Teitl Casgliad: Monmouth Guardian

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

< Biand of Choloe Mighland Malt Whisky. B uch-alle Old BlenM Scotch Jatupwi, Blended BottMMIVli BUCHAN A CO., Wine A Spirit Merohtmi, RHYMNIY.

Advertising

4 Blend of Choice Highland Mult "Whisky XESuchan's Old Blended Scotch atured, Blended & Settled only ? BUCHAN & Co., Wine and Spirit Merchants, RHYMNEY.

Advertising

| P C G A N'" EJI!I(:Late Trapnell) I J, J i | iT. &. ????& ? & Gane ? L?O!? | For Sound Value and Style in | FURNITURE, J.lI l!, CARPETS, I BEDSTEADS, FLOOR COVERINGS. Painters, Decorators and Paperliiiugers, Estimates & Specifications Free Competent jvlell Sent any Distance. This sft 6in. Handsome Chippendale Style — j Sideboard, in Mahogany, with beautiful ¥ A AC 0do figured Panels, ?'?t ??' ??. EASY CHAIRS TIND SETTEES IN ALL STYLES. I 38 41, QUEEN ST., CARDIFF. 1 TELEPHONE 403.  "A.B.A." (ALL BRIGHT ALE). Analyst's Report. The Laboratory, 69, Dock Street, Newport, Mon., Sept. 13th, 1905. Messrs. A. Bwchan & Co., Rhymney. Dear Sirs, I Shave "analysed a sample Gallon of your ALL BRIGHT ALE received from you in screw-stoppered Flagons, and beg to hand you my report. This is a most inviting looking beverage, being absolutely free from all traces of turbidity, and, as its name implies, is bright to the last drop. The results of my analysis shew it to be a Light Bitter Beer of the very highest grade of purity, and in my opinion, 18 the product of Malt and Hops of first-class quality. The amount of Alcohol present renders it strictly a Light Ale, and its aroma and flavour are excellent. The characteristic bitter of the Hops being well in evidence It forms a most agreeable drink. There is not the slightest trace of any obiectionable metallic substance present, and I consider it a very high-class Beer in every respect. Being sent out in screw-stoppered Flagons its high aera- tion is preserved to perfection in consequence, and there is no chance of its suffering in condition. I consider it a distinct advance in Bottled Beers for Table use, and its high general excellence should command a ready sale. It really is a splendid sample of Beer, and I must congratulate you on its production. I am, dear Sirs, Yours faithfully, GEORGE R. THOMPSON, Public Analyst. —HAPPIEST DAY OF YOUR UFE^Mfllk should be crowned by the thought that the symbol of your wedding joy is the most perfect rl fJ that money can buy. H. Samuel's II Lucky" Wedding Rings are perfect-perfect in beauty, /Mvf ?'??t? y perfect in their golden purity, perfect for sterling value, perfect for a lifetime's wear. /9?????''?? ????????H II  I i  M?-?BL Finished in all the newest Court styles, in 22ct. solid gold. Sold by weight, 10/6 to 70/U '?*'? ???????????Mt ?,| 1 I bN en1 Psa H. MUEL HIG H STREET NEWPORT. ??'? w.?htt I ^i———— 11 x j WATCHMAKER TO THE ADMIRALTY.?

