Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Absenteeism in Steelworks

Absenteeism in Steel- works. FURNACELMAN WHO EARNED £ 15 FINED £ 3 FOR HAVING OVER- SLEPT! Charges of ab.-er.teeism against a dozen «taelw orkitors employed at a controlled establishment in the county withdrawn at Moumeutiu-hire Munitions Court (Aid. J. T. Richards presiding) on the appli- cation of the company's representati ve, who said that satisfactory EL.ss.ura.nces had bean given by the repretentafcves of the Trade Cmiion oorioerned that they would apply all the prtssu-re they could to pre- renot a repetition of the offencas. The chairman said if the Trade Unious could effect an improvement it was to the advantage of the State that it should be done, and the tribunal would certainly not object, because it was better to prevent absence than punish it. The tri- bunal would allow th3 ca os to be with- drawn, and would watch the result. Alfred Scr^-gg and Robert Meyrick, moulders at another works were fined 30s each, fcT playing cards when they should have been working. Jeremiah Gallivan, a smith's striker, who pleaded to absence on, January 1. 3, 7. 8. and 9, said he was not gettinig enough money to keep his family, and he had therefore, joined the Army to en- zible his family to get more money. He way fined £ 1. Henry Biiiin«ham, a leading furnaoe- jnam, who w?j? stated to earn somelrmca JB13 to t 15 per N (there was an aver- age oft9 9a par week for 13 weeks) ■was fined £ 3 for- absence on December 27, when lie to'd the manager he over- skrpt. A ch-tr.re wh eler, nnrrrd James Noden wal; fined 50.?.. for absence on three days in Chiristanss week.

Craigcefnparc Soldier I

Craigcefnparc Soldier. I HOW HE MET HIS DEATH IN FRANCE. V In the course of a eymtPvU-lietic letter, Sec.-Lieut. Stathan explains how Private Rees J. Rcas (Welsh Re>g ment) of Pantyreithyn, Crai pee f.) pare, was killed in action, in France on D.c. 27th, last. He wrote :— It is with great regret that I write to tell you of the death of your brother, Pte. R. T. Rees, who was killed in action to-day. He was standing by my eide at the time, so I saw how he was killed. He received a shrapnel wound in the head, and died almost, immediately. It will console you to know tha,t he had no pain. Being one of the orig'nal bat- talion he had seen over two years' ser- vice in France, and was an excellent soldier, a good worker, and died deing his duty. He was popular with the officers and men of his battal:on, and all were very sorry to hear of his deaitlh. Please accept my deepest sympathy in your bereavement.

BULLET EXTRACTED FOR THE HEART

BULLET EXTRACTED FOR THE HEART. Professor Gaudier, of Lille, chief sur- aeon of the Nice Centre, has successfully extracted from the heart of a, Russian officer a bullet which he rooeive.d on the Bulgarian front. The operation took place at he South African Ambulance at Cannes, which is supported entirely by Soath Afr-'can money, and is doing magnificant, work among the French, Russian, and Serbian wounded.

JC30000 GIFT FOR A HOSPITALI

JC30,000 GIFT FOR A HOSPITAL. Mr. T. Wytton, chairman of the joint eornimittoe of Abertillery tradesmen and workpeople, which has been seeking to erect a cottage hospital for Abertil'ery and Disij'-iefc, announced at a local trades t-ouncil en Tuesday that the Ebbvr Valo Company had agreed to build a cottage hospital at a. cost involving £ 25,000 to R,30,000, and to contribute 50 per Cent, towards the maintenance. The hospital ij to be open to all-tr."Aes lnü¡l and residents in the district who contributed to it-, maintenance, on equal ms with the connpaaiy's workmen. The «mp,-i.ny insist that, it shall be one of the hes-L of i-+v. kind in. "Wales, and one of the bcift equipped with appliances and LHstrurnents for the a of eu erung that the mind of mam. dU1 devise.

GULLS RAID ON HAII OF SPRATSI

GULLS' RAID ON HAII OF SPRATS I Whilst Deal ifshermen on Tucsdav were making a record haul « £ eprats ihey woro attacked by *warm,s of sea- gulls. Hard wether had made the birds so ravenous that as the leavily laden nets were being; ha.uled in they swooped do and fiercely attacked fcfoa fish, making at the same time a fearful clamour. It was only with considerable difficulty that the fisher- men were alfle to keep the birds at bay with their OSTS, Stwno single iauls exceeded 100,000 sprats.

