Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
The Underground War

The Underground War. Ancient Caves as Dug-Ou?s. & MT. Henry Wood, the correspondent of the United Press of America with the French Armies on the Somme, gives in- teresting details of the ancient excava- tions on the front in Picardy now be- ing used by the Germans as underground fortresses. He es the one at Chilly ueair Chaulnes, 1,000 feet long, in which 400 Germans had taken refuse after the French attack had swept over. These ■eventually were forced to suBrender. Mr. Wood continues While the oa.ve warfare which has been adopted by the Germa.118 as their latent defensive tactics ie beiiig graatiy facili- tated at the southern extremity of ths Franco-British offensive by the existence of caves dug by the Huguemsts., it is be- ing even more facilitated At the notthorn extremity of the "big-push" by the existence of eJiStire underground villages. The caves, cellars, and vaults dug by the Hugunots in ike Province of San- terre, both for refuge and for concealing tfa-rir valuables, date back to the religieue wars which were waged in France sevoral centuries ago. The sub tern-mean Tillages in Mie no-rthern part of Pieardy are of a, snore antique origin, and go Igaek to feudal t' mes. As a rale they are dug into solid rock, and the French G-eaeraJ Staff ha* reason tbclieve tlwlt their «xif(tenoe wm lk)t only long age known to the Germans, but long ago counted tgpori by >tbe German General Staff tl8 a definite meatia fQT el mating ou to the •oil of France.

Tttiining of Disabled SoldiersI

Tttiining of Disabled Soldiers. I fa 6e Houae of OommoM oil Tvw- jUqp Mr Mayoe Fisher stated, iA& reply t4 Mr Hogge. iimi the Statutory Com- Sitfcoe had agreed with the I?ur?mc? (XtmniuMto?ora u??ot? a? scheme f?r the ■ladteal treatment (including specialist a&vice) of all disabled sailors and sold- irø, whether pr^ioudy i rushed or mpt. Witt rega-rcT to training io ed- tftiOli to special schemes suck as those im operation at Roehamrtoal, Brighton and St. Dunstan's, the Statutory Com- ttittee proposed to utilise aa far as possible the training which, waa a-90 rded by the local edutiol1 authori- ties. Further, the assistance of the Chambers o £ Com more# had "beeft •ought by means of a circular. The Statutory Committee were approach- ing the Treasury with the view of ob- taining sanction for the payment of all adeque.te. maintenance grant for the soldier during his period of train- ing in addition to the allowance for "his wife and family. With referance j;o employment, the Statutory Committee had made special arrangements with the Board of Trade as to the use of the Labour Exchanges and of the Department's professional classes register for officers. He might add that the demand for labour was so great and work was so plentiful t.hat there had been little diflfculty in employment being obtained. Sir C. Kinloch Cooke: In the event of any disabled soldier wishing to emi- grate will funds be forthcoming from the StateP Mr Haye Fisher: That is possible under the regulations of the Com- mittee, I

CHILDS DEATH FROM SCALDS I

CHILD'S DEATH FROM SCALDS. I The death took place at the Llanelly Hospital of David Richards, the 2J, year old child of Gwen Richards, Cainbritii- street, Seaside, as a result of scalds. It appMrs 5»t the child's mother was pre- paring to bath the child, and placed a pa? of water 

No title

Women carpenters make splints and other articles for the wounded in a Lon- don hospital. A pound of sugar given by a widow of Bedhampton (Hants.) m receipt of, parish rehef, who with her family had stinted themselves for a fortnight, real- ised £ 4 10s. at a P^-aini-CT'a' Red Cross Fund sale. While the picture, "The B;ttle of the Somme," was in progress at Ebbw Vale, a roar of cheering and laughter was heard from a party of wounded soldiers who were present, and this was the reason The fourth part pourtravs a scene in which wounded English and Ger- man prisoners are bring tended by the R.A.M.C. Amid the crowd of prisoners a figure staggered to the foreground of the picture, and was immediately recog- nised by every wounded soldier present, and also by many civilians as a popular jimate of Ebbw Vale Red Cross Hoq. 4>iUU, who waa himself present,