I THE DUTY OF THE CHURCHES J IN THE PRESENT CRISIS

I THE DUTY OF THE CHURCHES J ? IN THE PRESENT CRISIS. I j A Paper by Prof. Davies, Cardiff. At the half-yearly meeting of the ■ East Glamorgan Baptist Association, which was held at Abertysswg on Wed- j Hosday, Professor J. M. Davies, M.A., Cardiff, submitted a paper on the duty J of the Churches in view of the present crisis caused by the war." He reviewed the circumstances leading up to the war, and stated that it seemed that the Christian conscience had been moved and the opinion firmly fixed as to the righteousness of this war. It seemed, in i face of all the circumstances, that our country had nothing to do but to go to take part in the war, and the chief object of their entering into the struggle was the preservation and security of the in- dependence of small nations, to abolish that Prussian militarism, to put an end to the evil philosophy of the Gremans, and to protect their own homes. They should appreciate their responsibilities in this present serious crisis. They lived in the most revolutionary period in the history of the world, and it was for tliei-ii to be worthy of that hymn" Marchog Iesu yn llwyddiannus." In these days amongst other duties which had fallen to them was the care of the wounded. Certainly no one could say that Christianity was a failure in view of the administration, the services, and the sacrifice rendered toward the wounded, both by the community at large, the Y.M.C.A., and he was pleased j to say by members of the Baptist de- 'j nomination as well as other sections of 1 the Christian Church. He referred to the great work which had been done to- ward the dependents of soldiers and j! sailors in the great fight, and he re- minded them that this work should not rest entirely with the local destress com- j mittees, but should be borne partly by the Churches. The kindness which was now shown by this country toward the Belgians would, especially on their return to their native land, fill them with an unending gratitude for the treatment which they had received during their sojourn here. Another matter which they had to be thankful for was that they had not emulated the brutalism of the Germans, but that they had fought as Churchill had said, like gentlemen and like soldiers of old with clean hands, but they should also remem ber to act kindly toward those Germans who were in- terned in this country. A great many changes had taken place since the war commenced, and it had brought many Churches closer together. If all the Christians of Europe were more loyal to King Jesus than they had been this war would have been impossible. If the Church was to be pure and to be an in- strument for peace then there was reason for her to be more enthusiastic and to realise her responsibilities. The good which had been done to the cause of temperance partly by the edict of the Czar of Russia in prohibiting absolutely the sale of vodka in Russia at a sacrifice of C70,000,000 per year to the revenue of the country, and which caused the ex- clamation in Venice of It's all over with us now," partly by the prohibition of absinth in France, and partly by the earlier closing of public houses in this country was incalculable. He hoped that these changes would be permanent and the nation would return to more reasonable forms of living. He hopod that the result of the war would be to see a new Europe and a new world where righteousness would reign and have a power. Principal Edwards, Rev. R. W. Joi.es (Trealaw), and others spoke in eulogistic terms of the paper. One of the delegates asked, that in view of the paper which had just been read, whether ministers should encourage young men to join the colours? Professor Davies, in reply, said it was a very delicate and difficult matter to answer. He thought it was really more a question for a layman than a minister because ministers figured in two spheres, the spiritual and the civil, never-thfi-Lss; if matters came to the extreme crisis it would be their duty, as ministers of reli- gion, to encourage young men to join, at the moment, however, that crisis diu not appear as yet. Mr. Evan Owen, J.P., said that he agreed to a great extent with what Prof. Davies had said. They were fightirg a righteous war so far as Great Britain was concerned. As a nation they had pledged themselves to do everything they could to maintain the independonce of, small nations. The attack had Been made upon one of these small countries, and England was fighting now not unly to fulfil that pledge, but to defend their own homes as well. Religion and humanity called upon them to do what they could in defence of land and jatme. If they viewed their position from this standpoint then it was clear, whether they were ministers or laymen, it was their duty to do all they could to sup- port and encourage young men to go out to fight in the defence of the homes. (Hear, hear.) Rev. W. Jones, Rev. T. T. Jones (Ynyshir), and others, spoke upon the subject. Finally, it was decided to have the paper circulated amongst the Churche-s.

NOT COMING BACK I I

NOT COMING BACK. RHYMNEY'S INTERESTING ACCOUNT. The following will interest every one of our readers, for it is the open-hearted statement of a Rhymney man, who was cured five years ago of serious kidney disorders, and declares that to this day there has been no return of the illness. On July 29th, 1909, Mr. W. Price, of 9, Tre Edwards, Rhymney, said I strained myself some years ago, and this, together with a cold I caught, brought on my kidney trouble. I was so ill that I was obliged to take to my bed for over two months. I tried several medicines, but could not get any lasting relief. At last I decided to try Doan's backache kidney pills, and I quickly obtained relief from them. After I had taken two boxes of the pills all signs of my former trouble had disappeared and I was in good health again. I have great faith in Doan's pills, and always recommend them to my friends. Siglled) W. PRICE." On April 30th, 1914-EARLY FIVE: YEARS LATER-Mr. Price said :— I am keeping very well now, and free of kidney trouble. I always recommend Doan's pills, for I had so much benefit from them." Doan's backache kidney pills are NOT for constipation, liver trouble, or stomach troubles. They are SOLELY for disorders of the kidneys and bladder-such as dropsy, gravel, sediment in the water, urinary troubles, backache, lumbago, rheumatism, and uric acid poisoning. They relieve the kidneys like laxatives relieve the bowels. Price 2/9 a box, 6 boxes 13 19; of all dealers, or from Foster-McClellan Co., 8, Wells St., Oxford St., London, W. Don't ask for backache or kidney pills, ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mr. Price had.

