anv Minister of Food Supply ap- pointed must not forget the wives and children of the men who are lighting, ivhose allotments are limited hy the Crovernmcnt, and whose purchasing power is correspondingly restricted. To use a hackneyed phrase I used at a big public meeting on the North, 'It is with the greatest difficulty that the poor people can make both ends meet.' On that occasion an old woman in the crowd interjected: "Both end meat! We should be glad to get one bread and the other meat!" "The 'position to-day, it seems to me, is best described in the words of the old lady who, asked if she had had bread and poultry for dinner replied, 'No. not bread and pullet, but bread and pull-it.

MINERS SPECIAL RISKSI

MINERS' SPECIAL RISKS. SUGGESTED NATIONAL INSUR- ANCE SCHEME FUND. The Glasgow commission appointed to inquire into the working of the National Health Insurance Act took evidence at Glasgow on Tuesday. Mr James Gold, secretary of the Scottish Miners' Approved Society, said his or- ganisation was not able to work with- in acturial estimates, or able to show a rate of sickness experience which would enable it to offer additional benefits to its members similar to other societies, or to offer terms equal to societies whose membership was com- posed of persons employed in mixed occupations. He suggested the crea- tion of a special risks fund.

FOOD WAR MATERIAL

FOOD & WAR MATERIAL. GOVERNMENT MOVE TO CON- TROL PRICES. By Order in Council published in the 'London Gazette" on Tuesday the following new regulations are made under the Defence of the Realm Act: The Admiralty or Army Council or Minister of Munitions may by order regulate, restrict, or prohibit the manufacture, purchase, sale, delivery, or payment for, or other dealing in, any war material, food, forage, or stores of any description, or any ar- ticle required for or in connection with the production thereof, and if any person refuses to sell any article the sa le whereof is regulated by any such Order, he may be required by the Ad- miralty, Army Council, or Minister of Munitions to sell it on the terms, and subject to the conditions orf. and sub- ject to, which the sale thereof is authorised by the Order. The Ad- miralty or Army Council or Minister of Munitions may by Order require any person engaged in the production, manufacture, purchase, sale, distribu- tion, transport, storage, or shipment of any war material, food, forage, or stores of any description, or of any article required for or in connection with the production thereof, to give such particulars as to his business as may be specified in the Order, and may require any such particulars to be verified as they may direct. The existing regulation with regard to the detention, of articles dropped from or forming part of hostile air- craft is made more stringent. The possession or finding of such articles must be notified to the authorities forthwith, while interference with air- craft wreckage is prohibited.

Increased Revenue

Increased Revenue. NEARLY 40 MILLIONS IN THREE MONTHS. By the Treasury returns almost every source of revenue shows an in- crease—some of them very substantial. The net increase for the past three months is E39,670,273. while the net increase for the six months of the financial year runs to £ 61,056,135. The most substantial increase comes from the Excess Profits Tax, which amounts now to £ 31,385,000. This is of course, the first year in which this tax has figured in the national balance sheet. Income tax (including super- tax) shows a remarkable increase of £18,020,000, while Customs have jumped up by £ 11,350,000. Another striking increase is one of £ 1,770,240 in the receipts for Suez Canal shares. The only material decrease is a sig- nificant one. There has been a falling offn the Excise revenue of £ 2,935,000. The Exchequer balance sheet for the six months ended 30 September shows that the receipts into the Exchequer have amounted to the great total of £1.968,687,085, as compared with £ 1,050,898,854 in the same period last year. The totaJ issued out of the Ex- chequer for the six months amounted to £ 1.942.038.803, as compared with £9811",712,147, an increase of nearly one thousand million pounds.

