Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
NEATH CONSTITUENCY I

NEATH CONSTITUENCY • A mooting of the Executive Com- M* tee of the new Liberal Association for the Neath Parliamentary Division was held on Saturday at the Liberal j Club. Aid. Kopkin Morgan (the ^Tor), presided. It was unanimously resolved that Mr J. Hugh Edwards, ^•P. for Mid-Glamorgan, be adopted as the Liberal Candidate. This resolution will be submitted for confirmation to a full gone.rid mcet- ing of the Association on Jure- 8th, and Mr Edwards will 11.> asked to nd- dress the meeting. Mr Edwards has held the Mjd-Gl h morgan seat since 1910. A large number of societies have ^opted Mr Ivor Gwynre, Tinplate '17 k 1"' .1' 1. "?k<'rs I?no! :? thfir candidate, hl M number of Branches in the I "ivtsi?? h:ln nominated the Rev. Her- bert Morgan, M.A., of Bristol, as In- (?f l?ristol, is l?ii- doP?P

ECCENTRIC AMERICANS DEATHI AT SWANSEA

ECCENTRIC AMERICAN'S DEATH I AT SWA-NSEA At Sw ansea on Monday in inquest was held oil the body of an American naraed Alfred Sinus (3G,) found on Saturday on th esaads ne-ar the West Pier. Death was said to be due to starvation. Evidence was given that the man came over to Swansea in a cattle boat and had since obtained work in the town. He was of eccen- tric habits, and seemed to suffer from religious mania, frequently stopping his work to kneel down and pray, and i of using to partake <;f any food but bread ami water. Dr. Trevor Evans said a post-mortem showed there was 110 S-g»< of any food in his stomach, a-nd death was due to exposure, ex- haustion, and starvation. The jury returned a verdict to this effect, add- ing that, the starv-ation was self- Iraposed.

ALIENS AND IGNORANCE OF THEI LAW

ALIENS AND IGNORANCE OF THE I LAW. Thirtv Russians, fined at Thames Police Court on Tuesday with failing to notify their change of address, offered the usual plea of ignorance of the It w. "If it had anything to do with your business or putting money in your pocket, you would know what to do," said Mr Rooth, the magis- trate, "but when it is a question of conforming to the laws of the coun- try that has given you hospitality, you plead ignorance."

UBOAT LETTER TO MR LLOYD GEORGEI

U-BOAT LETTER TO MR. LLOYD GEORGE. I When Mr Lloyd George returned to London from Scotland he found await- ing him the "letters for Mr Lloyd George" which were handed to a sur- vivor of the Irish steamer Inniscarra (running between Cork and Fishguard) by the commander of the U-boat which sank her. One of the letters, which Was enclosed in an official envelope, with German stamps, and sealed, says: "We have been having a very nice and interesting time in the Irish &t. All we have missed is some of your speeches to laugh over." The letter is signed, and tlio writer's rank is given as second-lieutenant, to which he adds, "Hun Barbar and Baby- killer." It is written in indelible ink and covers two sheets. The letter was no doubt intended as a U-joke. The real joke is that soon after the Inniscarra was sunk an American destrover sank the U-boat. Some, at any rate, of the crew were rescued, and landed as prisoners, but it is not stated whether the polite letter-writer was among them.

I GLYNCORRWG WIFES DISI I CO VERY

I GLYNCORRWG WIFE'S DIS- I CO VERY. j David Lewis (38), a Glynoorrwg col- lier, who had been unable to sleep and had not been able to work for twelve Months, has been found dead by his wife. He was sitting in a chair with his face on a gas c> stove, his head covered by a tablecloth, and the gas turned 011. <

IMINERS MEAT SUPPLY I I

MINERS & MEAT SUPPLY. I • I Mr. J. Winstone, J.P., presi- dent of the S.W. Federation of Miners, has received, in reply to representations he made to the Ministry of Food on behalf of Welsh miners, a telegram which states that Mr. Clynes is doing his best personally in the matter of increasing the meat supply to South Wales and Monmouthshire. The telegram adds: "Mr Clynes hopes to ease the position, but there is a great shortage of live cattle owing to increased rations He knows that Welsh miners will a ppreciate the difficulties, other industrial areas having almost en- tirelv frozen meat at present. The Ministry of Food desires in the national interest to turn grass into meat during these fine weeks by allowing cattle to fatten. The ai m is to be fair all round, and South Wales claims are certainly not forgotten.—Ministry of Food."