I MINE ABSENTEES

I MINE "ABSENTEES" I Managers Indicted by Men's I Leaders. Allegations of arbitrary action by managers of South Wales coal mines in turning away men who arrive late at work are made by miners' leaders m interviews published below. Mr George Barker, one of the repre- sentatives of Sou th Wales Oil the executive of tie Miners' Federation, seen by an English mining correspon- dent regarding the problem of absen- teeism in the pits, said:— "In South Wales there is no sym- pathy for the employers with reference to the regularity of employment. For instance, ab the Prince of Wales col- liery, A bercarn, t wo week ago MB men were sent back from the colliery at six a.m. because thw were not dews the pit when the hotter sounded. The men were there considerably before six but the management did not afford theIR facilities for going down the I)lt, ati(i those men are reported as absentees. It is difficult, in the faoe of action of this character on tike part of colliery managers, to persuade the men that there is any real necessity for regular work or foroool. "This is not a. solitary insto-aee. A case of a worse character occurred at the Arrail Griffin Colliery, when up- wer4dn of 100 men were tent back under similar circumstances. Both of theae Otliiell, I believe, have been neporteii to the Bome Office authorities." Mr James Winstone, president of tke South Walee Miners' Federation, Who WaM PTeSetlt, :—"I am deal- ing now with a. case wfie'se the manager *vned back 340 men who Jsad cerae to wwIt a shift because eome men Were late on thp pre | 8Wft." DANGER TO BIGHT HOUDS ACT. Mt- R-Glwt Smftlie prebideat of the Miaiors' Ferfteratiio* ei Great Britain, d a. meeting at the Skating Rink, Brynimawr. in reply to a ques- tioa whether the National ExecutiTe of the Fodoration haA Waken asy action iw. regand to the increased coet of living Mr SmslLie said it was a. Hvitter that sJiould be brought a Federation district. Further queg- fcionted, he Miid that men of miiiteu-j age in the oollieries who were exemp- ted from military service should work as ttoedtly a8 ^esKiVta in order to lwe- rent tlto suspensic-n of the Eight Hours Act fled, a r uc^ion of the age at which lads could be takou under- i ground. He believed there were some men who would be eelfi»h enough to take lads underground alfc an early age and he wanted that, if possible, to be prevented. He was qlfiteaware that in some districts the output of coal could be increas-ed by 20 per cent. if there was a regular attendance at the colliery. Men would stay away two, three, or even four days a week in some cases without reaeonable cause. There were many men who absolutely refused to go to the pit more than two or three days a week, and were not amenable to .the local committee. He appealed to his hearers to work regu- larly.

LEAVING THE CHAPEL 1

LEAVING THE CHAPEL. 1 NONCONFORMISTS AND PASTORS WHO SECEDE. There is, I am informed eays the London letter writer of t-he "Daily Dispatch," consternation and some bitter feeling among Welsh Noncon- formists at the number of their voung graduated theological students who have gone over to the Anglican Church at the completion of their theological and academical training at the var- ious denomin.atiofnal colleges. Recently three young Nonconformist ministers were received into the Anglican Church at Aberystwyth, and a Welsh Bishop has said that he knows of several other well-educated ministers belonging to the various denominations who are willing to go over. From the Nonconformist, point of view tho most bitter part of the pill is that these young men have been trained, and even kept and clothed, at the various colleges and universities for a period of five or six years at the expense of the various funds for which collections are made each year in the churches of each denomination. During the last few years more than eight theological students who were trained and got their degree at the expense of a certain denomination have left its fold, while quite a large number are to be found teaching in secondary and private schools. There is a movement to enforce ell ) future students to give a written pro- mise that- they intend to devote them- selves as ministers in the denomina- tLon i.o ?liicli. ti?y bel\Wg.. CI.

