Teitl Casgliad: Dravod

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
3 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
SUGARBEETI

SUGAR-BEET. I At -t meeting of the Farmers' Club, on Monday last, a paper was read by Mr. R. N. Dowiing, N.D.A., etc., Organiser of Agricul- tural Education for Lindsey, Lincolnshire, on "Sugar Beet: Its Cultivation and Financial Aspects." '1. "'I, :4-: t-¡ n.- }-.I ,A'" .;1-, He said The question as to the' possible benefits, or otherwise, resulting from the introduction of die sugar-beet crop into o t I I- 1 r ¡ system oi fanning, and of the. erection of factories to deal with the crops, • has been written about and discussed to a great extent. Unfortunately, a lot of unreliable in formation was broadcasted with disastrous results. It was with the idea of sifting the available in- formation, and of carrying out systematic inquiries, that the Earl of Deubigh, in his I capacity as Chairman of the National Sugar- Beet Association, instructed me a few years a?o to in?ke a most thorough study of sugar- i ill -1? kc? i r? and its economic aspects nr the d¡fkrelt countries of EUfOpC. This work was carried out, and was in due course sup plemeuted by numerous field trials in many con?tics of En.?h.nd and Wa l cs. It is on the strength of this practical experience that I no?vh?vcthe honour of reading this paper. I propose to deai brieny ?.'ith the cu'tiv?'o!! of the sugar-beet crop in order that we may be able to discuss the many vital points of economic interest, and also because the question of cultivation has been largely dealt with in various pamphlets and journals. It will be weii to remember that the sugar-beet and the mangel belong to the same species 01;:4. :i.t"- .f'OJ..r" IJ" l.'p :L .1 (Beta- vulgaris) and the characteristics, re- v.¡'¡:' c.l'C'-ö\t >Jit ¡ It .Ii.4"Q.l. .)t.J9 ¡. quirements, and treatment of the two crope are very much alike. Suitable soils. Tile ideal sugar-beet soil is a nice, deep, friable loam, but successful crops can be 'I obtained on almost any soil that will produce J a fair crop of mangels, provided that there ¡ is sufficient depth. It is characteristic of beet cultivation that it greatly improves the fertility of all soils, particularly these of a poor quality, such as very light sands. Al- though a good deep friable loam is, perhaps, the idea! soil, the statement that it is a sine ,ent that it is qua nan that is so frequently made by various writers is by no means correct. I have seen sugar-beet crops growing for factory pur- poses on the chalk hills in the North of I France, on the light, sandy, and at one time before the introduction of sugar-beet, sterile soils near Soissons. I have, again, seen splendid crops on the heavy soils in Holland, and near Wcchelde, in Germany. The heav- iest crops that have been grown under my supervision in this country were grown on strong clay loams, yields of 18 to 20 tons of washed and topped beet being obtained. It is true the lifting was more difficult, and the 11 tare" heavier than on light soils, but the I' extra crop more than balanced any extra cost in that direction. i Autumn cultivations, I (r) Clean the stubbles arter harvest. (2) Apply a dressing of 10 to 15 loads of farm- yard manure per acre. It is essential that the dung should be applied in the autumn, I or, at the latest, during the early spring (in which ease it must be well rotted), because í fresh dung produces "fanginess" and coarse- 101. ""t" 'JIU" J.a' 1 ;¡ ..lj.IJ'l. ness of the root. (3) Deep plough a3 cady in the autumn as possible. If the land has not usually been ploughed deeply, and there is a "plough pan" present, then it is advis- able that the plough should be followed by a subsoiler. This subsoiler follows behind the plough in the open furrow, or it can be done by a subsoilei attachment to the plough, or by another plough with the mould-board removed. A greater depth of worked soil is required for sugar-beet than for mangels, because the beet-root should grow like a well- shaped parsnip, and if it meets with resist- ance in the shape of a hard "plough pan" or uncorked soil it wi!} become "fangy, which  makes 'he "root" unsatisfactory frcm the factoi-y pint of view, both as regards sugar and the working-up of the "root." Fangy "roots" are often the cause of the high per- centage of "tare," and such condition is generally due to insufficient: depth of worked soil. The "care" is the amount of dirt to be I deducted after washing the roots at the fac- tory, generally about 15 per cent. to 30 per cent. It will not always be necessary to I subsoil, because in the course of time plough- ing would tend to get deeper, and wc should have a greater depth of worked soil available for plant life prevailing in the sugar-beet areas. As to spring cultivations, the cus- tomary operations of preparation for the mange), crop are carried out to obtain a fairly fine tilth or "season," together with firmness of seed-bed and a loose, friable condition below. ( To he continued).

