Teitl Casgliad: Dravod

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
SELF MADE AND AN OLD ADAGE

"SELF MADE" AND "AN OLD ADAGE.' To the Editor of Y DRAFOD. Sir,—As I am much interested in matters of language and literature, I trust that you will forgive me for t, espassing once more to say a few words on a point or two raised in my reply to Mr. Williams. First, in regard to self-made." I am not at all certain that Mr. Williams was quite wrong in using it as he did. The case is, I believe, an example of those many cases in which we have to contend with the ambiguity of the noblest of the modern languages— "th H great sea," as Emerson savs, to which all ether languages are but tributaries." (I fear I am quoting very incorrectly). if we say, for instance, "A.H.'s self-made article," we must, I think, allow that "self" can refer to A. H." or to article," and we have only our common sense to help us decide with which it shoul 1 go. Similarly, A. H.'s self imposed task may mean a task that A. H. impose upon himself, or a task that imposes itself upon A. H. In cases of this sort, the better plan is, of course, to con- struct the sentence in some other way, so as to avoid the ambiguitw If Mr. Williams, since replying to me, has happened upon any examples likely to help us, I should be Iad of an answer to this note of mine. I have no real authority on these points at hand here, but being interested in language I often try to pick out faults of grammar or diction (except, of course, when I commit them myself!) Mr. Williams prob- aoly wrote hurriedly, as I also generally do, but English is unfortunately a language that has a way of poking fun at us unless we art- extra careful. It is not a language that can be written with the ease of Spanish. My second point is that Mr. Williams has in no way proved the sentence—"a little knowle Ie is a dangerous thing" to be originallyadage and notaquotation. All the collection of II Proverbs and Maxims "that I h tve seen, Rayner's included, contain scores ot-lines from English poets and writers, lines which are quoted verbatim at times, at others with some slight modification, as in the pres- ent case, having bccome proverbs in the course of centuries. It has been said of Hamlet, for instance, tint nearly all the Play is as famÏ- iar Oy often quotation as the New Testament." I must admit, of course, that the contrary is also true poets often make use of maxims and proverbs in their works. However, I should feel grateful to Mr. W lliains, or any one else, for a proof, posi- tive and irrefutable, that he is right. It is one thing to make a statement: to prove it may be another. But I never like to be cock- sure of anything. Yours, etc., & A. H. I

A LETTER FROM W J BROWNI

A LETTER FROM W. J. BROWN. Pte. W. J. Brown, Queen's Bays, 2nd Dragoon's Guards, Reserve Squadron, Nov. 20th, 191 5. Aldershot. My dear Mother,—I hope this letter will find you enjoying the best of health. What would I not give to be with you at Christ- inas ? but it is no good wishing anything like that until this blessed old war is over. Next week I am getting six days' furlough before going to France, where we expect to be by Christmas, because now I have finished my training and have come out as a first- class rider and marksman, and I am booked for the next excursion our regiment takes to gav Paree." Its jolly nice to be in a crack cavalry regiment, for they are nearly all toff's sons that are in it. I only wish you could see us on parade. I am sure you would find a change in the slovenly great brute that left Madryn. We are stationed with the Scottish Horse and the 1st Life Guards, and I get on jolly well with all of them, in fact one old Ser- geant will not believe that I have never been in the Army before, and I must say I feel as if I had been in it all my life, You need have no doubt as to who will win this war because England is chock full of soldiers, in Aider- shot alone there are thirty-five thousand troops. Last week Lord Kitchener came to review the troops, and as you can well guess the town was crowded. He gave a speech and said he admired the way our officers had trained us in such a short time. I miss you all very much and am longing to see you again, but God knows when that will be, but we must hope for the best; others pull through, why not I ? Think ot the old saying,—" Faint heart never won fair lady;" and I am jolly glad to think that I shall soon be able to get a smack at the Germans, so cheer up and remember your little boy is always thinking of you and home. It was no fault of yours or anyone else that I came home. I felt it was my duty, so I had to come, and I shall never be sorry no matter what happens. It is up to every Britisher worthy of the name to do his best. Your loving Son, WILLIAM JAMES BROWN.

CYMDEITHAS GENHADOL LLUNDAIN

CYMDEITHAS GENHADOL LLUNDAIN. Derbyniodd Eglwysi Annibynol Bethel, Gaiman, y ddau lythyr canlynol, yu cydnabod derbyniad Rhodd oddiwrthi a dymunir eu cylloecldl CYMDEITHAS GENHADOL LLUNDAIN. (London Missionary Society.) PWYLLGOR EGLWYSI CYMREIG GOGLEDD CYJIRU Cadeirydd—Parch. T. J. Teynon, Cwmyglo, Goruchwiliwr dros Gymru—Parch. R.Griffith, (Madagascar). Ysgrifenydd—Parch. Keinion Thomas. Y FRONHEULOG, MENAI BRIDGE, Tachwedd, 24, 1915. AtEglvvys Annibynol Bethel, Gaiman,Chubut, Dc America. Anwyl Frodyr a Chwiorydd hoff, Yr wyf yn diolch i chwi am eich haelioni at yr achos cenhadol, ac am y Cheque am £ 17 us. 2C. a dderbynias oddiwrthych drwy Cwinni Mas- nachol y Camwy. Yr wyf wedi anfon eich rhodd ilr Trysorvdd i Lunden gan cideisvf ai- y Parch. R. Griffith (gynt yn genhadwr yn Madagascar ac yn awr yn cynrychioli Cymru yn y Ty Cenhadol) yrrn y gydnabyddiaeth swyddogol aydalr llythyr hwn. Mawr yw anghen y Byd Paganaldd; a phan y mae y Rhyfel blin preseuol yn gwasgu ar Eglwysi yr Hen Wlad, calondid mawr yw eich help amserol chwi. Gallaf ddwyn tystiolaeth i anhawsder y meddygon i gael cyffyriau yn awr, oblegid y mae mab i mi (Dr. Garth ap Thomas) yn un o ysbytai y Gymdeithas yn Neyoor, De India, acyn methu cael moddion at ei waith. Gwerir tua £ 600 ar gyffyriau yn yr ysbyty bob blwyddyn, a gellwch dddirnad mor galed ydyw pan y mae prisiau pob peth mor uchet. Gobeith- y gweddiwch dros y gweithwyr a'r gwaith. Gyda serch mawr, gorphwysaf yr eiddoch yn yr Efeugyl, Yn ffyddlon, D. KEINION THOMAS.

LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETYI

LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 16, New Bridge St., London, E.C. Tachwedd 28, 1915. At Eglwys Annibynol Bethel, Gaiman, Chubut, De America. Anwyl Gyfeillion,—Derbyniwyd yr arian, £17 us. 2c., drwy y Parch Keinion Thomas, am ba rai yr ydym yn wir ddiolchgar i chwi. Fel y gwyddoch fod angen y byd yn fawr, ag rod yn rhaid ymdrechu er mwyn i Iesu Grist, Gwaredwr y byd, gael Ei osod ar Ei Orsedd. Mae yn galondid rneddwl fod Cymry yn rhanau pellenig y byd yn cofio am y Cym- deithasau Cenhadol yn yr Hen Wlad. Yr wyf yn amgau ychvdig o'n llenyddiaeth. Dioich yn fawr i chwi. Yr eiddoch vn bur. ROBERT GRIFFITH.

Advertising

AR WERTH—SEPARATORS o'r dos- barth goreu gan.— WILLIAM JONES, (Smith,) Gaiman

I At Olygydd Y DRAFOD

I At Olygydd Y DRAFOD. Br. Golygydd -Gwelais a ganlyh yn y Church Family Newspaper am y 3ycd o Rhag- fyr. Teimlat ei tod o ddycldordeb i lawer yn ein plith, a hyn yw ty esgus dros ei anion i chwi. Os ydych yn dewis gallwch gyhoeddi yr oil tel yr ymddangosodd, ond y rhan gyntaf sydd fwyaf dydciorol i ddarllenwy Y DRAFOD. D. J. WILLIAMS. I CHANGE OF ATTITUDE. Prayers foi the Dead was the subject discussed by the Liverpool Christian Confer- ence at its first meeting of the season, under the presidency ot Sir Edwaid Russell. The Rev. T. R. Dann (hon. secretary) read a very interesting and significant letter from the Rev. John Owen, of the Welt>h Calvin- lstic Methodist Church, who wrote that a recent discussion at Beaumaris showed a great change of attitude on this question. It was said that hundreds of Welsh Methodists —strong Protestants of the Puritan t pe- were praying for the dead. Clearly, he added, the present stress had effected a change of feeling on the subject. COMFORT AND RELIEF." The Rev. S. F. Leadley Biown, Vicar of St James-the-Less, Liverpool, in opening the discussion, said that mOle people were to-day offering prayers for the dead than ever before in the history of this country, and were find- ing comfort and relief in the exercise. War had always been an impetus to pi a.\ ers for the dead, a practice which he contended was taught by the Church of England, although Article 22 condemned the "Romish doctrine" of purgatory. He believed that the Jews at the time of Crist prayed for the dead the practice was not condemned by Christ or His apostles; and it was in use in the early Church. Not only was there a -prejudice against the practice, though that was steadily decreasing, but many people believed that praying for the dead was a waste of time, and that they could be more profitably oc- cupied in praying for the living but he be- lieved that the rlead had IJeeói of their prayers, because he believed that those who passed out of this life in an imperfect state went to purgatory, or an intermediate state. The Rev. J. R. Derbyshire. Vicar of St. Luke's Liverpool, contended that though prayers for the dead might have been used in the Jewish Church, they were not used by full authority. It was only when the Church began to lose her grip of the brightness and the joy of her rehgion, and when the Latin conception of Christ as judge took the place of the Greek conception of Him as illumin- ator, that the tone of happy resignation of the departed into the hands of God changed into a tone of fearful intercession. ENLARGEMENT OF THE PRIVILEGE. Lanon Harford suggested that the question should be: Why should they stop praying for people because the physical accident of death had taken place ? The question was, however, in his opinion, a comparatively trivial one. If it was meant to occupy an important or essential place in Christian worship, it must have got into the New Testament. Although he favoured an en- largement of the privilege they enjoyed in the Church of England in this matter, he recognised that the prayers they should de- vote themselves to with the greatest zeal were those in which they themselves could co- operate, support, and back up. The Chairman expressed the view that there was nothing unwholesome, erroneous, or misleading in prayers for the dead, and there was great scope for such prayers apart from the idea of supplication.

Ar Rent

Ar Rent. Tyddyn a nifer o Warthel- l Godro o fewn ilai na dwy filldir i'r "Ffactri Gaws ac Ym- enyn. A fanylion pellach ymofyner yn Swydd- fa'r C.M.C., Gaiman, o hyn i ddiwed y mis hwn. Gaiman, Ion. 18, 1916.