INational Service for IAllI

I National Service for I. All. Ir. Neville Chamberlain, Director- General 'of National Service, presided at Birmingham at the first provincial meet- ing of the National Alliance of Employ- ers and Employed. Among those on the phtform was Mr. John Hedge, Minister of Labour. MI. Cliamiberlain said :— "011 what we do in the course of the next few weeks may perhaps depend the question whether we shall win vicitry in the next spring, or whether we shall have to endure a fourth winter of hos- t. lilies. ANY STEPS NECESSARY. Having alluded to the enormous work of the nation in providing men, tions, coal for ialdustriæ, ships and money, Mr. Chamberlain proo.,c.,(ied '■ While the Govecrani nit desire to give the nation eveay opportunity of its own voiit.on to come forward in the country's need, they w.11 not hesitate to take aJoly &tep« which may be neoe«.^ary to briikg the war to a Kuooee«fu] conclusion, in- eluding conpuls.ry national service, if voluntary .service is not found adequate. "It wiU be my duty very shortly t.) issue a great appeal to tht, country, an a,ppeal for our people to jain a new induistri^i army. In diovng so, I do not with to to any man feat, by becoming a volunteer in this, army, he is to better his portion." po-t i 4>ti. Ofe of the would arise aXter the war, oaiid Mr. Chambec- lain, would be tivit of demobilisation, acid for this the cooperation of mpitoA and lab QUI* would bo required. NEW LABOUR EXCHANGE. Mr. Hodge xa.:d that from the monient lie bocame M arster of La'>ux he wa. vei to 1:cleT,,}>é;,nd th:¡rt lie had the handiiivr of the probleni of deanobiliisa.- L;œ1. Thove were goi.r.g to be about SIX cr hundred new labour cxcliangeg. There wcmld. be MI exohaugc, or sub- exchange, so that none. of our returned boys 'would have to go more than five miles to an exchange. When they got there they would be in telephonic com- o.,i ,Jl r;}tmd. so 

French Oiils Braver I

French Oiil's Braver}. I CHECKED THE ADVANCE OF A GERMAN ARMY CORPS. Public homage has been done to a brave French girl, aged 21—Mile. Mar- cellc Sommer, who in the early days of the war, just after Charleroi, checked the advance of a German army corps for 24 hours. Outnumberea, the French troops, were retiring before the enemy, who were in hot pursuit, when the French crossed a canal swing-bridge at Ecluaier. Mile. Sommer followed them, and had th3 courage to stay and uncra.nk the bridge, making the canal impassable. She then threw the crank into the water, so that I the Germans should not take it from heir if any swam over and captured her. She did this under heavy oremy fire (says a Paris correspondent). Later she saved the lives of 16 French wounded soldiers. Finadly the Germans, who had thrown a tamporary bridge over the canal, seized her while she was carrying a 1 rench priva.be. She made no attempt to concetti what she had done, and proudly said, "I am .an orphan. France is my only mother, and I am ready to die for her." She was sentenced to death, and wa,3 before the firing squad, when a. French 75 shell opportunely scattered the Ger- man,?., who were about to shoot her. Res- cued by the French troops ehe had saved she acted as their guide between the liken?)1 n^led linea, and was again cap- tured, and wm looked up in the church at Friae. A French shell made a breach m the church wall, through whioh she escaped, the French artillery having thMA saved her life a seoond time. Whilo the bevmbnrdment continued General Baret decorated her with the Legion of Hononr on Decemher 13, 1914, and subsequently she received the Croix de Guerre. When the Bu-jtish took over this sector of tlie Somme frcnt. their oom- manding general rendered public homage to "the grand French girl," and ordered his ineit to give her the military salute whenever they saw her.

I FIVE YEARS FOR RICK FIRE I

FIVE YEARS FOR RICK FIRE. A sentence of five years' penial servi- ( tude for firing a rick has been passed at Somerset Assizes, on a tramp. Mr Justice I Bray said this offence was extremely E-erioaia in war time.

