Teitl Casgliad: Monmouth Guardian

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

k Bland of Oboles HWhlMd Malt Wtiliky, Buchart Old Blendil Scotch Matured, Blended Bottm BUCHAN" CO., Wine Spirit MwobMMi IIHYMNEY.

Advertising

A Blend of Chotoe B" i.nd Buchan's Old JEtlended Scotch stored, Blended & Bottled only b BUCHAN & CO., Wine and Spirit Merchants, RHYMNEY.

Advertising

Pe E. GAN E (Late Trapnell )g Ltd-9 P. E. GAN E ? ? & Q?e /t Ltd., For Sound Value and Style in FURNITURE, CARPETS, BEDSTEADS. FLOOR COVERINGS. Painters, Decorators and Papertiangers. Estimates & Specifications Free. Competent Men Sent any Distance. This sft. 6in. Handsome Chippendale Style j Sideboard, in Mahogany, with beautiful 14 os. Ode figured Panels, EASY CHAIRS AND SETTEES IN ALL STYLES. 38 & 41, QUEEN ST., CARDIFF. TELEPHONE 403. "A.B.A." (ALL BRIGHT ALE). Analyst's Report. The Laboratory, 69, Dock Street, Newport. Won., [Sept 13th, 1905. Mean. A. Buchan & Co., Rhymney. Dear lirs, i Dear Birs, I have: analysed a sample Gallon of your ALL BRIGHT ALE received from you In screw-stoppered Flagons, and beg tojhand you my report. This is a most [inwtting looking beverage, being absolutely free from all traces of turbidity, and, as its name impMes, is bright to the last drop. The results of my analysis shew it to be a Light Bitter Beer of the very highest grade of purity/and in my opinion, Is the product, of Malt and Hops of first-class quality. The amount of Alcohol present renders it strictly a Light Ale, and its aroma and flavour are excellent. The characteristic bitter of the Hops being well in evidence ft forms a most agreeable drink. There is not the slightest trace of any objectionable metallic substance present, and I consider it a very high-class Beer In every respect. *|Being sent out in screw-stoppered Flagons Its high aera- tion is preserved to perfection in consequence, and there is no chance of its suffering In condition. I consider it a distinct advance in Bottled Beers for Table use, and its high general excellence should command a ready sale. It really is a splendid samole of Beer, and I must congratulate you on its production. I am, dear Sirs, Youn faithfully, GEORGE B. THOMPSON, MkMpL r" | TELL THE TIME IN THE DARKI I LI AVE a Watch that shows They are proving a great boon LUMINOUS WRIST WATCH I  .? I Hyou the time at mid. IN THE TRENCHES ??'???

I MINERS WAGE AGREEMENT

I MINERS' WAGE AGREEMENT. I MEETING ARRANGED. m | OT" A meeting of the Conciliation Board for the coal trade of South Wales and Monmouthshire was held at Cardiff on Monday. A number of disputes from all parts of the coalfield which were referred to representatives of the owners and the men to be dealt with included the question of notices at Cribbwr Fawr, Celynen and Cwmcarn, the refusal of the workmen at the South Wales Anthracite Colliery and Crumlin Collieries to accept price lists, and disputes with regard to certain payments at other collieries. The following joint official report was sup- plied by Mr. W. Gascoyne Dalziel and Mr. Thomas Richards, M.P., the joint secretaries A meeting of the Board of Conciliation for the Coal Trade of Monmouthshire and South Wales was held at Cardiff to-day (Monday). Mr. F. L. Davis presided over the owners' representatives, and Mr. W. Brace, M. P.. over the workmen's side. It was arranged that the workmen will take only one day as a holiday at Whitsun, namely, Whit-Monday. The Board considered an intimation given by the Earl of St. Aldwyn that he wishes to resign his position as independent chairman of the Board, and it was arranged that the joint secretaries should communicate with his Lord- ship, urging him to reconsider his decision. Mr. Brace, on behalf of the workmen's repre- sentatives, again urged the owners to agree to the workmen's application that facilities should be given at the collieries for dealing with non- Unionists with a view to prevention of notices to terminate contracts and possible stoppages i of work resulting from such notices. The matter was fully discussed, and it was arranged j that the workmen's representatives should send to the owners' secretary their proposals in writing in order that they may be placed before the next meeting of the Coalowners' Association, and the owners representatives promised that a reply should be given to the workmen's repre- sentatives after that meeting. ¡ The workmen's representatives asked the owners whether they were willing to fix a date for a meeting of the Board to consider the question of the revision of the Conciliation, Board agreement, as the notice to terminate the agreement would expire on the 30th of June I next. It was arranged that a special meeting of the Board shall be held on Monday, the 31Sb inst., to consider the quession. A number of disputes were considered by the Board, and arrangements were made for referring them to representatives for investigation and with power to settle.