Advertising

Eisteddfod Gadeinol y Wladfa. A -OYNliKLlR YN ■ TR6LEW, Hydref 21 alr 225 19158 i^hesfr* Oi" TQsvnaUa Rhyddiaeth. I. Diwydianau priodol'i'r Wladfa." Gwobr $30. 2. CencdIgarweti," (cyfyngedig i rai dan 25 oc-ci) Gwobr §25. 3. Rhan y fam ym iuhenderfynu cyrner- iad ei phlentyu," (cyfyngedig i ferched.) Gwobr$25. 4. Stori fer, seilledig ar unrhyw ddigwydd- iad neu ddigwyddiadau Gwladfaol." Gwobr 11 5. Adal.- y Diriogaeth." Gwobr Barddoniaeth. 6. Pryddest heb fed dan ddau can liinell, Yr Andes." Gwobr I30 a Chadair Dderw. r 7. Myfyrdraith, Ac ni ddysgant ryfeI mwyach." Gwobr$20. 8. Tuchangerdd, "Ein Cynghorau.' Gwobr $20. C). Tri Hir-a-Thoddaid Coffadwriaet'nol—I'r diweddar Barchedlgiou D. Lloyd Jones, R. Jones, Tryddyn, a J. C. Evans. Gwobr I30. 10. Englyu, y Gwobr §5. 11. Emyn Gwladfaol ti-, peniil, ar fesur Hen Wlad iy Cerddoriaeth. 12. Y Brif Gystadleuaeth Gorawl.—I Gor heb fod dan 40 o nifcf, Ii Unis y Gwan- wyn," (J. 11. Roberts, Mus. Bac.), heb gyfeiliant. Gwobr$50 a Chwpan arian. 13. Yr Ail Gystadleuaeth Gorawl.—I Gor heb fod dan 30 o nifer, "Ogylch gorsedd- faine Duw dilyth," (Handel), a 11 an o "Samson." Gwobr $50. 14.. Cor o Un Gynulleidfa, "Fel y brefa'r hydd," (John Thomas), o Lyfr Tonau y M.C. Gwobr #30. 15. Cor Meibion, heb fed dan 30 mewn niter, Nyni yw'r Meibion Cerddgar," (Gwilym Gwent). Gwobr $60. 16. Cor Merched, heb fC-,r?i 20 o nifer, Can y l;c]aD,r (Gwiiym Gwent. Gwobr$50. I 17. Pmti 0 '6??, "Priod yMorwr," (J. Price) Gv.-obrSgo. 18. Cor Plant, lí Madeline," (G. Marks Evans, Mus. Bac.) Gwobr$25. 19. Pedwarawd, "Y ddeileu wywedig."— G\vobr $ 12. 20. Deuawd T. a B., Arwyr Cymru Fydd,' (R. S. Hughes, R.A.M.) Gwol,)r Sio. 21. Unawd Soprano, "Perl fy Nwyfron," (R. Bryan Warhurst). Gwobr$6. 22. Unawd Tenor, I'aier ein Gwiad," (Dr. Joseph Parry). Gwobr$6. 23. Unawd Baritone, "p\vy sy'n mynd fagu ef," (W. Davies). Gwobr $6. 24. Unawd Bass, Caradog," (R. S. Hughes). Gwobr$6. 25. Deuawd i Blant (S. ag A.) Haf," (Llcw Owain), ailan o Cymru'r Plant" Awst 1913. Gwobr$4; ail,$2. 26. Unawd i Ferched dan ijegoed, "Can y Fam i'w Baban Cyntaf," (D. EmJyn Evans). Gwobr #4- E,aiis). G%vol)i- $4. 27. Unawd i Fcchgyn dan 15 oed, "Y vn Mynyddig," CD. Emlvn Evans). Gwobr I $4. j 28. DarHen darn o Gerddoriaeth roddir ar y I" piyd, i barti o bedwar. Gwobr 4. ¡  .2). Cyfansc.ddi Tongyf?ddas i b?ani, S.A.T.i?. ar eiriau ymgeiswyr. Gwobr $10. 30. Dadausoddi y Don Heatherdale," (Car? adog Roberts), allau o Raglen Cymaufa y Gwobr$5. 31. Canu ar y Berdoneg, Ymdaith y Mwnc" o'r Gems of Welsh Melody," (Owain Alaw). Gwobr $5. A i-ra r y 32. Adroddiad i Feibion, Brwydr olaf 1,ly- wdynJ" (Elfcd). Gwobr $I'. 33. Adroddiad i Ferched, Y baban ar fin y dibin," (Gwyrosydd). Gwobr § re. 34. Adroddiad i rai dan 15 oed, "Eiu Cyfie," (Elfed). Gwobr fq. 35. Perfformio Drama, i barti o Blant, "Cnradog yn Rhufain," (T. GWYHn Jones). Gwobr §30. 36. Cvfieithu i'r Saesneg, Ffydd y Cyniry," (Tom Ellis). Gwobr fS. 37. Etto i'r Sbaeneg. Gwobr$8. 38. Cvfieithu o'r Vsbaeneg i'r Gym it. eg." Pro- greso y Miseria." Gwobr$8. Celfyddydwaitli. 30. Clustog Grugweuedig (Crocheted Cush- ion) gyda'r Ddraig Goeh wedi ei gweitiiio i'r Faner Arianin. Gwobr §20, rhodtl- edig gan y Br. J. Ilowell Jones. 40. Cadach pocecl wedi ei frod-weithio (Em- broidered Handkerchief), i ferched dan 12 oed. Gwobr $3; aH, $2. if 1. (;PO':¡?' ,y)1, ivobi" 3 an. $2. 42. Plethu Basged-ddel (Fancy Basket) o ¡ wellt neu wial Gwladfaol. Gwobr fv; ail, I2. 43. olygfa Wlau- faol. ail,$3. .(') -.i. C&'), L.. ¡i'.). ), >i" T'IP( (, r?"L. :I- 44. Map o Diriogaeth y Caimvy, i fechgyn dan i^.eg oed. Gwobr *7. 45. Caaw-Mi-Gei, o unrhyw bren Gwladfaol, gyda chauad a chlo. Gwobr $5. 46. Paeatio ar Wy Estrys, "Coat of Anns Prydain" ar un ochr, ar "Escudo At- chentino ar y Hall. Gwobr f 5. Bel rn laid. Rhif i, Br. Elias Owen. 2 a 36, Parch R. R. 1, i.r.1.(O:"(;l.jrd 1..(' Jones, Trelew. 3, Parch. R. R. Jones, I Newbwrch. 4 a 5, Dr. R. J. Benvyn. 6- I I Glan Tywi a'r Br. Arthur Hughes, b.a. ti Y t.11. \'t.j -ol.I.r,. 12-3 I, Bwyr. Carrog a Joseph Jones. 32—34, Glan Eifion. 35, Br. Evan G. Ellis. )- .I!'L 1:. \'l.. ), .1'1. A\'(t. _f..4 L t:. 37, Br. Arthur Roberts. 38, Br. Arthur Hughes;B.A. 39—41. Fouesau R. Robns, Win. Oliver, a H. E. Roberts. 42, Fones Samuel Roberts. 43 a 46, Br. a'r Foncs R. Lloyd Davies. 44, Br. Moreteau. 45, Dr. Owen Lloyd. V Pwyilgor.