STEEL FOR TINPLATE WORKS I

STEEL FOR TINPLATE WORKS. I It will be recalled that Mr Frank Gilbertsen (Pontardawe) and Mr. D. S. Davies were appointed by the authorities to allocate the steel available among- tin- plate manufaotrurers. Measures in this I di.ri-ction are now being a.rrrnge

I LABOUR PARTY i CONFERENCE I

I LABOUR PARTY i CONFERENCE. I HUGE MAJORITY SUPPORTS WAR POLICY. BITTER ATTACK BY PACIFISTS. The sixteenth annual conference of the Labour Party was opened on Tues- day in the Albert Hall, Manchester, and continues till Friday. Mr G. J Wardle, M.P., presided, aind the prin- cipal members of the party were pre- sent. "fiiev included Mr Arthur Hen- derson (a, member of the War Cabinet) Mr John Hodge (Mimsiter for Labour), Mr Barnes (Minister for Pensions), ,Mr Brace (Under Home Secretary), and other prominent leaders. About 700 delegates attended. The subjeots down for discussion were of an im- portant character as bmring on the war and the position of labour when peace is deolaired. MUNITIONS DISASTER: VOTE OF SYMPATHY. On taking the chair Mr Wardle said:—"Our first duty this morning is to pass a vote of condolence with the victims of the terrible disaster which hajppen«d in London last week." I The delegates stood in their places aa a mark of respect, In liis presidential address Air .Wardle reonarked that whether the ,party was to be a failure as a regult of internal disoonsioll largely depend- ed on the result of that conference. The strength of tho pan-ry had been its catholicity, its tolerance, its wel- come even to revolutionary thought. It had not., like the German Socialist {xarty, been drilled into an army or regimented into a bureaucracy. Any such attempt spall disaster. Referring to the war, Mr Wardle 5-lid :1 aim as convinced to-day as I was at the outset that there could have been one grro t-er tragedy than ,the war, and thart would have been for [ Britain, to have kept out of it." (Loud cheers and a little dissent). Mr Wardle was commenting on the objects of the war w:hcn he was met with cries of "What about Con- stantinople ?" "The present is not the time," lie continued, "to diiscuss that matter." (A Voice: "Why not?") PRESIDENT WILSON CHEERED. I "Recently," added Mr Wardle, J "there havo been put forward over- ,tures for peace; but the Germans usod the language of victors and as- sumed tilie rotl-e of dictator's. Since then President Wilson (at this point a good many of the delegates jrose, waved hats and handkerchiefs, and cheered for President Wilson). At the conclusion 'of the cheering Mr Wardle remarked: "We shall know better before the end of the confer- ence what this means. (Much cheer- jnlg). We aire fighting for the free development of all peoples. (Cries of *N*h,at ab-out TreYand?"). Germany has not renounced her war aims- (a Voice: "Nor Riissi,a")--aiid iintil sho does so peaee is rn;possible." (Cheers). I PARTY AND NEW COALITION. The big question of the conference, .the action of the executive in deciding to accept Mr Lloyd Gerge's invita- tion to Labour to join the Govern- ment, then came up for consideration. Mr Arthur Henderson moved the adaption of the paragraph in the exe- cutive's report relating to the de- cision to accept office in the Govern- ment. Mr Henderson said that in the pauses which led up to the crisis the Labour Padty had no part or lot. He was invited by the prceeat Prime Mimistar to convey to the Parliament- ary party the suggestions he had to na.ke in the hope of securing t'he co- operation end co-partnership of the Labour Party with the new Govern- ment. In May, 1915, when they ac- cepted Mr Asquith's invitation to join ,the Coalition, they were told that they had got very little in return. Per penally, he never viewed the matter from that standpoint. He thought in a. national crisis li-ke tMs, if they were going to co-operate with any Govern- ment, they ought to concern them- selves more with what tbef were going to get. He det-ermine,d to ascertain from Mr Lloyd George the most that. lie was prepared to give, not onJy in. jbho way of places in his Gaverent, hiit more—what he was prepared to ,do as to policy. MR LLOYD GEORGE'S STATE- MENT. The 

I Womans Future

I Woman's Future, ) I Is She to Go Back to Her Pots and Paas ? Mrs. Lewis Donald, of Leicester. pre- siding at the 11th aiinual conference of the Women's Labour League in Gaxtan HaJl, Saifora, in her ad-drcss a." president said that had women had their share in the management of affairs in our own and other countries &uch a mess as the world-war could not have oomoe about. In r"lgatd to women's employment after the war she ask. d, "Is the woman going back l.ke Joan of Arc to her plough and rough, menial work after dellver-jil, her country, and, Laying down her armour, is she going to leave the arena of oom- merce, to lay down her uniform tram conductor, postman, ,and the rest, and go back to her pots and kettles, to un- paid, and what, is worse, unconsidered labour, or to the lower alleys of factory work? If she stays on, on what terms is she to srk or main- tenance at fair rates should be provided for all women displaced from em ploy ment to make way for men returning. The repeal of the Military Service Acts was also called for. A resolution of sym- pathy with the sufferer" from Friday's explosaca was unanimously carried.