IWATERED MILKI

I WATERED MILK. I I NOVEL POINT AT CAERPHILLY. I Thomas Conway, milkyendor, Nelson, was fined Lz by the Caerphilly Magistrates on Tues- day, for selling milk containing 10 per cent. of added water. Superintendent T. Williams said he took a sample of milk from defendant at Ystrad Mynach and the analyst's certificate showed it to con- tain 10 per cent of added water. Since the summons was served defendant complained 1 that he was not satisfied with the milk supplied to him. He sold the milk as he received it. 1 Lewis Williams (56), farmer, Nelson, wfco j supplied the milk to Conway, was summoned for selling milk containing 5 per cent. of added water on April 18th.—Mr. J. A. Lovat Eraser I defended.—Superintendent T. Williams said that at seven a.m. on April 18th he went to defen- dant's farm. Conway was present with his cart to fetch the milk. Williams and Conway poured some milk into a churn, and as they were about to transfer the churn into the cart witness asked Williams for a pint.of milk, and paid him twopence. He did not see Williams hand the money to Conway. The analyst's certificate showed 5 per cent. of added water. Evidence was given by defendant and several witnesses that nothing was done to the milk to contaminate it. Defendant said that when the Superintendent gave him the twopence he offered it to Conway. He considered then that the milk belonged to Conway.—Mr. Lovat Fraser submitted that when the sample was purchased the milk was in Conway's possession and under his control, and, therefore, Mr. Williams had not sold the milk to the superintendent.—A fine of £ 2 was imposed.

Advertising

WHITSUN-MONDAY. A GRAND Military Display On MONDAY lWEX" ON THE Caerphilly Castle Grounds, In Aid of the Local Branch of the illiT RED CROSS SOCIETY. PRESIDENT GENERAL LEE. Amongst numerous other features will -be :Cutting the Turk's Head, Balaclava Melee, Wrestling on Horseback, Musical Chairs, Tug-of-War on Horseback. Councillor PETER WRIGHT, of Newport, will Wrestle dOE CARROLL, The ex-Middleweight Champion of the World. WATNOIthe Welsh Wizard, in his Marv,ellous,'Water Case Mystery. At 3 p.m. and 6-30 p.m., the Caer- ,philly LadieW Choir and the, Caer- philly Male Voice Party, with a number of Artistes, will conduct Concerto. Procession at 11*30 a.m. Grates Open at 12-30. A, day's thorough enjoyment guaranteed. Don't fail to support the Red Cross Society atCaerphiily on Monday next.

1st MONMOUTHS HEROIC STANDi

1st MONMOUTH'S HEROIC STAND. STIRRING STORY OF BRAVE MEN. Major C. A. Evill, commanding the ist Mon- mouthshire Regiment (Territorial Force), has returned to his home at Chepstow. He is tired, but looks well. He speaks highly of the way in which the regiment fought, saying they up- held the reputation of the county, coming out of a very trying position as only brave men could." He has been sent home by his brigadier to bring the i st Battalion up to fighting strength again, and for this purpose Major Evill said that 800 men were needed immediately, and he thought there would be little difficulty in getting the men to come forward. A STIRRING CALL. The men hung on to the trenches like heroes," he said. We now call to other men of Monmouthshire to join the ranks and come out .to the front to avenge the death of the brave fellows who died gallantly fighting for their country." Major Evill said that the regiment would in all probability be reorganised in France, the small remaining units acting as a nucleus. There are two reserve battalions, one being at Cambridge, under Colonel Birrell Anthony, and the other at Newport, under Capt. Fothergill Evans. The battalion at Cambridge is known as the second line, whilst the one now at New- port is the third line. Drafts, we understand, are to be made to the Service Battalion from the second line, the depletion of the latter in the course of time being made good by men from the third line. In regard to the Territorial Force, in general throughout the county, the drafts to the three Service Battalions will mean a depletion of reserves by about 2,500 men.