I MR LLOYD GEORGE

I MR. LLOYD GEORGE. Mr. Lloyd George has done more to cheer up the people of England than any other man. His speech at Manchester, his speeches else- where, and the bold action of his department have helped to re-establish public confidence. Mr. Uoyd George has the courage to tell the people the truth. We are tired of hearing- only smooth news, of having bad tidings doled out to us, and of having favourable facts related at great lengh and with great empha- sis. The people of this country arc not chiJdren. We know that we are up against a very serious proposition. We realise that this war will demand all our resources before it is brought to a satisfactorycollclucioll There has been too much administration of soothing syrup and too much fear of alarm- ing the public. The public ought to he; alarmed! Mr. Lloyd George recognises this. It is very hard to realise that the Minister of Munitions was even only ayear ago the bogey man of half England. The City feared him. The denunciation of Lloyd George tbnt tock place every night in nine out of ten first- class suburban railway-carriages was as bitter as the denunciation hurled to-day at some of the men who are trying to wake the nation up to seriousness of the war. The men who denonced him then are the first to praise him now. The City will doubtless erect in time—may it be a very long time a statue to him in front of the Royal Ex- change. Lloyd George has won out not only because he has had the courage to adjust his principles to the new facts, but because he has shown a force and splendid ability and driving power much as no other statesman in England possesses.—Times.