RHYMNEY VALLEY SEWERAGE BOARDI

RHYMNEY VALLEY SEWERAGE BOARD. The ordinary meeting of the Rhymney Valley Sewerage Board was held at New Tredegar Council Offices on Wednesday evening, Mr. W. S. Nash, J.P., in the chair. A report was presented by the com- mittee appointed at the last meeting to visit the foreshore works, and it was de- cided that the whole Board should again visit these works on March 11th. The Committee recommended the appoint- ment of an additional inspector. The Agreement for No. 3 contract was sealed. Mr. W. Hammond said he had raised the question at the last meeting as to how often the engineers visited the works. Mr. Hugh Raikes said they visited the works when their attendance was neces- sary as with any other eontracts which they might have in hand. Mr. Hammond said the point he wished to get at was whether it was likely that a long period of six months might go by without a visit from the engineers. The Chairman explained that the works were visited by the engineers be- fore each meeting. Mr. Hammond: Then I am satisfied.

Advertising

VEND'S LICHTNINC COUCH CURE WM? The Ideal family remedy. Contains no opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at aUages. ?OUCHS.COLOS COUCHStCOLDS tM J t Yon?'s is (he surest and speediest ????__ BX c?te for these winter ills, the Wst pro- ?BM? tection aainst ,?ei-ious dtilger.?. ?H!LDREN S CO';I:on. Soon yield to Veno's—even W hooping C()l ?ll And there is no trouMe in ??Bj?? ?ivin? it, children simply love Veno's. Othel' sizes llll and /g. ?? t « /7'o?!t c/xnusts aKd <

CRIES OF MURDER AT GILFACH I

CRIES OF "MURDER" AT GILFACH, Christmas Eve Scene. Serious Assault. Amusing Sidelights. At Bargoed Court to-day, before Messrs. Walter Lewis (chairman), D. M. Yorwerth, and Hubert Jeiikins-Williaiii Evans (15), collier, of 4, Aeron Place, Gilfach, and his wife Mary, were sum- moned for assault by William Bendon. Mr. John Evans (Bargoed) prose- cuted for Bendon, and said that the assault took place on Christmas Eve. Complainant said defendants lived m apartments with him. On Christmas Eve there was some talk about certain money, which witness asked defendants to repay. Defendants appeared to be in a quarrelsome mood, and said it was just like his cheek to ask for it, and that he deserved a smack fn the mouth. Sub- sequently, after further talk, William Evans struck his (witness's) wife. Wit- ness went to her rescue and received a blow in the mouth. Quite suddenly afterwards Mrs. Evans struck him on the head with some instrument, felling him. While on the ground he received several other blows which rendered him uncon- scious. He was attended by a nurs*, and had to be under the care of a doctor since, and had lost 10 days' work. There was no provocation beyond his asking for the money. Cross-examined by the male defend- ant. witness denied "throwing a slur" at him (defendant) in the Capel Ho-el. Cross-examined by Mrs. Evans, witness denied that his wife took hold of her (Mrs. Evans) by the hair and pushed her out of the room and called her a naughty cow." He denied calling her a bitch and hitting her in the passage." Nor did lie hit her and hit her husband after. He agreed, however. that he struck her husband after be I struck him. Mrs. Evans I did hit you three times with my fist. Mrs. Elizabeth Bendon confirmed the material parts of her husband's st'.ry, adding that so far as she could see it was with a flat iron that Mrs. Evans struck her (witness's) husband down. Sh2 alleged that Mrs. Evans struck LiD, several blows in succession with the same article." Witness's mwband did nothing to her. He came to her fwit- ness's) rescue when Mr. Evans struck him. Cross-examined by the male defend- ant, witness denied that she was drunk, that she was covered with blood, tbit she called Mrs. Evans a Welsh Cow, that she had a scramble with Mrs. Evans, that she pushed her clean out of the kitchen and pulled her hair. ad- mitted, however, that she sought a bullock's heart, but denied that she lost it because she was in drink. Mrs. Evans, a next door neighbour, said she heard cries of Murder emanating from Mrs. Bendon's h.?u?e on I Christmas Eve. She rose from bed, and f on getting next door found comnia-rar t. bleeding and being attended by a nurse, A policeman was also there. Nurse Goodman said she was called to the house about midnight. Complaiaant was bleeding from four wounds on the face and two on the head. The bridge of the nose was also broken. The rroui ds must have been inflicted by some- instru- ment, one of the cuts was an inch long and extended to the bone. Mrs. Bendon at the time was hysterical, but witness could not say whether she was in drink. The male defendant said complainant insulted him in the Capel Hotel. Sub- sequently in the house they were pushing his wife about because she wished to pass through the kitchen. Mrs. Bendon was under the influence of drink. Pro- ceeding, witness said Of course Mrs. Bendon's face was like the Map of Wales, all scratches. (Loud laughter.) Mr. Yorwerth: How is that? Witness: Well, the Map of Wales is all rivers and mountains, is not it? (Laughter.) Proceeding, he said Bepdon called his (witness's) wife a bitch, and witness told him to be a man. Wit- ness said he then put his hand up to divide them. Mrs. Evans said defendants told her to clear out of the kitchen, and pushed her and called her "A North Cow." Bendon attempted to strike her and her husband come to defend. She hiEtlng complainant with her fist. Mrs. Bendon came to the house and her face was in a terrible state, she said she bad fallen down the steps." Elsie Evans, defendants' daughter, and P.C. Lloyd having given evidence, the Bench came to the conclusion that an assault had been committed and defend- t ants were fined 10si and costs each. l I