DIRTIEST TOWN IN ASIA I

DIRTIEST TOWN IN ASIA. I HIT AND ITS "MOUTHS OF HELL". I We h^ve entered a new country on the Euphrates, and our ad- vanced troops are relieved to be out of the dismal, flat, featureless, deltair plains (writes Mr. Edmund Chandler, official press correspon- dent with the Expeditonary Force in Mesopotamia). Hit marks a dividing point on the Euphrates. These small ancient Biblical cities are built on refuse. Tie Hit of to-day is built on a strata of Hits dating back to the Ava of the Bible. Inside the town the dogs are the municipal scavengers. Outside mangy little donkeys forage in the offal in lieu of grass. From the bitumen wells whiffs are car- ried into the town sometimes when the wind is in the west, and the change of smell is, if anything a relief. The Arabs used to call these bitumen wells, which are scattered all over the desert, "the mouths of hell." There is one within half a mile of Hit, and it lives up to its re- puted origin. The foul gas spurts up in intermittent gushes, raising the scum in bubbles like gigantic black boils, which distend and burst with a hissing sound. The pitch discharges itself, down a slope, where it is collected and carried away by the Arabs in the panniers of their donkeys. Boats are caulked with it. It is invalu- able for boat bridges. Basket work coated with with bitumen is used as a substitute for wood ii) the gufas or round coracles peculiar to the country, and for metal in the pitchers which the women of Hit carry down to the Euphrates—a different type of vessel from any I have seen else- where. Bitumen, water-wheels, and dirt are likely to be the abiding impressions that the soldier will carry away from Hit. I have al- ways thought of Hit as the dirti- est little town in Asia, and in this judgment the sentiment of the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force is with me. The crime of the Turks here has been the destruc- tion of the fruit trees. The people of Hit have not forgiven, and are not likelv to forget the crime. I have no doubt that the temples of the gods of Ava were in con- tinual. disrepair, and the walls and floors innocent of whitewash and pitch. But in now in one Rmall corner of the town where a familiar flag is flying masons and scavengers are busy, immemorial t (smells are being exorcised, and the work of purgation has begun.

79 YEARS IN A WORKHOUSEI

79 YEARS IN A WORKHOUSE. Lizzie McMorrow, after being 79 years an inmate of Manor Hamilton Union, has died at the age of 861

FIFTH WEEK OF TEACHERS STRIKE I

FIFTH WEEK OF TEACHERS' STRIKE. I • ■ The assistant teachers' strike jn East Carmarthenshire has now entered its fifth week, and there is still no prospect of a settlement of the disrrate. All the schools have been reopened after the Whitsun holidays, but a big de- crease in attendance is reported. It is reported that, acting on advice of the National Union of Teachers, the headmasters at the various schools, who are at pre- sent working out their notices, and as the only teachers in the respective schools have to attend in some cases to hundreds of child- ren, have decided not to admit more than sixty children to any school, Sthis beiiig the number that a certified teachers is responsible for. and the remainder of the children will be sent home. The opinion generally is that this drastic action will accelerate a settlement of the unfortunate dis- pute.

LLANELLY PROHIBITION

LLANELLY & PROHIBITION. The result of the plebiscite taken at Llanelly last week on the question whether prohibition ought to be introduced for the duration of the war has now been announced :— For prohibition 9,054 I Ag-ainst. 4,043 Majority for 5,011

TIN PLATE TRADEI

TIN PLATE TRADE. I As the summer approaches the difficulty of keeping tinplate mills at work, due to scarcity of labour, is increasing. The Centra l Com- I mittee dealing with recruiting has intimated that recruitment, from I the tinplate trade he suspended, and industries to which tinplate workmen were transferred have been asked to retransfer them, their place to be filled by released soldiers.