WILL IT LAST

WILL IT LAST ? SIRHOWY CASE. I But will my cure last ? That is the anxious question of the unhappy kidney sufferer, the assuring word of this Sirhowy resident, who has stayed cured for three years, will be glad news indeed. On October 31st, 1911, Mr. J. Woolf, of 198, Tredegar Terrace, Sirbowy, nr. Tre- degar, said ;—" I had a bad attack of kidney trouble some seven or eight years ago-it lasted for about six weeks. The pains were so bad that I hardly knew how to keep at work. Some days I was in agony, and had considerable difficulty in straightening myself after bending. I had trouble with the kidney excretions, which were dis- ordered and painful. MR. J. WOOLF. From a Photo]. I tried several medicines for my com- plaint. but none of them did me any good. I was at last advised to try Doan's back- ache kidney pills. I derived great benefit from these pills, and by the time I had used three boxes I was quite cured of my old trouble. I have great faith in Doan's piUs, and can honestly re- commend them for kidney disorder.—(Signed), J. WOOLF." On May 1st, 1914-NEARLY THREE YEARS LATER—Mr. Woolf said :—I keep quite free of kidney trouble, I am glad to say. Though my cure took place about 1903 I have had no return since. I have advised many to take Doan's pills, for they are excellent for kidney disorders." Price 2/9 a box, 6 boxes 13/9 of all dealers, or from Foster-McClellan Co., 8, Wells Street, Oxford Street, London, W. Don't ask for backache or kidney pills,— ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mr. Woolf had.

H STREET CORNER HEROES i

H STREET CORNER HEROES." I URGENT APPEAL TO "SLACKERS." The following is an extract from a letter re- ceived from a member of the ist Mons., some- 1 where in France My word, there are still I some slackers about. If they could only see what has been done in Belgium they would soon join the Army to stop the Hun coming to Eng- land. I am very comfortable where I am,-Dut somehow I cannot rest contented, fancying I am not doing my duty. (N.B.—The writer is in hospital). How can young chaps rest in England when such diabolical methods of war are done by the rotters. ? I have seen villages which have been shelled till everything is down to the ground. Last year's crop was left, as the Belgians had to fly; skeletons of pigs, cows, and other animals lie absout the farmhouses--wholesale havoc everywhere, enough to make a fighting man of anyone who says he was not born a soldier. It's men and more men are wanted, and I cannot understand how young men who read their paper and see the reports can still stay in civil life. If the Hun ever gets to England, and does as much damage as in Belgium, it's those slackers will be to blame. I do not know if the n

Advertising

NO INCREASE IN PRICB. REDUCE YOUR MEAT BILL. Puddings made with ATOR. A. Shredded Beef Suet are sustaining and digestible lib. cartons lOJd. with recipe" goes much further than raw Suit. Ask your g rocer for it.

P CHEAP COAL AT MERTHYR j

P CHEAP COAL AT MERTHYR. MINERS' PRIVILEGE ABUSED. A case of particular interest to workers in the coalfield was heard at Merthyr Police Court on Tuesday, when Joseph Piercey (17), a Pen- yard collier, employed at Messrs. Hills-Plymoutli l Company's South Duffryn Level, was charged with obtaining four loads of coal, valued at .£: 6s. 4d., by false pretences. Mr. Cyril James (from the office ot Messrs. Gwilym James, Charles, and Davies), who prosecuted, said that it was a custom throughout the coalfield that colliery workmen, who were householders, were allowed coal at reduced rates. In this case the defendant, in order to obtain the necessary coal notes," represented himself to be a married man and a householder, and even went so far as to produce a rent-book purporting to show the weekly rental he was supposed to be paying, with the result that four loads of coal were delivered at his father's house. Coal was delivered to bona-fide householders employed at the level for 3S Sd. per load of ifcwt. Pleading guilty, Piercey added in mitigation I saw other boys getting coal, and if they could I thought I could have some." The Stipendiary (Mr. R. A. Griffith), in view of the good character hitherto borne by defen- dant, bound him over under the Fyrst Offenders' Act.