GELLIGAER COUNTY SCHOOLS

GELLIGAER COUNTY SCHOOLS. A Pengam Boy's Success. The ordinary meeting of the Governors of the Gelligaer County Schools was held at Hengoed on Wednesday, when there were present:—Mr. J. D. Thomas, J.P., (Chairman), Alderman W. Williams, J.P. (Viee-Chairman), Rev. D. Leyshon Evans, C.C., Dr. E. W S. Martin, Councillor B. Hughes, Councillor Joseph Morgan, Mr. R. W. Jones, B.A., J.P. The nett balance, including grant of £38 3s. 8d. for the Bovs School was re- ported to be £ 1,457 6s. 3d. Mr. B. Hughes raised a question respecting the caretakers salary and urged that in compliance with the auditor's suggestion all payments of ikl and over should he made by cheque. The Chairman said he bad himself. favoured this. but the majority of the Governors decided to continue the old system of making the payment through the head teachers. As to the auditor's suggestion the ehainnan said it was only a suggestion. A letter Wfts read from the Board of Education urging that all teachers who could be spared should not be thwarted in their desire to jnju the regular army. The Chairman remarked that the Governors had shown their disposition in this matter by making up the salaries of those who had joined the army, and keeping their appointments open for them. A letter was read from Dr. John James stating that Belgian Refugee pupils were to be admitted to the County Schools free. Miss James said that she was accept- ing such pupils next week after obtain- ing police permission as this was a pro- hibited area which rendered it necessary to obtain policc permission. A curious question arose in regard to a girl who having obtained a scholarship had since resided out of the parish, viz., at Newport, and a member raised the point as to whether when a pupil went out of the parish that pupil could be re- garded as a Gelligaer girl or boy. Mr. R. W. Jones said that a scholarship could never be forfeited, except by misconduct, A list of mem bers' attendances was submitted and it was found that certain governors had made a very small number of attendances, which Mr. Leyshon Evans said would cause questions at the County Education Committee. A vote of congratulation was passed by the Governors to Waiter Jones, of Gil- fach, upon his having obtained a £ 50 scholarship at Jesus College, Oxford Mathematical Exhibition. [n reply to Mr. Ben Hughes, Miss James stated that the attendance of Pontlottyn girls was satisfactory and that if absent there was some justifiable cause.

CARMET INEW TREDEGAR SUNDAY SCHOOL

CARMET, INE-W TREDEGAR) SUNDAY SCHOOL. A very interesting meeting was held in Carmel C%tpel on Monday evening to distribute attendance prizes to the Sun- day School children. There was a very large attendance of parents, teachers, and scholars. The Rev. Fred. Jones, pastor of the Church, presided, and Mr. Jones, Headmaster of the Council School and superintendent of Carmel Sunday School, distributed book prizes to scholars under 16 years of age. consist- ing of Hymn Books. Book of Praise," Sacred Sony's and Solos." and other useful books on biography, history. travel. Missionary heroes, etc.. accord- ing to attendance merit of eaen scholar. The Rev. Harri Edwards (Bargoed) gave an address suitable to the occasion, vtfhile Mr. Prangley. the singing con- ductor, interspersed the proceedings with solos, as also did a. number of the scholars. The i-t)o(,tinct en- couraging to the work of the school, and c?)iirac,i na to the of tfie s.-(i.h ooI. and

Advertising

yMS??iti???MM????M??aM?MMMaM ? The Welshman's Favourite. J I MABON Sau | ??? ?4s?ood