Welsh Fusiliers VC I

Welsh Fusilier's V.C. I Stirring Story of Gallant Exploit I A thrilling story descriptive of the exploits of Private Albert. Hill, the Welsh Fusiliers' V.C., is that told by his platoon sergeant, Sergeant H. Green, who has visited Hill's home in Denton, and thus fulfilled a promise made to the V.C. before leaving the battlefield at the beginning of August. Oreen has just been discharged from a Burnley hospital, where he has been an inmate since August. Green tells the following story of the events on the night of July 20. when Hill so wonderfully distinguished himself:— "On the night of July 19 we moved up to the advanced line for attack, I the object being to take Delville Wood. It was three o'clock in the morning when we got to within fifteen yards of the German trenches. Hill and myself were alone. Suddenly, two Germans, both 6ft. tall, surprised us. They were coming for us with fierce determination when Hill, as coolly as if he was going to meet a boxing op- ponent, leapt at them, and like light- ning, bayoneted them both I KILLED EIGHTEEN GERMANS. "It was one of the finest examples of pluck I have ever seen or read about. The little fellow only 5ft. 3in. accounting for two big, burly Huns was great! He returned to me as if nothing had happened, and the next thing we found was that we were surrounded by some 20 ar 30 Germans. "Hill remarked, 'Sergeant, we look like being taken prisoners.' I replied, 'They will never take us alive. We will fight for it.' No sooner had I said this than we both got our bombs, and Hill flung two with surprising ac- curacy straight in the midst of them. He killed about eighteen, and wound- ed and scattered the rest. "He did not think he had done anything big, and when I suggested he should go to the right and tfy to find some of our company he was ready instantly. He went, reported to the sergeant of that Company, and he heard whilst there that Captain Scales and- a scout were lying danger- ously wounded. Hill at once volun- teered to fetch them in. He suc- ceeded in bringing the captain to safety, but the latter died soon alter. "Hill them started to return to me, and on the way he found two Germans hiding in a shell-hole. How he found them is a puzzle, for i was dark. He levelled his rifle at them, and the Runs put up both hands before my little man, and, as thev always do, pleaded 'Mercy, Kamerad.' Hill took his prisoners down the line, and this was the only time during that night that he showed any emotion. He was proud of this 'bag.'

EggandPoultry Train I

Egg-and-Poultry Train. I TRAVELLING DEMONSTRATION I OF UP-TO-DATE METHODS. Consisting of four vehicles, an egg and poultry demonstration train has been constructed bv the Great Eaetern Railway, and will be on exhibition at various stations in Norfolk and Suffolk from October 9 to November 2. The four vehicles will show:— Models of poultry houses and other appliances. Methods of hatching and rearing. Egg, production, table poultry and packages. Egg testing and grading. The cars have been equipped with many of the most modern appliances. The system of testing and grading eggs will be demonstrated, and speci- mens of the various classes of eggs which command the highest prices on our market will be shown in comparis- on with ordinary grades, and the best methods of packing will be displayed. Lectures will be given each day, to- gether with general information as to the best methods of poultry keeping, and of increasing the production of eggs and poultry in accordance with the various localities. Local poultry enthusiasts,—especially in the Ystradgynlais and Cwmllynfeil districts, are doing valuable work in the direction of fostering poultry keeping, by means of the shows that are being held at these places periodic- ally, but undoubtedly still greater popular interest would be aroused if it were possible to get one of these poultry trains into the neighbourhood for a. week. May we commend the idea to the various local Poultry Societies ?

No title

Mr. W. Brace, M.P., Under-Secretary of State for Home Affairs, has been spending a few days at Swansea meeth)? representati ves of some of the local in- dustries.