GERMAN PRISONERS ANDI COAL MINES

GERMAN PRISONERS AND I COAL MINES. In answer to Colonel Sir F. Hall in the House of Commons, Mr. Macpherson said that there were now 65,000 German prison- ersoof war in this country, of whom 42,000 were employed in agriculture and other works of national importance. A further 10,000 were earmarked for such employment pending arrange- ments for their sa fe custody. The Coal Controller had been ap- proached with the view to the em- ployment of some of them, but there were grave difficulties in the way.

ABERGAVENNY SCHOOLBOYS I FEAT

ABERGAVENNY SCHOOLBOYS I FEAT. Abergavenny affords a notable ex- ample, quoted by the Board of Educa- tion, of the working of a co-operative school potato field. T" v elementary school masters a.t Abe. gay en nv last year rented four fields with an aggre- gate nf 24 acres. It warj ploughed up in tho ordinary way and marked out into rows for potato growing, and the r » r, which totalled over 1,000 were leased to the boys and girls attending schools in the town. The children planted their own rows and hoed and dug the potatoes. The total crop per row, an aggregate of 210 tons. Such a suc- cess has been the scheme that 34 aores are being cultivated this year.

WHAT lojOOO VOLUNTEERS WILL n6

WHAT lojOOO VOLUNTEERS WILL n6. The 15,000 Volunteers who are asked to give a minimum period of two months' service at home will, it is understood, be asked to undertake work of a garrison character. trhis includes the guarding of prisoners and public buildings, and other work which is at present carried out by certain sections of the Home Forces.

I MUNITIONERS WEEKENDS I I I

I MUNITIONERS' WEEK-ENDS I I I I It is estimated that 20,000 munition workers a week will be affected by the new Order, issued by the Ministry of Munitions, abolishing the c h eap railway fares hitherto occasionally per- mitted An official of the Ministry informed a press representative tha-t the with- drawal of the half-fare ticket privilege had been caused solely by the < ver- ineroasdng demands made upon the ( railways. Reduction in the total vol ume of the traffic was imperati ve. Thousands of the men live long dis- tances from their homes and families, and it is pointed out the additional payment for travelling will be a heavy i tax. Hitherto men have been allowed the redtic,tl one,, ,,i,-ei-y four weeks.

i FRENCHWOMEN FOR BRITISH I I FARMS 1 1 t

FRENCHWOMEN FOR BRITISH I FARMS. 1: 1.. rivnen women are anon., to oe m- troduoed into the Women's Land Army in this country for the purpose of undertaking farm anil market gardening work. Tliis faee- was an- nounced at Chertaey Rural War Tri- bunal by Mr Hutchinson Driver, The agricultural representative.

WARS SEWK TO THE MEMORY rI TO

WAR'S SEWK TO THE MEMORY. .rI TO Many thousands or men on discharge from the Army would find themselves incompetent bemuse of minor elapses of memory, declared Dr. Ellliot Smith J at the General Medical Council. He doubted whether one medical man in a. thousand knew how to deal with such cases, and hr. suggested that students should be given special trnin- ing to enable them to cope-with the problems tJley would meet in every 1 f day practice in the future.

LAND CAMPAIGNS RESULTS

LAND CAMPAIGNS RESULTS. At a W omen's Land Army demon- stration at Bedford Mr Protheroe, Minister for Agriculture, said that the production campaign started 18 months ago there had been a great advance in growing wheat barley, and oats, and we had increased allotments in this country by 800,000, which meant something like 800,000 tons. This had been done with fewer ■bourers, 0:1 the land. With the. ree.sit additional calls to the fight- ing forces land women should come forward to give their aid.

ILABOUR AND EDUCATIONALI BILL

LABOUR AND EDUCATIONAL I BILL. Mr Arthur Henderson M.P., pre- siding on Saturday at a conference in London on educational problems, said the LRoour movement demanded that the Education Bill should be strength- ened, not weakened, and the Labour Party in the House of Commons would throw its whole weight against at- tempts to water it down in Committee. They knew very well that behind the j scenes certain sinister industrial in- terests representing not all nor even most of the employers, but a reac- tionary section among them, were en- deavouring to intimidate the President of the Board of Education to aban- don the continuation Scl1001 proposals, which were the kernel of the Bill. The Labour Party demanded that the workers' children should receive as good an education as the children of his employer.