The Tanks in Action The Tanks in Action I

The "Tanks" in Action The "Tanks" in Action I I What an Ad;ance is like. I What an Advance is Like. I have been aeked a score of time what it feels like to be in an advance (writes an Officer-Correspondent in the "London Daily News). At first one thinks of few things but the music of the giiiis which pave the way to victory. We poor infan- try mortals are very spiall fry in these affairs of iron gods. And from what I ha.ve seen of the enemy after our assaults the majority of them, are reduced, to the state of merest worm. We are given a talc We pore over m-a-pe and make precise calculations. We become more and more important as the day ap- proaches. We take ap our positions with a consciousness that a big tllk--a juggle with death.—lies ahead. That is the time when we think--of England of home; friends. Here there ie nothing but doe- ytion, villages flattened till there is not 00. stone upon another, a wrecked country churned up Ity shell flre blasted arwl viUftated. Eiaglaud with her smiling c^uutirytiide knows no such tragedy of j dest ruction as this; and ii-Q-m the ruined land comes the incessant Porip of the giiiis. One think? hard in tie midst ef all thM e. I THE WAR MACHINE. f owi orily epetek for myself, bat I know t"t daring the days ei pfepa,ra- libn and the final hotiiis of waiting for "Beire" time I waz Jwpired by a feeling of supreme conffaenca in our war machine. 1% WAS half the battle, "The ryght before" I dined with the Colonel, who was to lead us on the Morrow. He WM x north ct*ut(ry doctor before the war; mid for eeventeen months hte had Led hifl battalion moat of the time tIL-iough T-)erilonA days in the Ypres Mklieni, iacludin? the Mcond bttle of ? Yprea. N?Y?r haa the T?rnto?ia? fty&tem fcu.rn»d out a fiaer hard, busi- ness-like, irl&piriug leader of raen. Some- one aAeid him what be thought of the of our attack. "Ww ahail do well, he eaid, with absolutely firm aca- ri

TINPLATE WORKERS

TINPLATE WORKERS. IMPORTANT LONDON CONFER- ENCE. A Londtnj correspondent says:— Some months ago arrangements were made whereby DwniQd tinplaters were not te be called up for military eer- i,lee-biit only in men under ?5 years of elpe. The period for which thia ajTftngemsnt we* made haa now expired, and the question has arisen whether the better course would fee to ealU up -b men for military terrice or whether it would Be wiser in view of the fact that over 6,060 men of that trade, equal to 3Q per cent, tbve en- Ilood, to roBerre the othera lof the great. extension taking place ivn the production, of atfteI. seeing that tin- platers ore lased 4 iwnffling hot nwtol asd werkin.g in heated atmosphere On Tuesday at tine invitation of the Ite- rT Occupation* Committee, re pre- serbtati" of employers and men 4iJIl- gaged in the tin plate trade met it-io <#,omraitte«j named at tRe Boarti t Trade end ed the matter. Ko decisio* was V., but tiie VOTE mlttoe gremised to give the views put forward on the ore litves fall con- ide ration. Before the maeting art tfce Doe. tlf Trade « prelimiiiary oonferew.N waa held, among tlieae present being Mewrs F. W. Gi&bi™, Theodore Gib- bins, ft. n4iiggx, W. Ii, Bdwaxdfl, D. Tvewifi, S- W K- Tregoning. Hy. Pwllard H. Striok ftilr súaJ yf fa'a) an. H. !W\iI.JROJH{ (secretary) reprebdatftia tie employer#, and if", A. Pugh, Ivor Gwyteoe, T Grifflih., and lvorla*. repiusonling the workmen, 8Dd W TiJleU ikqpl* aen ing the pockem, Ulaium WOMEN DP SINGLE ItD'S I BLAOES. Mr Llewelyn Williams K.C., re- cently called the attenwien of the Munitioms Ministry to the rewlu8 of local tribunals in Oarnmr^jemshire with regard to the employment of so many single men in certain works in the country. He has been informed that as tresult of an inspection of the various firms, arrangements have been made for increasing the number of women employed, ami for releasing a number of unskilled men of military age,