State Control of Coal I I

State Control of Coal, I ——— I Mr Vernon Hartshorn and I Lord Rhondda. By Mr. VERNON HARTSHORN. Now and again Lord Rhondda gives expression, to views which prove to us that he has not only his fair share of business shrewdness, but also the intel- lectual insight which gives him a social vision. Lord Rhondda will have missed the destiny for which his natural gifts have fitted him if he does not develop from the private exploiter, which harsh circumstances have hitherto made him, into the State organiser of the most vital industry in the country. ADMIRALTY COLLIERIES. The views to which he has recently given public expression on the subject of the State control of the coalmining in- dustry ha.ve given us further evidence that he has a much wider social outlook than have his colleagues of the South Wales Coalowners' Association. His viewjs bring him, in principle, mjuoh nearer to the Miners' Federation than to the owners' organisation. "A few weeks after war broke out, says his lordship, "I recommended the Admiralty, through their representa- tive at Cardiff, to take over the entire control of the Admiralty collieries in South Wales, guaranteeing, as they did in the case of the railways, profits equal to those derived before the war. Had the Government com- menced with the Admiralty collieries, under a process of evolution, Govern- ment control might have been extend- ed to the whole production of the U. Kingdom. Much of the unrest in the South Wales coalfield has been due to the not unnatural discontent among the miners that the coalowners were making undue profits out of the war, and, in my opinion, had the Govern- ment -t the outset limited the profits to those obtained before the war, and allowed no increase in wages beyond those sufficient to cover the increased cost of living, public opinion would have supported them to the fullest extent." Though Lord Ilhondda has never ex- pressed these opinions to me, I have for a long time known that he held them, and was in favour of the Government control of the mining industry since the commencement of the war, azd I have aJl the time regretted that he did not pub licly express his views when it would have been comparatively easy to put the scheme into practice, and that he did not seek for help in carrying the scheme through from proper quarters which alone have the will and power to force such schemes upon the serious attention of the Government. Still, I am glad that he has at last made his public announce- ment, belated though it is, and I would suggest that in future he should adopt a different policy from that which he has adopted in the gast. The Labour movement generally will welcome his public adherence to the principle of Government control, and, incidentally, I may remark that the South Wales miners will receive with special satis- faction his admission that "much of the unrest in the South Wales coalfield has been due to the not unnatural discon- tent among the miners that the coal- owners were making undue profits out of the war." In themselves the proposals for the Government control of the pits are not new. They were suggested by the South Wales Miners' Federation from the very beginning of the war, and perhaps I may be allowed to remark that on several occasions in these articles I have expressed the Federation views on the subject. It was even suggested to the South Wales coalowners that they should voluntarily limit their profits during the war, so that the miners might come to a. beneficial social settlement with them in the matter of wages. The coalowners refused, and this refusal proves that in principle at least Lord Rhondda, as re- gards the social question of Government control, is nearer the Federation than he is to the Coalowners' Association. As the advocate of the Government control of the mining industry for the enhancement of the public welfare he will find that the Miners' Federation is the only or- ganisation that can push his scheme through on the right lines. As I pointed out in my last article, this matter of the Government control of the mines has become seriously complicated through the neglect of it during the past two years. The owners have pocketed "undue profits." The lust of profit-making has become greater through two years of unrestrained indulgence. But the need of a real social measure of control is more apparent than ever. It is admitted on all sides. STATE SCHEME. All that is needed to set up a satis- factory scheme of public control is that no further indulgence should be extended to the profiteer's lust for wealth, no matter how powerful it may have grown, and that the claims of the men upon the wealth already realised, and their wel- fare in face of the steadily rising cost of living, should be properly safeguarded. Let Lord Rhondda. make up for the blunder of his past silence. Let him not be merely a theoretical reforniei-, but a practical one. And above all, let him. on social questions, cut himself &drift from the men with whom he is associated in private profit-making. He will get no help from them, for they have no social vision. He must turn to the only quarter in which he can get the help he needs—the organised Trade Unions. Except in agreement "with thf Miners' Federation it will be impossible for him to get the Government to adopt a scheme for the Government control of the mining industry. But if he and the Miners' Federation can agree upon a fair scheme of Government control there is no power in the country that can prevent such a scheme being ulti- mately adopted.

RELIGIOUS PEACE

RELIGIOUS PEACE. Judge's Appeal to Wehh Nonconformists. Speaking at the Llandaff Diocesan annual conference at Cardiff, Mr. Justice Sankey made an appeal to Nonconform- ists. He seconded a proposal by Arch- deacon Edmondes that a diocesan chief bmissioner and two assistants should be appointed at a cost of nearJy £1,000 a year, whatever the effect of the Welsh Church Act might be "At the beginning of the war," he continued, "the position of the Chancel- lor of the Exchequer was occupied by a Welshman who, however much they might differ from him, had commanded their respect and admiration. (Applause) He (Sir John) recollected that at the very beginning of the war the subject upon which .N I r. Lloyd George laid special stress was the manufacture of 'silver bullets.' The silver bullet was needed in the State, but it was equally Useful in the affairs of the Church. This war would end. Already they could see the sun of victory rising in the East. (Applause.) When that day fully dawned it would be the time for helping, not for harming every religions body, and it would be the time for giving to and not the time for taking away from the Church. (Cheers.) To you. the friends of the Church (continued Sir John), it is not necessary for me to appeal to oome to her aid. I desire to appeal to a larger audience than I have the honour of addressing to-day. I de- sire to appeal to the opponents of the Church to come to her aid. There are in this country many Roman Catholics, many Nonconformists and many Church. men, but first of all we a.re British, and I appeal to them that they do at once come over and help us. (Applause.) After all, are we not all regiments marching to the same goal, and is it not madness for one of those regiments to try and deprive another of its means of exist- aloe 1 I yield to none as a Britisher in saying that I, at any rate, will never give up this war against Germany with- out inflicting upon her a crushing defeat -(a.pplawse)-but, with my friends the Nonconformists, what I desire with tham at the close of this world war is an honourable peace, and I ask that they will join us in promoting the service of Him Whom we acknowledge to be our Lord and Maoier."