I CALL UP OF OLDER MEN

CALL UP OF OLDER MEN. The first bevteh of older men, ot the I ages of 44 and 45, reported to the colours on Saturday. They were drawn from all classes, but only men I in Grades 1 and 2 were affected.

No title

A Welsh soldier, describing the Serbians, writes, ''Their singing is very interesting. The strain of their music is very similar to 'Dyffryn Clwyd' and 'Morfa Rhuddlan.' They sing in the minor key. The soul of Serbia, is anything but dead. Serbia has lost everything but the vision. Tho country to-day lies in devastation but the Serbians have full confidence that the day of delivemnoo is close at hand."

A CHANGE OF COLLIERY MANAGEMENT

A CHANGE OF COLLIERY MANAGEMENT. Mr D. L. Thomas, M.E., mana- ger of the Copper Pit, Morriston, 'has accepted the important posi- tion of general manager of Hill s Plymouth Collieries., Mertiiyi, and Mr. Standidge, Aberdan.. has succeeded him. Mr." Thomas JUlS been at Morriston for about ,ten years. Owing to its confine.! position and lack of railway facili- ties the Copper Pit has been t difficult mine to manage. Mr. Thomas, however, has very suc- cessfully converted an obsolete colliery into one of the most ur- to-date in the South Wales coa- field. Mr. Thomas, before taking up the position at Copper Pit, managed the Diamond Colliery, TTstradgynlais; while his family hail from Cwmgiedd. Mr. Standidge was the general manager at Tarreni previous to taking up the Cwmamman ap- pointment some months ago.

No title

Prophets say the wox-thtr tbiE summer is likely to be cool rather th?i hot. They come to this conclusion be- cause this year the oaks are in le&i before the ash. The Executive Council of the Wales Mi nen' Fock-i-stion ooiiTrneu t.he selection of Mr John Win i:1 m. M.P., as the Federation Parli m- mary candidate for the Gower Division. Harry Lauder has reached Glasgow after eight months' tour in A m-rica, where he addressed nearly 1 iug-s, and travelled 35.000 Tn i, p,) rT nipped a'v)\vt. £ 3f>,000 for fund, and greatly aided 'o -A merrs Liberty War Loan by At Ammanford on Monday, jMary Davies, a married woman, of Maesygwaed, Llandebie. wes fined £ h inclusive upon four sum- monses charging her with using indecent language. Alfred Lam bourne (401 married with eight children, and living at the Old George Inn, Penclawdd, was instantaneously killed by 'A fall of roof at Killan Collieries on Monday. The appearance of two {jramant conscientious objectors before the Amman ford Court on Monday, charged with being absentees, oc- casioned much liveliness. The court was thronged with friends ,and sympathisers, who sang and cheered the defotultints. The de- fen dan ts were Win. Hy. Rees and Harding Bartlett. They were remanded to await an escort, ani ordered to pay costs. Under the presidency of Mr. Penter Thomas, a meeting of elec- tric light consumers was held at the Upper Prynamman Schools to protest against the new rate of posed by the electric company of 3s. per month for light. It was re- solved unanimously that the con- sumers should make a determine. Stand against the new rate, and should anyene's light he discon- tinned for non-payment a meet- ing should be called immediately to deal with the. matter. An amusing incident is de- scribed bv a TV elsh soldier sta- tioned on the i^ust v oust ot ng- land. The Welsi) ii,,(,i-abers of tll'1 regiment formed a choir, which proved very popular in the t.o. As an encore at one of their con- certs they gave "Sospan Fach." and a very important local die-no- tarv, mistaking it for the Welsh National Anthem, rose and stood at attention. He was followed by the rest of the audience. The choir however, kent serious, until on finding their mistake, the mem- bers of the audience began stealthily and unobtrusively ro take their se^ts one by one. The the strain proved too great, ami .laughter took the place of song.