WATER SUPPLY AT BARGOED ANDI HENGOED

WATER SUPPLY AT BARGOED AND HENGOED. SOME SERIOUS COMPLAINTS. At the meeting of the Gelligaer Council on I Tuesday, Canon Jones, J.P., in the chair, three residents of Beechfield, Hengoed waited upon the members and complained of the lack of water dur- ing the past three weeks. For that period, Mr. Evans said, the water had been on for scarcely an hour a day, although houses higher up were supplied. Chairman expressed his sympathy with the de- putation and said the Conncil would do all they could to remedy the grievance. Mr. E. Richards said it was a serious matter; and it was obvious that the supply was inadequate, and notwithstanding the new main laid from Tre- lewis to Gelligaer, there was the statement of the enginfJer to the Merthyr Corporation that the area of the pipe at Rhymney Bridge was insufficient to receive the water. The Council had been alive to the importance of this matter for some time, and had waited patiently to know what result would follow the laying of the main from Tre- lewis to Gelligaer, but he, for one, was disap- pointed to find that it was still inadequate in volume and pressure. In places like the Isolation Hospital, the supply from the new main did not rise higher than three feet, and it was most serious for the householders, and was a positive danger to the Hospital in the event of an outbreak of fire. They had a remedy under the Company's Act of 1898, and the right to ask them to erect a pumping station at Trelewis. Chairman There is pressure at Gelligaer. Mr. Richards At your house. Chairman Is the Hospital supplied from the Gelligaer or the Rhymney Valley main? Mr. Richards There is a balancing between the supply from Rhymney and that from the Trelewis main. Chairman I was informed that company are supplying Twynyff ald. Mr. Richards That aggravates the situation. We have no right to censure the company for in- creasing its area of supply, but the question is. how are these thwgs going to affect the supply of our own area. If they enter into agreements with authorities outside their statutory area some- one must go short of water; but to obviate that, I and whilst waiting for the construction of the new reservoir, the Council should call upon the Com- pany to erect a pumping station at Trelewis. Chairman I approve of the object in view, but I think the method proposed will not bear consideration, because there is already as great a presanre from Trelewis to Gelligaer as need be. The water comes in considerable force: but what becomes of that pressure afterwards in regard to the Hospital and other places? I think it goes off very largely to Twynyffald. Mr. Richards We are receiving water from two reservoirs the Merthyr Corporation and the Upper Neuadd; but that supply is tapped by the Bedwellty Council. The main from Trelewis to Gelligaer is water from Dolygaer. Dr. Richards said thai for three days there liad been no water at the Isolation Hospital. Mr. Edmund Jones apoke strongly of the in- convenience from the same cause at Bargoed. Mr. M. Jones asked if there were any penalty in which the Company could be mulcted. The Clerk said the Council could take legal j proceedings.. Mr. S. Jones said that complaints had reached him, and it was through his advice that this deputation appeared before the Council to state their own case. He would support anything that would ensure a supply of water. Mr. Gus Jones said that at the inquiry on the Rhymney Valley Water Bill, a question had been asked as to how many actions had been taken against the Company by the Council, and the an- swer was not one. This was an opportunity to drive it home. The evidence of the Medical Officer of Health in regard to the Isolation Hos- pital was enough. Now was the time to "pop" on these people. He moved that the Clerk take proceedings. Mr. M. Jones I second that. Nothing can move these people but the Law Courts. It is a breach of contract. We shall have the whole of the ratepapers with us in this matter. The discussion then turned on the question of the better course, the creation of a pumping sta- tion or to take proceedings, and eventually, on the motion of Mr. M. Jones, seconded by Mr. S. Jones, it was decided to ask the Surveyor to report on the effect of a pumping station at Tre- lewis; also, on the motion of Mr. Gus Jones, to send the matter to the Parliamentary Commit- tee on the question of taking proceedings against the Company. The deputation then withdrew.

Advertising

Xju EDDIES B L A A C H.!kRD98 PILLM, Ate unrhrsdled for (ill Irregularities, &c., they M

CAERPHILLY SCHOOLMISTRESS ASSAULTED

CAERPHILLY SCHOOLMISTRESS ASSAULTED. LOCAL ARCHITECT BOUND OVER. William Guy Young (36), architect, Caer- philly, was charged at the local Police Court on Tuesday, with assaulting Phyllis Evans, school- mistress, Caerphilly. Mr. Reginald Harrison, who prosecuted, said complainant was a certificated mistress at the Twyn Council School, Caerphilly, and defendant was an architect's assistant, and his children attended that school. On the evening of May 10th, Miss Evans received a letter from Mr. Young, in which he accused her of being abusive and maltreating his children, that she had made a dead-set" against these children, and also that, as a result of all this, his children were becoming demoralised, developing stuttering, and becoming nervous. The same evening complainant went to defendant's house to ask for an explanation, and it was then that the assault was alleged to have taken place. Complainant denied abusing or maltreating the children and had never struck them. After receiving the letter, she went with a friend, a Miss Brown, who lived with her, to defendants, house. Witness asked him for an explanation and he said, No, my children's word is better than yours." Defendant then pushed her and caused her to collapse. She was too unwell to attend school next dav. At the time of the assault witness said, "Mr. Young, you have hit a woman," and he replied, No. I have simply prevented you from forcing an entrance into my house." Mis. Young then came out and said to defen- dant, You are no gentleman, you are behaving like a beast. I lost my temper and said too much before." Mrs. Young apologised most profusely and asked witness to burn the letter. She. also brought out a chair for witness a gave her some water.—Mr. C. S. Goodfellow (for the defence) Did Mr. Young say you cannot appreciate a parent's feelings when his children are being terrorised ?- Witness Yes. —Miss Brown corroborated and said Miss Evans had a nervous attack as a result of the assault- Defendant said his children had been bringing home complaints foi several weeks regarding their treatment at bdiool. When complainant and Miss Brown came to his house they were trying to force themselves through the door. He denied striking or pushing complainant. He admitted saying, You must be devils to intimidate little children." Defendant was bound over for six months and ordered to pay costs.