I WE MUST FIGHT TO A FINISH j

"WE MUST FIGHT TO A FINISH. I JOHN HODGE AND A PEAOO MOVE. Speaking r.t Roiherhazn lr, Jdln Hodge, Minis-ter of La-bor.r. repudiated the message with respect to peace seat to Pres'dent WiL4cn by a. certain .section j of labour in this country. He knew the opinion of Mis fellow trade unionifte, and could assert without- hesitation that the great volume of t'at opinion considered a PTerntuJ:'o or inconclusive W-tee would be an even greater disaster than war it- self. "We must fijjht to he decLared, "for ?h? bcn?t cf poe't-eiSty, no matter how ??a.t the sacriace may he The only wa? to secure a lasting pæce is to ft gilt to the end. I ;il most think when I look back upon our peace mis- sions to Germany tnat we were an awful set of you can supply the word yourselves. Workman, he added, c?uld -now see the eiIllness of our "open door" policy. He would have no more German steel in this country while there was a single idle furnace here. I

No title

A delay has occurred in the ksue of I the new £1 notes; they should have b:en available cc ="f"n<

I Darkness Fatality I

I Darkness Fatality. I i CLYDACH MAN SUFFOCATED- I TH1WUGH FALLING INTO A BROOK. At the Clydach Police Station on Tues- day mprn-ng, Mr. R. W. Be ,r (coroner) conducted an inquiry into the circum- stai-'Kes attending the deaih of a married Jl).Jl naJned Thos. Thomas, Ynistaaiglw*, Clydach, who was found dead in a br ok near hia home late 0.11 Saturday night. Mr. Tom. Sani-tb was foreman of tht ] ury. William Themis, Cwmrhydyceirw, bro- th-ET of the deceased, #ave ev.dence of identificat oa. He said the d, ea.s.ed w 40 years of age, and was employed as a labourer at the Clyduch Fuel Works. He last saw h.s brother alive on the pre- vious Saturday. John Hughes, RoVerts'-rcw, Clydech, labourer at the Futil Works, said that deceased and himself c ;.me home to Clydach from Morriston on the 9.40 p.m. train on Saturday. On alighting at Cly- dach, deceased stoPTted to talk to too porter, and witness gave- up hia ticket to the collector and went home. He left the deceased on the piatform. When wit- ness war, on the canal bank lie 'W.iS hailed by the deceased from the canal bridge. where he had again &:op.pe.t1 to t-ala W u fiiend. Witness replied, "Come oil, Tom end proceeded on his way home. Later. cweasf^i'g little girl came to his home and a.t.koed wrtriess wiure wa- h r father. Hannah Hughes, wife of the previous witn,Es- said that deceased's wife came to her h>me in an excited eta e at abori 10.30 on Saturday night, and told her that her husband had lot c'me home. V«'dtaiest^ told us "Let us go and loolc for him." They both went in roi.rch of him. t

WOMEN TO HAVE THE VOTE

WOMEN TO HAVE THE VOTE there -is authority foT stat'ng (;-avs UHO E^ xcJian^e Telegraph Company) that the Speaker's conference on el ectoral reform and registration has decided by a con- siderable majority in favour of the general principle of women suffrage. There is a SOKII minority against grant- mg the oojicesisioni or. equal terms to thoso enjoyed by the opposite sex.

I GREAT EXPLOSION IN CHINESE COAL PIT

I GREAT EXPLOSION IN CHINESE COAL PIT. A gas explosion has occurred in the- Oyama, Pit, the largest of the Fadxun coal mines, belonging to the South Man- ehur Railway. Out of 188 m?n. ?? were tekn\' a.t t.Jle  1.0 ::Je m¡":lg-. were below a& U?e tme I.OT ?e m ?-:?. 

16 FINE FOR ADULTERATEBUTTER

£ 16 FINE FOR BUTTER. A smart penalty was inflicted bv the Pembroke Dock Bench m a CA « in which a farmer pleaded guilty to selling hutter aduiterateii by 40 p cr cent. 

PAYING REBELS THEIR WAGES

PAYING REBELS THEIR WAGES. The "Belfast Telegraph" says th< employees of the Dublin Corporation who have been interned for participa- tion in the Sinn Winers, rebellion and have been released are to be paid their ksalaries or wages in full for the time they were absent from their duties, .and several of these officials have al- ready received cheques some including twar bonuses, for the amounts they would have -drawn if they had been vorking in th"-ir different posrts sinoc Mav last 1 p--