Adulterated NewsI

Adulterated News. I BRITISH BAN ON AMERICAN I AGENCY. The Press Bureau haa issued the following:- In the House of Commons on the 27th June last, the Secsetary of State for the Home Department stated t at attention had been drawn to an aJeged telegram relating to the Jut- land battle which appeared in certain American newspapers as having been sent from London by the correspon- dent of the International News Ser. vice. No such message was included in any telegram sent from this coun- try. In view of the continued garb- ling of messages and breach of faith on the part of the International News Service, the Secretary of State had directed that no representative of the International News Service shall be permitted to use the Official Press Bureau, and that the Agency shall be debarred from the use of all other facilities for the transmission of news until further notice. do

FEDERATION OF LABOUR UNION

FEDERATION OF LABOUR UNION. In reference to the Federation of the Labour Union connected with the steel smelting tirades it is understood that the ballot of the British steel smelters is ai- med cxinifjlebyd, aind the figures are something like 16,000 in favour of feder- ation and 14,000 against. The National Steel Workers' Unions have also decided in favour and also the National Steel Workers' League. There now only r-e- main the Tin and Sheet Millmen's As- sociation of South Wales and the Scot- tish Milltni-n to come in, hut they call- Dot affect the general result, j

MINERS1 EXECUTIVE j

MINERS1 EXECUTIVE. I Tribnnal and House Coal j HauHets. i The Executive Council of the South W ales Miners' Federation met at Car- diff on Monday, Mr James A\ instone. J.P., pre?iding? Mr Thomas Richards M.P. (general ?cretaj-y?, and Mr A. Onions (general treasurer) were also present. The estiaiate of expenditure neces- sa-rr to be incurred at the Labour CoL lege to the end of the year was re- ceived M!d considered. It wa? resolved that. the estimate o? expenditure to the S?t of December be paid, it bein? understood tha-t no further expenditure after that date is to be incurred by keeping the college open. It was reported that hauliers em- ployed by workmen for hauling c-l for domestic purposes had been re- fused oxpmption from military service. It was resolved that deputation con- sisting of the officials wait upon the Home Secretary on the matter. The Council resolved that it could noi undertake to become a eoKiinittee for war savings purposes. f The general secretary was instructed to inrext ^«ibe the position of crafts- men wider ifoe ti»err^>]oyme«it stec-tion 01 the Insuranw Avt. The questie* of tiie cost of explosives was again raised by the Anthracite District. It wae deeided that the m att er lie oonsides-ed \¡y the Concilia- tion Boo*d. The price list for Llest Colliery was fteoepted.

IN GERMAN EAST AFRICAi

IN GERMAN EAST AFRICA. I Chdach Sower's Experiences. A Gtydiuih mldier a"Yi)mg with the Brilish forces hi German FAW4 Ahic writes Ix?ae ? a friend giTiMp- a de&- cription of the e&ptured ?Germ?n Rows of Tomjja. Proceeding, ke says:— "Tfeie town hag beem a pretty place Unftl it aeceired the ailenUoiis of the ATavy, »ftho»^b it » not 80 bad now. We are fixed 1IIp UI. a finte house with its roof nai«cinav end Ititfl of sheik are still lying ftbwt niezu- are still IQIbø id ttiags leh hePL-, amongst fkwwn Veing the town hand--Al niggers. It is '8OB1- baed I oan aseure you, and whoever traia&ed t-he.1I1 must have had napre pationce with a Bigger tfcan I have RTfoelf. And there are some fine buildings here which have not been touehed. All the hotels h-wre start with the name of the KaiseT, and finish off with Drome or Dorome. There are still quite a number of civilians leit, such as Greeks and Indians, all of whom carry on their business as usual. The most interesting sights of all are the trenehes one sees where- ever he goes. They have been construc- ted tinder very skilful direction. I should think. But the grim signs of wa

No title

The first lady bank manager has been appointed to a branch of the London City a.nd Midland Bank. At Swan. an enine-driver, Thomas Griffiths (30), summoned for being an Army absentee, was alleged to have said when arrested, "I don't want to fight; I don't believe in fighting." He claimed that he was a qualified driver and cold- rr>ll machine man, and consequently ex- fTnpt. L ined 40s. and handed over to the military authorities.