I LATE LIEUT ONIONS

LATE LIEUT. ONIONS. At Tredegar Police Court on Tuesday, Mr. T. J. Price, the presiding magistrate, made sympathetic reference to the death of Lieutenant Wilfred Onions, son of Mr. A. Onions, miners' agent, Tredegar, and moved a vote of sympathy with Mr. Onions and his family, together with all who in the locality had lost relatives in the war. Mr. R. H. Spencer, solicitor, and Super- intendent Saunders joined in the expressions | of sympathy., on behalf of the legal profession of sviupathv,, iand' tlie poce.

RHYMNEY VALLEY SEWERAGE BOARD

RHYMNEY VALLEY SEWERAGE BOARD. The ordinary meeting of the loemoers ol e Rhymney Valley Sewerage Board was held at Hengoed on Wednesday, at which there were pre- sent, Mr. W. S. Nash, J.P. (chairman), Mr. Gus Jones, Bargoed (vice-chairman); Messrs. J. Mor- gan. W. Hammond, E. Richards (Gelligaer). J. Shannon, J.P., Hubert Jenkins, J.P.. R. P. Malvn, T. James (Caerphilly), R. J. Jones, J.P., J. Tillott.. Edgar Davies. D. Jones (Bedwellty), J. Evans, W. Griffiths (Rhymney), G. Morgan, J.P. (Bedwas and Machen); with Mr. T. J. Thomas (Clerk). Mr. Jarman (Deputy Olerk), Mr J S. Alford and Mr. Raikes (Engineers). PROGRESS OF THE WORK.—The reports of the engineers were .read in which details were given of the progress made by three contractors with the various sections of the work. There were 81 men engaged by day, and 11 men by night. MORII OFFICERS.—Mr. J. S. Alford recommend- ed the appointment of another two inspectors for supervision of the work now in progress. This led to a some what heated discussion.—Mr. R. J. Jones remarked that it appeared to him that one of the contractors was. particularly slow,with the work, and this would involve a considerable ex- penditure to the Board by prolonging the services of officers. He was afraid that if they continued they would be spending as much money for in- spectors as would be paid in wages to the work- men. He thought that to appoint one man to look after 14 was ridiculous.—Chairman Preven- tion is better than cure.—Mr. W. Hammond It seems to me that there is no curing at all.—-Mr. R. J. Jones How many men do you say should be-employed on the No. 1 Contract at present?— Mr. Alford Three times at least of what there are.Ilr. Hubert Jenkins pointed out that there was a possibility of the work not being properly done or pipes properly laid unless there was ade- quate supervision and this may involve the Board in heavy expenditure later on. He moved that the recommendation of the Engineer be adopted. -ATr. W. Griffiths seconded—Mr. W. Hammond in movnig an amendment, said he could not set the necessity of so many inspectors. He enumer- ated the number which the Board now had in ad- dition to the Engineers, and pointed out that they would have five officials for a length of four miles. He moved that the request be not granted.—Mr. J. Morgan seconded.—Mr. E. Richards supported the motion and said it would be presumption on his part as a layman to over-ride the desires of an expert such as the engineer.—Mr. R. J. Jones What will be our payments for officials after these are appointed.—Chairman: £ 930.—Mr. Edgar Davies supported the amendment, and said they would shortly have an army of officials adequate enough to superintend every shovel full of earth thrown up from the trenches.—Qn a vote, the motion was carried by 10 votes to 6. ENGINEER'S VISITS.—Mr. R. J. Jonea asked Mr Alford if he could say how many visits he had made to the works since the last meeting of the Board.—Mr. Alford I cannot answer that straight off. I carry out the work in accordance with the agreement.—Mr. R. J. Jones I am sorry that the Engineer objects to give the in- formation to-night—Mr. W. Hammond When will these inspectors be put on ?-Mr. Alford As soon as I can get them. I will bring them up for confirmation by you.—Mr. W. Hammond And all we shall have to say will be "Amen."

Advertising

FOR SALE. One MICHELIN INNER TUBE 760 x 90. excellent condition 10/—" X uardGian Offices, Bhymney )