THE ALLIES PEACE TERMS I I

THE ALLIES' PEACE TERMS! I I A German newspaper, "the "Kolnische Volkszeitung," says "The burning question comes to our lips again and again. When will this terrible war come to an end? But let us never forget that it is not only we who have to settle the terms of peace. The enemy's terms comprise the destruction of Germany, the partition of the German Empire in- to single States, the robbery of Ger- many's Fleet, merchant ships and Colo- nies, and a war indemnity of from two to three hundred thousand million marks (i.e., ten to fifteen thousand million pounds), to be spread over a hundred years. Would it not be an eternal dis- grace for Germany to accept such a peace?"

GOVERNMENTS INDICATION TO I IMR HARTSHORN

GOVERNMENT'S INDICATION TO I MR. HARTSHORN Mr Vernon Hartshorn, J.P., the I well-known Welsh miners' leader, has been invited by the Right Hon. Arthur Henderson M.P.. Labour ad- viser to the Government, to take a seat on the Consultative Committee which is intended to establish a definite means of co-operation between the Government and the organised labour movement. The committee consists of 15 prominent Trade Union leaders. Mr Hartshorn has for the I pas-t year or so also acted as a mem- ber of the Coal Trade Organisation Committee, a Departmental Com- I mittee of the Home Office.

Important Comp nation Point

Important Comp na- tion Point. Workman's Action Uphtid. » Judge LJoyd Morgan was called up- on on Monday last to decide a niot in- teresting and far-reaching question ci the greatest importance to all work- people. Joseph Creel, steelworker, claimed compensation from Richard Thomas and Co.. Ltd., of the South Wale-s Steel Works, Llanelly, in re- spect of an injury received during the course of employment. on 3rd of August last. Mr D. Villiers Meager, instruc- ted by Mr E. Harris, of Swansea, ap- peared for the applicant, and Mr Pros- ser, of Messrs. Kensholes and Prosser appearer for the employers. Mr Meager explained that. the dis- pute arose in the following way. On application for compensation. the em- ployers were asked to make an agree- ment wit.h the workman in the tame_ terms as a County Court award that is to say, the emplovers were asked to adnilt liability and to continue the ? full weekly payments during the con- tinuance of both total and partial in- capacity, and until either the parties greed upon some variation, or failing agreement the employers were able to satisfy the Court that the weekly pay- ments should be stopped or reduced. The employers, acting upon the advice of the Insurance Company, had re- fused to admit liability in these terms, but had offered to make the full week- ly payments during totol incapacity the amount to be paid during partial incapacity to be settled hereafter. The workman, who was being guided by his Trade Union, the British Steel Smelters' Association, had refused the firm's offer and also the weekly pay- ments and proceedings were com- menced. No witnesses were called to give evidence for the applicant's case. WORKMAN'S ACTION UPHELD. Mi- Meager read extracts from de- cisions of the Court of Appeal and a decision of the House of Lords which supported the workman's attitude, and asked his Honour by his award to give what the employers had refused to give bv agreement, namely, a right to continuance of the weekly payment* until a-notlyer agreement was made or until the court- otherwise ordered Mr Prosser called Miss Marsh. In replv to question she stated that she was responsible for the payment of compensation to men injured at the steelworks. Creel had not applied for his compensation, which was ready for him whenever he chose to call for it. He would not be asked to take it on any conditions. Cross-examined by Mr Meager, she said that she acted only upon ins true- > tions from the cashier, and did not know what was the question involved. Mr Prosser argued that, as Creel's compensation was ready to be paid whenever he applied for it. no ttueø- tion had arisen and therefore the court had no jurisdiction. He *l»o referred to several decisions of the Supreme Court. 1 At the conclusion of legal argument* his Honour stated that he was satis- fied the workman's attitude was cor- rect. Creel, having refused to accept compensation unless the employers gave the unqualified admission of liit- bility. acted within his rights, and therefore he was entitled to an award with costs on Scale B.

Sparing the Men

Sparing the Men. MR WILL CROOKS' TRIBUTE TO OUR MILITARY LEADERS, Mr Will Crooks delighted a large audience at the Bishopsgate Institute with a breezy and characteristic ad- dress. "When I was in A base hos- pital in France," he said, "1 said to myself: 'Coal is dear, tea is dear, meat is scarce, and life is hard to bear, but with it all it is nothing com- pared with what these brave lads are doing for us.' (Applause). No one knew what 'that. contemptible little Army' had saved us from. Many a bad man had made good, and many a hero had turned out where least ex- pected. 'We must end this war victoriously, he went on: "we are winning. (Ap- plause.) We could win faster, bu.t happily for us our genera lsare taking care of the men. God bless them." (Applause). Referring, in concl usion, to hi visit to stricken families after a recent raid Mr Crooks declared. "Rather than give in to the brutal barbarian who could do these bloody murders I woukl see every member of the British Empire peri«h.v (Cheer*).