I Wheat and Freights

I Wheat and Freights. i I Government Action at La?t. r In the House of Common* on Tue&- f day, the President of the Board ci > Ti-(Ie, (Mr Runciman). answering Sir J. MacCallum. said the possibility- of large quantities of wheat, which are at present locked up in some grain-ex- porting countries, being freed a* the result of military operations has led to a disinclination on the part of the trade to hold more s ocks than an ab- solute minimum, and it has become clear that the supplies during the coming year cannot safely be left. tn private enterprise- The Government have accordingly endorsed a conciu«o» arrived at by the Cabinet Committee on Food Supplies that we must now provide a further development of iD'" portotioin bv the Stnte. The King has approved tfie appointment of a Royal Commission entrusted with fut powers to take steps as they iiaav deem necesserv and desira ble to ensure — quate Mid regular supplies mf wheat and flour for the United Kingdom is co-operation with the Committee whi48 Lqinc,o the beginning of the precept vear. has been purchasing wheaf an4 flour for the Allies. This moans ;6at. e.. t tititc) *.i kt the importation ef wheat into lat Fnfeod Kingdom will have to be -on- dertaken Larselv. if not entirelv, Ittndw the control of the Rrfyal Commission. II "RHB STATE TO*TAKE THB j PROFITS. j In anticipation of this step tlw Government have made a very larpr purchs^se of Australian wheat. S kftlve new been taken to provide all m tonnage required for th4s cclnvovanoo of the wheat purchased by is U 4 QMtV-' .S GOT Ma J that veeeee t so requisitioned will te rpqtt?d to provide the sp&C neeft- :yj s&rv for State importations at &3?  Mid no? vafi??te rate of freigh?. Further details for the guidasoe <>f the cocn exchanges will be pu blished. expeditiously, and arrangements havt > already been made in co-operation with the trad e to prevent any in(terrtiptid!i» in the regular and adequate supply of j wheat to the British and Irish mills ;| during t4ie short transition ctage. MIDDLEMEN EXPLOITERS I ELI.NIINATED. Mr Wardlc: Are definite steps to be taken wheli the wheat arrives in th's .» country to ensure that no inereaee ii1 price beyond what is reasonable will be charged by retailers? Mr Runciman: Yes, certainly. The Government had no intention of bring- ing wheat here under th esk, conditiom and then allowing the whole advant- t age to be filched from the corifluroerfi. Lord Crawford will act as chairman of the Commission. (Cheers). Mr Alan Anderson, a well-known business man, will act as vice-chairman. Sir George Saltmarsh, Sir Henry Rew. and Mr Royden. who have already done much 1 work for the Government in expert capacities, will sit on the Commission. There will also be present the prvoi- dent of the Millers' Association, Mr Oswald Robinson. Mr Rathbone. and Mr Patrick.

I i Tribunal and VTC I

Tribunal and V.T.C. In a letter to the Tribunals with re- gard to exemptions given on conditioii a. man joins a V. T.C.. Mr Walter Long says: "Such a condition should not. of course, be enforced unless it is- ad- visable in the national interests and fair to the man to require him to com- ply with it; for instance, if he is em- ployed for long hours on work which if of national importance it may be un- wise to compel him to devote part oi v his leisure to some public service which will make a further demand on his already }w.avily-taxed en&rgie:- Even if the man may have the time. it should be clear that lie can reason- ablv give the services required. All- ■; that is desired is that the Tribunal should not impose the condition when it would be unreasonable." ————-

No title

Of the Welsh colonists who went out I to settle in Patagonia in the sixties there are thirty-five still left, ailve, of whom thirty are still in the colony. Among later settlers are a nuinker of I rami ires trom the Ystatyfera district